15th Annual UndergraduateGraduate Student Engagement Forum by mby20700

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									15th Annual Undergraduate/Graduate
     Student Engagement Forum

       Program & Abstracts


                        Editors
                    Bailey Rector
      Graduate Assistant for the Honors Academy
                   Joe King, Ph.D.
           Director of the Honors Academy



                   Sponsored By
                The Honors Academy
              Graduate Student Council




                      1
     The following individuals and ofces are acknowledged for their
                       contributions to the Forum:

                        Graduate Student Council
               Dr. Joe King - For coordination of the event
          Bernd Kuennecke and the Department of Geography
                   Sally Cox, Event Planning Manager
  Radford University Printing Services for their patience and cooperation
                 Dr. Mark Cline, Department of Biology
Lora Gordon - University Photographer for her wonderful photography work
                   Jane Park - Printing all of the posters
             Loretta Opes, Honors Academy Ofce Manager

                 Thank you to everyone for their patience
                   throughout the submission process




                                2
         Table of Contents
Welcome Statements---------------------------------------- 4
     Dr. Wil Stanton, Interim Provost for Academic Affairs
     Dr. Steve Lerch, Vice Provost for Academic Programs
     Dr. Joe King, Director of the Honors Academy


Program
     Monday, April 16------------------------------------------------------- 6
     Tuesday, April 17------------------------------------------------------- 8
     Wednesday, April 18--------------------------------------------------- 11

Senior Honors Capstone
Presentations-------------------------------------------------              14


Faculty/Student Grant
Recipients----------------------------------------------------              24


Abstracts------------------------------------------------------ 27




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                                  Welcome!
I am delighted to welcome all of you to this outstanding celebration
of learning on our campus. Scholarship and creative activity are at the very
heart of the academic life at all universities. At Radford University, we
embrace our responsibility to create and expand knowledge. We support
and value scholarship, interdisciplinary inquiry, issues-oriented research,
and creative activity. We also value student engagement. We encourage
faculty to work as partners with students in the learning process and to
develop in students the excitement of inquiry, discovery, and creative
expression.
         The Undergraduate and Graduate Student Engagement Forum exemplies
our commitment to these values. The Forum provides the opportunity for
faculty and students to demonstrate the results of their efforts in collaborative
scholarship. Through this partnership, our students learn to embrace and
create change, and they obtain the knowledge, skills, and abilities required
to lead productive, responsible, and creative lives.
         I congratulate our students on their outstanding work, I thank our faculty for their
wonderful mentorship, and I encourage everyone to enjoy a Forum that is sure to enlighten,
entertain and inspire.
Dr. Wil Stanton
Interim Provost for AcademicAffairs


         The annual Undergraduate and Graduate Student Engagement Forum offers us
the opportunity to reect upon another year of academic accomplishment, to take pride
in the intellectual growth of our students, and to celebrate scholarship and creativity at
Radford University in all of its forms. The students who are participating in the Forum
could hardly have imagined at the beginning of their careers at RU that they would be
producing scholarly and creative work of the quality that they will showcase at the Forum.
They undoubtedly also will astonish themselves by the poise and professionalism they
will demonstrate in their presentations. All of us at RU applaud the faculty who
encouraged, threatened, cajoled, prodded and pushed our students to reach this point in
their intellectual development.
        We also owe a debt of gratitude to Dr. Joe King, Director of the RU Honors
Academy, Ms. Bailey Rector, Graduate Assistant who organized the 2007 Forum, and
Ms. Jane Park, Graduate Assistant with responsibility for the posters publicizing the Forum.
Putting together an event of this magnitude is a daunting task, and the Herculean efforts of Dr. King, Ms. Rector, and Ms.
Park are greatly appreciated.
         Please attend as many Forum sessions as you can; revel in the achievements, enthusiasm, and intellectual vitality
of our students; and be heartened by the realization that these students will soon be taking their place as the performers,
writers, scientists, teachers, business and health care professionals, and others who will be leading our Commonwealth
and nation into the future.

Dr. Steve Lerch
Vice Provost for Academic Programs



                                                         4
         Welcome to our 15th Annual Undergraduate and Graduate Student
Engagement Forum. The Forum is our community’s celebration of student and
faculty collaborative scholarship. This year’s event is composed of 170 presentations,
posters and performances by almost 300 students. Student engagement is alive and
well at Radford University. The Forum is a testimony to the hard work of our students
and the dedication of our faculty to an educational experience grounded in collaborative
scholarship. Whether performed in the laboratory, library, classroom, eld or studio rest
assured that these presentations are only the tip of a proverbial iceberg composed of
hours of hard work.
        The Honors Academy exists as an instantiation of collaborative scholarship.
The Forum provides concrete evidence that such scholarship is contagious and, in fact,
 emerges from a wide variety of academic programs including study abroad, internships,
service learning and a variety of campus leadership initiatives. Take a moment to read the abstracts of our graduating
Highlander Scholars’ Capstone Projects. These works represent the culmination of months of collaborative work with
their professors in both their majors and in their General Education courses. Also read the abstracts from our students
who worked with faculty mentors through our Faculty-Student Collaborative Grants Program. The professional and per-
sonal friendships that resulted from these collaborations will remain with both parties for many years to come.
        Our thanks go to Drs. Stanton and Lerch who not only enthusiastically supported changes to this year’s Forum,
but agreed to nancially support the poster sessions and this expanded Program in an effort to provide our students with
a more professional Forum experience. Thanks also to the Faculty Development Ofce, Bernd Kuennecke and Mark
Cline for helping to make our poster sessions a success. Finally, thanks to my collaborators, Bailey Rector and Jane Park.
Thanks to Bailey for her enthusiastic commitment and hard work in putting this Program together. Her willingness to
comply with dozens of ‘special requests’ and exceptions to our plans went beyond any reasonable expectations. Thanks
also to Jane for the literally scores of hours that she spent printing posters for the Special Sessions. Many presenters owe
her a real debt of gratitude for the advice she shared, the little corrections to posters that resulted in a successful printing.
This Program and the entire Forum are a success largely due to their diligence. Thanks also to Ms. Loretta Opes who
kept the Honors Academy ofce running while much attention and time were diverted to planning and implementing the
Forum.
        Finally I must thank Ms. Carolyn Turner from Radford University Printing Services whose patience and profes-
sionalism resulted in this document. Her willingness to wait for last minute photos and abstracts is truly appreciated.
        It is a privilege to put together these works from our campus community. Enjoy the celebration!

Dr. Joe King
Director of the Honors Academy




                                                           5
             Program Schedule
Monday April 16, 2007                                                      10:30 A.M. - 11:00 A.M.
                                                                           Literacy Skills: The Association Between Children’s Access to Books
Heth Student Center                                                        and Being Read to at Home
Commonwealth Room                                                          By: Heather McGinn
1:00 P.M. - 4:30 P.M.                                                      Mentor: Dr. Jayne Bucy and Dr. Jennifer Mabry

                                                                           11:00 A.M. - 11:30 A.M.
1:00 P.M. - 1:30 P.M.
                                                                           Teacher’s Job Satisfaction: Self Efcacy Beliefs and Perceived Disci-
Learning Research and Writing with Health Related Topics
                                                                           pline Problems
By: Adam Richardson, Lindsey Silwa
                                                                           By: Debra Craft
Mentor: Nancy Taylor
                                                                           Mentor: Dr. Jayne Bucy and Dr. Jennifer Mabry
1:30 P.M. - 2:00 P.M.
                                                                           11:30 A.M. - 12:00 P.M.
Pyrite oxidation and environmental hazard assessment: recent ndings
                                                                           The Effect of emphasis on increasing standardized test scores on teacher
and the potential for investigation of black shale in southwest Virginia
                                                                           job satisfaction
By: Nanda Chassot
                                                                           By: Beth Michel
Mentor: Dr. Parvinder Sethi
                                                                           Mentor: Dr. Jayne Bucy and Dr. Jennifer Mabry
2:00 P.M. - 2:30 P.M.
                                                                           12:30 P.M. - 2:30 P.M.
America’s Environmental Paradigm
                                                                           Social Sciences Poster Session I
By: James Gay
Mentor: Dr. Margaret Hrezo
                                                                           The Effects of Gender and Group Membership on Cell Phone Use
                                                                           By: Sarah Clark, Mendy Adams
4:00 P.M. - 4:30 P.M.
                                                                           Mentor:Dr. Jeff Aspelmeier
The TSCU Patient Teaching Plan
By: Sarah Donnelly
                                                                           Spanking Pre-operational Children
Mentor: Joni Goldwasser
                                                                           By: George Johnson
                                                                           Mentor: Dr. Jo Brocato
5:00 P.M. - 5:30 P.M.
Mind Innite
                                                                           Gender Differences in Role Model Inuence
By: Jared Wilke
                                                                           By: Patricia Parsley
Mentor: Dr. Bruce Mahin
                                                                           Mentor: Dr. Hilary Lips

Lounge A                                                                   Role Model Inuence Themes
9: 00 A.M. - 10:00 P.M.                                                    By: Patricia Parsley, Whitney Gaber

9:00 A.M. - 9:30 A.M.                                                      Cup elongation and Pouring habits: Controlling amount poured by alter-
What makes schools effective? A look at administration, parent, and        ing a cup’s shape
teacher variables                                                          By: Tabitha O’Bryan, Jacqueline Permito, Leah Speck, Juralee Smith,
By: Siobhan Daniels                                                        Scott Koval
Mentor: Dr. Jayne Bucy and Dr. Jennifer Mabry                              Mentor: Dr. Jeff Willner

9:30 A.M. - 10:00 A.M.                                                     Attachment and Disgust Sensitivity
Sesame Street: Does it really make a difference in student’s achievement   By: Deanna Caincross
scores?                                                                    Mentor: Dr. Jeff Aspelmeier
By: Lauren Wolkove
Mentor: Dr. Jayne Bucy and Dr. Jennifer Mabry                              Understanding the Expanding U.S. Hispanic Market
                                                                           By: Jennifer Orrock
10:00 A.M. - 10:30 A.M.                                                    Mentor: Dr. Courtney Bosworth and Dr. Hsin-Min Tong
Full-Day Kindergarten: Is It Worth It?
By: Lisa Ciampaglio                                                        Predicting Students Academic Success Using Podcasts
Mentor: Dr. Jayne Bucy and Dr. Jennifer Mabry                              By: Kara Ramer
                                                                           Mentor: Dr. Ken Cox

                                                                           People Just Don’t Blow the Same
                                                                           By: Jason Sells
                                                                           Mentor: Dr. Jill Stewart
                                                                      6
Women’s Hospitals: Perception of Hominess                                 1:00 P.M. - 1:30 P.M.
By: Ashley James, V. Claire Kennedy                                       Terror Management Theory and Disgust Sensivity
Mentor: Dr. Joan Dickinson                                                By: James Clifford
                                                                          Mentor: Dr. Jeff Aspelmeier
6:30 P.M. - 9:30 P. M.
Faculty/ Student Collaboritve Grant                                       1:30 P.M. - 2:00 P.M.
                                                                          Childhood maltreatment, Poly-victimization, Psychological Distress &
6:30 P.M.                                                                 Adjustment to College
Attachment Theory, Religion and Adaptation to College                     By: Apryl Alexander, Casey Marin, Jennifer Nunn
By: Kyle Stephens and Dr. Jeff Aspelmeier                                 Mentor: Dr. Ann Elliott

6:55 P.M.                                                                 2:00 P.M. - 2:30 P.M.
Neuropeptide FF decreases feed intake through hypothalamic interac-       Examination of causal factors in water-rights conicts
tions via opioid receptors while decreasing intestinal transit time and   By: Seth Santz
affects other behaviors in chicks.                                        Mentor: Dr. Parvinder Sethi
By: Wint Nandar, Dr. J Orion Rogers and Dr. Mark Cline
                                                                          3:30 P.M. - 4:00 P.M.
7:10 P.M.                                                                 The Effect of Reminiscence on Memory Retention in Older Adults
Searching for Olive Moore                                                 By: Paul Tompkins
By: Shelley Gentry and Dr. Renee Dickinson                                Mentor: Dr. Tom Pierce

7:30 P.M.                                                                 4:00 P.M. - 4:30 P.M.
Central oxyntomodulin decreases feed intake in 4-day post hatch chicks    Factors Affecting the Use of College Mental Health Services
By: Christie Bowden, Dr. J. Orion Rogers and Dr. Mark Cline               By: David Hope
                                                                          Mentor: Dr. Paula Brush
7:50 P.M.
Inuence of Site Conditions on the Spread of Invasive Plants in Eastern   5:30 P.M. - 6:00 P.M.
Forests                                                                   Looking at the Relationship Between Females and Mathematics: Is it
By: Laura J. Clement, Breanna L. Hargbol, Erica M. McIntyre, and          Still on Rocky Ground?
Roger Conner II and Dr. Christine J. Small                                By: Jennifer Waskey
                                                                          Mentor: Kevin LoPresto
8:10 P.M.
Central Neuropeptide S Decreases Feed Intake, Locomotor Activity,         6:30 P.M. - 7:00 P.M.
and Plasma Corticosterone While Altering Activation of Hypothalamic       The Literary Criticism of T.S. Eliot
Nuclei in Chicks                                                          By: Scott Gibson
By: David Godlove and Dr. Mark Cline                                      Mentor: Dr. Jolanta Wawrzycka

8:30 P.M.                                                                 Lounge C
Using Molecular Techniques to Examine Environmental Bacterial Com-
                                                                          10:00 A.M. - 4:00 P.M.
munities in an Ecosystem Contaminated with Heavy Metals
By: Katelyn Christopher, Shanley Ignacio, Heather Charron, and Stuart
                                                                          10:30 A.M. - 11:00 A.M.
Coeld and Dr. Georgia Hammond
                                                                          Media and You
                                                                          By: Angela Mack
8:50 P.M.
                                                                          Mentor: Dr. Paula Brush
Studies of 5,10-Methenyltetrahydrofolate Synthetase (MTHFS)
By: Paul Redmon and Dr. Timothy W. Johann
                                                                          1:00 P.M. - 1:30 P.M.
                                                                          Memories of Migration In and Out of Floyd County
9:10 P.M.
                                                                          By: Jessica Baciu, Kathy Murphy, Brittony Fitzgerald, Morgan Hawkins,
When the Glass is Half-Full: Optimism and Relationship Commitment
                                                                          Patricia Jacobs
Among Undergraduates
                                                                          Mentor: Dr. Melinda Wagner
By: Trisha Nash and Marissa Montouri and Dr. Sarah Hastings
                                                                          1:30 P.M. - 2:00 P.M.
Lounge B                                                                  Fraternity/Sorority Involvement and its Effects on Academic Achieve-
10:00 A.M. - 7:00 P.M.                                                    ment
                                                                          By: Jeannie Fry
10:00 A.M. - 10:30 A.M.                                                   Mentor: Dr. Paula Brush
P.E. Was Never Recess
By: Heather Amon
Mentor: Susan Miller and Dr. Monica Pazmino-Cevallos

10:30 A.M. - 11:00 A.M.
Power, Political Participation, and Efcacy
By: Sarah Hauslohner
Mentor: Dr. Paula Brush



                                                                      7
2:00 P.M. - 2:30 P.M.                                                     11:00 A.M. - 11:30 A.M.
Relative Deprivation Caused by Media Imagery                              Lessons for Life: A Rhetorical Analysis of Relational Themes in
By: Brandon Craddock                                                      Children’s Films
Mentor: Dr. Paula Brush                                                   By: Sarah Swedberg
                                                                          Mentor: Dr. Gwen Brown
2:30 P.M. - 3:00 P.M.
The Future of Marriage?                                                   1:00 P.M. - 5:00 P.M.
By: Margaret Wallen                                                       Information Technology Symposium
Mentor: Dr. Paula Brush
                                                                          2:00 P.M. Keynote Speaker
3:00 P.M. - 3:30 P.M.                                                     The Global Curriculum: What You Will Need to be Attractive to Compa-
Academic and Social Management                                            nies Operating Internationally
By: Daniel Hernandez                                                      By: Ms. Sheila Talton
Mentor: Dr. Paula Brush                                                   Vice President,
                                                                          Cisco Advisory Services

Tuesday April 17, 2007                                                    3:30 P.M.
                                                                          Establish A Network Sensor Grid Using Gumstix
Heth Student Center                                                       By: Robert Beaton
Commonwealth Room                                                         Mentor: Dr. Joe derrick
2:30 P.M. - 4:30 P.M.
                                                                          3:50 P.M.
                                                                          Code: Nova -- A brief view of game development
2:30 P.M. - 3:00 P.M.                                                     By: Miguel Nunez
Center-based vs. Home-based childcare: Which generates the greatest       Mentor: Dr. Hwajung Lee
language development?
By: Angela Rose                                                           4:10 P.M.
Mentor: Dr. Jayne Bucy and Dr. Jennifer Mabry                             Amorphous Slicer for an Ada Subset
                                                                          By: Brandon Moye
3:00 P.M. - 3:30 P.M.                                                     Mentor: Dr. Edward Okie
Military Transition Following the Cold War
By: Brian Erskine                                                         4:30 P.M.
Mentor: Dr. Craig Waggaman                                                Application Server Clustering
                                                                          By: Christopher Burton
3:30 P.M. - 4:00 P.M.                                                     Mentor: Dr. Hwajung Lee
Great American Rhetoric: Orators and their Craft
By: Brian Erskine                                                         4:50 P.M.
Mentor: Dr. Matt Franck                                                   GridFTP: File Transfer Protocol in Grid Computing Networks
                                                                          By: L. Caitlin Minteer
Lounge A                                                                  Mentor: Dr. Hwajung Lee
9: 00 A.M. - 5:00 P.M.                                                    5:10 P.M.
                                                                          Grid Computing Fundamentals
9:00 A.M. - 9:30 P.M.
                                                                          By: Damien Allen, Brandon Moye
Obese and unhappy? Is a child’s BMI related to interpersonal skills and
                                                                          Mentor: Dr. Hwajung Lee
positive feelings?
By: Heather Adkins
                                                                          5:30 P.M.
Mentor: Dr. Jayne Bucy and Dr. Jennifer Mabry
                                                                          Replica Management
                                                                          By: Kelly Clynes
9:30 A.M. - 10:00 A.M.
                                                                          Mentor: Dr. Hwajung Lee
The affects of ADHD Medication on Social Skills: A Comparison of Self
and Teacher Reports on Medicated and Non-Medicated Adolescents
By: Lisa Dehart                                                           Lounge B
Mentor: Dr. Jayne Bucy and Dr. Jennifer Mabry                             10:00 A.M. - 9:00 P.M.
10:00 A.M. - 10:30 A.M.                                                   9:30 A.M. - 1:30 P.M.
Does Offering Art and Music to Low Income Students Increase Aca-          Chemistry Symposium
demic Achievement?
By: Shalisa Harrison                                                      9:30 A.M. - 10:00 A.M.
Mentor: Dr. Jayne Bucy and Dr. Jennifer Mabry                             Examining the Effects on the Enzyme 5, 10 Methnyltetrahydrofolate
                                                                          Synthase of Changing L
10:30 A.M. - 11:00 A. M.                                                  By: R. Shane Coleman
Transitional kindergarten programs versus retention: A comparison of      Mentor: Dr. Tim Johann
long-term effects
By: Erin Quigley
Mentor: Dr. Jayne Bucy and Dr. Jennifer Mabry

                                                                    8
10:00 A.M. - 10:30 A.M.                                                  By: Leigh Aldridge, Caitlyn Colbs, Jessica Harner
Phosphorus Assessment of the Constructed Wetland at Radford Univer-      Mentor: Dr. Jeffery Aspelmeier
sity
By: Kaleb Woldeamanuel, Sara Charlton                                    Attractive and Intelligent: Breaking the Stereotype
Mentor: Dr. Joseph Wirgau                                                By: Sara Boyd, Whitney Gilliam, Richard Boyce
                                                                         Mentor: Dr. Jeffery Aspelmeier
10:30 A.M. - 11:00 A.M.
Determination of Semi-Volatile Organics Entering and Exiting Radford’s   Different Music Styles and Their Effect on Aggression Levels
Wetland                                                                  By: Karla Matheny, Kelly Skluzak, Derek Hommema
By: Joshua Coiner                                                        Mentor: Dr. Jeffery Aspelmeier
Mentor: Dr. Joseph Wirgau

11:00 A.M. - 11:30 A.M.                                                  The effects of social anxiety disorder on classroom performance
Bioinorganic Model for Photosystem II                                    By: Cora Taylor
By: Brooke Francis                                                       Mentor: Dr. P. Niels Christensen
Mentor: Dr. Joseph Wirgau
                                                                         Understanding How Romantic Partners Solve Everyday Problems
11:30 A.M. - 12:00 P.M.                                                  By: Kimberly L Childers, Brittany Deering, Kelsey Fuller, Jenny Glass,
Synthetic Pathways for Cobalt Complexes Analyzed for Reactivity and      Brooke Gumm, & Chad Miller
Optical Purity                                                           Mentor: Dr. Jenessa C. Steele
By: Rebecca Damron, Lauren Robinson
Mentor: Dr. Joseph Wirgau                                                An HIV/AIDS Prevention Program for Myanmar (Burma)
                                                                         By: Ei Ei Tun
12:00 P.M. - 12:30 P..M                                                  Mentor: Dr. Jo Brocato
The removal of zinc from wetlands through phytoremediation with
Lemma                                                                    Gender Stereotypes in Children’s Televison Programming
By: Ebony Matthews                                                       By: Brandi Taylor, Adam Smith, Julia Liles
Mentor: Dr. Joseph Wirgau                                                Mentor: Dr. Jeffrey Aspelmeier

12:30 P.M. - 1:00 P.M.                                                   4:00 P.M. - 8:00 P.M.
Oxidative Damage From the Treatment for Iron Overload                    Biology Oral/Poster Presentations
By: Brandon Alderman                                                     Dr. Cline
Mentor: Dr. Joseph Wirgau
                                                                         4:00 P.M.
1:00 P.M. - 1:30 P.M.                                                    Analysis of Gene ow in Plethodon cinereus populations using ISSR
Cadmium, Zinc, and Semi-Volatile Load in Radford University’s Con-       primers
structed Wetland                                                         By: Emily Kerr and Robert Sheehy
By: Alex Bollweg, Cecil H. Phillips                                      Mentor: Dr. Bob R. Sheehy
Mentor: Dr. Joseph Wirgau
                                                                         4:10 P.M.
2:00 P.M. - 4:00 P.M.                                                    Central Neuropeptide S Decreases Feed Intake, Locomotor Activity,
Social Sciences Poster Session II                                        and Plasma Corticosterone While Altering Activation of Hypothalamic
                                                                         Nuclei in Chicks
Violent Crime in Proximity to Bars                                       By: David Godlove
By: Katherine Drummond                                                   Mentor: Dr. Mark Cline
Mentor: Dr. Isaac Van Patten
                                                                         4:20 P.M.
Behavioral and Heart Rate Responses to the Disruption of Attention       The Distribution of Invasive Plants Relative to Site Characteristics in
By: Patsy Kerstetter, Walter Shackelford                                 Southwestern Virginia.
Mentor: Dr. Joseph King                                                  By: Erica M. McIntyre, Laura J. Clement,
                                                                         Mentor: Dr. Christine J. Small
College Students with Disabilities: A Study of Graduation Rates at
Virginia Tech                                                            4:30 P.M.
By: Christy Horn                                                         Diversity in: the RU Wetlands
Mentor: Dr. Jolae Brocato                                                By: Megan Flora, Krista Greene, Stephanie Ratliff, Brian Richardson
                                                                         Mentor: Dr. Judy Guinan
Gender Stereotyping in Family Based Vs. Non-Family Based Television
Dramas                                                                   4:40 P.M.
By: Tristan Scott, Laura Clark, Sarah Gagne                              Neuropeptide FF decreases feed intake through hypothalamic interac-
Mentor: Dr. Jeffery Aspelmeier                                           tions via opioid receptors while decreasing intestinal transit time and
                                                                         affects other behaviors in chicks.
Perceived Intelligence as Related to Attractiveness                      By: Wint Nandar, J. Orion Rogers
By: Patsy Kerstetter, Staci Woodyyard, Jessica Vance                     Mentor: Dr. Mark A. Cline
Mentor: Dr. Jeffery Aspelmeier

