From Hot War to Cold: The U.S. Navy and National Security Affairs, 1945-1955

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					                                                                           BOOK REVIEWS        151




Yet Graham also well portrays
Rumsfeld as a complex man who got
things accomplished. A tenacious colle-
                                           Barlow, Jeffrey G. From Hot War to Cold: The U.S.
giate wrestler at Princeton and a Navy     Navy and National Security Affairs, 1945–1955.
pilot, Rumsfeld was elected to Congress    Palo Alto, Calif.: Stanford Univ. Press, 2009.
at age thirty. He served four terms be-    710pp. $65
fore President Richard Nixon ap-           The U.S. Navy that patrolled the
pointed him as head of the Office of       world’s oceans with such unquestioned
Economic Opportunity and then as am-       dominance in the 1990s did not spring
bassador to NATO. Under President          into existence full-blown, nor was its
Gerald Ford, Rumsfeld would serve as       creation a smooth evolution based on
White House chief of staff and as the      dispassionate analysis and national con-
youngest-ever secretary of defense. In     sensus. The early years of that postwar
Rumsfeld’s business career, he was a       Navy, particularly its first, crucial de-
CEO responsible for the successful         cade, were marked by storms, impas-
turnaround of several major corpora-       sioned debate, and bitter political
tions. With his appointment in 2001, he    battles. This turmoil had started before
would also become the oldest to serve      the end of the Second World War and
as secretary of defense. In all of his     would continue into the mid-1950s.
many appointments and responsibili-        Unfortunately, there has been far too
ties, Rumsfeld comes across as an in-      little written about this period in the
tense, capable, and ambitious operator     U.S. Navy’s history.
with a “deep moral streak.”
                          
				
DOCUMENT INFO
Description: 710pp. $65 The U.S. Navy that patrolled the world's oceans with such unquestioned dominance in the 1990s did not spring into existence full-blown, nor was its creation a smooth evolution based on dispassionate analysis and national consensus. Among the more dramatic accounts is the tale of how Secretary of the Navy Charles Thomas fired Admiral Robert B. Carney, who, as Chief of Naval Operations, had tangled with the secretary of state, infuriated President Eisenhower, and refused to exchange message traffic with Thomas.
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