ECOLOGY OF BUTTERFLIES IN EUROPE by ProQuest

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									                                                                                                              Eur. J. Entomol. 107: 228, 2010
                                                                                    http://www.eje.cz/scripts/viewabstract.php?abstract=1537
                                                                                                 ISSN 1210-5759 (print), 1802-8829 (online)


                                                           BOOK REVIEW

SETTELE J., SHREEVE T., KONVI KA M. & VAN DYCK H. (eds):               mating and egg laying behaviour and thermoregulation. The last
ECOLOGY OF BUTTERFLIES IN EUROPE. Cambridge Uni-                       chapter in this part introduces the new methods of predictive
versity Press, Cambridge, UK, 2009, xii + 513 pp. Paperback            modelling of the distributions of species. Part II, “Population
ISBN 978-052-176-6975, price USD 75.00, hardback ISBN                  biology: population structure, dynamics and genetics”, deals
978-052-174-7592, price USD 160.00.                                    with new trends in the study of butterfly populations. Apart
                                                                       from non-invasive methods, such as “mark-release-recapture”, it
   During the nearly two decades since the publication of Den-         describes genetic methods used to determine the structure,
nis’ (1992) successful book on the ecology of British butterflies,     dynamics and history of populations. Logically, this part is fol-
the growing popularity of butterflies has resulted in a rapid          lowed by a cluster of chapters that focus on evolution (Part III
increase in the number of important ecological, taxonomical and        “Evolutionary biology”) and phylogenetics (Part IV “Species in
conservation studies using butterflies and burnets as model            time and space: distribution and phylogeny”). New findings,
groups. This rise in interest was further supported by the devel-      from adaptations to different conditions, through functional
opment of new field and laboratory methods, which facilitated          wing morphology and evolution of wing patterns to whole life-
studies on population and genetic structures and evolutionary          cycle st
								
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