The Relationship between Competitive Attitudes, Aggression, and Ath-
letic Participation
                                                                     9
4:50 P.M.                                                                  Central Amylin More Potently Reduces Feed intake in Anorexic Con-
Central amylin decreases feed intake through brainstem and hypotha-        taining Lines of Chickens
lamic interactions in chicks                                               By: Christie Bowden, Paul Siegel, Wint Nandar
By: Wint Nandar, J. Orion Rogers                                           Mentor: Dr. Mark Cline
Mentor: Dr. Mark Cline
                                                                           Bacterial Community Proles from an Arsenic Mine
5:00 P.M.                                                                  By: Shanley Ignacio, Katelyn Christopher, Heather Charron, Stuart
Retinoic Acid and Ethanol Inuence Development of Cultured Embry-          Coeld
onic Chick Intestine                                                       Mentor: Dr. Georgia Hammond
By: Ashley DeFreitas, Ashlee Carter
Mentor: Dr. J. O. Rogers                                                   Central alpha-MSH more potently suppresses feed intake in low body
                                                                           weight select rather than high body weight select lines of chickens
5:10 P.M.                                                                  By: Wint Nandar, Paul Siegel
Spatial Analysis of Invasive Plant Distribution, Land Use, and Site Con-   Mentor: Dr. Mark Cline
ditions at the Selu Conservancy in Southwestern Virginia
By: Laura J. Clement                                                       Neuropeptide Y differentially effects behavior between high body weight
Mentor: Dr. Christine J. Small                                             select and low body weight select lines of chickens
                                                                           By: Wint Nandar, Paul Siegel
5:20 P.M.                                                                  Mentor: Dr. Mark Cline
Factors Inuencing the Invasion of Rosa multiora into Natural Areas of
the Selu Conservancy, Southwestern Virginia                                Using Molecular Techniques to Examine Fungal Diversity
By: Breanna L. Hargbol                                                     By: Jessica Dolloff, James Muller
Mentor: Dr. Christine J. Small                                             Mentor: Dr. Georgia Hammond

5:30 P.M.                                                                  Diversity, Abundance, and Species Richness of the Avian Community at
Identifying Genetic Modiers of hira mutants in Arabidopsis thaliana       Radford University Wetland
By: Angela D. Via                                                          By: Jessica Dolloff
Mentor: Dr. Tara Phelps-Durr                                               Mentor: Dr. Judy Guinan

5:40 P.M.                                                                  Chemical Identication of Various Crystals Produced in Crystal Idio-
The anorexigenic effects of xenin are mediated directly via the ventro-    blasts of Dieffenbachia seguine
medial hypothalamus in chicks                                              By: Alexandra J. Andrews
By: Justin M. Milligan                                                     Mentor: Dr. Gary G. Coté
Mentor: Dr. Mark A. Cline
                                                                           Natural History Study of Dragony and Damsely Species Found in the
5:50 P.M.                                                                  By: Michaela P Meissner
Exercise Physiologist Career Exploration                                   Mentor: Judy Guinan
By: Lauren R. Storie
Mentor: Dr. J. O. Rogers                                                   Radford University Storm Water Wetland
                                                                           By: Brian Prall, Brad Howard
6:00 P.M.                                                                  Mentor:Dr. Gary G. Coté
Geriatric Medical Care Internship
By: Daniel Eyassu                                                          RNA Isolation and Extraction in Diffenbachia seguine
                                                                           By: Heather L. Combs
Mentor: Dr. J. Orion Rogers                                                Mentor: Dr. Mark Cline

6:10 P.M.                                                                  Central obestatin does not cause central orexigenic effects in broiler
Central xenopsin reduces feed intake in male but not female chicks.        chicks
By: Bonnie Van Dyke                                                        By: Heather L. Combs
Mentor: Dr. Mark Cline                                                     Mentor: Dr. Mark A. Cline

6:20 P.M.                                                                  Creation of a Dichotomous Key of Mammal Hairs of Southwest Virginia
Observations in the eld of Physical Therapy                               By: Alexandra J Andrews, Sarah E Childress
By: Lana N. Hall                                                           Mentor: Dr. Robert Sheehy
Mentor: Dr. J. O. Rogers
                                                                           Central obestatin does not affect appetite in Carassius auratus
6:30 P.M.                                                                  By: Brian Prall
Central oxyntomodulin decreases feed intake in 4-day post hatch chicks     Mentor: Dr. Mark A. Cline
By: Christie Bowden, J. Orion Rogers
Mentor: Dr. Mark Cline

6:30 P.M. - 8:00 P.M. (Poster Presentations)
                                                                           Lounge C
Crystal Characterization in Lemna                                          10:00 A.M - 6:00 P.M.
By: Krista L. Greene
Mentor: Dr. Gary G. Cote                                                   10:00 A.M. - 10:30 A.M.
                                                                           Tattoos and Stigmas
                                                                           By: Vesna Jones
                                                                           Mentor: Dr. Paula Brush
                                                                      10
10:30 A.M. - 11:00 A.M.
The Presence of the Televised Sports Manhood Formula in Professional    3:30 P.M.
Wrestling                                                               Family Inuence
By: Shannon Scott                                                       By: Stacey Fernandez
Mentor: Dr. Jeanne Mekolichick                                          Mentor: JoAnn Asbury

11:00 A.M. - 11:30 A.M.                                                 3:45 P.M.
Diversity’s Role in College Student Development                         Family Remedies Compared to Modern Day Medicine
By: Elizabeth Henderson                                                 By: Ashley DeFreitas, Emily Williamson, Whitney Spradlin
Mentor: Dr. Nadine Hartig                                               Mentor: JoAnn Asbury

11:30 A.M. - 12:00 P.M.                                                 4:00 P.M.
Lessons Learned from the FBI                                            Botetourt County
By: Caitlyn Rancourt                                                    By: Kimberley Farmer
Mentor: Dr. Nan Patten                                                  Mentor: JoAnn Asbury

12:30 P.M. - 2:00 P.M.                                                  4:15 P. M.
Forensic Anthropology Symposium                                         Lifestyles of Our Different Families
                                                                        By: Jessica Wickline, Ashley Tilley
12:30 P.M.                                                              Mentor: JoAnn Asbury
The Effects of Field Tip and Broad Tip Arrow Point Trauma on Bone
By: Daniel DiMichele, Christopher Hodges                                4:30 P.M.
Mentor: Dr. Donna Boyd                                                  The Music of Appalachia
                                                                        By: Matthew Miller, Krisa Hanks, James Gearhart
12:45 P.M.                                                              Mentor: JoAnn Asbury
Facial Approximation: Methods and Uses in Forensic Anthropology
                                                                        4:45 P.M.
By: Angela Cales
                                                                        Stereotypes In Film: Past and Present
Mentor: Dr. Donna Boyd                                                  By: Kara Gordon, Tiana Lovelace, Robert Davis, Megan Croughwell
                                                                        Mentor: JoAnn Asbury
1:00 P.M.
Is The Glass Slipper Always a Perfect Fit? A Comparison of Three        5:00 P.M.
Methods for Calculating Stature from Shoe Size                          Nuclear Progression
By: Patricia Jacobs                                                     By: Radford Davis
Mentor: Dr. Donna Boyd                                                  Mentor: JoAnn Asbury


1:15 P.M.                                                               Wednesday April 18, 2006
Investigating the Mystery of an Augusta County Plane Crash Through
                                                                        Heth Student Center
Forensic Anthropology
By: Kassandra Nelson, Kerry Taylor
Mentor: Dr. Donna Boyd                                                  Commonwealth Room
                                                                        11:00 A.M. - 2:00 P.M.
1:30 P.M.
Examining the Remains of a Purported 19th Century Executed Slave: Is    11:00 A.M. - 12:00 P.M.
This Lucinda?                                                           Health Poster Session
By: Natalie Scanlon
                                                                        The Investigation of Drug Use Among Males and Females at Radford
Mentor: Dr. Donna Boyd
                                                                        University
                                                                        By: Brittany Tinnell, Leisha Johnson
1:45 P.M.                                                               Mentor: Dr. Melissa Grim
Operation Decomposition:Short Term Postmortem Changes in Interred
and Above-ground Remains                                                The Relationship between drug use and violence
By: Charde Cobbs, Taylor Quillen                                        By: Sierra Hairston
Mentor: Dr. Donna Boyd                                                  Mentor: Dr. Melissa Grim

                                                                        Physical Activity Levels at Radford University
3:00 P.M. - 3:30 P.M.
                                                                        By: Nicole Sullivan
Stress and Stigmatization
                                                                        Mentor: Dr. Melissa Grim
By: Eric Kirste
Mentor: Dr. Paula Brush                                                 Sex & Alcohol Discriptive Results
                                                                        By: Kelly Kananaugh
3:30 P. M. - 5:30 P.M.                                                  Mentor: Dr. Melissa Grim
Honors English 203
                                                                        Creating Awareness about the Effects of Smoking During Pregnancy
                                                                        By: Erin Kann
                                                                        Mentor: Dr. Sharla Cooper
                                                                   11
Alcohol Consumption and Behaviors among Radford University Stu-
dents                                                                      Romantic Relationships (a Communication Study)
By: Christinia Irving                                                      By: Erin Bentley, Declan Grogan, Devin Grimsley, Andrew Cook, and
Mentor: Dr. Melissa Grim                                                   Tim Baines
                                                                           Mentor: Dr. William Kennan
1:00 P.M. -1:30 P.M.                                                       2:00 P.M. - 2:30 P.M.
Art in the Middle Ages                                                     Title 1 Programming: A Comparison of the In-class and Pull-out Meth-
By: Lindsay Spencer                                                        ods Their Effects on Reading Achievement
Mentor: Dr. Richard Bay                                                    By: Tia Humphreys
                                                                           Mentor: Dr. Jayne Bucy and Dr. Jennifer Mabry
Lounge A
                                                                           2:30 P.M. - 3:00 P.M.
10:00 A.M. - 9:30 P.M.
                                                                           Does Being Read to at Home and Attending Preschool Improve Reading
                                                                           Achievment?
10:30 A.M. - 11:00 A.M.
                                                                           By: Bailey Rector
Efcacy of an Equine Assisted Psychotherapy Anger Management
                                                                           Mentor: Dr. Jayne Bucy and Dr. Jennifer Mabry
Group for Adolescents
By: Stephanie Nelson, Shelby Ryan
                                                                           Chemestry Poster Session
Mentor: Dr. Jolae Brocato
                                                                           3:30 P.M. - 4:30 P.M.
11:00 A.M - 11:30 A.M.
                                                                           Extraction of Trimyristin from Nutmeg
Costuming in Historic Movies: Accuracy, Trends, and Inspiration
                                                                           By: Hannah Helms
By: Coutney Yates
                                                                           Mentor: Dr. Christine Hermann
Mentor: Dr. Jennifer Clevenger
                                                                           Isolation of Xanthophyll from Lemon Peel
12:00 P.M. - 12:30 P.M.
                                                                           By: Erin Waddell
Late Era Cosmology
                                                                           Mentor: Dr. Christine Hermann
By: Brian Summa
Mentor: Dr. Brett Taylor
                                                                           Tomato Juice Rainbow
                                                                           By: Richard Johnson
Social Sciences Poster Session III/Oral Presentation
                                                                           Mentor: Dr. Christine Hermann
12:30 P.M. - 2:00 P.M.
                                                                           Faculty Lecture Series
1:00 P.M. 1:30 P.M.
                                                                           7:00 P.M. - 9:30 P.M.
Sincere Apologies: A Study on the Act of Contrition and forgiveness
By: Christian Benedi, Parker Garbee, Wayne Gore, Danny McLean,
Camille Miles, Cory St.Clair, Beth Veney                                   Lounge B
Mentor: Dr. William Kennan                                                 11:00 A.M. - 5:30 P.M.
Posters:                                                                   11:00 A.M. - 11:30 A.M.
                                                                           Mixed Messages: A critical analysis of cause-related marketing and the
Assessing the Involvement of Greek Organizations in Relation to Alco-      ethical implications of strategic media
hol Use                                                                    By: Joanna White
By: Sara Boyd                                                              Mentor: Dr. Lisa Webster
Mentor: Dr. Jenessa Steele
                                                                           1:00 P.M. - 1:30 P.M.
Social Interaction and the Relationship Between Change in Postive and      Mine Safety
Negative Affect                                                            By: Emily Flora
By: Leigh Aldridge                                                         Mentor: Dr. William Kovarik
Mentor: Dr. Janessa Steele
                                                                           Food and Nutrition Poster Session
Allow Me: Gender Stereotypes and Equality in Door-Holding                  2:00 P.M. - 3:00 P.M.
By: Sarah J. Webster, Juralee Smith, Christopher Braun, Leah Speck, K.
Elizabeth Zutter, & Elizbeth Hish                                          The Effect of Oat Bran Fiber on Blood Pressure in Young, Healthy Col-
Mentor: Dr. Jeff Willner                                                   lege Students
                                                                           By: Jennifer Anaya, Aurielle James, Kristina Brown, Isi Amenkhienan
Nonverbal Cues: What They Mean To Men and Women During a First             Mentor: Dr. Anne Alexander
Date
By: Chelsea M. Archer, Ashley C. Ewell, Lauren A. Keller, Tyler J.         The Effect of Oat Bran Fiber on Intestinal Function in Young, Healthy
Leveski, Darcy N. MacCauley, Lindsay B. Rupert, Shayna M. Walker           Adults
Mentor: Dr. William Kennan                                                 By: Kelly Greena, Katherine Peck, Megan Barley, Megan Watson,
                                                                           Naomi McKensie
Fox News Coverage of Operation IraqI Freedom Leading to College            Mentor: Dr. Anne Alexander
Students Misperceptions of the War
By: Mary K. Baxter, Ryanne M. Bosley, Erin E. Brooks, Melissa G.           The Effect of Oat Bran on Blood Lipid Levels in Healthy, Young Adults
Brown, Richard A. Payne, Stephanie L. Rogers, and Daniel D. Shepel-        By: Tarren Corbin, Abbey Dean, Christine Haueter, Christine Hillegass
wich                                                                       Mentor: Dr. Anne Alexander
Mentor: Dr. William Kennan
                                                                      12
The Effect of Oat Bran on Body Weight, Body Composition and Satiety    2:30 P.M. - 3:00 P.M.
in Young Adults                                                        Making Present Satisfaction: Dramaturgy for Shakespeare’s The Com-
By: Rachelle Estes, Megan Abernathy, Meagan McClure, Elizabeth         edy of Errors
Heeschen                                                               By: Rachel Kohler
Mentor: Dr. Anne Alexander                                             Mentor: Jennifer Juul

The Effect of Oat Bran on Glucose Excursion                            3:00 P.M. - 3:30 P.M.
By: Danielle Freeman, Amy Messner, Justin Paxton,Andrea Pless          Cognitive Behavioral Therapy
Mentor: Dr. Anne Alexander                                             By: Andrew Peddy
                                                                       Mentor: Dr. Jeffery Chase
Maintaining Dietary Behavior Change: Reviewing the Evidence
By: Brandy Tate                                                        3:30 P.M. - 4:00 P.M.
Mentor: Dr. Anne Alexander and Dr. Melissa Gutschall                   Online Interactions and Communities
                                                                       By: James Dye
3:30 P.M. - 4:00 P.M.                                                  Mentor: Dr. Paula Brush
Organizational Anaylsis of Boys and Girls Club of Southwest Virginia
By: Robin Anthony, Michelle Taylor                                     4:00 P.M. - 4:30 P.M.
Mentor: Dr. Dale Henderson                                             Nutrition and Performance in the Femal Collegiate Athlete
                                                                       By: Chris Proctor
4:00 P.M. - 4:30 P.M.                                                  Mentor: Dr. Beverly Zeakes
QuickBoard: Minimizing Airplane Turn Around Time
By: James Inman, Kevin Thompson, Kevin Jones                           4:30 P.M. - 5:00 P.M.
Mentor: Dr. Laura Spielman                                             Comparison of Sleep Disturbances: Nocturnal Panic and Sleepwalking
                                                                       By: Sarah Waldrop
4:30 P.M. - 5:00 P.M.                                                  Mentor: Dr. Jeffery Chase
Sleep and The College Student
By: Jeffrey Horne                                                      5:00 P.M. - 5:30 P.M.
Mentor: Dr. Paula Brush                                                The Dance Department Costume Room: An Extensive Project of Refur-
                                                                       bishing, Remodeling, and Organizing.
5:00 P.M. - 5:30 P.M.                                                  By: Heather Meeboer
An Examination of the Factors that Inuence the Legality and Preva-    Mentor: Margaret Devaney
lence of Capital Punish
By: Katherine Miller, Joseph Yost                                      5:30 P.M. - 6:00 P.M.
Mentor: Dr. Stephen Owen                                               Advertising on the Local Level
                                                                       By: William Amos
5:30 P.M. - 6:00 P.M.                                                  Mentor: Dr. Courtney Bosworth
Isolation and DNA Sequencing of Members of Microbial Communities
in Arsenic Contaminated Environments                                   6:00 P.M. - 6:30 P.M.
By: Katie Christopher                                                  The light for our future: Celebrating 10 years of the AASIS program
Mentor: Dr. Georgia Hammond                                            By: Shai Cullop, Sarah Crawford, Kathy Murphy, Betsy DiSalvo, Gisela
                                                                       Hornberger
Lounge C                                                               Mentor: Ms. JoAnn Asbury
9:00 A.M. - 8:00 P.M.
9:30 A.M. - 10:00 A.M.
Dangerous Behaviors on College Campuses
By: Ryan Self
Mentor: Dr. Paula Brush

10:00 A.M. - 10:30 A.M.
Feeling Invincible
By: Emily Badger
Mentor: Dr. Paula Brush

1:30 P.M. - 2:00 P.M.
The Hookup Culture: Realities, Reasons, and Reputation
By: Jessica Harner, Vesna Jones
Mentor: Dr. Danielle Currier

2:00 P.M.- 2:30 P.M.
The Lifestory Project
By: Kimberly Colna
Mentor: Ms. Beth Deskins




                                                                  13
                                  Highlander Scholars
                                Senior Capstone Projects
Leigh Aldridge, Psychology
Faculty Sponsor: Dr. Jenessa Steele
Abstract Title: Social Interaction and the Relationship Between Change in Postive
and Negative Affect
Abstract: In this study the relationship between different modes of communication, telephone,
e-mail, face-to-face, and the change in either positive or negative affect after the interaction
was investigated. Ten participants from the Radford University student body were studied.
The investigation took place over a two-week period. Each participant was supplied with a
palm pilot that was preprogrammed with questions and set to beep at different times throughout
the day. The questions on the palm pilot referred to a variety of methods of communication,
what was discussed during the interaction, the relationship between communication partners
and how they felt after the particular interaction.




Heather Amon, Excercise, Sport & Health Education
Faculty Sponsor: Dr. M. Pazmino-Cevallos
Abstract Title: P.E. Was Never Recess
The present dilemma of childhood obesity has brought more attention to the P.E.
setting in schools, and therefore it may seem that P.E. has just recently gone through
a revolution, but these changes in curriculum have been occurring for quite some time.
The word dodgeball still brings back horrible memories for some people, and the use
of such elimination games are often referred to as “old P.E.” because that’s exactly what
it is: old! Take a glance at a “new P.E.” classroom, which includes the use of modern
technology such as heart-rate monitors and pedometers, and has students experiencing
activities such as roller-skating, rock-climbing and orienteering. It’s not your parents’
P.E. anymore, and it hasn’t been for awhile, so get over the painful memories and learn
what these programs have been accomplishing!




W. Aaron Amos, Media Studies
Faculy Sponsor: Mr. Courtney Bosworth
Abstract Title: Advertising on the Local Level
This project will focus on my efforts in constructing a local advertising campaign.
I will present the campaign, and an evaluation of my efforts. The campaign is for
 a local company, and includes secondary research, objective setting, advertising and
media strategy and tactics, a media plan, advertisements, and special promotions and
 public relations efforts. This is an overall representation of all the skills I have learned
in my advertising concentration including Media Planning,Advertising Production, and
 Campaign building. This campaign focuses on local advertising and how to creatively
reach audiences with limited media types.




                                                                  14
Kasey Brandmahl, Media Studies
Faculty Sponsor: Dr. Clayland Waite
Abstract Title: Stereotypes of Women in Today’s Advertising: Moving Forward or Run-
ning in Place
As women in today’s society we would like to believe that we are evening out the playing
eld in the battle against sexism. However, if you look at our advertising, women’s roles
and stereotypes are not much different than they were over 50 years ago. For my project,
I have decided to further explore this topic by analyzing advertisements from the past and
the present. Through my research I will show that not only are some of the past stereotypes
still being used in today’s advertising, but that even more are being created. I plan to report
my ndings in a research paper as well as a visual presentation using the advertisements as
examples.

Kimberly Childers, Psychology
Faculty Sponsor: Dr. Jenessa Steele
Abstract Title: Everyday Problem Solving Among Romantic College Partners
Across the life span, research has conrmed that everyday decision-making often occurs in
a collaborative, social context (Berg, Johnson, Meegan, & Strough, 2003; Radziszewska &
Rogoff). Less is known about how performance on everyday tasks are inuenced by differ-
ent types of collaborative conditions. The current study hypothesized that couples randomly
assigned to a full-collaborative condition would outperform (e.g., time to completion, route,
distance) the part-collaborative condition. The full-collaborative condition received one
ctitious town map and one list of errands. The part-collaborative condition received a map
and two, individual lists of errands. The part-collaborative condition was asked to work
from only their own list when completing the errands and map route. Data is currently being
collected; however pilot data on six couples (three part-, three full-collaborative) suggested
that the full-collaborative condition completed the task faster than the part-collaborative
condition. Discussion regarding real world implications of this experimental study will be
discussed.

Katelyn Christopher, Biology
Faculty Sponsor: Dr. Georgia Hammond
Abstract Title: Using Molecular Techniques to Examine Environmental Bacterial Com-
munities in an Ecosystem Contaminated with Heavy Metals
Bacterial communities are complex, and many bacteria have yet to be discovered due to
their inability to survive outside of their natural habitat. We are developing molecular tech-
niques to isolate and analyze members of bacterial communities contaminated with heavy
metals and to track the composition of the communities over time. We use soil samples
collected from an abandoned arsenic mine in Floyd County. We use gradient gel electro-
phoresis to create ngerprints (proles) of community composition. In these gels, different
banding patterns correspond to different bacterial communities. In the future, we may be
able to isolate individual members of the community and sequence their DNA. From this
we can identify new members of these communities that have the potential to use arsenic as
part of their metabolism and remove it from the environment.

Kimberly Colna, Social Work
Faculty Sponsor: Dr. Karma Castleberry
Abstract Title: The Lifestory Project
The purpose of The Life Story Project is to provide a therapeutic group set-
ting to explore issues commonly experienced by middle school children who
are raised by grandparents. Both cognitive (thinking) and affective (feeling)
components of issues related to (1) understanding of their family-of-origin
situation and changes in relationships with biological parents, (2) individual
developmental changes and needs of middle school children, and (3) con-
cerns related to being raised by grandparents, will be explored through the
creation of individual autobiographies, narratives, photographs, and draw-
ings that depict their lives as children being raised by grandparents.
                                                       15
Sarah Donnelly, Nursing
Faculty Sponsor: Ms. Joni Goldwasser
Abstract Title: The TSCU Patient Teaching Plan
My Honors Capstone Project at Radford University presents signicant features of an in-
novative patient discharge program. It is designed to answer questions for patients before     No Photograph Available
they leave the womb-like environment of the Thorasic Surgical Care Unit. The project
provides an education-based discharge program designed to teach patients about their
diagnosis. The project’s goal is to create a discharge folder for EVERY patient that holds
relevant information. The empowerment of the knowledge the folder evokes among both
the nursing staff and the patient, has the ability to save a patient’s life, reduce mistakes
made by a patient’s inadequate knowledge, and aid in the patient’s safe recovery.




Ashley DeFreitas, Biology
Faculty Sponsor: Dr. J. O. Rogers
Abstract Title: Retinoic Acid and Ethanol Influence Development of Cultured Em-
bryonic Chick Intestine
We are studying the inuence of retinoids and ethanol on embryonic chick intestinal
development. Ethanol retards growth during embryonic development by altering retinoic
acid concentration. Effects on intestinal development will be determined through dissec-
tion, embedding, sectioning, and staining of cultured and uncultured duodenal tissue of
14 and 16-day chick embryos. Segments of duodenal tissue were xed and embedded in
parafn. Embedded tissue was sectioned into 5 mm thick ribbons, adhered to slides by
Haupt’s adhesive and stained with periodic acid–Schiff reagent and fast green to count
goblet cells and measure previllous ridge height. Data collection is currently underway.




Katherine Drummond, Criminal Justice
Faculty Sponsor: Dr. Isaac VanPatten
Abstract Title: Violent Crime in Proximity to Bars
This project will consist of a display of maps of Roanoke showing violent crimes, such as
assaults, in proximity to bars and other establishments serving alcohol in the years 2004
and 2005. Explanatory background information on the topic of violent crime in relation to
bars will also be included. The purpose of the research is to show how violent crime can
center around bars, and why this occurs.




Brian Erskine, Political Science
Faculty Sponsor: Dr. Matthew Frank
Abstract Title: Great American Rhetoric: Orators and their Craft
Aristotle’s Rhetoric will be presented through analysis of select American public speak-
ers and their speeches. This study will delineate the different types of rhetoric and the
purposes behind them as well as dispel common misconceptions about the use of rhetoric.
Audio and video excerpts ranging from Presidents Kennedy to George W. Bush will be
on display. What type of person can be an effective public speaker or does the speaker
matter as much as the speech itself?




                                                                16
Emily Flora, Media Studies
Faculty Sponsor: Dr. William Kovarik
Abstract Title: Mine Safety
This presentation involves video clips from interviews that I conducted with some of Vir-
ginia and West Virginia’s most inuential mining researchers and speakers. The purpose of
this project was to gain a better understanding of how mine safety affects our world today
and how it affects those in surrounding countries. This is an informative presentation to
bring awareness to how mines may or may not follow all the procedures necessary to con-
duct a safe working environment. A deeper look is taken into how these companies operate
and accidents that have happened in past and its affect on rules and regulations now.




Dawn Fouse, Biology
Faculty Sponsor: Dr. Mark Cline
Abstract Title: Effects of Amylin on Nuclei in the Hypothalamus to Determine its
Stimulating or Inhibiting Effects on Apetite
The purpose of this project is to study the effects of Amylin on nuclei in the hypothalamus.
Earlier research indicates that Amylin is an important factor in the regulation of appetite.
This experiment will involve the injection of Amylin into chickens and feed intake will be
measured as a dependent variable. The data will be analyzed in terms of statistical analy-
sis/behavioral analysis and will be discussed in terms of the literature on the relationship
between Amylin and its inhibiting or stimulating effects on nuclei in the hypothalamus and
how that affects appetite.




James Gay, Political Science
Faculty Sponsor: Dr. Margaret Hrezo
Abstract Title: America’s Environmental Paradigm
The evaluation of factors such as public opinion will demonstrate the dominant social
paradigm(DSP) and its connection with environmental policy. The discussion from an
emphasis on production to emphasis on sustainable development will show an alternative
possibility for the current DSP. The analysis of the importance of such a change will include
the depletion of natural resources, and the controversial issue of climate change. Policies
and attitudes concerning these specic issues will be researched.




Shelly Gentry
Faculty Sponsor: Dr. Renee Dickinson
Abstract Title: Searching for Olive Moore
This Capstone Project documents my search for Modern novelist Olive Moore. Moore
published four works between1929 and 1932, but little is known of her life. I have searched
for biographical information on Moore. My research included genealogical research, web
research, and correspondence with other researchers interested in the same group of authors.
Through a grant from the Faculty Development Center, I traveled to London and continued
the search. My search has taught me about the research process, the denition of scholar-
ship, and the value of dead ends. The discoveries found this semester will lead to future
scholarship on Moore and will widen the canon of Modernist literature.

                                                              17
Erin Kann, Nursing
Faculty Sponsor: Dr. Sharla Cooper
Abstract Title: How smoking on College Campuses can lead to sick babies
I contacted Boo Pack at the Blue Ridge Perinatal clinic. They are trying to decrease the
incidence of smoking in Pulaski,VA. I did some research on the effects of smoking in preg-
nancy and helped them do a project for smoking cessation at Pulaski Community Hospital.
I put together about 200 packets for mothers to receive upon discharge after they deliver
their baby. They contained a onesie for the new baby and some information about second
hand smoke and smoking during future pregnancies. I did an inservice with the nurses at
PCH and told them that we were trying a new way to decrease the incidence of mothers who
are smoking in pregnancy. I instructed them to hand out a package and for the new moms to
ll out a response sheet whether they are still smoking or will continue to smoke since they
have received the information about the devestating effects. We might not be able to receive
feedback before the undergraduate forum, but hopefully a new student in the fall will see
whether this project has helped.



Rachel Kohler, Theatre
Faculty Sponsor: Dr. Jennifer Juul
Abstract Title:
This presentation details the process of dramaturgical research for William Shakespeare’s
‘The Comedy of Errors,’ outlining the steps from preliminary research to the nished pro-
duction, with an emphasis on linguistic research and educational outreach. This project was
undertaken as an Honors Academy Capstone, synthesizing academic research with theatrical
performance.



Heather Meeboer, Dance
Faculty Sponsor: Dr. Margaret Devaney
Abstract Title: The Dance Department Costume Room: An Extensive Project of Refur-
bishing, Remodeling, and Organizing.
The name “Costume Room” was a misnomer since it had become a storage closet for any-
thing and everything the Dance Department accumulated. Costumes crammed into card-
board boxes were stored alongside a myriad of other objects in no particular order. It was
difcult to nd anything and no one had a sure idea of what all was actually there. A clean
and well-organized costume room would aid the Department in nding specic costumes,
produce a better method for storing the costumes, and also provide an appropriate work
space for creating new costumes. I rst purged the room of anything other than costumes
and things directly related and then took stock of everything left. I researched proper storage
for costumes and visited the Theater Department’s costume room for ideas. I determined
that more and better storage containers were needed and that a better means of organizing
was imperative. Costumes were folded into clear plastic containers with pictures on the
outside showing what they contained. Those containers were neatly stacked into large cabi-
nets with similar types of costumes housed together. Other costumes were hung on hangers
in wardrobes. The cabinets and wardrobes were arranged against the walls of the room for
efcient use of space and shelving was added to bare walls to provide additional storage.
Two tables were put in the center of the room to provide a suitable work area. The costumes
in the Costume Room are now properly stored in a well-organized manner that facilitates in
nding them and also provides space for the creation of and storage for additional costumes.




                                                               18
Michaela Meissner, Biology
Faculty Sponsor: Dr. Judith Guinan
Abstract Title: Natural History Study of Dragonfly and Damselfly Species Found in
the Radford University Storm Water Wetland
The purpose of this study was to: 1) analyze the effects environmental variables on
species richness and abundance; 2) analyze the effects of those on individual species
abundance; and 3) create a temporal diagram based on wetland use by the species. The
variables recorded per day were the temperature of each period of day, the wind speed,
the water depth, percent water coverage, grass coverage, and algae coverage for each
site. Species richness and total number were found to be positively affected by period,
temperature, average water depth and percent water coverage per site. The 12-Spotted
Skimmer, the Wandering Glider, and the Bluet were also positively affected by the period.




Justin Milligan, Biology
Faculty Sponsor: Dr. Mark Cline
Abstract Title: The anorexigenic effects of xenin are mediated directly via the ventro-
medial hypothalamus in chicks
In a previous experiment we demonstrated that xenin, a 25 residue neuropeptide, caused
anorexigenic effects in 4-day post hatch chicks and caused an increase of neuronal acti-
vation in the ventromedial hypothalamus (VMH), the classical satiety center. Thus, we
designed the present experiment to determine if xenin injected directly on the VMH via
stereotaxically placed guide cannulas causes neuronal activation.




Brandon Moye, Information Technology
Faculty Sponsor: Dr. Edward Okie
Abstract Title: Amorphous Slicer for an Ada Subset
Amorphous slicing is an extension of static slicing, a program analysis technique devel-
oped by Mark Weiser in 1979. Static slicing produces a simplied version of a program
that is formed by deleting program components that do not affect a specied computation
of interest. The computed slice is typically a subset of the original statements in the pro-
gram. Static slicing is used in many application areas ranging from program debugging
to cohesion measurement. Amorphous slicing begins with Weiser’s static slicing rules for
statement deletion and adds rules, such as rules for combining statements and loop unroll-
ing, to further simplify the returned slice. By incorporating these extra rules, amorphous
slicing allows for the creation of considerably smaller slices while still maintaining the
static slice’s semantic properties. Currently, the majority of work with amorphous splic-
ing revolves around the C programming language. Differences between the C and Ada
programming languages should allow for a tailored set of amorphous slicing rules. Goals
of the project include identifying amorphous slicing rules for Ada and implementing
these rules using Ada Semantic Interface Specication (ASIS) queries. This presentation
will cover Weiser’s static slicer, amorphous slicing, and nally the design of an amor-
phous slicer for a subset of Ada.




                                                               19
Jennifer Orrock, Media Studies
Faculty Sponsor: Dr. Hsin-Min Tong and Dr. Courtney Bosworth
Abstract Title: Understanding the Expanding U.S. Hispanic Market
The U.S. Hispanic market is the fastest growing market in the United States. Experts
predict that the Hispanic population will make up a quarter of the U.S. population in the
next 40 years. In the past, the U.S. Hispanic market has been undeveloped, but American
businesses are increasingly aware that this market can no longer be overlooked. The U.S.
Hispanic population is very diverse and it is extremely important for American businesses
to understand these differences. Some distinct differences include nationality, generation
and social class. Each segment presents different challenges that must be deciphered in
order for American businesses to successfully target this market.




Lindsay Spencer, Art
Faculty Sponsor: Dr. Richard Bay
Abstract Title: Art in the Middle Ages
The true denition of ne art has been debated since the turn of the 20th century. Every-
one has an opinion on the subject, even children. Could tweens have viable answers to
the art world’s biggest question? After completing a survey that asked middle school stu-
dents about their thoughts on art, I realized I had found some interesting answers. These
answers and lesson plans based on the study will be shown during the presentation.




Elizabeth Spring, Nursing
Faculty Sponsor: Dr. Patrica Conklin
Abstract Title: Raising Awareness of Sepsis and Early Intervention Through Clinical
Simulation
The aim of this project is to establish a student-run debrieng session to develop increasing
skills with critical thinking and assessment in order to promote early recognition of sepsis.
Currently, the clinical simulation lab has the intention of instructing students in clinical
skills and critical thinking in a non-threatening environment. The student-run debrieng
session will specically target the issue of sepsis and the importance of early recognition
to prevent septic shock and death. The session will use a pre-test followed by a case study
scenario. In the debrieng there will be a discussion of clinical cues and a post-test. The
assumption is that awareness and early recognition will be increased after the simulation
and debrieng session as evidenced by improved scores on post-test compared to pretest.




                                                                20
Brian Summa, Physics
Faculty Sponsor: Dr. Brett Taylor
Abstract Title: Late Era Cosmology
The two ways of looking at cosmology include the Newtonian viewpoint where grav-
ity is a force and the relativistic viewpoint where gravity is caused by the curvature of
space-time. Observational quantities of the universe include the Hubble constant, the
density of the universe, and the deceleration constant. The values for these parameters
are constantly being rened via astronomical observations. The future evolutionary
path for the universe can be determined by comparing the observational results with the
results from the two theoretical viewpoints. An understanding of current values and how
they are found is needed in order to understand the future of the universe.




Sarah Swedberg, Communications
Faculty Sponsor: Dr. Gwen Brown
Abstract Title: Lessons for Life: A Rhetorical Analysis of Relational Themes in
Children’s Films
Using a narrative perspective, this study seeks to understand the messages in lms that
could potentially impact children’s perspectives and the roles they have in their own
relationships. The relationships focused on in this study are parent/child in Finding Nemo
(2003), friendship in Monsters, Inc. (2001), and family in The Incredibles (2004). The
lessons in these lms become morality tales for the viewing children, and the messages
children receive about relationships may well carry over into their adult life.




Brandy Tate, Foods and Nutrition
Faculty Sponsor: Dr. Ann Alexander and Dr. Melissa Gutschall
Abstract Title: Maintaining Dietary Behavior Change: Reviewing the Evidence
Maintaining a behavior change is crucial for medical nutrition therapy and optimal health
outcomes. There is little research concerning how to maintain behavior changes once
adopted. The literature offers therapeutic guidelines, motivational strategies, and mea-
surement of successful outcomes; however limited research evaluates long term outcomes.
Additionally several theories describe the process of behavior change, but few address
successful maintenance of this change.
          In this research, we reviewed the literature on weight loss and chronic disease
management to identify strategies that might prevent relapse. Because much of the be-
havior change literature is derived from studies on smoking cessation, alcohol and drug
rehabilitation we also examined this literature for techniques and strategies.
          We categorized ndings into environmental, behavioral, psychological and phar-
macological interventions. Successful smoking cessation and drug rehabilitation programs
offer a variety of these strategies to prevent relapse of the newly acquired behavioral
change. Likewise dietitians could benet from this body of knowledge when counseling,
since weight loss and chronic diseases management require life-long changes.




                                                               21
Cora Taylor, Psychology
Faculty Sponsor: Dr. Niels Christensen
Abstract Title: The effects of social anxiety disorder on classroom performance
Social anxiety disorder is a problem as approximately 24 million Americans suffer from
this disorder. Research on the socially anxious has indicated that they suffer from cognitive
distortions; however, the reason for these distortions has not been investigated. This research
investigates self-regulatory depletion – reduced conscious control – as a cause, and the ef-
fects it may have on school performance. Participants will complete questionnaires on social
anxiety, depression, and trait self-control. After the questionnaires are complete, the students
in the experimental condition will give a spontaneous ve-minute presentation. Students in the
control condition will not complete any task. After the presentations, undergraduates will be
given math problems to complete within three minutes. The math problems are the dependent
measure of self-regulatory depletion. Consequently, lower self-regulation should be indi-
cated by fewer numbers of completed math problems. Therefore, in the speech condition, the
socially anxious should complete fewer math problems than the non-socially anxious. In the
control condition, we expect that all participants will perform equally well on the problems.

Marie Utt, Management
Faculty Sponsor: Dr. Christy Weer
Abstract Title: Gender Differences in the Meaning of Career Success
The purpose of this project is to conduct an empirical study of differences between men and
women in their denition of career success. Some research suggests that career success means
different things to men and women. Although management theories have discussed the mean-
ing of career success, relatively little has been done to study the relationship between gender
and individual feelings of career success. Both quantitative and qualitative data were gathered
from both students and working adults within the Radford University community. Results
were analyzed and then interpreted in terms of Gender Role Theory.




Jennifer Waskey, Elementary Education
Faculty Sponsor: Dr. Kevin LoPresto
Abstract Title: Looking at the Relationship Between Females and Mathematics: Is it
Still on Rocky Ground?
While studying elementary education, Jennifer Waskey became interested in the number of
young female students who showed little to no interest in Mathematics. For this reason, she
was determined to discover if and why females tend to loose their interest in math. In do-
ing so, Jennifer hoped to identify ways in which she could subside this loss of interest. Her
research involved the review of current professional journals including Leder and Angelo, as
well as interviews of female students ages nine and up. With the information she has gained,
Jennifer hopes to improve her teaching methods and bestow her ideas upon future colleagues.




Joanna White, Communications
Faculty Sponsor: Dr. Lisa Webster
Abstract Title: Mixed Messages: A critical analysis of cause-related marketing and the
ethical implications of strategic media
This Capstone project provides an in-depth analysis and ethical critique of consumer and
cause-related marketing. On a fundamental communication level, messages are sent, re-
ceived, and then processed. Recent social marketing campaigns such as Dove’s Campaign for
Real Beauty and Merck’s Tell Someone Campaign have had a tremendous impact on brand
building. Research conducted will reveal the ethical implications of cause-related marketing
and advertisement placement. The presentation will cover the following topics: a)Women’s
self-image and the Beauty Myth, b)Merck’s Tell Someone Campaign, c) Dove’s Campaign for
Real Beauty, and d) Contradicting Messages in Magazines.

                                                                22
Courtney Yates, Fashion design
Faculty Sponsor: Dr. Jennifer Clevenger
Abstract Title: Costuming in Historic Movies: Accuracy, Trends, and Inspi-
ration
The purpose of this study is to research women’s costuming in historic movies that
are set in the 18th century time period. Specic interest will be in the accuracy of
the costumes, trends that current movies have inspired, and historical movies as an
inspiration for a line of clothing. Many people base their knowledge of histori-
cal dress on what they have seen in the movies. For accuracy to be maintained,
documenting deviations in the past are important. An analysis was conducted
based on the accuracy and trends of the lead female character in each of the fol-
lowing movies: Marie Antoinette, Amadeus, Dangerous Liaisons, and Pirates of
the Caribbean I and II. A ready-to-wear line of six garments is being created using
inspiration from the movies and time period.




                                                                23
                      Faculty/Student Collaborative
                            Grant Recipients
Kyle Stephens, Psychology
Faculty Mentor: Dr. Jefffery Aspelmeier
Abstract Title: Attachment Theory, Religion and the Adaptation to College
The present study examined the associations between attachments,
religious beliefs, and how individuals adapt to the college experience.
 Also, the inuence of attachment to an incorporeal being (i.e., God) on
college adaptation was also investigated. Further, it was proposed that social
support would serve as a mediator of the relationship between college
adaptation and attachment to God. The nal objective of this study was to
provide further validation for the Attachment to God Inventory. Preliminary
ndings are reported.




Wint Nandar, C.N. Bowden and David Godlove, Biology
Faculty Mentor: Dr. Mark Cline
Abstract Title: Teaching through Research: An Alternative Vertebrate Model
to Study Appetite Regulation
We conducted studies to determine the biological effects of central
 neuropeptide FF (NPFF), neuropeptide S (NPS) & oxyntomodulin (OXM)
 on avian physiological processes related to appetite. Four day post
hatch Cobb-500 chicks responded to central NPFF, NPS and OXM with
linear decreases in feed intake. We also determined the effects of NPFF,
NPS & OXM on neuronal activation in various hypothalamic nuclei in
order to better understand the anorexigenic mechanisms of action. Behaviors
 after central NPFF and NPS were also quantied. We conclude that NPFF,
 NPS & OXM modulate the perception of satiety in chicks. These results
may be used to better understand human neurological appetite regulation.




Shelley Gentry, English
Faculty Mentor: Dr. Renee Dickinson
Abstract Title: Searching for Olive Moore
This Capstone Project documents my search for Modern novelist Olive Moore.
 Moore published four works between1929 and 1932, but little is known of her
life. I have searched for biographical information on Moore. My research
included genealogical research, web research, and correspondence with other
researchers interested in the same group of authors. Through a grant from the
Faculty Development Center, I traveled to London and continued the search.
My search has taught me about the research process, the denition of scholarship,
and the value of dead ends. The discoveries found this semester will lead to future
scholarship on Moore and will widen the canon of Modernist literature.




                                                              24
Laura J. Clement, Breanna L. Hargbol, Erica M. Mc-
Intyre,
and Roger Conner, Biology
Faculty Sponsor: Dr. Christine J. Small
Abstract Title: Influence of Site Conditions on the Spread of Invasive
Plants in Eastern Forests
Non-native species are a major threat to biological diversity and ecosys-
tem function, competing with native species and reducing the structural
and compositional complexity of natural systems. To identify ecological
factors correlated with the spread of invasive plants, we sampled vegeta-
tion and site conditions across the Selu Conservancy in southwestern
Virginia. A GIS database was constructed to map areas of high invasive
plant abundance and to analyze spatial relationships of invasives and
site conditions. Multiora rose and Japanese honeysuckle occurred with
greatest frequency in sample plots (82.1% and 71.4%). Higher light, soil
moisture and fertility, and lower slope positions supported greater invasive
abundance (r2 = 0.592; p < 0.001) and seem to encourage the spread of
these pest plants into our forests.



Katelyn Christopher, Shanley Ignacio, Heather Charron,
and Stuart Cofield, Biology
Faculty Sponsor: Dr. Georgia Hammond
Abstract Title: Using Molecular Techniques to Examine Environmental
Bacterial Communities in an Ecosystem Contaminated with Heavy
Metals
Bacterial communities are complex, and many bacteria have yet to be
discovered due to their inability to survive outside of their natural habitat.
We are developing molecular techniques to isolate and analyze members
of bacterial communities contaminated with heavy metals and to track the
composition of the communities over time. We use soil samples collected
from an abandoned arsenic mine in Floyd County. We use gradient gel
electrophoresis to create ngerprints (proles) of community composition.
In these gels, different banding patterns correspond to different bacterial
communities. In the future, we may be able to isolate individual members
of the community and sequence their DNA. From this we can identify
new members of these communities that have the potential to use arsenic
as part of their metabolism and remove it from the environment.



Paul Redmon, Biology
Faculty Sponsor: Dr. Timothy W. Johann
Abstract Title: Studies of 5,10-Methenyltetrahydrofolate Synthetase
(MTHFS)
Studies of 5,10-Methenyltetrahydrofolate Synthetase (MTHFS)
MTHFS is an enzyme involved in folate metabolism. Its substrate is
important as a rescue agent for cancer patients treated with the toxic drug
methotrexate. We wish to better understand what amino acids are impor-
tant to this enzymes catalytic function. To accomplish this, we altered
MTHFS by changing the amino acid lysine at position 3 to alanine. Bacte-
rial cells were transformed with a plasmid containing the mutant MTHFS
gene, replicated, translated to a high concentration, and then puried. The
kinetics of the altered MTHFS was then compared to those of the wild
type. Differences between the two forms of MTHFS yield information
about the role of the changed amino acid in the enzyme.



                                                                25
Trisha Nash and Marissa Montouri, Psychology
Faculty Sponsor: Dr. Sarah Hastings
Abstract Title: When the Glass is Half-Full: Optimism and Relationship Commit-
ment Among Undergraduates
This study examined the relationship between optimism as reected in attributional
style and romantic commitment. Commitment consists of personal dedication (the
desire to preserve the relationship for its benets), constraints (pressure to maintain the
relationship to avoid the costs of dissolving it), and condence (expectations about the
relationship’s endurance). Partnered subjects were more optimistic than unpartnered ones.
Regression analyses found a positive association between optimism and condence and
between optimism and dedication. Further research with a more reliable measure of con-
straints may better explain optimism’s role in romantic commitment.




                                                              26
                                                Abstracts(In Alphabetical Order by Author)


Obese and unhappy? Is a child’s BMI related to interpersonal skills           The Relationship between Competitive Attitudes, Aggression, and
and positive feelings?                                                        Athletic Participation
By: Heather Adkins                                                            By: Leigh Aldridge, Caitlyn Colbs, Jessica Harner
Abstract: This study analyzed the relationship between third grade            Abstract: This study investigated the relationship between competitive
children’s Body Mass Index (BMI) to internalizing problems and qual-          attitudes and its effect on aggressive behavior. The relationship was
ity of peer relationships. Comparisons will also be made between BMI          determined using a combination of two pre-established scales: Rychman,
and teacher ratings of third grade students in these areas. Data was used     Hammer, Kaczor and Gold’s Hypercompetitive Attitude Scale(1971) and
from the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study from the U.S. Department          Buss and Perry Aggression Questionnaire (1992). It was expected that
of Education. Results showed a positive correlation between BMI and           the participants who self report as having higher competitive attitudes,
self-reported internalizing problems, and a negative correlation between      will have a higher aggression score than those participants who do not
BMI and self-reported interest and competence in peer relationships. No       self report as having highly competitive attitudes. It was also expected
signicant correlation was found between BMI and teacher ratings of           that those individuals who participate in contact sports will score higher
these areas.                                                                  on the competition scale and show higher levels of aggressiveness.
Tuesday, 9:00 am Lounge A                                                     Tuesday, 2:00 - 4:00 pm Social Sciences Poster Session II

Oxidative Damage From the Treatment for Iron Overload                         Grid Computing Fundamentals
By: Brandon Alderman                                                          By: Damien Allen, Brandon Moye
Abstract: Chronic iron overload is a disease common in most third world       Abstract: Grid Computing is one of the latest technologies to emerge
countries and with suffers of ?-thalassemia. If left untreated, the disease   from the eld of scientic computing. Through the use of world-wide
ultimately leads to death. This medical condition is exacerbated by high      computer networks, solving the world’s hardest problems can be made
levels of ascorbic acid. This research is aimed at elucidating a pathway      easier by sharing the available computing power. Allowing many
to explain oxidative damage from the traditional treatment of iron over-      computers to simultaneously solve a single problem, the time needed to
load with desferriferrioxamine B, and ascorbic acid. Ferrioxamine B,          produce a solution is decreased dramatically. In the past, these types of
the iron complex of Desferal, is stable in the presence of ascorbic acid, a   problems were solved through brute force using a single, very powerful,
biological reducing agent. Introduction of the iron(II) chelator bipyri-      but very expensive hardware. Now, through Grid Computing a large ag-
dine facilitates the reduction of ferrioxamine B by ascorbate through the     glomeration of low cost, low power machines are able to tackle what was
formation of a ternary complex.                                               once the sole domain of supercomputers. Computers acting as part of a
Tuesday, 12:30 pm Lounbe B                                                    Grid are now able to greatly exceed the capabilities and capacity of even
                                                                              the largest supercomputing systems. There are several aspects of Grid
Social Interaction and the Relationship Between Change in Postive             Computing that must be addressed before such a large scale network is
and Negative Affect                                                           deployed. The most visible of these are the requirements for wide area
By: Leigh Aldridge                                                            security, quality of service for optical networks, and distributed data
Abstract: In this study the relationship between different modes of com-      management. This presentation will address these issues in addition to a
munication, telephone, e-mail, face-to-face, and the change in either         general overview of the grid computing paradigm.
positive or negative affect after the interaction was investigated. Ten       Tuesday, 5:10 pm Information Technology Symposium
participants from the Radford University student body were studied. The
investigation took place over a two-week period. Each participant was         P.E. Was Never Recess
supplied with a palm pilot that was preprogrammed with questions and          By: Heather Amon
set to beep at different times throughout the day. The questions on the       Abstract: The present dilemma of childhood obesity has brought
palm pilot referred to a variety of methods of communication, what was        more attention to the P.E. setting in schools, and therefore it may
discussed during the interaction, the relationship between communica-         seem that P.E. has just recently gone through a revolution, but
tion partners and how they felt after the particular interaction.
                                                                              these changes in curriculum have been occurring for quite some
Wednesday, 12:30-2 pm Social Science Poster Session III
                                                                              time. The word dodgeball still brings back horrible memories for
Childhood maltreatment, Poly-victimization, Psychological Distress            some people, and the use of such elimination games are often
& Adjustment to College                                                       referred to as “old P.E.” because that’s exactly what it is: old!
By: Apryl Alexander, Casey Marin, Jennifer Nunn                               Take a glance at a “new P.E.” classroom, which includes the use
Abstract: This paper will report results from a study involving ap-           of modern technology such as heart-rate monitors and pedom-
proximately 320 female undergraduates attending a southeastern U.S.           eters, and has students experiencing activities such as roller-skat-
university. The study examines the relationship between a history of vic-     ing, rock-climbing and orienteering. It’s not your parents’ P.E.
timization in childhood, current psychological health, adjustment to col-     anymore, and it hasn’t been for awhile, so get over the painful
lege, and polyvictimization prior to the age of 17. The study examined
                                                                              memories and learn what these programs have been accomplish-
whether female college students who were victimized as children differ
from non-victimized students in terms of 1) adjustment to college life,
                                                                              ing!
                                                                              Monday, 10 am Lounge B
2) current psychological health, and 3) adjustment to college. The study
also examined the contribution of polyvictimization versus individual
types of childhood victimization as predictors of psychological distress.
Results and implications will be provided in paper.
Monday, 1:30 pm Lounge B

                                                                      27
Advertising on the Local Level                                                 differ in their nonverbal sensitivity and their accuracy in decoding non-
By: William Amos                                                               verbal cues. As a result of this, nonverbal cues on a rst date may have a
Abstract: This project will focus on my efforts in constructing a local        good chance of being misinterpreted by the other party. A survey of 175
advertising campaign. I will present the campaign, and an evaluation of        undergraduate students (91 males and 84 females) was administered to
my efforts. The campaign is for a local company, and includes secondary        examine four nonverbal cues: eye contact, body lean, facial expression,
research, objective setting, advertising and media strategy and tactis, a      and touch. The survey studied the opinions and experiences of college
media plan, advertisements, and special promotions and public relations        students in regards to nonverbal cues. One key nding in the analysis
efforts. This is an overall representation of all the skills I have learned    was that women were more aware of and sensitive to eye contact than
in my advertising concentration including Media Planning,Advertising           men. Another important nding was that after reading two hypothetical
Production, and Campaign building. This campaign focuses on local              date scenarios (one which emphasized descriptions of positive nonver-
advertising and how to creatively reach audiences with limited media           bal behavior and one which emphasized negative nonverbal behaviors)
types.                                                                         males reported a signicantly higher level of sexual expectations in the
 Wednesday, 5:30 pm Lounge C                                                   positive nonverbal scenario. A nal key nding was that a signicant
                                                                               percent (83%) of the respondents (males and females) felt that the more
Chemical Identification of Various Crystals Produced in Crystal                 positive nonverbal communication present, the more likely a second date
Idioblasts of Dieffenbachia seguine                                            will occur.
By: Alexandra J. Andrews                                                       Wednesday, 12:30-2 pm Social Sciences Poster Session III
Abstract: The common household plant Dieffenbachia seguine produces
various kinds of crystals in special cells throughout its stems, roots and     Feeling Invicible
leaves. Although it has been assumed that the crystals are all calcium         By: Emily Badger
oxalate, this has not, to our knowledge, been tested. Calcium oxalate is       Abstract: Do people that feel they have more power over their lives par-
stable in acetic acid but dissolves in hydrochloric acid, while other min-     ticipate more in risk-taking activities? I hypothesize that the more power
erals known to form crystals in plants dissolve in both acids. Samples         you perceive you have over your life, the more risk-taking activities you
from all parts of Dieffenbachia seguine plants were taken, cleared,            will be involved in. Using a non-random probability sample of 160 col-
treated with either hydrochloric acid or acetic acid, and observed through     lege students at Radford University, I surveyed students on their risk-tak-
a microscope. Results indicated that all the various crystals of Dieffenba-    ing behavior and their sense of control over life events. Findings reveal
chia are indeed calcium oxalate.                                               that younger people seem to possess more power than older people.
Tuesday, 4-8 pm in Biology Symposium                                           Those that expressed power participated more in extreme sports and
                                                                               experienced more risky situations than those who expressed powerless-
Creation of a Dichotomous Key of Mammal Hairs of Southwest                     ness. There is no difference between men and women on the feeling of
Virginia                                                                       power or powerlessness. The results conrm that people who feel power
By: Alexandra J Andrews, Sarah E Childress                                     engage in more risky situations more than those who feel powerless.
Abstract: Coragyps atratus, Black vultures, and Cathartes aura, Turkey         Wednesday, 10 am Lounge C
vultures play a major role in the removal of carcasses from the envi-
ronment, as a major part of their diet is carrion. However, little else is     Fox News Coverage of Operation IraqI Freedom Leading to College
known about their diet preferences. We hope to make a comparative              Students Misperceptions of the War
analysis of the hairs found in vulture pellets to hairs from known species,    By: Mary K. Baxter, Ryanne M. Bosley, Erin E. Brooks, Melissa G.
in order to create a dichotomous key of their diet. Our results will be pre-   Brown, Richard A. Payne, Stephanie L. Rogers, and Daniel D. Shepel-
sented at the Radford University Undergraduate Research Symposium.             wich
Tuesday, 4-8 pm in Biology Symposium                                           Abstract: The importance of this study is to entirely understand why
                                                                               college students are misinformed about vital issues concerning the U.S.
Organizational analysis for the Boys and Girls Club of Southwest               The purpose of this research was to explore the correlation between
Virginia                                                                       FOX’s News coverage and the misperceptions held by college students
By: Robin Anthony and Michelle Taylor                                          regarding Operation Iraqi Freedom. 210 college students in the New
Abstract: My partner and I will be presenting our nal report on what          River Valley area were given a survey to understand which mispercep-
we did for out internship project. We will be taking the audience through      tions about the war in Iraq were the most common. FOX News broadcast
each step of the process that we used to gather our analysis information.      is regarded as causing more misperceptions among these students as
The project is based on doing an organizational analysis for the Boys          opposed to competing media networks. There are three common misper-
and Girls Club of Southwest Virginia. We were working with Elizabeth           ceptions held by college students that we tested to be determined as true
Jamison from the Leadership and Development Center of Radford Uni-             or false. Regarding the rst misperception that the U.S. found weapons
versity. This project is to be nished by late April and presented to the      of mass destruction in Iraq, 25.4% of FOX viewers were misperceived
Board of Directors for the Boys and Girls Club So that we may provide          whereas only 19.0% of viewers of other networks were misperceived.
our recommendations that would help better the organization.                   Concerning the second misperception that Saddam Hussein was directly
Wednesday, 3:30 pm Lounge B                                                    involved with September 11Th terrorists, 48.0% of FOX viewers were
                                                                               misperceived whereas only 30.0% of viewers of other networks were
Nonverbal Cues: What They Mean To Men and Women During a                       misperceived. Finally, our research indicated that regarding our third
First Date                                                                     misperception that World public opinion favors our involvement in Iraq,
By: Chelsea M. Archer, Ashley C. Ewell, Lauren A. Keller, Tyler J.             18.0% of FOX viewers were misperceived whereas only 17.0% of view-
Leveski, Darcy N. MacCauley, Lindsay B. Rupert, Shayna M. Walker               ers of other networks were misperceived. The results show that FOX
Abstract: The purpose of this project was to understand how nonverbal          News coverage leads to more misperceptions among college students
cues are perceived by men and women during a rst date. It is impos-           than any other media networks.
sible to “not” communicate and since information is constantly being           Wednesday, 12:30-2 pm Social Sciences Poster Session III
expressed through body language, the distinction between nonverbal
actions and behaviors and the way they are interpreted is signicant
to subsequent relational development. Particular cues carry particular
relational meanings, but these meanings can be misinterpreted depending
on how they are perceived especially during a rst date. Men and women
                                                                       28
Establish A Network Sensor Grid Using Gumstix                                of attractiveness, there was no signicant difference between the two.
By: Robert Beaton                                                            There was a signicant difference between social networks consisting of
Abstract: Network security in today’s web based world is essential for       parents. Males were shown to have a standard deviation of .923 whereas
successful and professional businesses. Data at any given time needs to      females had a standard deviation of .976 in this instance. This study
be guaranteed safe and secure. The problem becomes how to safeguard          has shown that there is inconclusive evidence to support whether or not
a network with minimal cost and maximum security. This study focuses         background and culture affect a romantic relationship.
on establishing a secure Linux based Grid using gum stick-sized devices      Wednesday, 12:30-2 pm Social Sciences Poster Session III
called Gumstix as wireless sensors. Gumstix devices are small, yet pow-
erful, computers that are approximately the size of a stick of gum. These    Central oxyntomodulin decreases feed intake in 4-day post hatch
nodes implement a light-weight Grid capable of gathering network intru-      chicks
sion data and transmitting it to a central host for analysis. Gumstix pro-   By: Christie Bowden
vide a scalable and affordable solution to Grid based network security.      Abstract: Central oxyntomodulin (OXM) reduces appetite in rats. Ef-
Tuesday, 3:30 pm Information Technology Symposium                            fects in avians are unreported. Chicks received 0, 3, 6, or 12 microg
                                                                             OXM & feed intake was recorded. OXM-treated chicks had a linear
Sincere Apologies: A Study on the Act of Contrition and forgiveness          dose-dependent feed intake decrease. To determine if the hypothalamus
By: Christian Benedi, Parker Garbee, Wayne Gore, Danny McLean,               (Hy) mediates this effect, chicks were injected with OXM & neuronal
Camille Miles, Cory St.Clair, Beth Veney                                     activation was quantied in the lateral Hy, paraventricular nucleus, &
Abstract: The purpose of this research is to evaluate the dynamics of an     ventromedial Hy. OXM had no effect. To determine if OXM affects the
effective apology. An understanding of these dynamics is benecial in        gut, chicks received OXM & were gavaged with a red feed. Time red
communication and maintenance within relationships. An apology, as           was detected in feces was determined. OXM had no effect. Central OXM
dened in the research, is an attempt to justify or excuse norm violation.   reduces feed intake in chicks; however, the effects do not appear to Hy
An effective apology is characterized by sincerity. A sincere apology        or gut mediated.
consists of acknowledgement, remorse, reparation, and reconciliation. A      Tuesday, 6:30 pm in Biology Symposium
non-probability convenience sample of 174 Radford University students
was given a 23-question survey using a combination of nominal and            Central Amylin More Potently Reduces Feed intake in Anorexic
interval Likert style questions. Frequency charts derived from SPSS          Containing Lines of Chickens
provided descriptive statistics used to analyze the data. In all six situ-   By: Christie Bowden, Paul Siegel, Wint Nandar
ational contexts presented in the survey, a great majority of respondents    Abstract: Amylin is a 37 amino acid peptide of pancreatic organ that is
believed a face-to-face apology is an acceptable channel of apology. An      secreted after a meal. Central amylin reduces feed intake in normal body
apology in the form of a text or an e-mail was chosen by the majority        weight chicks. However its role in animal models with body weight
of respondents in only two of the six contextual situations. Letters and     dysfunction is unknown. Thus we centrally administered 0, 0.5, 1.0, 2.0
phone calls were not chosen by the majority of respondents in any of the     microg of rattus amylin in high (HWS) and low weight select (LWS)
six contextual situations. These ndings strongly supported the research     chicken lines. The HWS contain some obese individuals and the LWS
hypothesis that a face-to-face apology is the most effective medium for      contain some anorexic individuals. Chicks were fasted for three hours
a recipient to accept an apology. 125 of the 174 respondents agreed or       prior to injections. Feed intake was recorded every 30 min for 180 min.
strongly agreed that they apologize in order to relieve feelings of guilt    Feed intake in LWS was more potently inhibited by central amylin than
or shame. Conclusions derived from this data helped to answer the rst       in HWS (51% vs. 22%)
research question posed in the study; when a person apologizes, are they     Tuesday, 4-8 pm in Biology Symposium
attempting to repair their relationship and make the injured party feel
better or are they attempting to make themselves feel better? 148 of the     Assessing the Involvement of Greek Organizations in Relation to
174 respondents agreed or strongly agreed that they apologize in order       Alcohol Use
to restore relationships. 133 of the 174 respondents agreed or strongly      By: Sara Boyd
agreed that their willingness to accept an apology depends on the sever-     Abstract: The study examined relations among alcohol use and leader-
ity of the action. 152 of the 174 respondents agreed or strongly agreed      ship among students of Greek organizations at Radford University. It
that an apology is only believable if it’s sincere and acknowledgement       included 74 participants recruited via a randomized cluster sampling
was the aspect of sincerity that the majority of the respondents found to    method. Self-report measures of the Alcohol Use Disorders Identication
be most important. Helping to answer the second research question of         Test (AUDIT; Babor, Higgins-Biddle, Saunders, & Monteiro, 2001) and
the study, this data provided insight into what makes an apology believ-     the Revised Self-Leadership Questionnaire (Houghton & Neck, 2002).
able.                                                                        Men reported signicantly higher AUDIT scores than women. AUDIT
Wednesday, 1 pm Social Sciences Poster/ Oral Session III                     scores were negatively related to six leadership items and positively
                                                                             related to two items. Positive relations reected items in which partici-
Romantic Relationships (a Communication Study)                               pants reported rewarding themselves with ‘some thing’ they enjoy after
By: Erin Bentley, Declan Grogan, Devin Grimsley, Andrew Cook, and            completing a task.
Tim Baines                                                                   Wednesday, 12:30-2 pm Social Sciences Poster Session III
Abstract: The purpose of this study was to determine what components
Radford University students nd most important when considering a            Attractive and Intelligent: Breaking the Stereotype
potential romantic relationship. Three key aspects were investigated:        By: Sara Boyd, Whitney Gilliam, Richard Boyce
rst impressions of physical attractiveness and personality, social          Abstract: Our experiment contributed to the growing body of research on
networks, and background, or culture. Using a non-probability sample         rst-impression character attributions such as intelligence, grade point
of convenience, a Likert-type survey was distributed to 85 Radford           average (GPA) and life success. In this experiment participants viewed
University students between the ages of 19 years and 25 years. A total       two photographs. One was of an attractive woman; the other was of an
of 34 males and 51 females answered the survey. Using a scale of one to      unattractive woman. We expected that the participants would deem the
ve, students responded to their feelings towards the three core aspects,    more attractive woman as being more intelligent than the unattractive
with one representing “never,” and ve as “very often.” Questions were       woman. We also attempted to nd a moderator by priming some of our
aimed at examining the inuence of attractiveness or personality and the     subjects to see an unattractive woman paired with a high level of intel-
correspondence to the initiation of a romantic relationship. Key ndings     ligence.
showed that although the mean score of personality was higher than that      Tuesday, 2:00 - 4:00 pm Social Sciences Poster Session II
                                                                      29
Application Server Clustering                                                will discuss the results of soil collection, digestion, and analysis for
By: Christopher Burton                                                       phosphorus content. Wetlands are known to accumulate phosphorus.
Abstract: Because the internet has become a critical part of many aspects    Soil samples were collected from both elevations within the wetland for
of society, powerful servers are now a necessity for businesses and orga-    analysis of their phosphorus content. The samples were digested in per-
nizations. Their performance demands frequently exceed the capabilities      chloric acid and analyzed spectrophotometricly according to procedures
of web and database servers, increasing the need for web application         suggested by the Soil Science Society of America.
servers with enhanced capabilities. Often, many application servers are      Tuesday, 10 am Chemistry Symposium
required to meet volume and reliability demands. This presentation will
provide an overview of three-tier architecture, the structure on which       Understanding How Romantic Partners Solve Everyday Problems
most web applications are built. A brief description of application serv-    By: Kimberly L Childers, Brittany Deering, Kelsey Fuller, Jenny Glass,
ers and their role in three-tier architecture will follow. The discussion    Brooke Gumm, & Chad Miller
will then focus on the concept of server clustering and how application      Abstract: Research has conrmed that everyday decision-making often
servers are congured in a cluster. An example conguration will be          occurs in a collaborative context. Less is known about how performance
outlined using the Apache Software Foundation’s Tomcat server. This          on everyday tasks are inuenced by different collaborative conditions.
should offer a better understanding of how businesses and organizations      The study hypothesized that couples in the full-collaborative condition
provide the information and services with which most internet users have     would outperform the part-collaborative condition on an errand-running
become familiar.                                                             task. The full-collaborative condition received one list of errands and
Tuesday, 4:30 pm Information Technology Symposium                            where asked to work together, whereas the part-collaborative condition
                                                                             received two errand lists and were asked to work from their own errand
Attachment and Disgust Sensitivity                                           list. Group differences in collaborative condition and gender in perfor-
By: Deanna Caincross                                                         mance, communication style, and heart rate will be presented.
Abstract: This study proposes a relationship between adult romantic at-      Tuesday, 2:00 - 4:00 pm Social Sciences Poster Session II
tachment and sensitivity to disgusting stimuli and situations. Evolution-
ary theory suggests that disgust sensitivity has developed as a defense      Using Molecular Techniques to Examine Environmental Bacterial
emotion, guarding the purity of the body. Similarly attachment theory        Communities in an Ecosystem Contaminated with Heavy Metals
suggests that individual differences in attachment reect strategies for     By: Katelyn Christopher, Shanley Ignacio, Heather Charron, and Stuart
regulating ones emotions. Avoidant individuals tend suppress the attach-     Coeld and Dr. Georgia Hammond
ment behavior system, compared to secure individuals. It is expected that    Abstract:Bacterial communities are complex, and many bacteria
avoidant individuals would report lower levels of disgust compared to        have yet to be discovered due to their inability to survive outside
the other attachment styles.                                                 of their natural habitat. We are developing molecular techniques
Monday, 12:30 - 2:30pm Scoial Sciences Poster Session I
                                                                             to isolate and analyze members of bacterial communities con-
Facial Approximation: Methods and Uses in Forensic Anthropology
                                                                             taminated with heavy metals and to track the composition of the
By: Angela Cales                                                             communities over time. We use soil samples collected from an
Abstract: Facial Approximation is a broad term used to describe a            abandoned arsenic mine in Floyd County. We use gradient gel
number of methods that share a common goal: to determine if a skull can      electrophoresis to create ngerprints (proles) of community
be matched to a particular face. These methods are a complex mixture         composition. In these gels, different banding patterns correspond
of art and science. While each has its own limitations and controversy,      to different bacterial communities. In the future, we may be able
they all have potential value. The goals of this study are to explore the    to isolate individual members of the community and sequence
different techniques involved in facial approximation and their value to     their DNA. From this we can identify new members of these
the eld of forensic anthropology, to offer an analysis of which method
                                                                             communities that have the potential to use arsenic as part of their
produces the best results, and to critique the difculty level of learning
and employing each.
                                                                             metabolism and remove it from the environment.
                                                                             Monday, 8:10 pm Faculty/ Student Collabortive Grant
Tuesday, 12:45 pm Forensic Anthropology symposium
                                                                             Isolation and DNA Sequencing of Members of Microbial Communi-
Pyrite oxidation and environmental hazard assessment: recent find-
                                                                             ties in Arsenic Contaminated Environments
ings and the potential for investigation of black shale in southwest
                                                                             By: Katie Christopher
Virginia
                                                                             Abstract: The structure and composition of bacterial communities in
By: Nanda Chassot
                                                                             nature is an area of study needing much work as it is not well under-
Abstract: Organic-rich black shales can contain pyrite and other suldic
                                                                             stood. In conjunction with the research project “Bacterial Community
materials which pose environmental concerns due to the oxidation of
                                                                             Proles from an Arsenic Mine,” DNA of bacterial community members
pyrite leading to acid rock drainage (ARD). Such shales are common to
                                                                             in soils containing arsenic are isolated and then amplied using PCR.
the Appalachians and also located in close proximity to Radford. Limited
                                                                             The PCR products are then run on a gradient gels and their bands were
research has been conducted on local shales to determine the extent of
                                                                             extracted from the gradient gels in order to isolate their DNA. This DNA
the potential for environmental degradation due to ARD. Investigation
                                                                             is processed and sent off for sequencing to identify (and potentially
of this issue requires a preliminary understanding of pyrite formation/
                                                                             discover new) species which compose the bacterial communities in soils
oxidation, shale development and weathering, and related environmen-
                                                                             containing arsenic. This will also shed light on which species are capable
tal hazard analysis. The objective for this project is the production of a
                                                                             of metabolizing arsenic, and could be further investigated for use in
document that provides this necessary background to facilitate future
                                                                             bioremediation.
eld investigations conducted by students at Radford University.
                                                                             Wednesday, 5:30 pm Lounge B
Monday, 1:30 pm Commonwealth
                                                                             Full-Day Kindergarten: Is It Worth It?
Phosphorus Assessment of the Constructed Wetland at Radford
                                                                             By: Lisa Ciampaglio
University
                                                                             Abstract: Data from the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study were used
By: Sara Charlton, Kaleb Woldeamanuel
                                                                             to compare the effects of full-day versus half-day Kindergarten on math,
Abstract: Radford University has constructed an articial wetland to
                                                                             reading, and science achievement scores. Scores were gathered in the
remove pollutants from parking lot run-off entering the New River. We
                                                                     30
spring from Kindergarten, First, Third, and Fifth grades. A one-way               the use of a self esteem boost when coupled with the previous research
ANOVA was conducted to compare these groups and results indicate                  of mortality salience (death thoughts) and disgust sensitivity.
that only reading achievement scores in Kindergarten were signicantly            Monday, 1:00 pm Lounge B
higher for students attending full-day Kindergarten. Additional signi-
cant ndings from all four grade levels will be reported and discussed.           Replica Management
Possible explanations, limitations and confounding variables will be              By: Kelly Clynes
discussed as to why these unexpected results were obtained.                       Abstract: Grid computing uses the resources of many computers con-
Monday, 10am Lounge A                                                             nected by a network to solve large-scaled computer problems no matter
                                                                                  where they are located. Globus, which is a de-facto standard in the
The Effects of Gender and Group Membership on Cell Phone Use                      United State of fundamental enabling technology for the “Grid”, main-
By: Sarah Clark, Mendy Adams                                                      tains a mapping between logical names for les and collections and for
Abstract: The present study investigates the effects of gender and group          one or more physical locations. It also allows others to share computing
membership on cellular telephone use. Two different samples were                  power, databases, and other tools securely online across corporate, insti-
obtained, one from the Radford University campus and another from the             tutional, institutional, and geographic boundaries, along with the Globus
city of Washington D.C. All data was collected by psychology students             Replica Catalog and the replica management Applicable Programming
at Radford University using naturalistic observation. The preliminary             Interface (API). Among many upper layer components in the data grid
analyses suggest that there is a signicant relationship between gender           architecture, this presentation will focus on replica management. We will
and cell phone use.                                                               rst address the denition of replica management and what it is used for.
Monday, 12:30 - 2:30pm Scoial Sciences Poster Session I                           Next, we will explore the pros and cons for using a replica management
                                                                                  system/ replica manager. Lastly, we will talk about how replica manage-
Influence of Site Conditions on the Spread of Invasive Plants in                   ment is used in the Globus Toolkit.
Eastern Forests                                                                   Tuesday, 5:30 pm Information Technology Symposium
By: Laura J. Clement, Breanna L. Hargbol, Erica M. McIntyre, and
Roger Conner and Dr. Christine J. Small                                           Determination of Semi-Volatile Organics Entering and Exiting
Abstract:Non-native species are a major threat to biological                      Radford’s Wetland
diversity and ecosystem function, competing with native spe-                      By: Joshua Coiner
cies and reducing the structural and compositional complexity                     Abstract: Radford University has developed a wetland for the treat-
                                                                                  ment of urban run-off before its introduction into the New River. Urban
of natural systems. To identify ecological factors correlated with
                                                                                  run-off is expected to contain organic compounds which originate from
the spread of invasive plants, we sampled vegetation and site                     automotive pollution. It is important to ascertain the effectiveness of the
conditions across the Selu Conservancy in southwestern Virginia.                  wetlands in removing toxic organic compounds which create free radi-
A GIS database was constructed to map areas of high invasive                      cals which are harmful to the environment. Samples of rain water, rst
plant abundance and to analyze spatial relationships of invasives                 ush off of the parking lots, and from standing water within the wetland
and site conditions. Multiora rose and Japanese honeysuckle                      underwent continuous liquid-liquid extraction, concentration, and analy
occurred with greatest frequency in sample plots (82.1% and                       sis with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry to determine the organic
71.4%). Higher light, soil moisture and fertility, and lower slope                compounds. We will discuss the results and methods of the study.
positions supported greater invasive abundance (r2 = 0.592; p <                   Tuesday, 10:30 am Chemistry Symposium
0.001) and seem to encourage the spread of these pest plants into
                                                                                  Examining the Effects on the Enzyme 5, 10 Methnyltetrahydrofolate
our forests.                                                                      Synthase of Changing L
Monday, 7:45 pm Faculty/ Student Collabortive Grant
                                                                                  By: R. Shane Coleman
                                                                                  Abstract: MTHFS is an important enzyme in cellular function. This
Spatial Analysis of Invasive Plant Distribution, Land Use, and Site
                                                                                  enzyme catalyzes the rst step in the conversion of folinic acid into more
Conditions at the Selu Conservancy in Southwestern Virginia
                                                                                  active forms of folate. These other forms are essential for DNA, ATP,
By: Laura J. Clement
                                                                                  and protein synthesis as well as DNA repair. MTHFS is also important
Abstract: Geographic Information Systems (GIS) allow the integration
                                                                                  because folinic acid is used in two forms of chemotherapy. Our goal is
of spatial and non-spatial data layers and investigation of relationships
                                                                                  to determine the binding contacts made by individual amino acids in
between them. A GIS database was constructed to map the distribution of
                                                                                  MTHFS with its substrates, folinic acid and ATP. To accomplish this,
invasive plants at Selu Conservancy in southwestern Virginia. Field data
                                                                                  we substituted the amino acid lysine at position 120 in the enzyme with
on native and invasive plants and site conditions (soil composition, light,
                                                                                  alanine. Changes in the structure and function of the modied enzyme
topography) were collected in summer 2006. Locations of high invasive
                                                                                  provide clues to the importance of the lysine at position 120.
plant cover were recorded using GPS. Spatial data were overlain onto
                                                                                  Tuesday, 9:30 am Chemistry Symposium
2002 aerial photographs to analyze relationships between invasives,
land use, and site conditions. These results allow us to identify areas of
                                                                                  The Lifestory Project
signicant invasive impact and establish management priorities.
                                                                                  By: Kimberly Colna
Tuesday, 5:10 pm in Biology Symposium
                                                                                  Abstract: The purpose of The Life Story Project is to provide a thera-
                                                                                  peutic group setting to explore issues commonly experienced by middle
Terror Management Theory and Disgust Sensivity
                                                                                  school children who are raised by grandparents. Both cognitive (think-
By: James Clifford
                                                                                  ing) and affective (feeling) components of issues related to (1) under-
Abstract: Terror management research has been replicated in several
                                                                                  standing of their family-of-origin situation and changes in relationships
laboratories, but most of those labs have had training under the direc-
                                                                                  with biological parents, (2) individual developmental changes and needs
tion of the theory’s original founders. Previous terror management
                                                                                  of middle school children, and (3) concerns related to being raised by
research at Radford University has failed to replicate the ndings of
                                                                                  grandparents, will be explored through the creation of individual autobi-
those experiments, in particular, Goldenberg and colleagues work with
                                                                                  ographies, narratives, photographs, and drawings that depict their lives
disgust sensitivity. In this study, it is proposed that the failure is due to a
                                                                                  as children being raised by grandparents.
contamination of the study via an unaccounted for self esteem boost dur-
                                                                                  Wednesday, 2 pm Lounge C
ing the distracter task; a word nd matrix. The current research examines
                                                                          31
Central obestatin does not cause central orexigenic effects in broiler         between higher self-efcacy and job satisfaction. Results further suggest
chicks                                                                         a negative relationship between one’s perception of classroom discipline
By:Heather L. Combs                                                            problems and job satisfaction.
Abstract: Obestatin is a newly discovered 23 amino acid peptide within         Monday, at 11:00 am in Lounge A
the ghrelin gene. It is cleaved from ghrelin by proteolytic cleavage and
decreases feed intake in rats. In layer type chickens obestatin increases      The light for our future: Celebrating 10 years of the AASIS program
feed intake. In our study, we centrally injected broiler chicks with a range   By: Shai Cullop, Sarah Crawford, Kathy Murphy, Betsy DiSalvo, Gisela
of obestatin concentrations. We did not detect an effect of obestatin in       Abstract:The Research in Appalachia class proposes a presentation and
broiler chicks. Apparently the obestatin system differs between strains of     discussion on the successes of the Appalachian Arts and Studies in the
chickens.                                                                      Schools Program. This mentorship program is celebrating its tenth year
Tuesday, 4-8 pm in Biology Symposium                                           of reaching out to students in rural Southwestern Virginia high schools
                                                                               who are college able but not college bound, helping them to pursue post-
Operation Decomposition:Short Term Postmortem Changes in In-                   secondary education. The presentation explains the program’s goals and
terred and Above-ground Remains                                                history, and showcases the achievements of three AASIS high schools
By: Charde Cobbs, Taylor Quillen                                               and their students. The panel of RU students will invite participants
Abstract: Research is conducted to determine the short-term effects of         to share ideas about the future of the youth of Appalachia, as we piece
decomposition on soft tissue. In a period of three weeks, two fetal lambs      together ten years of AASIS students’ achievements.Wednesday, 6:00 pm
(one interred and one above ground) are used to study how season,              Lounge C
freeze-thaw rate, insect/animal activity, and the overall environment
have an effect on the process of decomposition. Similarities between           What makes schools effective? A look at administration, parent, and
animal and human rates of decay are studied, along with the validity           teacher variables
of using animals for researching decomposition. It is predicted that the       By: Siobhan Daniels
lamb above-ground will more thoroughly decompose in a shorter amount           Abstract: This study investigates the differences in school function-
of time than the one below ground due the signcant difference in the          ing on school-wide achievement. A nationally representative sample of
decomposition environment.                                                     569 elementary schools from the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study
Tuesday, 1:45 pm Forensic Anthropology symposium                               provided information on three school-level characteristics: Administra-
                                                                               tive school improvement plan, parental involvement in school activities,
The Effect of Oat Bran on Blood Lipid Levels in Healthy, Young                 and teacher-administration collaboration. Results indicate that schools
Adults                                                                         that emphasize these 3 characteristics do not report a signicantly higher
By: Tarren Corbin, Abbey Dean, Christine Haueter, Christine Hillegass          percentage of students above the national average on tests of reading
Abstract: Oat bran consumption has been touted as an effective adjunc-         and math than schools that place less emphasis on these characteristics.
tive therapy for lowering blood cholesterol levels. We investigated the ef-    Therefore, school-wide achievement is not signicantly inuenced by
fect of beta glucan in the form of raw oat bran on blood lipids in young,      these particular factors of school functioning.
healthy adults. 29 subjects consumed two tablespoons of oat bran for 28        Monday, at 9:00 am in Lounge A
days. They were advised not to change their current diets or exercise rou-
tines. Fasting blood cholesterol, HDL-cholesterol and triglycerides were       Nuclear Progression
measured using a small aliquot of whole blood derived from a nger             By: Radford Davis
stick. LDL-cholesterol was calculated using a standard formula. Blood          Abstract: This project will analyze the progression of nuclear energy. It
samples were taken before initiating the diet containing oat bran and 28       will start in the beginning with the development of nuclear weapons dur-
days later. At this time the study is still in progress.                       ing World War II. It will follow a logical timeline ending with the current
Wednesday, 2:00 - 3:00 pm Food and Nutrition Poster Session                    uses of nuclear energy, such as creating electricity. Personal perspectives
                                                                               and experiences will also be presented.
Relative Deprivation Caused by Media Imagery                                   Tuesday, 5 pm Honors English 203
By: Brandon Craddock
Abstract: Are feelings of deprivation felt by individuals about the body       Family Remedies Compared to Modern Day Medicine
caused by the media? I propose that media sources that depict ideal            By: Ashley DeFreitas, Emily Williamson, Whitney Spradlin
images are responsible for many individuals’ feeling of deprivation            Abstract: We wil be presenting a comparison of medicinal remedies used
concerning their bodies. I analyze the occurrence of relative depriva-         by three different family cultures from Portugal, Southwest Virginia, and
tion by Radford students in a campus-wide, 20 question, online survey          the Appalacian Region of Tennesee. We will also be comparing these
using a probability sample of 100 students from a p9opulation of 9,633         family remedies to the modern day medical practices used to treat the
students. Findings reveal that the sample unfortunately lacks diversity,       same illness.
78.2% of respondents, and 88.1% of the total population being Caucasian        Tuesday, 3:45 pm Honors English 203
in ethnicity. Though lacking in diversity, the study also shows that 97%
of respondents believe the media inuences body images and 99% say             Retinoic Acid and Ethanol Influence Development of Cultured Em-
that the media has some kind of inuence on them.                              bryonic Chick Intestine
Monday, 2:00 pm Lounge C                                                       By: Ashley DeFreitas, Ashlee Carter
                                                                               Abstract: We are studying the inuence of retinoids and ethanol on
Teachers Job Satisfaction: Self Efficacy Beliefs and Perceived Disci-           embryonic chick intestinal development. Ethanol retards growth during
pline Problems                                                                 embryonic development by altering retinoic acid concentration. Effects
By: Debra Craft                                                                on intestinal development will be determined through dissection, embed-
Abstract: Various factors have been suggested to inuence job satisfac-        ding, sectioning, and staining of cultured and uncultured duodenal tissue
tion, including the school environment, level of teacher competence,           of 14 and 16-day chick embryos. Segments of duodenal tissue were
salary, and lifestyle disposition. Using data from the Early Childhood         xed and embedded in parafn. Embedded tissue was sectioned into
Longitudinal Study, this study examined teachers’ self-reported self-ef-      5 mm thick ribbons, adhered to slides by Haupt’s adhesive and stained
cacy beliefs as well as their perception of classroom discipline problems      with periodic acid–Schiff reagent and fast green to count goblet cells and
as factors affecting their enjoyment of their current teaching job. Results    measure previllous ridge height. Data collection is currently underway.
from over 2500 teachers indicated that there was a positive association        Tuesday, 5 pm in Biology Symposium
                                                                       32
The affects of ADHD Medication on Social Skills: A Comparison of             environment of the Thorasic Surgical Care Unit. The project provides an
Self and Teacher Reports on Medicated and Non-Medicated Adoles-              education-based discharge program designed to teach patients about their
cents                                                                        diagnosis. The project’s goal is to create a discharge folder for EVERY
By: Lisa Dehart                                                              patient that holds relevant information. The empowerment of the knowl-
Abstract: The affects of ADHD medication on improving academic               edge the folder evokes among both the nursing staff and the patient, has
performance and achievement has frequently been studied, and found           the ability to save a patient’s life, reduce mistakes made by a patient’s
efcacious. ADHD also takes its toll on adolescents in the social arena.     inadequate knowledge, and aid in the patient’s safe recovery.
In comparison to studies examining the affect of medication on academic      Monday, 4:00 pm Commonwealth
success, reviews of its inuence on peer relations are less common.
Using data from The Early Childhood Longitudinal Study (ECLS), the           Violent Crime in Proximity to Bars
current study examines the results garnered from self and teacher report     By: Katherine Drummond
measures of peer relations as they are inuenced by the presence and         Abstract: This project will consist of a display of maps of Roanoke
consequent duration of ADHD medication in fth graders. The subse-           showing violent crimes, such as assaults, in proximity to bars and other
quent analysis suggests neither self nor teacher reports on peer relations   establishments serving alcohol in the years 2004 and 2005. Explanatory
and social skills showed any signicant variance resultant to the pres-      background information on the topic of violent crime in relation to bars
ence and/or duration of ADHD prescribed medication.                          will also be included. The purpose of the research is to show how violent
Tuesday, 9:30 am Lounge A                                                    crime can center around bars, and why this occurs.
                                                                             Tuesday, 2-4 pm Social Sciences Poster Session II
The Effects of Field Tip and Broad Tip Arrow Point Trauma on
Bone                                                                         Online Interactions and Communities
By: Daniel DiMichele, Christopher Hodges                                     By: James Dye
Abstract: Few studies have examined the effects of projectile points on      Abstract: This research project is aimed at examining online communi-
bone (Downs et al. 1994). We will experimentally examine the effects         ties and interactions within the college student realm. The level and time
of eld tip and broad tip arrow point trauma on cranial and postcranial      to which the student uses a computer or interacts is viewed. The research
(pelvic and shoulder girdle) bone using two deceased animals donated by      tries to see if there is a connection between the level of power a student
the Virginia/Maryland College of Veterinary Medicine. Arrows are shot        experiences within their everyday life and the level of power a student
from 5 meters distance; two variables are examined--would shape and          experiences during interaction with cyber communities. The hypothesis
depth of penetration--in an attempt to understand the traumatic signature    is that a if a student feels less power in everyday life they will engage in
of projectile wounds on human bone. Citation: Downs JCU, Nichols CA,         online communities more because there is a greater sense of power. The
Scala-Barnett D, Lifschultz BD. 1994. Handling and interpretation of         data that has been collected does show a slight increase in feelings of
crossbow injuries. Journal of Forensic Sciences 26:480-485.                  power when online, but needs further analysis.
Tuesday, 12:30 pm Forensic Anthropology symposium                            Wednesday, 3:30pm, Lounge C

Using Molecular Techniques to Examine Fungal Diversity                       Military Transition Following the Cold War
By: Jessica Dolloff, James Muller                                            By: Brian Erskine
Abstract: Fungi are a very diverse set of organisms. Using morphologi-       Abstract: The U.S. transition from a Cold War posture to a modern,
cal approaches to examine fungal diversity and relationships is fraught      more efcient military stance had a momentous impact on international
with difculty. Our research relies on using molecular techniques to         relations. Further, the deployment of American forces to several dif-
look at fungal diversity. We extract DNA from dried fungi that we have       ferent theatres has altered the methodology of the U.S. armed forces.
identied using eld guides. We have representative members of most          More lightweight and technological means have transitioned the armed
fungal groups in our collection. We then utilize PCR to generate DNA         services into a 21st century readiness posture. Affected by politics, this
fragments equivalent to a conserved Internal Transcribed Spacer region       transition came about as a result of different leaders and different agen-
(ITS) found in the ribosomal gene cassette for each of our samples.          das which will be discussed here. The physical armament of the military
These fragments are then subjected to restriction enzyme analyses in         and the process by which it was attained are the two focal points of this
order to determine DNA sequence variability among our samples.               study.
Tuesday, 4-8 pm in Biology Symposium                                         Tuesday, 3:00 pm Commonwealth

Diversity, Abundance, and Species Richness of the Avian Commu-               Great American Rhetoric: Orators and their Craft
nity at Radford University Wetland                                           By: Brian Erskine
By: Jessica Dolloff                                                          Abstract: Aristotle’s Rhetoric will be presented through analysis of select
Abstract: The presence of birds has been linked with increased diversity     American public speakers and their speeches. This study will delineate
in an ecosystem. This study observed the avian community at the RU           the different types of rhetoric and the purposes behind them as well as
wetland through bird censuses. These censuses were performed during          dispel common misconceptions about the use of rhetoric. Audio and
morning and evening hours, since studies show birds are more active in       video excerpts ranging from Presidents Kennedy to George W. Bush will
the morning than the evening. After all the data was collected, an analy-    be on display. What type of person can be an effective public speaker or
sis of morning versus evening bird sightings were performed and showed       does the speaker matter as much as the speech itself?
no signicant difference between the two. The same analysis of indi-         Tuesday, 3:30 pm Commonwealth
vidual bird species did show a signicant difference with the European
Starling (Sturnus vulgaris). Due to the length of the study (ve weeks) it
is not unexpected that there were minimally signicant results.
Tuesday, 4-8 pm in Biology Symposium

The TSCU Patient Teaching Plan
By: Sarah Donnelly
Abstract: My Honors Capstone Project at Radford University presents
signicant features of an innovative patient discharge program. It is de-
signed to answer questions for patients before they leave the womb-like
                                                                      33
The Effect of Oat Bran on Body Weight, Body Composition and                  versity Wetlands by calculating the alpha diversity of each site sampled
Satiety in Young Adults                                                      and calculating the beta diversity or turnover between the two types of
By: Rachelle Estes, Megan Abernathy, Meagan McClure, Elizabeth               sampling devices.
Heeschen                                                                     Tuesday, 4:30 pm in Biology Symposium
Abstract: Health claims for oat bran include decreased hunger and
weight maintenance. In this study, we questioned if oat bran in the          Bioinorganic Model for Photosystem II
amount of two tablespoons per day would positively impact on satiety         By: Brooke Francis
(feelings of fullness following a meal) in our population of college stu-    Abstract: The oxygen mammals breathe in order to survive is provided
dents. 29 subjects added two tablespoons of raw oat bran to their meals      through the process of photosynthesis, a complex biochemical process
for 28 days. Weight and body composition were determined initially and       involving twelve redox cycles and light. Oxygen is evolved from the part
at the conclusion of the study. A satiety questionnaire was administered     of photosynthesis known as photosystem II. In order to better understand
three times during the study, before consuming the oat bran, during the      and harness the potential of these light induced reactions the develop-
consumption and at the conclusion of the study. The study is not com-        ment of simple model systems is needed. The active site for the enzyme
pleted at this time.                                                         in photosystem II contains a core of four manganese atoms held together
Wednesday, 2:00 - 3:00 pm Food and Nutrition Poster Session                  by u-oxo bridges. A synthetic pathway for a small manganese containing
                                                                             complex will be reported, as well as the complexes ability to evolve
Geriatric Medical Care Internship                                            oxygen from reactive oxygen species.
By: Daniel Eyassu                                                            Tuesday, 11 am Chemistry Symposium
Abstract: I have a geriatric medical internship at the Radford Nursing
and Rehabilitation Center. This experience focuses on physical and           The Effect of Oat Bran on Glucose Excursion
occupational therapy and medication for geriatric patients. Assignments      By: Danielle Freeman, Amy Messner, Justin Paxton,Andrea Pless
include spending 180 hours working with therapists, nurses and doc-          Abstract: Oat bran ber has favorable effects on glucose tolerance,
tors, a daily log of my activities, a paper on the evolution of geriatric    particularly on postprandial glucose (two hours following a meal).
medicine and a paper on a specic drug prescribed for geriatric patients.    In this study, we looked at young, healthy, free-living subjects to see
This internship has given me more experience with patients and geriatric     what effect oat bran ber would have on the glucose and post-prandial
medicine. Spending time in the physical and occupational therapy as          glucose. Blood glucose was measured on 29 subjects using a nger stick
well as taking vital signs of patients with the nurses have enhanced my      technique both in the fasting and postprandial states. Following the ini-
technical skills and communication abilities.                                tial testing, subjects ate 2 tablespoons of oat bran every day for 28 days.
Tuesday, 6 pm in Biology Symposium                                           On day 28, the 2 glucose tests will be repeated. Blood glucose levels will
                                                                             be compared. At this time the nal data is not available since the study is
Botetourt County                                                             still in progress.
By: Kimberley Farmer                                                         Wednesday, 2:00 - 3:00 pm Food and Nutrition Poster Session
Abstract: This presentation will include information about Botetourt
County, VA, an Appalachian community. Information from history of the        Fraternity/Sorority Involvement and its Effects on Academic
county, county size past and present, members of the community, inter-       Achievement
esting facts and pictures of the beautiful scenery will be presented.        By: Jeannie Fry
Tuesday, 4 pm Honors English 203                                             Abstract: Using social control theory, I examine how students involve-
                                                                             ment in Greek life affects their academic achievement. A nonprobability
Family Influence                                                              sample was used by sending surveys from WebSurveyor to many dif-
By: Stacey Fernandez                                                         ferent disciplines to students in 21 classes at Radford University (total
Abstract: In our presentation, we will be researching our geneological       population: 9,633). I recieved 94 responses.Preliminary ndings show
backgrounds and heritage. We will then determine how immigration             only 22% respondents were actually involved in a fraternity or sorority
from various regions have shaped and inuenced Appalachian culture.          in which 83% of the organizations had minimum GPA requirements.By
Tuesday, 3:30 pm Honors English 203                                          analyzing this data, I have found that students with the highest GPA’s
                                                                             (3.5-4.0) were not in an organization.Students with lower GPA’s (2.0-
Mine Safety                                                                  2.4) were not in a Greek organization suggesting minimum GPA’s with
By: Emily Flora                                                              no aspirations.
Abstract:This presentation involves video clips from interviews that I       Monday, 1:30 pm Lounge C
conducted with some of Virginia and West Virginia’s most inuential
mining researchers and speakers. The purpose of this project was to gain     America’s Environmental Paradigm
a better understanding of how mine safety affects our world today and        By: James Gay
how it affects those in surrounding countries. This is an informative pre-   Abstract: Presentation of Capstone Project. The evaluation of fac-
sentation to bring awareness to how mines may or may not follow all the      tors such a public opinion will demonstrate the dominant social
procedures necessary to conduct a safe working environment. A deeper         paradigm(DSP) and its connection with environmental policy. The
look is taken into how these companies operate and accidents that have       discussion from an emphasis on production to emphasis on sustainable
happened in past and its affect on rules and regulations now.                development will show and alternative possibility for the current DSP.
Wednesday, 1 pm Lounge B                                                     The analysis of the importance of such a change will include the deple-
                                                                             tion of natural resources, and the controversial issue of climate change.
Diversity in: the RU Wetlands                                                Policies and attitudes concerning these specic issues will be researched.
By: Megan Flora, Krista Greene, Stephanie Ratliff, Brian Richardson II       Monday, 2 pm Commonwealth
Abstract: The goal in our study of the Radford University Wetlands was
to compare the alpha and beta diversity of macro invertebrates using
different sampling methods. Hester-Dendy and sediments samplers
were used to collect these macro invertebrates after being in place in
the Radford Wetlands for two weeks. In theory, these sampling devices
should directly inuence the species of macro invertebrates that were
collected. We wanted to test this idea in the constructed Radford Uni-
                                                                     34
Searching for Olive Moore
By: Shelley Gentry and Renee Dickinson                                        Crystal Characterization in Lemna
Abstract:This Capstone Project documents my search for Modern novel-          By: Krista L. Greene
ist Olive Moore. Moore published four works between1929 and 1932,             Abstract: Dr. Coté is studying crystal-producing cells (crystal idio-
but little is known of her life. I have searched for biographical infor-      blasts) in plants of the Aroid Family. I am studying Lemna, a genus
mation on Moore. My research included genealogical research, web              of duckweeds in the Aroid Family. Duckweeds can be grown in pure
research, and correspondence with other researchers interested in the         culture, which could help with isolating macromolecules specically
same group of authors. Through a grant from the Faculty Development           from crystal idioblasts. My goal is to characterize the crystal idioblasts
Center, I traveled to London and continued the search. My search has          in these plants, particularly to determine if any are alive. Interestingly, I
taught me about the research process, the denition of scholarship,           have been nding rare examples of a type of idioblast (biforine) that has
and the value of dead ends. The discoveries found this semester will          not been reported in Lemna.
lead to future scholarship on Moore and will widen the canon of Mod-          Tuesday, 4 -8 pm in Biology Symposium
ernist literature.
Monday, 7:20 pm Faculty/ Student Collabortive Grant                           The Relationship between drug use and violence
                                                                              By: Sierra Hairston
The Literary Criticism of T.S. Eliot                                          Abstract: The purpose of this study is to see if there is any relation-
By: Scott Gibson                                                              ship between drug usage and violence. Data was collected by giving
Abstract: This multimedia PowerPoint program features T.S. Eliot, the         anonymous surveys to sections of Health 200 classes. Participants
father of New Criticism, and highlights statements from three of his          willing returned the surveys. The surveys did not contain any identify-
works: “The Sacred Wood,” “Selected Essays,” and “On Poetry and               ing information, data was scanned, and imported into SPSS. Results
Poets.” The presentation demonstrates Eliot’s unique style of criticism       will be presented that their may be a correlation between drug usage and
and his philosophical thoughts on the importance of Literature.               violence.
Monday, 6:30 pm Lounge C                                                      Wednesday, 11-12 pm Health poster Session

Central Neuropeptide S Decreases Feed Intake, Locomotor Activity,             Observations in the field of Physical Therapy
and Plasma Corticosterone While Altering Activation of Hypotha-               By: Lana N. Hall
lamic Nuclei in Chicks                                                        Abstract: My shadowing experience was set up to give me the oppor-
By: David Godlove                                                             tunity to acquire experience in physical therapy through observation. I
Abstract: Exps. determined effects of neuropeptide S (NPS) on chicks          shadowed professionals in a hospital and an outpatient clinic. Each day I
(Ch). Exp. 1: Ch received 0, 1.35, 0.63, or 0.31 microg NPS. Ch               spent shadowing, I kept a journal of daily observations. I also completed
responded with a linear reduction in feed intake (p < .05). Exp. 2: Ch        writing assignments pertaining to physical therapy. Regularly I met with
received 0 or 0.63 microg NPS. Ch had fewer exploratory pecks, fewer          my supervisor to give progress reports. Because of this experience I am
feeding pecks, fewer jumps, traveled less distance, and spent more time       now certain this is the career I wish to pursue. I have gained insight into
sleeping (p<.05). Exp. 3: Blood samples were collected from Ch in Exp.        the many aspects of physical therapy while observing procedures and
1. Treated Ch exhibited a trend toward decreased plasma corticosterone        techniques. This knowledge will benet me greatly in the furtherance of
concentrations. Exp. 4: Ch received 0 or 0.625 µg NPS. Ch showed              my education in this eld.
increased PVN activation (p<.05). Results demonstrate that NPS is a           Tuesday, 6:20 pm in Biology Symposium
hypothalamically mediated anorexigenic signal which reduces locomo-
tion and stress in Ch.                                                        Factors Influencing the Invasion of Rosa multiflora into Natural
Tuesday, 4:10 pm in Biology Symposium                                         Areas of the Selu Conservancy, Southwestern Virginia
                                                                              By: Breanna L. Hargbol
Stereotypes In Film: Past and Present                                         Abstract: Invasive species disrupt biotic and abiotic components of
By: Kara Gordon, Tiana Lovelace, Robert davis, Megan Croughwell               natural systems. To determine growing conditions when invasive plants
Abstract: Both in the past and present, screenwriters have created stereo-    became established at Selu Conservancy in southwestern VA, tree cores
typed characters to t all shapes and colors. Stereotypes are present just    were taken in fall 2006 and annual growth rings measured. Vegeta-
about everywhere. Commercials, Movies, and even children’s chartoons          tion, light availability, soil fertility and topography were measured and
portray stereotypes that are either simply not true, or are greatly over-     analyzed using NMS ordination to identify factors inuencing invasive
exagerated. The goal of this project is not only to point out some of these   plant growth. Ordination explained 72.7% of the data variation and dem-
stereotypes, but to explain and educate on how stereotyping affects our       onstrated that invasives such as Lonicera japonica and Rosa multiora
culture and reasons for their use in lm.                                     are favored by high light, soil moisture and fertility, and lower slope
Tuesday, 4:45 pm Honors English 203                                           positions. Intact forests canopies and poorer soils seem to deter these
                                                                              species.
The Effect of Oat Bran Fiber on Intestinal Function in Young,                 Tuesday, 5:20 pm in Biology Symposium
Healthy Adults
By: Kelly Greena, Katherine Peck, Megan Barley, Megan Watson,                 The Hookup Culture: Realities, Reasons, and Reputation
Naomi McKensie                                                                By: The Hookup Culture: Realities, Reasons, and Reputation
Abstract: Dietary bers have been shown to have a benecial effect on         Jessica Harner, Vesna Jones
gastrointestinal function. Oat bran improves gastrointestinal function by     Abstract: The study addresses a growing normative trend among college
increasing fecal bulk, producing softer feces, and increasing frequency       students: the hookup. In general, hookups are a way that college students
of bowel movements thereby reducing intestinal transit time. A potential      get their physical, emotional, and social needs met outside the param-
benet of diets high in dietary bers is lower rates of colon cancer. Does    eters of historically dened “romantic relationships”. Data were gathered
a moderate amount of oat bran show this benet? Twenty nine volun-            from 1,123 surveys and 40 in-depth interviews with undergraduates at
teers added oat bran to their regular diet for 28 days. They will complete    Radford University. We examine the multitude of reasons why students
a questionnaire describing their stool frequency and consistency using        engage in hookups and present data showing the similarities and differ-
the Bristol Stool Form Scale before and after the 28 days of oat bran and     ences between how women and men dene and interpret hookups and
differences will be determined.                                               the different strategies used by women and men to negotiate effects on
Wednesday, 2:00 - 3:00 pm Food and Nutrition Poster Session                   their reputations. Our research sheds light on a prevalent form of social
                                                                      35
interaction among young people that affects their self-concepts and            sampling that is used to not create biases or exclude others from taking
beliefs about sexual norms.                                                    the survey. I used a series of question about demographics of a person,
Wednesday, 1:30 pm Lounge C                                                    whether they are in a social organization, do they have any extracur-
                                                                               ricular activities, how many time do they attend social gatherings in a
Does Offering Art and Music to Low Income Students Increase                    week, and, when and with whom they are attending these functions. The
Academic Achievement?                                                          ndings are minimal. There were only a handful of people that were in
By: Shalisa Harrison                                                           Greek organizations but all the people who answered my survey said
Abstract: Over the years, research has offered inconsistent results on         there is a conict between school work and social gatherings.
whether elementary students in low income schools who participate in           Monday, 3:00 pm Lounge C
art and music instruction benet academically. Using the Early Child-
hood Longitudinal Study from the U.S. Department of Education this             Factors Affecting the Use of College Mental Health Services
study investigated the impact of art and music instruction on reading and      By: David Hope
math achievement among low income students. Results indicated that             Abstract: The purpose of this study is to investigate how stigmas against
students score signicantly higher on math and reading when they are           mental health services affect college students’ willingness to obtain
exposed to music and art instruction at least four times a week. Implica-      needed services. I propose that the more stigma that students’ perceive
tions for these results will be discussed.                                     on campus, the less likely they will be to seek services when needed.
Tuesday, 10 am Lounge A                                                        Students’ perceptions were measured using Web Surveyor distributed
                                                                               by email to Sociology and Anthropology classes. Data was collected at
Power, Political Participation, and Efficacy                                    a small, rural, southern university. 151 students responded to the survey.
By: Sarah Hauslohner                                                           The ndings showed that students perceive a stigma against people with
Abstract: Are students who experience feelings of power more likely            mental health issues and many would choose not to use the university’s
to participate in the political process? Do they have strong feelings of       counseling services.
efcacy? Are students who experience powerlessness less likely to par-         Monday, 4:00 pm Lounge B
ticipate in the political process? Do they have weak feelings of efcacy?
The following study examines feelings of power and its relationship            College Students with Disabilities: A Study of Graduation Rates at
to voting behavior among college students. To examine this relation-           Virginia Tech
ship, I will analyze the results of a survey that was distributed through      By: Christy Horn
Websurveyor to a purposive sample of 148 Radford University students.          Abstract: There is scarce and conicting research regarding the success
Preliminary ndings suggest a positive correlation between feelings of         of students with disabilities in post secondary education. This study
power and voting behavior. Sixty-four percent of those surveyed feel           seeks to gain a better understanding of the graduation rates of students
their actions produce their desired results, indicating an orientation to-     registered with the university Services for Students with Disabilities
wards feelings of power. Sixty one percent of those surveyed responded         ofce at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University. In a study of
that they vote in local elections, demonstrating strong political participa-   184 students with disabilities who enrolled in the summer/fall of 2002,
tion. Further analysis is needed to understand the origins of these feel-      it was found that students with disabilities are achieving graduation at
ings of power and the effect they have on other political behaviors.           slightly lower rates, with higher rates of leaving the university before
Monday, 10:30 am Lounge B                                                      graduation, than the university average. These ndings do indicate a
                                                                               signicantly higher college graduation rate than other reported studies.
Extraction of Trimyristin from Nutmeg                                          Tuesday, 2-4 pm Social Sciences Poster Session II
By: Hannah Helms
Abstract: An experiment was designed to extract trimyristin, a fat,            Sleep and The College Student
from powdered nutmeg to be used as an Organic Chemistry lab. In the            By: Jeffrey Horne
original experiment, ligroine (petroleum ether) was used to extract the        Abstract: The transition from high school to college presents many
trimyristin from the nutmeg powder. The purpose of this experiment was         students with a challenging opportunity for self-discipline. Where
to nd a greener solvent than the original; in addition, the solvent was       previously they may have been guided by parental restrictions on social
changed in order to see which solvent would give the greatest yield of         activity and had rules regarding time to be spent on academics, the social
product. The solvents used were hexane and ethyl acetate. It was found         landscape of college eliminates those parameters with myriad alterna-
that hexane was the solvent that would yield the highest amount of             tives. The anomie resulting from a loss of principles to guide behavior
trimyristin. From the crystallized trimyristin, a soap solution was made       in the switch from high school to college can alter many habits for stu-
and tested.                                                                    dents; perhaps the most disruptive and damaging of which is undoubt-
Wednesday, 3:30 - 4:30 pm Chemistry Poster Session                             edly a change is sleeping patterns. In an online survey, three hundred
                                                                               and ninety-four students at Radford University responded to questions
Diversity’s Role in College Student Development                                regarding what changes they may have experienced in the move from
By: Elizabeth Henderson                                                        high school to college and to discover if this impacted their sleeping
Abstract: This presentation uses student development theories to provide       habits and ultimately their academic success. Initial ndings seem to
a framework for understanding the critical role diversity has on college       indicate a change in social patterns concurrent with loss of sleep quality
campuses, while current literature provides empirical evidence to sup-         and a slight drop in cumulative GPA.
port that understanding. The second portion of the presentation explores       Wednesday, 4:30 pm Lounge B
the practical implications this has for student affairs professionals.
Tuesday, 11 am Lounge C                                                        Title 1 Programming: A Comparison of the In-class and Pull-out
                                                                               Methods and Their Effects on Reading Achievement
Academic and Social Management                                                 By: Tia Humphreys
By: Daniel Hernandez                                                           Abstract: Since its inception in 1965, Title 1 programs have provided
Abstract: The hypothesis I am working with is do social organizations          funding for high-poverty schools to give further assistance to low-
waste student’s time that can be spent on work due for their classes? To       achieving children. Using data from the Early Childhood Longitudinal
test my hypothesis, I used the method of distributing an online survey to      Study (ECLS), this study compared the reading achievement of rst
different classes at Radford University. The sample is a non-probability       grade students in public schools who were receiving Title 1 services

                                                                       36
either in a pull-out or in-class setting or a combination of the two. The      Abstract: Research has shown a small benet of oat bran consumption in
researcher predicted that those receiving a combination of in-class and        blood pressure readings in healthy subjects when oat bran was delivered
pull-out services would have higher reading achievement compared to            in the form of a mufn or oatmeal. Our study examined the effects of a
students receiving either service independently. Implications and limitia-     larger amount of raw oat bran ber on blood pressure in young, healthy
tions of ndings will be discussed.                                            college students. 29 students were given 2 tablespoons of oat bran each
Wednesday, 2 pm in Lounge A                                                    day for 28 days. Blood pressure was measured before the diet interven-
                                                                               tion and at the conclusion. Care was taken with subject preparation and
Bacterial Community Profiles from an Arsenic Mine                               blood pressure technique to obtain the most accurate measurement pos-
By: Shanley Ignacio, Katelyn Christopher, Heather Charron, Stuart              sible. At this time the nal data is not available since the study is still in
Coeld                                                                         progress.
Abstract: Bacterial communities in the environment are very complex,           Wednesday, 2:00 - 3:00 pm Food and Nutrition Poster Session
and not well-understood. We isolate bacterial DNA from soil samples
from an old arsenic mine in Floyd Co. We then use PCR and gradient gel         Spanking Pre-operational Children
electrophoresis to create ngerprints (proles) of the bacterial commu-        By: George Johnson
nities. In these gels, different banding patterns correspond to different      Abstract: In recent years there have been a rash of school/mall rampages,
bacterial communities, and this gives us a way to track changes in the         gang violence, and senselessly staged ghts on the internet. How did
communities over time. Our most recent work is to isolate individual           our teenagers become so horrendous? In the 1960s and 70s, parents
members of the community and sequence their DNA. From this we can              were making a strong move away form corporal punishment (spanking)
identify new members of these communities that have the potential to           as the primary method of disciplining their children. The paradigm of
bioremediate areas that have been contaminated by heavy metals.                Dr. Benjamin Spock was the most popular parenting style in America.
Tuesday, 4 -8 pm in Biology Symposium                                          Ultimately, social observers would notion that the “Baby Boomers” gave
                                                                               birth to a spoiled, over-indulged generation of children that had a sense
Alcohol Consumption and behaviors among Radford University                     of entitlement, and were materialistic. Thusly, parents returned to corpo-
Students                                                                       ral punishment, as the primary method of discipline.
By: Christinia Irving                                                          Monday, 12:30 - 2:30pm Scoial Sciences Poster Session I
Abstract: The purpose of this study was to look at the similarities and
differences of alcohol consumption and related behaviors of both female        Tomato Juice Rainbow
and male freshmen and sophomores. We gave anonymous surveys to sec-            By: Richard Johnson
tions of Health 200, and students who wanted to participate in the survey      Abstract: The purpose of doing this experiment for Organic Chemistry
turned it in. Data was scanned and then entered into SPSS. The results of      301 was to improve on an already published procedure by expanding the
this study are pending and will be presented during the Forum.                 procedure out to include different variables in order to provide a basis
Monday, 11 am Louonge B                                                        of comparison. This reaction is the bromination of the double bonds of
                                                                               the lycopene found in tomatoes. Using a solution of bromine water I was
Is The Glass Slipper Always a Perfect Fit? A Comparison of Three               able to create a change in color in three different kinds of tomatoes, red,
Methods for Calculating Stature from Shoe Size                                 yellow, and green. Additionally, tomato juice was used. The resulting
By: Patricia Jacobs                                                            effect caused a spectrum of color which varied depending on the kind of
Abstract: While DNA is often found at crime scenes, processing time            tomato products tested and the amount of bromine water added.
may be lengthy, and it may tell police little about a suspect’s appearance     Wednesday, 3:30 - 4:30 pm Chemistry Poster Session
other than sex. Law enforcement must look at other evidence in order
to develop a descriptive prole of a suspect, including height. Three          Tattoos and Stigmas
techniques are currently used for determining stature from footprints—         By: Vesna Jones
standard percentage ratio for adults, percentage ratios by gender, and         Abstract: How much do stigmas affect our judgments? I hypothesize
regression formulas for males and females. This project will evaluate          that when looking at a common social marker, the tattoo, there appears
and compare the accuracy of each method by measuring the maximum               to be a direct connection between stigmas and tattoos. The more stigmas
length of traced shoeprints, then using that data as the basis for calculat-   associated with a tattoo, the less likely a person will get a tattoo. Stigma
ing stature in adults.                                                         affects whether or not we ourselves will ever get a tattoo. I analyzed the
Tuesday, 12:30 pm Forensic Anthropology symposium                              data of the opinions of college students at Radford University through
                                                                               over 100 purposive sampling surveys. Preliminary ndings suggest sup-
Women’s Hospitals: Perception of Hominess                                      port for the hypothesis. Most surveyed felt that tattoos created a stigma
By: Ashley James, V. Claire Kennedy                                            associated with the person and that they did not want that stigma and did
Abstract: Over the past decade there has been an increase in the number        not want a tattoo. Respondents that already had a tattoo report that did
of women’s hospitals and based on previous research ndings, women             not feel they deserved an attached stigma to themselves. Future research
prefer more home-like environments in a hospital setting. Therefore, we        is needed to fully understand the popularity of tattoos and the continued
conducted a study on women’s perceptions of hominess in a healthcare           stigma associated with tattoos.
environment.                                                                   Tuesday, 10 am Lounge C
    For this study, a purposive sampling technique was used as 13
women, ages 18-55, were surveyed to compare their (a) denitions and           QuickBoard: Minimizing Airplane Turn Around Time
perceptions of hominess (b) evaluation of overnight stays in hospital          By: Kevin Jones, James Inman, Kevin Thompson
rooms and, (c) importance towards family visitation.                           Abstract: Airplane boarding and deboarding time is currently the limiting
    Overall ndings show that having warm colors, pictures on walls,           factor for airplane turn around. For an airline, time is money and it is
cozy beds, large windows with views of nature, and an area for family          desired to minimize these processes. A mathematical model has been
visitation all contribute to creating a home-like environment.                 developed to simulate three boarding procedures. A computer simula-
Monday, 12:30 - 2:30pm Scoial Sciences Poster Session I                        tion combines airplane models, passengers, and the three boarding
                                                                               procedures. These boarding procedures are back to front in groups of six
The Effect of Oat Bran Fiber on Blood Pressure in Young, Healthy               rows, window seat to aisle, and random boarding. The data produced by
College Students                                                               these simulations is then analyzed using ANOVA to test forsignicant
By: Aurielle James, Jennifer Anaya, Kristina Brown, Isi Amenkhienan            differences in mean boarding times. It was found that ran
                                                                        37
dom boarding is statistically faster that the other boarding procedures.     Abstract: I propose that stress causes a feeling of stigmatization within
This work was conducted as part of the Consortium for Mathematics            whatever setting the student is feeling stress.I analyze the reporting of
and Its Applications (COMAP) Mathematical Contest in Modeling.               stress and the setting that the sample of the number of respondents are
Wednesday, 4 pm Lounge B                                                     in based on an email survey sent out in March 2007. Students in higher
                                                                             grade levels that are juniors and seniors feel stress when it comes to
Creating Awareness about the Effects of Smoking During Pregnancy             the situation of nding a job when being done with college.Younger
By: Erin Kann                                                                students in grade levels of freshman and sophomore feel stress and
Abstract: I contacted Boo Pack at the Blue Ridge Perinatal clinic. They      stigmatization when it comes to making friends and nding a group of
are trying to decrease the incidence of smoking in Pulaski,VA. I did         people to associate with.The results conrm that when students have a
some research on the effects of smoking in pregnancy and helped them         feeling of stress it is in fact causing them to feel stigmatized in the situa-
do a project for smoking cessation at Pulaski Community Hospital. I          tion that is causing them stress.
put together about 200 packets for mothers to receive upon discharge         Tuesday, 3 pm Lounge C
after they deliver their baby. They contained a onsie for the new baby
and some information about second hand smoke and smoking dur-                Making Present Satisfaction: Dramaturgy for Shakespeare’s The
ing future pregnancies. I did an inservice with the nurses at PCH and        Comedy of Errors
told them that we were trying a new way to decrease the incidence of         By: Rachel Kohler
mothers who are smoking in pregnancy. I instructed them to hand out a        Abstract: This presentation details the process of dramaturgical research
package and for the new moms to ll out a response sheet whether they        for William Shakespeare’s ‘The Comedy of Errors,’ outlining the steps
are still smoking or will continue to smoke since they have received         from preliminary research to the nished production, with an emphasis
the information about the devestating effects. We might not be able to       on linguistic research and educational outreach. This project was under-
receive feedback before the undergraduate forum, but hopefully a new         taken as an Honors Academy Capstone, synthesizing academic research
student in the fall will see whether this project has helped.                with theatrical performance.
Wednesday, 11-12 pm Health poster Session                                    Wednesday, 2:30 pm Lounge C

Sex & Alcohol Descrpitvie Results                                            Media and You
By: Kelly Kavanaugh, Siemon Shishkov                                         By: Angela Mack
Abstract: The results yielded by the Health Risk Behavior study were         Abstract: The purpose of this study is to investigate if there are any cor-
broken down to describe both alcohol consumption and condom use              relations between the amount of television a Radford University student
amongst Radford University students. To collect data, surveys were           watches and their self-esteem. Using the relative deprivation theory we
handed out to several Health 200 sections and later returned by those        hypothesize that an individual will compare their body image to what
who were willing to participate. The surveys were completely anony-          they see on television, if their actual body image does not meet that of
mous, so no information could be traced back to any student. The gath-       which they see on television then will feel discontent and have a lower
ered data were scanned and imported into the database program SPSS.          self-esteem. Utilizing Web Surveyor, I will collect a sample of 100 Rad-
The results of the study will be presented.                                  ford University Students. The survey consists of 37 questions measuring
Wednesday, 11-12 pm Health poster Session                                    the relationship between amount and type of television watching and
                                                                             students self-esteem. Data analysis using SPSS will include frequencies,
Analysis of Gene flow in Plethodon cinereus populations using ISSR            correlations, and regression
primers                                                                      Wednesday, 7 pm Lounge C
By: Emily Kerr and Robert Sheehy
Abstract: The red-backed salamander (Plethodon cinereus) is common           Different Music Styles and Their Effect on Aggression Levels
in Appalachian Mountains. The salamanders may be distributed in one          By: Karla Matheny, Kelly Skluzak, Derek Hommema
population or many sub-populations. Primers which amplify Inter-             Abstract: The present study investigates the relationship between music
spersed Simple Sequence Repeats may reveal differences in sub-popula-        and aggression. Participants were placed in one of three conditions: 1)
tions and therefore aid in determining how much gene ow is occurring.       aggressive music, 2) non-aggressive music, 3) no music (control condi-
Examination of fragment length variation enables identication within        tion). All participants completed an aggression questionnaire. Next the
and among populations. This variation will aid in the identication          participants completed ller tasks while either listening to one of the two
of phylogeographic boundaries and limitations to gene ow among              different types of music or no music at all (control group). Finally par-
Plethodon populations. Findings within this taxon and may be extended        ticipants were asked to perform a grip strength test and to complete the
to other, environmentally more sensitive, Plethodon taxa.                    average person aggression questionnaire. It is expected that participants
Tuesday, 4 pm in Biology Symposium                                           in the aggressive music condition will have higher grip strength results
                                                                             and will rate the average person more aggressively.
Perceived Intelligence as Related to Attractiveness                          Tuesday, 2-4 pm Social Sciences Poster Session II
By: Patsy Kerstetter, Staci Woodyyard, Jessica Vance
Abstract: The present study investigates the relationship between two        The removal of zinc from wetlands through phytoremediation with
levels of attractiveness and writing skill. The dependent variable,          Lemma
perceived intelligence, is assessed using a multi-item critique including    By: Ebony Matthews
quality, clarity, and meaningfulness of an essay. It was hypothesized that   Abstract: Zinc is a component of urban water runoff which can be fun-
those rated high in attractiveness would be perceived as having better       neled into articial wetlands for purication. The bioremediation proper-
writing skill. This study investigates whether this effect can be coun-      ties of Duckweed; a common aquatic plant, was studied in a simulated
tered by the participants need for the core motive of accuracy. Accuracy     wetland environment. The simulated environment was spiked with zinc
motive was produced by telling half the participants that teachers have      chloride, the most common salt of zinc found in nature. The adsorp-
previously graded these essays, and that most students’ evaluations came     tion of zinc by Duckweed was measured by microwave digestion of the
close to the grades of the teachers.                                         dry plant material, and detection by Flame Atomic Adsorption. We will
Tuesday, 2-4 pm Social Sciences Poster Session II                            discuss the results and the capabilities of Duckweed as a remediation
                                                                             mechanism for zinc.
Stress and Stigmatization                                                    Tuesday, 12 pm Chemistry Symposium
By: Eric Kirste
                                                                      38
Literacy Skills: The Association Between Children’s Access to Books         to create a temporal diagram based on wetland use by the species. The
and Being Read to at Home                                                   variables recorded per day were the temperature of each period of day,
By: Heather McGinn                                                          the wind speed (km/s), the water depth, percent water coverage, percent
Abstract: Studies have proven that children who are read to at home         grass coverage, and percent algae coverage for each site.
have better developed literacy skills than children who are not read to     Tuesday, 4 -8 pm in Biology Symposium
at home. This study investigated the association between children who
are read to at home or have access to children’s books at home and their    The Effect of emphasis on increasing standardized test scores on
literacy development in their kindergarten year. Results indicated that     teacher job satisfaction
children who are read to at home and have access to books perform           By: Beth Michel
higher on the teacher reported literacy skills scale in the fall of their   Abstract: This study investigated how emphasis on improving standard-
kindergarten year. Implications for future research and primary preven-     ized test scores effected teachers’ job satisfaction. Participants consisted
tion programs are outlined.                                                 of 863 teachers from the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study who self
Monday, 10:30 am Lounge A                                                   rated their job satisfaction in schools which were rated as having either a
                                                                            minor, moderate, or major emphasis on raising standardized test scores.
The Distribution of Invasive Plants Relative to Site Characteristics        Job satisfaction was measured in three domains: enjoyment, feelings
in Southwestern Virginia.                                                   of making a difference in student’s lives, and likelihood of choosing a
By: Erica M. McIntyre, Laura J. Clement, and Christine J. Small             teaching career again. Results did not show signicant impact of stan-
Abstract: Invasive species have been introduced into ecosystems in          dardized test score emphasis on teacher job satisfaction.
which they did not evolve, disrupting local ora and diversity. We          Monday, 11:30 in Lounge A
studied invasive plants relative to land use and site conditions at Selu
Conservancy in southwestern Virginia. In 22 - 10 x 10 m plots, vegeta-      The Music of Appalachia
tion, soil, and topographic variables were sampled. The most abundant       By: Matthew Miller, Krisa Hanks, James Gearhart
invasives were Rosa multiora (64% of samples), Lonicera japonica           Abstract: This presentation is an examination of the Friday Night
(54%), and Celastrus orbiculatus (18%). Increasing tree density, light,     Jamboree located in Floyd County, VA. Our group will be document-
and mesic slope positions, and decreasing litter depth supported greater    ing the event through the following processes: 1. Videotape interviews
abundance of R. multiora (r2 = 0.592; p < 0.001). These results high-      with both participating and non-participating Floyd County citizens. 2.
light conditions that encourage invasives, thus aiding in their control.    Observations of the event (specically in the catagories of dance, music,
Tuesday, 4:20 pm in Biology Symposium                                       and song). 3. Social Interaction and participation in the Jamboree. 4.
                                                                            An overall analysis of our experience. Through this examination we
The Dance Department Costume Room: An Extensive Project of                  will research the history of the Jamboree and how its traditions have
Refurbishing, Remodeling, and Organizing.                                   signicantly impacted the Floyd County community. This project will
By: Heather Meeboer                                                         incorporate powerpoint, videography, and spoken rst-hand experiences.
Abstract:The name “Costume Room” was a misnomer since it had                Tuesday, 4:45 pm Honors English 203
become a storage closet for anything and everything the Dance Depart-
ment accumulated. Costumes crammed into cardboard boxes were                An Examination of the Factors that Influence the Legality and
stored alongside a myriad of other objects in no particular order. It was   Prevalence of Capital Punish
difcult to nd anything and no one had a sure idea of what all was         By: Katherine Miller, Joseph Yost
actually there. A clean and well-organized costume room would aid the       Abstract: This research explores the factors that inuence the legality
Department in nding specic costumes, produce a better method for          and prevalence of state sanctioned capital punishment. A series of regres-
storing the costumes, and also provide an appropriate work space for        sion models will be utilized to determine which of the following vari-
creating new costumes. I rst purged the room of anything other than        ables are signicant in determining the legality of capital punishment:
costumes and things directly related and then took stock of everything      political culture, political afliation, religious afliation, poverty level,
left. I researched proper storage for costumes and visited the Theater      race, educational level, and state urban density. A path analysis will then
Department’s costume room for ideas. I determined that more and better      be incorporated to determine which variables signicantly predict the
storage containers were needed and that a better means of organizing        prevalence of capital punishment within states. Policy implications will
was imperative. Costumes were folded into clear plastic containers with     be discussed.
pictures on the outside showing what they contained. Those containers       Wednesday, 5 pm Lounge B
were neatly stacked into large cabinets with similar types of costumes
housed together. Other costumes were hung on hangers in wardrobes.          The anorexigenic effects of xenin are mediated directly via the ven-
The cabinets and wardrobes were arranged against the walls of the           tromedial hypothalamus in chicks
room for efcient use of space and shelving was added to bare walls to      By: Justin M. Milligan
provide additional storage. Two tables were put in the center of the room   Abstract: In a previous experiment we demonstrated that xenin, a 25
to provide a suitable work area. The costumes in the Costume Room           residue neuropeptide, caused anorexigenic effects in 4-day post hatch
are now properly stored in a well-organized manner that facilitates in      chicks and caused an increase of neuronal activation in the ventromedial
nding them and also provides space for the creation of and storage for     hypothalamus (VMH), the classical satiety center. Thus, we designed the
additional costumes.                                                        present experiment to determine if xenin injected directly on the VMH
Wednesday, 5 pm Lounge C                                                    via stereotaxically placed guide cannulas causes neuronal activation.
                                                                            Tuesday, 5:40 pm in Biology Symposium
Natural History Study of Dragonfly and Damselfly Species Found in
the Radford University Storm Water Wetland                                  GridFTP: File Transfer Protocol in Grid Computing Networks
By: Michaela P Meissner                                                     By:L. Caitlin Minteer
Abstract: The Radford University has recently constructed a wetland         Abstract: Grid computing is the rising networking infrastructure that
structure designed to catch water run-off from two surrounding park-        is designed to offer access to computational data and human resources
ing lots. The wetland is home to various Odonata species and yet this       spread over wide area environments.The Globus Toolkit is a technology
remains unexamined. The purpose of this study was to: 1) to analyze the     for the grid which is an open source toolkit for building computing grids
effects environmental variables on species richness and abundance; 2)       developed by the Globus Alliance. There are two types of Data Move
to analyze the effects of those on individual species abundance; and 3)
                                                                     39
ment within the Globus Toolkit: GridFTP and RFT (Reliable File Trans-         chicks. These results may be used to better understand human neurologi-
fer.) The presentation will focus on GridFTP, File Transfer Protocol in-      cal appetite regulation.
Grid Computing Networks, which is a high-performance, secure, reliable        Monday, 6:55 pm Faculty/ Student Collabortive Grant
data transfer protocol optimized for high-bandwidth wide-area networks.
The GridFTP server and client tools and libraries make up a product           Neuropeptide FF decreases feed intake through hypothalamic inter-
suite intended to transfer large amounts of data faster and more reliably     actions via opioid receptors while decreasing intestinal transit time
than File Transfer Protocol (FTP) alone. The presentation will describe       and affects other behaviors in chicks.
in more detail what GridFTP is and how it relates to the Globus Toolkit,      By: Wint Nandar
and the similarities between GridFTP and FTP. There are numerous              Abstract: We conducted a study to determine the biological effects of
advantages of GridFTP, such as Security, the use of Parallel Streams,         central Neuropeptide FF (NPFF) on avian physiological processes re-
the use of Striping, Partial File Transfer, Reliable and Restartable data     lated to appetite. Chicks responded to central NPFF injection with linear
transfer, Data Extensibility, and Protocol Extensibility. All of these will   decreased in feed but not water intake. When NPFF was centrally coin-
be discussed in further detail in the presentation. Also discussed will be    jected with naloxone, an opioid receptor antagonist, the NPFF-induced
a few of the disadvantages and known problems with GridFTP. There             anorexigenic effect was attenuated. Central NPFF caused activation of
are several memory leaks, unclear error responses and bugs that have          the paraventricular nucleus (PVN), ventromedial hypothalamus (VMH)
caused many issues in the use of GridFTP. Finally, the presentation will      but not the lateral hypothalamus (LH) as detected by c-Fos expression.
cover general use information such as how to install, congure, and use       Cental NPFF also increased gastrointestinal transit time. Finally, we
GridFTP from an administrator and a user standpoint.                          demonstrated that central NPFF decreased anxiety-related behaviors.
Tuesday, 4:50 pm Information Technology Symposium                             Tuesday, 4:40 pm in Biology Symposium

Amorphous Slicer for an Ada Subset                                            Central amylin decreases feed intake through brainstem and hypo-
By: Brandon Moye                                                              thalamic interactions in chicks
Abstract: Amorphous slicing is an extension of static slicing, a program      By: Wint Nandar
analysis technique developed by Mark Weiser in 1979. Static slicing           Abstract: Amylin, a 37-amino acid peptide, is found in gastrointestinal
produces a simplied version of a program that is formed by deleting          mucosa, and the central nervous system. We recently demonstrated that
program components that do not affect a specied computation of inter-        central amylin dose-dependently decreased feed intake in chicks. To
est. The computed slice is typically a subset of the original statements      determine if the hypothalamus and the brainstem were involved in this
in the program. Static slicing is used in many application areas ranging      effect, chicks were centrally injected with amylin, and c-Fos immunore-
from program debugging to cohesion measurement. Amorphous slicing             activity was quantied in the ventromedial hypothalamus (VMH), lateral
begins with Weiser’s static slicing rules for statement deletion and adds     hypothalamus (LH), area postrema (AP) and nucleus of solitary tract
rules, such as rules for combining statements and loop unrolling, to fur-     (NTS). Central amylin decreased LH activity, did not affect the VMH
ther simplify the returned slice. By incorporating these extra rules,         and caused increased activity in the AT and NTS. Apparently amylin
amorphous slicing allows for the creation of considerably smaller slices      activates the AP, which activates the NTS leading to deactivation of the
while still maintaining the static slice’s semantic properties. Currently,    LH.
the majority of work with amorphous splicing revolves around the C            Tuesday, 4:50 pm in Biology Symposium
programming language. Differences between the C and Ada program-
ming languages should allow for a tailored set of amorphous slicing           Central alpha-MSH more potently suppresses feed intake in low
rules. Goals of the project include identifying amorphous slicing rules       body weight select rather than high body weight select lines of chick-
for Ada and implementing these rules using Ada Semantic Interface             ens
Specication (ASIS) queries. This presentation will cover Weiser’s            By: Wint Nandar, Paul Siegel
static slicer, amorphous slicing, and nally the design of an amorphous       Abstract: Alpha-melanocyte stimulation hormone (a-MSH), a 13 amino
slicer for a subset of Ada.                                                   acid peptide, causes anorexigenic effect in mammals and chicks. In this
Tuesday, 4:10 pm Information Technology Symposium                             exp., we determined the effect of central a-MSH on feed intake in lines
                                                                              of chickens selected for high (obese containing, O) or low (anorexia
Memories of Migration Into and Out of Floyd County                            containing, A) body weight. Chicks from both lines were centrally in-
By: Kathy Murphy, Jessica Baciu, Brittony Fitgerald, Morgan Hawkins,          jected with a-MSH. Central a-MSH linearly decreased feed but not water
Patricia Jacobs                                                               intake in both lines. However, the magnitude of suppressive was higher
Abstract: ANTH 493: Practicum in Anthropology. Floyd Co. residents            in A than O chickens. Thus, differences in the melancortin system be-
who recollected the stories of family members and friends who migrated        tween A and O may be partly responsible for the different body weight.
out of Floyd Co. during the rst two-thirds of the Twentieth Century, as      Tuesday, 4 -8 pm in Biology Symposium
well as newcomers from recent times, were interviewed using ethno-
graphic research methods. The results of the analysis of the interview        Neuropeptide Y differentially effects behavior between high body
transcriptions will be reported.                                              weight select and low body weight select lines of chickens
Monday, 1 pm in Lounge C                                                      By: Wint Nandar, Paul Siegel
                                                                              Abstract: Recently we demonstrated that neuropeptide Y (NPY) increas-
Teaching through Research: An Alternative Vertebrate Model to                 es feed intake in lines of chickens selected for high (HWS) but not low
Study Appetite Regulation                                                     (LWS) body weight. To gain more insight, we centrally injected either
By: Wint Nandar, C.N. Bowden, David Godlove and Dr. Mark Cline                0 or 9.0 !g of NPY in both lines. Chicks from the HWS line responded
Abtract:We conducted studies to determine the biological effects of           with decreased standing and preening, but had increased sitting, pecking
central neuropeptide FF (NPFF), neuropeptide S (NPS) & oxyntomodu-            and locomotion. The LWS line also responded with decreased standing
lin (OXM) on avian physiological processes related to appetite. Four day      and increased sitting, but spent more time sleeping and had increased
post hatch Cobb-500 chicks responded to central NPFF, NPS and OXM             pecking that only lasted 5 minutes post injection. These differential
with linear decreases in feed intake. We also determined the effects of       behavioral effects after central NPY may be associated with altered feed
NPFF, NPS & OXM on neuronal activation in various hypothalamic                intake and different body weight between the lines.
nuclei in order to better understand the anorexigenic mechanisms of           Tuesday, 4 -8 pm in Biology Symposium
action. Behaviors after central NPFF and NPS were also quantied. We
conclude that NPFF, NPS & OXM modulate the perception of satiety in
                                                                      40
When the Glass is Half-Full: Optimism and Relationship Commit-                   up a quarter of the U.S. population in the next 40 years. In the past, the
ment Among Undergraduates                                                        U.S. Hispanic market has been undeveloped, but American businesses
By: Trisha Nash and Marissa Montouri and Dr. Sarah Hastings                      are increasingly aware that this market can no longer be overlooked. The
Abstract:This study examined the relationship between optimism                   U.S. Hispanic population is very diverse and it is extremely important
as reected in attributional style and romantic commitment. Com-                 for American businesses to understand these differences. Some distinct
mitment consists of personal dedication (the desire to preserve the              differences include nationality, generation and social class. Each segment
                                                                                 presents different challenges that must be deciphered in order for
relationship for its benets), constraints (pressure to maintain the
                                                                                 American businesses to successfully target this market.
relationship to avoid the costs of dissolving it), and condence                 Monday, 12:30 - 2:30pm Scoial Sciences Poster Session I
(expectations about the relationship’s endurance). Partnered
subjects were more optimistic than unpartnered ones. Regression                  Gender Differences in Role Model Influence
analyses found a positive association between optimism and con-                  By: Patricia Parsley
dence and between optimism and dedication. Further research                     Abstract: Forty-three male and 103 female Radford University students
with a more reliable measure of constraints may better explain                   completed the Role Model Social Inuences Survey. Through a series of
optimism’s role in romantic commitment.                                          chi-square analyses, the researchers examined gender differences in the
Monday, 6:55 pm Faculty/ Student Collabortive Grant                              types of role models reported, as well as the role model functions. Sig-
                                                                                 nicant results indicated that males and females reported having different
Efficacy of an Equine Assisted Psychotherapy Anger Management                     types of role models in the academic domains of law and business, ?2
Group for Adolescents                                                            (25, N=146)=55.122, p>.05, in the physical sciences, math, and engineer-
By: Stephanie Nelson, Shelby Ryan                                                ing, ?2 (14, N=146)=32.360, p>.05, and in the elds of arts, literature,
Abstract: The purpose of this study was to determine the effectiveness           and humanities, ?2 (14, N=146)=32.543, p>.05. However, there was no
of equine assisted psychotherapy (EAP) in reducing inappropriate angry           signicant difference between the types of functions that role models
outbursts, impulsive behavior, and poor decision making. Participants            served for male and female students.
were 3 female adolescents who have a history of anger control problems           Monday, 12:30 - 2:30pm Scoial Sciences Poster Session I
and reside together in a residential group home. Participants attended 6
EAP group sessions, co-facilitated by an LCSW and an Equine Special-             Role Model Influence Themes
ist. Participants and residential staff completed the Adolescent Anger-          By: Patricia Parsley and Whitney Gaber
Management Rating Scale pre and post intervention. Results indicated             Abstract: Forty-three male and 103 female Radford University students
                                                                                 completed a questionnaire examining role model inuence. Participants
improvements in the adolescents’ ability to control anger. Future research       were asked if they had role models in the following academic domains:
should focus on larger studies that may further support these ndings.           law, business, physical sciences, arts, humanities, and social sciences.
Wednesday, 10:30 am in Lounge A                                                  Quantitative data reports that 37% of students’ role models provide them
                                                                                 with encouragement, support, and condence. This was a recurrent
Code: Nova -- A brief view of game development                                   theme through the data. In addition, 17.1% of students learn through
By: Miguel Nunez                                                                 observing or modeling their role models’ work and success.
Abstract: In game development, several aspects of software produc-               Monday, 12:30 - 2:30pm Scoial Sciences Poster Session I
tion are essential. Throughout this presentation, we will discuss these
elements, and how they were utilized to produce Code: Nova, a game               Cognitive Behavioral Therapy
developed for the ACM Local Game Programming Competition. Soft-                  By: Andrew Peddy
ware development, implementation, and testing are all essential phases           Abstract: I have performed research on Cognitive Behavioral Therapy
in game development. Code: Nova, a game produced within 4 weeks,                 this semester in a Directed Study with Dr. Jeff Chase. After multiple
demonstrates these various aspects.                                              readings I have created a slide show to summarize what I have learned
Tuesday, 3:50 pm Information Technology Symposium                                over the semester. The slideshow presents how Cognitive Behavioral
                                                                                 Therapy conceptualizes pathology, how it theorizes therapy, and also in-
Cup elongation and Pouring habits: Controlling amount poured by                  cludes techniques to use with Cognitive Behavior Therapy. The presenta-
altering a cup’s shape                                                           tion will be a brief introduction into Cognitive Behavioral Therapy.
By:Tabitha O’Bryan, Jacqueline Permito, Leah Speck, Juralee Smith,               Wednesday, 3:00pm Lounge C
Scott Koval
Abstract: This experiment attempts to replicate and expand upon the              RNA Isolation and Extraction in Diffenbachia seguine
work of Wansink and Van Ittersum by investigating how a container’s              By: Brian Prall, Brad Howard
elongation affects the amount of drink a participant pours. Seventy-ve          Abstract: This experiment was designed to isolate and extract RNA from
participants taking part in a taste test were given either a short or tall cup   crystal-containing biforine cells in Dieffenbachia seguine. Cells are
and asked to pour themselves a drink. Using Wansink and Van Ittersum’s           isolated by grinding leaf tissue and centrifuging through a density gradi-
results as a guide, three aspects were investigated: gender differences          ent. The biforine cells were concentrated in the pellet. Cells from roughly
in amount poured. The effect of container elongation on amount poured,           116 mature leaves were collected and stored at -81 degrees (Celsius). The
and container elongation and amount perceived poured. Although the               samples will be utilized through the Sigma plant RNA Extraction Kit.
study failed to produce statistically signicant results, some trends were       Previous results have demonstrated some success; however, no usable
observed that were consisted with Wansink and Van Ittersum’s experi-             sample has been obtained due to oxalic acid contamination. We hope to
ment. A larger sample size might have been enough to obtain statistical          run a usable sample on a formaldehyde gel. Characterization of RNA by
differences.                                                                     spectrophotometry and formaldehyde electrophoresis will be presented.
Monday, 12:30-2:30 pm Social Sciences Poster Session I                           Tuesday, 4 -8 pm in Biology Symposium

Understanding the Expanding U.S. Hispanic Market
By: Jennifer Orrock
Abstract: The U.S. Hispanic market is the fastest growing market in the
United States. Experts predict that the Hispanic population will make
                                                                         41
Central obestatin does not affect appetite in Carassius auratus               Does Being Read to at Home and Attending Preschool Improve
By: Brian Prall                                                               Reading Achievment?
Abstract: This experiment was designed to determine if obestatin, a           By: Bailey Rector
recently discovered neuropeptide, affects Carassius auratus feed intake.      Abstract: Many different factors contribute to children’s ability read.
Multiple concentrations of rattus and human obestatin were tested (0,         Using the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study from the U.S. Depart-
0.0125, .025, 0.05, 0.1, and 0.2 micog/g BW). Fish were weighed and           ment of Education, this study looked at the affects of attending preschool
were centrally injected with obestatin targeting the third ventricle. Fish    and being read to at home as factors affecting reading achievement. A
were returned to individual tanks and fed a predetermined quantity of         one-way ANCOVA was used to compare these groups of children while
oating sh food pellets. Overhead photographs were taken every 15            controlling for SES level. Results suggest that reading to children at
min for 120 min and the number of pellets quantied. Data were ana-           home has a signicant impact on reading achievement.
lyzed using ANOVA. We conclude that central obestatin does not affect         Wednesday, 2:30 pm Lounge A
appetite in goldsh.
Tuesday, 4 -8 pm in Biology Symposium                                         Studies of 5,10-Methenyltetrahydrofolate Synthetase (MTHFS)
                                                                              By: Paul Redmon and Dr. Timothy W. Johann
Transitional kindergarten programs versus retention: A comparison             Abstract: Studies of 5,10-Methenyltetrahydrofolate Synthetase
of long-term effects                                                          (MTHFS)
By: Erin Quigley                                                              MTHFS is an enzyme involved in folate metabolism. Its substrate is
Abstract: Research suggests that students in transitional kindergarten        important as a rescue agent for cancer patients treated with the toxic
programs may have better long-term academic and social-emotional              drug methotrexate. We wish to better understand what amino acids are
outcomes than students who are retained. Data from the Early Child-           important to this enzymes catalytic function. To accomplish this, we al-
hood Longitudinal Study (ECLS) were used to compare the academic              tered MTHFS by changing the amino acid lysine at position 3 to alanine.
and social-emotional functioning of fth grade students in transitional       Bacterial cells were transformed with a plasmid containing the mutant
kindergarten programs to that of fth grade students who were retained        MTHFS gene, replicated, translated to a high concentration, and then
in traditional kindergarten. Data analysis suggests that children in tran-    puried. The kinetics of the altered MTHFS was then compared to those
sitional kindergarten programs have better academic outcomes by fth          of the wild type. Differences between the two forms of MTHFS yield
grade than children retained in kindergarten. However, social-emotional       information about the role of the changed amino acid in the enzyme.
outcomes do not seem signicantly different among these two groups.           Monday, 6:55 pm Faculty/ Student Collabortive Grant
Implications and limitations of ndings will be discussed.
Tuesday, 10:30 Lounge A                                                       Synthetic Pathways for Cobalt Complexes Analyzed for Reactivity
                                                                              and Optical Purity
Nutrition and Performance in the Femal Collegiate Athlete                     By: Lauren Robinson and Rebecca Damron
By: Chris Proctor                                                             Abstract: Cobalt complexes are important for the role they play in the
Abstract: The objective of this project is to observe the eating habits of    biological regulation of folate, pernicious anemia, and the founding
Radford University’s eld hockey team in the off-season, and based on         of inorganic and bioinorganic chemistry. Here we will show synthetic
contemporary information and received data, to make generalized and           pathways for a series of cobalt complexes. A racemic mixture will be
individualized recommendations regarding diet and the athlete’s nutri-        resolved into its enantiomers and analyzed for optical purity. The rate of
tional needs. The subjects will submit height, weight, and a 5 day log of     racemization will also be discussed. Finally, cobalt complexes will be
all food and beverage intake. Using this data, including not only what        analyzed for their ligand exchange rates through spectrophotometry and
they eat, but when they eat it, I plan to pinpoint any nutritional decits,   nuclear magnetic resonance.
and through my recommendations, I hope to observe short and long term         Tuesday, 11:30 am Chemistry Symposium
advances in performance.
Wednesday, 4 pm Lounge C                                                      Center-based vs. Home-based childcare: Which generates the great-
                                                                              est language development?
Predicting Students Academic Success Using Podcasts                           By: Angela Rose
By: Kara Ramer                                                                Abstract: More than half of all U. S. infants and toddlers spend at least
Abstract: The purpose of this study was to investigate factors that may       20 hours per week in the care of a nonparent adult. Data from the
affect academic achievement when instruction is delivered via podcast.        Early Childhood Longitudinal Study were used to examine language
Participants included seventeen female Communication Sciences and             development between children in home-based programs and those in
Disorders students. Measurements of participants’ individual differences      center-based programs. Language scores were gathered in the fall of the
on four variables were taken prior to learners experiencing instructional     kindergarten year. A T-test was conducted to compare the group means.
podcasts. Multiple regression analysis was used to predict learner suc-       Results indicated children from center-based programs performed better
cess based on the four predictor variables: self-efcacy for online tech-     on tests of language development than children from home-based
nologies, academic self-efcacy, academic self-regulation, and cognitive      centers. Implications for further research of child-care selections and
style. Learner success was measured via a pencil and paper, multiple-         evaluations of early childhood programs will be discussed.
choice test covering the material delivered via podcast.                      Tuesday, 2:30 pm Commonwealth
Monday, 12:30 - 2:30pm Scoial Sciences Poster Session I
                                                                              Examination of causal factors in water-rights conflicts
Lessons Learned from the FBI                                                  By: Seth Santz
By: Caitlyn Rancourt                                                          Abstract: Water scarcity and attempts to attain water security often result
Abstract: This presentation is based on knowledge gained through an           in conict. These conicts play out at various levels within society, al-
internship with the FBI’s National Center for the Analysis of Violent         though it is the international realm that receives the most attention from
Crime (NCAVC). This Unit of the FBI is responsible for behavioral             the media and academia. This presentation shows that local and regional
analysis of crime. The presentation will focus on the functions of the        conicts have been grossly underestimated as far as their relevance to
FBI’s NCAVC while providing insight into statement analysis, “prol-          the subject of water conicts. Recurring issues permeate all levels of
ing” and licide.                                                             water rights debates; however it is the differences that can be observed
Tuesday, 11:30 am Lounge C                                                    between scales that makes small scale case studies worthy of careful
                                                                              study.
                                                                      42
While water conicts involving multiple nations are often overwhelmed         posive sampling. Preliminary ndings suggest support for my hypoth-
by socio-political issues, small scale conicts are less distorted            esis. Thirty-seven percent of my respondents have stated that they see
by political agendas. By studying smaller conict we may be able to           no clear guidelines to proper behavior in a college setting. As well, most
observe the essential elements of water conict unfettered by complica-       students had an increase in their participation in dangerous behaviors
tion and use the knowledge gained from these models at regional, state        once they were in college versus their before-college activities.
and international levels.                                                     Wednesday, 9:30 Lounge C
Monday, 2 pm Lounge B
                                                                              People Just Don’t Blow the Same
The Presence of the Televised Sports Manhood Formula in Profes-               By: Jason Sells
sional Wrestling                                                              Abstract: I conducted a project that was designed to investigate the
By: Shannon Scott                                                             difculty in collecting good data, and the differences in different people
Abstract: Hegemonic masculinity embodies “the currently most honored          doing the same task. A classmate and I each blew bubbles and recorded
way of being a man [and] require[s] all other men to position themselves      the data. I used Excel to compute average measures of variability and
in relation to it.” Sports media works exceptionally hard to reproduce        graphed, as well did some statistical tests. On average, my classmate
this concept, which can be measured using the Televised Sport Manhood         and I blew a signicantly different number of bubbles, even though the
Formula (TSMF). This model has been applied to sports shows, but a de-        variation in the number of bubbles blown per attempt was not signi-
tailed analysis of professional wrestling is absent from the literature. My   cantly different.
research applies this formula to professional wrestling. Because nearly       Monday, 12:30 - 2:30pm Scoial Sciences Poster Session I
50% of World Wrestling Entertainment’s weekly viewership consists
of teenagers and young adults, most of which are males, the messages          Behavioral and Heart Rate Responses to the Disruption of Attention
provided through its programming warrant examination.                         By: Walter Shackelford and Patsy Kerstetter
Tuesday, 10:30 am Lounge C                                                    Abstract: The purpose of this research is to investigate and character-
                                                                              ize the effects of disruption of attention on reading behavior and heart
Gender Stereotyping in Family Based Vs. Non-Family Based Televi-              rate. Specically, we used a Stroop-Type task to study the regularity
sion Dramas                                                                   with which people read the words in the color word list and the interbeat
By: Tristan Scott, Laura Clark, Sarah Gagne                                   interval as obtained from the subject’s electrocardiogram (EKG). The
Abstract: This study obsereved gender streotyping in present day televi-      participants are college students who were recruited through Radford
sion dramas. We analyzed main characters in family based and non-fam-         University undergraduate psychology courses. It is hypothesized that the
ily based dramas and compared traditional versus non-traditional/ sexu-       subjects’ heart rate will slow (evidenced by lengthened interbeat inter-
alized gender roles. The media was sampled by watching sixty minute           vals) while experiencing attentional interference. Furthermore, heart rate
family based and non-family based television dramas. Coding was based         should increase after the cognitive load has been relieved.
on two categories, competence and sexuality. Observations of the main         Tuesday, 2-4 pm Social Sciences Poster Session II
characters were coded for their occurence. Under the competence
category were dominance/ represtentation, orders given, and powerful          Learning Research and Writing with Health Related Topics
roles held. Under the sexuality category attractiveness, sexual overtures,    By: Lindsey Silwa and Adam Richardson
and actual/ implied sex were coded.                                           Abstract: Three freshman in Honors English 102 present research papers
Tuesday, 2-4 pm Social Sciences Poster Session II                             based on health and wellness issues. Students used health issues to learn
                                                                              the process of research, writing, and documentation.
Examining the Remains of a Purported 19th Century Executed                    Monday, 1 pm Commonwealth
Slave: Is This Lucinda?
By: Natalie Scanlon                                                           Art in the Middle Ages
Abstract: In September, 2006, the remains of a purported executed slave       By: Lindsay Spencer
were sent to forensic anthropologist Dr. Donna Boyd by the Bath County        Abstract:The true denition of ne art has been debated since the turn of
Historical Society. The remains were believed to be those of a slave,         the 20th century. Everyone has an opinion on the subject, even children.
Lucinda, who was executed in 1838 for the murders of two daughters            Could tweens have viable answers to the art world’s biggest question?
of Bath County plantation owner Mr. George Mayse. My main research            After completing a survey that asked middle school students about their
question is: are these the remains of Lucinda? This paper will present re-    thoughts on art, I realized I had found some interesting answers. These
sults of a scientic analysis of these human remains through metric and       answers and lesson plans based on the study will be shown during the
non-metric observations in conjunction with a consideration of historical     presentation.
records from that time in order to address the identity of the individual     Wednesday, 1 pm Commonwealth
(or individuals) the remains represent.
Tuesday, 12:30 pm Forensic Anthropology symposium                             Attachment Theory, religion and the Adaptation to College
                                                                              By: Kyle Stephens and Dr. Jeff Aspelmeier
Dangerous Behaviors on college Campuses                                       Abstract: The present study examined the associations between at-
By: Ryan Self                                                                 tachments, religious beliefs, and how individuals adapt to the college
Abstrract: Dangerous Behaviors on College Campuses                            experience. Also, the inuence of attachment to an incorporeal being
Are dangerous behaviors seen as normal on a college campus? Are there         (i.e., God) on college adaptation was also investigated. Further, it was
unclear rules guiding college students’ behavior? I hypothesize that          proposed that social support would serve as a mediator of the relation-
anomie, or normlessness is common in the college and this increases the       ship between college adaptation and attachment to God. The nal objec-
likelihood for engaging in dangerous behaviors. Most college students         tive of this study was to provide further validation for the Attachment to
are experiencing their rst real taste of independence and seem to lack       God Inventory. Preliminary ndings are reported.
direction which guides them away from these specic behaviors. I also         Monday, 6:30 pm Faculty/ Student Collabortive Grant
hypothesize that membership in social organization and place of resi-
dence affects the behaviors in which they engage. I am analyzing col-
lege students’ responses to a survey on dangerous behavior. My sample
includes 164 Radford University students of all demographics using pur-

                                                                      43
Exercise Physiologist Career Exploration                                      zine. Most recently she was named a 2007 “Woman Worth Watching” by
By: Lauren R. Storie                                                          Proles in Diversity Journal.
Abstract: My internship experience was set up to give me the opportu-         Tuesday, 2:00 pm Keynote: Information Technology Symposium
nity to acquire knowledge and skills as an exercise physiologist through
observation of physical activity in a tness center and the professional      Maintaining Dietary Behavior Change: Reviewing the Evidence
guidance and counsel of the members. I volunteered as a tness coach          By: Brandy Tate
at Curves Fitness Club. I kept a journal of tasks, observations, and as-      Abstract:Maintaining a behavior change is crucial for medical nutri-
signments I received as a volunteer. I participated in a weekly nutrition     tion therapy and optimal health outcomes. There is little research
assessment program provided by Curves. I also completed writing as-           concerning how to maintain behavior changes once adopted. The
signments pertaining to the profession. Regularly I met with my supervi
                                                                              literature offers therapeutic guidelines, motivational strategies, and
sor to give progress reports. Because of this experience, I am now better
informed about exercise physiology career opportunities.
                                                                              measurement of successful outcomes; however limited research
Tuesday, 5:50 pm in Biology Symposium                                         evaluates long term outcomes. Additionally several theories de-
                                                                              scribe the process of behavior change, but few address successful
Physical Activity Levels at Radford University                                maintenance of this change.
By: Nicole Sullivan                                                                In this research, we reviewed the literature on weight loss
Abstract:The purpose of my research is to depict the physical activity        and chronic disease management to identify strategies that might
levels amongst male and female students at Radford University. Data           prevent relapse. Because much of the behavior change literature
was acquired through an anonymous survey, created by the Centers for          is derived from studies on smoking cessation, alcohol and drug
Disease Control and altered by Radford University faculty. Three Health
                                                                              rehabilitation we also examined this literature for techniques and
200 classes volunteered their participation for the survey. The informa-
tion was then analyzed by SPSS, a data analysis program. The research
                                                                              strategies.
primarily focuses on specic types of physical activity in correspon-              We categorized ndings into environmental, behavioral, psy-
dence to body mass indexes. These two variables helped formulate my           chological and pharmacological interventions. Successful smok-
conclusions illustrating Radford University’s student’s physical activity     ing cessation and drug rehabilitation programs offer a variety of
levels.                                                                       these strategies to prevent relapse of the newly acquired behavioral
Wednesday, 11-12 pm Health poster Session                                     change. Likewise dietitians could benet from this body of knowl-
                                                                              edge when counseling, since weight loss and chronic diseases
Late Era Cosmology                                                            management require life-long changes.
By: Brian Summa                                                               Wednesday, 2:00 - 3:00 pm Food and Nutrition Poster Session
Abstract: The two ways of looking at cosmology include the Newto-
nian viewpoint where gravity is a force and the relativistic viewpoint        Gender Stereotypes in Children’s Televison Programming
where gravity is caused by the curvature of space-time. Observational         By: Brandi Taylor, Adam Smith, Julia Liles
quantities of the universe include the Hubble constant, the density of the    Abstract: This study uses content analysis to investigate gender stereo-
universe, and the deceleration constant. The values for these parameters      types in children’s television programming from the 1960’s and today.
are constantly being rened via astronomical observations. The future         Investigators coded for frequency and gender of main and supporting
evolutionary path for the universe can be determined by comparing the         characters. Investigators also coded for authority and attractiveness in
observational results with the results from the two theoretical view          male and female characters. It was hypothesized that the 1960’s TV
points. An understanding of current values and how they are found is          shows portrayed women as more attractive and with less authority than
needed in order to understand the future of the universe.                     today’s shows.
Wednesday, 12:30 am Lounge A                                                  Tuesday, 2-4 pm Social Sciences Poster Session II
Lessons for Life: A Rhetorical Analysis of Relational Themes in               The effects of social anxiety disorder on classroom performance
Children’s Films                                                              By: Cora Taylor
By:Sarah Swedberg                                                             Abstract: Social anxiety disorder is a problem as approximately 24 mil-
Abstract: Using a narrative perspective, this study seeks to understand       lion Americans suffer from this disorder. Research on the socially anx-
the messages in lms that could potentially impact children’s perspec-        ious has indicated that they suffer from cognitive distortions; however,
tives and the roles they have in their own relationships. The relationships   the reason for these distortions has not been investigated. This research
focused on in this study are parent/child in Finding Nemo (2003), friend-     investigates self-regulatory depletion – reduced conscious control – as
ship in Monsters, Inc. (2001), and family in The Incredibles (2004). The      a cause, and the effects it may have on school performance. Participants
lessons in these lms become morality tales for the viewing children,         will complete questionnaires on social anxiety, depression, and trait
and the messages children receive about relationships may well carry          self-control. After the questionnaires are complete, the students in the
over into their adult life.                                                   experimental condition will give a spontaneous ve-minute presentation.
Tuesday, 11:00 am Lounge A                                                    Students in the control condition will not complete any task. After the
                                                                              presentations, undergraduates will be given math problems to complete
The Global Curriculum: What You Will Need to be Attractive to                 within three minutes. The math problems are the dependent measure of
Companies Operating Internationally                                           self-regulatory depletion. Consequently, lower self-regulation should be
By: Ms. Sheila Talton                                                         indicated by fewer numbers of completed math problems. Therefore, in
Abstract: Ms. Talton is an innovative business leader with over 25 years      the speech condition, the socially anxious should complete fewer math
of experience in helping companies increase value through technol-            problems than the non-socially anxious. In the control condition, we
ogy. She was one of the pioneers in dening the network integration           expect that all participants will perform equally well on the problems.
consulting segment. Her career path has paralleled the growth cycle of        Tuesday, 2-4 pm Social Sciences Poster Session II
the network integration business, beginning with the early days of local
area networks and continuing through development of sophisticated
communications systems for the Euro-Tunnel, and today’s demands for
optimum efciencies across all business functions. She is a recipient of
the “Entrepreneurial Excellence Award” from Working Woman maga-
                                                                      44
Investigating the Mystery of an Augusta County Plane Crash                      that among the prevention programs evaluated the use of peer educators
Through Forensic Anthropology                                                   emconsidered by some to be on the same level with the HIV epidemic of
By: Kerry Taylor and Kassandra Nelson                                           ploying the health belief model is one of the most successful approaches
Abstract: In April, 1989, a small Cessna aircraft crashed in bad weather        for changing behavior and would most likely be effective in Myanmar.
in Augusta County, Virginia, killing the man and woman onboard.                 Tuesday, 2-4 pm Social Sciences Poster Session II
Remains of these wreckage (including human remains) were discovered
by turkey hunters in November 1989 and also in 1992. However, many              Central xenopsin reduces feed intake in male but not female chicks.
questions remain concerning this case, including the number of indi-            By: Bonnie Van Dyke
viduals the remains represent and their identities. We present a skeletal       Absrtact: Recently we demonstrated that central xenin is an anorexigenic
analysis of the human remains recovered from the crash in an attempt to         signal in chicks. The effect of xenopsin, an 8 residue peptide derived
answer these remaining questions and illustrate the many events which           from xenin, on avian appetite is unknown. Thus, 4 d post hatch chicks
can occur between life, death, and burial which can affect recovery and         were randomly assigned to receive 0, 0.75 1.5 or 3.0 µg xenopsin. Feed
interpretation of human remains in a forensic setting.                          and water intake were quantied every 30 min for 180 min post injec-
Tuesday, 1:15 pm Forensic Anthropology symposium                                tion. Male chicks responded to xenopsin with a linear concentration-de-
                                                                                pendant decrease in feed intake, whereas females did not respond. Water
Lifestyles of Our Different Families                                            intake was not affected by treatment. Therefore, the central xenopsin
By: Ashley Tilley, Jessica Wickline and Heather Tickle                          appetite related cascade differs between male and female chicks.
Abstract: Present the lifestyle of our different families. We are going         Tuesday, 6:10 pm in Biology Symposium
to compare our family traditions, superstitions, and recipes. Each of us
interviewed family members to get needed information                            Identifying Genetic Modifiers of hira mutants in Arabidopsis thali-
Tuesday, 4:15 pm Honors English 203                                             ana
                                                                                By: Angela D. Via and Tara Phelps-Durr
The Investigation of Drug Use Among Males and Females at Rad-                   Abstract: HIRA is a chromatin remodeling gene, and is highly conserved
ford University                                                                 in many organisms including humans. Arabidopsis thaliana HIRA mu-
By: Brittany Tinnell, Leisha Johnson, Angela Taylor                             tant seeds were treated with EMS and then planted. I am screening these
Abstract:The purpose of this study was to describe different trends in re-      mutants for phenotypes that suggest the unknown mutated gene is an en-
lation to drug use among males and females at Radford University. Our           hancer working with HIRA. Previous research has already shown some
data was collected by using an anonoymous survey given to the various           genes that interact with HIRA possibly by forming a protein complex.
sections of Health 200 classes. Students were not required to participate,      This research hopes to show the other proteins within the complex.
but those who did participate turned in the surveys, which were scanned         Tuesday, 5:30 pm in Biology Symposium
and imported into SPSS. The results of this study will be presented at the
forum.                                                                          Isolation of Xanthophyll from Lemon Peel
Wednesday, 11-12 pm Health poster Session                                       By: Erin Waddell
                                                                                Abstract: A laboratory experiment, to extract xanthophyll from citrus
The Effect of Reminiscence on Memory Retention in Older Adults                  fruit skins, was developed to be used in CHEM 302 (Organic Chemistry
By: Paul Tompkins                                                               II) for the students to perform. Lemon peel was selected as the citrus
Abstract: The purpose of this project was to study reminiscence in el-          fruit skin to be used. The original experiment was repeated multiple
derly participants. In this project I compiled family photographs and           times making small corrections to it each time. The solvent was changed
reminiscences from one 85 year-old woman who currently resides an               from methylene chloride (a carcinogen) to one that was more “green”
assisted-living facility. Family photographs were scanned and inserted          making it better for the environment and the students to work with. The
into PowerPoint slides. Extensive interviews were also conducted in             best solvent was found to be ethyl acetate.
which reminiscences prompted by the photographs were digitally re-              Wednesday, 3:30 - 4:30 pm Chemistry Poster Session
corded and edited. Links to digital audio les containing reminiscences
about the events in a particular photographs were inserted into the slides      Comparison of Sleep Disturbances: Nocturnal Panic and Sleepwalk-
for each photograph. My presentation will describe the process of creat-        ing
ing the PowerPoint presentation and my experiences in working with              By: Sarah Waldrop
this older adult. I will also describe the potential use of this type of pre-   Abstract: Nocturnal panic is characterized by waking up from sleep in a
sentation as a tool to cue memories for personal history in older adults.       panic-stricken state of mind. Physical symptoms of panic or anxiety are
Monday, 3:30 pm Lounge B                                                        present such as sweating, increased heart rate, fear and tension. One who
                                                                                experiences these panic episodes during sleep typically also experiences
An HIV/AIDS Prevention Program for Myanmar (Burma)                              elevated panic or anxiety while awake. There is no apparent trigger or
By: Ei Ei Tun                                                                   stimuli that cause a nocturnal panic attack to occur, but one’s fear of
Abstract: More than three million (3.1 million) people die of AIDS              having another attack can affect the physiological aspect of increasing
complications or AIDS-related health problems annually (Avert, 2005).           chances of another occurrence. Sleepwalking is a type of sleep dis-
Myanmar’s (Burma) 50 million people are in a serious HIV/AIDS crisis.           turbance that does not involve high levels of physiological arousal. In
In 2003, the UN estimated that 400,000 Burmese were infected with               contrast to nocturnal panic, one who sleepwalks is not consciously aware
HIV and some independent experts claimed that the incidents could be            of the processes they are engaging in at that time. Sleepwalking itself
double that gure. In Myanmar HIV has moved from high risk popula-              does not cause one to wake up in an abrupt manner. Instead, it tends to
tions to the general population. In 1999, among the commercial sex              be very difcult to wake up someone who is sleepwalking. Further dif-
workers, the prevalence rates rose from 25% to 50% becoming the main            ferences, as well as similarities, of nocturnal panic and sleepwalking will
source of HIV increase in Myanmar. Myanmar’s HIV explosion is                   be examined.
Africa. The purpose of this study was to: 1) determine whether HIV pre-         Wednesday, 4:30 pm Lounge C
vention programs used elsewhere in South East Asia could be culturally
adapted and effective if employed in Myanmar; 2) describe a strategy to
provide high quality, cost effective community-based HIV prevention
to target populations; 3) describe a strategy for reducing stigmatization
of, and discrimination against, HIV victims. The main ndings were
                                                                        45
The Future of Marriage?                                                         Abstract: Mind Innite is a culmination of my degree in Music Technol-
By: Margaret Wallen                                                             ogy. I have combined all aspects of my studies into a “music video”.
Abstract: I believe that individualism has encouraged modern Ameri-             This includes composition, recording, editing, and mastering the audio,
cans to challenge the social “norms,” and to evaluate your own situ-            as well as jumping into the lm world with the photography and video
ations. Although some people are strictly attempting to maintain our            manipulation. The nal project will consist of four scenes where the
traditional history, I think the further will open up to less activity in the   visual elements react from the musical elements. As expected, the music
social institution of marriage and/or changes within that institution, and      will be the emphasis. Through the course of the semester I have broken
others. If people see marriage as an obstruction to achieving their goals       the process into the four different scenes, so that I repeat the same pro-
in academic, traveling, and experience, they may choose to push it off to       cess four times and make adjustments accordingly. Dr Bruce Mahin has
a later time, or choose an alternative to the institution. This could result    overseen my progress.
in a lower rate of marriage; higher age averages at the time of marriage;       Monday, 5:00 pm Commonwealth
and an increase in co-habitation without marriage, or other alternatives.
People who put more emphasis on personal power of choice will likely            Sesame Street: Does it really make a difference in student’s achieve-
be more analytical about their life decision, and, therefore, may delay         ment scores?
marriage or choose co-habitation without marriage in order to reach a           By: Lauren Wolkove
higher personal goal.                                                           Abstract: Data from a longitudinal study were used to examine whether
Monday, 2:30 pm Lounge C                                                        children who watched Sesame Street before entering kindergarten would
                                                                                have higher achievement scores than children who did not watch Sesame
Looking at the Relationship Between Females and Mathematics: Is                 Street. Each level of SES was also examined to determine whether there
it Still on Rocky Ground?                                                       were signicant differences among the groups. Independent samples t-
By: Jennifer Waskey                                                             tests were used to compare groups and results indicate that students who
Abstract: While studying elementary education, Jennifer Waskey                  watched Sesame Street had signicantly lower achievement scores than
became interested in the number of young female students who showed             students who did not watch Sesame Street. Results for each SES level
little to no interest in Mathematics. For this reason, she was determined       were also analyzed. Explanations, limitations, and confounding variables
to discover if and why females tend to loose their interest in math. In do-     will be discussed as to why these unexpected results were obtained.
ing so, Jennifer hoped to identify ways in which she could subside this         Monday, 9:30 am Lounge A
loss of interest. Her research involved the review of current professional
journals including Leder and Angelo, as well as interviews of female            Costuming in Historic Movies: Accuracy, Trends, and Inspiration
students ages nine and up. With the information she has gained, Jennifer        By: Coutney Yates
hopes to improve her teaching methods and bestow her ideas upon future          Abstract: The purpose of this study is to research women’s costuming in
colleagues.                                                                     historic movies that are set in the 18th century time period. Specic in-
Monday, 5:30 pm Lounge B                                                        terest will be in the accuracy of the costumes, trends that current movies
                                                                                have inspired, and historical movies as an inspiration for a line of cloth-
Allow Me: Gender Stereotypes and Equality in Door-Holding                       ing. Many people base their knowledge of historical dress on what they
By: Sarah J. Webster, Juralee Smith, Christopher Braun, Leah Speck, K.          have seen in the movies. For accuracy to be maintained, documenting
Elizabeth Zutter, & Elizbeth Hish                                               deviations in the past are important. An analysis was conducted based
Abstract: Gender differences in helping were studied by observing               on the accuracy and trends of the lead female character in each of the
door-holding on a college campus. Students entering buildings were              following movies: Marie Antoinette, Amadeus, Dangerous Liaisons, and
scored for how often they held the door for a person following them and         Pirates of the Caribbean I and II. A ready-to-wear line of six garments is
for how much assistance they offered. Males and females were equally            being created using inspiration from the movies and time period.
likely to offer help to others (Males: 83%, Females: 84%). Both genders         Wednesday, 11 am Lounge A
were more likely to help females (89%) than males (76%), however,
and they differed in how much assistance they offered others. Male
door-holders were more likely to allow females to precede them through
a door, whereas other combinations (F-M, F-F, and M-M) were more
likely to wait for the recipient to reach the door. Males and females
appear to be equally likely to help others, then, but males continue to
display a gender bias in how much assistance they offer to females.
Wednesday, 12:30-2 pm Social Sciences Poster Session III

Mixed Messages: A critical analysis of cause-related marketing and
the ethical implications of strategic media
By: Joanna White
Abstract: This Capstone project provides an in-depth analysis and ethical
critique of consumer and cause-related marketing. On a fundamental
communication level, messages are sent, received, and then processed.
Recent social marketing campaigns such as Dove’s Campaign for Real
Beauty and Merck’s Tell Someone Campaign have had a tremendous
impact on brand building. Research conducted will reveal the ethical im-
plications of cause-related marketing and advertisement placement. The
presentation will cover the following topics: a)Women’s self-image and
the Beauty Myth, b)Merck’s Tell Someone Campaign, c) Dove’s Cam-
paign for Real Beauty, and d) Contradicting Messages in Magazines.
Wednesday, 11 am Lounge B

Mind Infinite
By: Jared Wilke
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