Sample Metric by kpw16392

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									                    Sample Metric: Occupational Exposure Limit (OEL)             Attachment 1



Performance     •    Percent of workers exposed above the Occupational Exposure Limit
Measure:             (OEL)
Measure         •    The percentage of workers within an organizational unit identified as
Description:         being exposed above the OEL used by this organization, including TWAs,
                     ceiling values, STELs, and action levels. (e.g. OSHA PEL, ACGIH TLV,
                     country standard, organization/company standard).
Objective:      •    Identify the rate at which employees are at risk for work-related illness
                     and disability and decreased social function. While not all employees
                     exposed above the OEL are expected to suffer from the health effect, this
                     metric does not wait for the effect to occur.
Definitions     •    (# of workers exposed above OEL x 100% / # of employees in this
                     organization)Each exposure above the OEL is counted. Example: an
                     employee exposed above the OEL for lead and for noise is counted as "2"
                     exposures.
                •    Workers are counted as exposed if they are protected by PPE. Workers
                     are not counted if the hazard has been practically eliminated by process
                     changes or by engineering controls. The count of exposures may be
                     segregated by the hazard to which employees are exposed.
                •    # of workers are counted by number of positions, not by # of individuals
                     (more than one individual in a position in one year) or full time equivalent
                     (FTE)
Target          •    Corporate
Audience        •    Site management
Current         •    None
Requirements:
Benefits /      •    Is not affected by the latency period of the illness.
Values:
Weaknesses /    •    Can put pressure on management and employees to underreport or ignore
Limitations:         significant exposures, which in turn can lead to employers failing to
                     protect employees from significant exposures.
                •    Does not measure risk, since it does not provide the relative risk of illness
                     occurring (e.g. exposure as a percentage of the OEL).
                •    Does not identify the relative level of the health effect expected from each
                     exposure (e.g. death vs. disability).
                •    The quality of this indicator depends on the rate at which worker
                     exposures have been assessed. If the rate of work processes assessed is
                     low, the true count of workers exposed above the action level may be
                     higher than currently measured. Recommend also measuring the percent
                     of work processes whose exposures have been determined for all hazards.
                •    Hazards without an OEL are falsely excluded (e.g. ergonomics).
Data Sources:   •    Exposure assessment results.
Interpreting    •    The desired trend is toward decreasing the rate of exposures.
Data            •    Decreasing numbers may indicate that: hazards have been eliminated
                     through process changes (or total elimination of a process), hazards have
                     been controlled through engineering controls, or hazards are being
                     underreported.
                   Sample Metric: Occupational Exposure Limit (OEL)    Attachment 1


Performance    •    Percent of workers exposed above the Occupational Exposure Limit
Measure:            (OEL)
Metric Type    •    lagging/outcome
Organization   NA
Using
Contributor    John Seibert, jseibert@lmi.org
                        Sample Metric: Occupational Exposure Limit (OEL)        Attachment 1



Metric Page                                                                         Page 2 of 2


Performance         •     Percent of workers exposed above the Occupational Exposure Limit (OEL)
Measure:




                 15.00%
    Percentage




                 10.00%                                                 rate of people
                 5.00%                                                  exposed above the
                                                                        OEL
                 0.00%
                             1997 1998 1999 2000
                                    Year



                                                  1997          1998        1999            2000
rate of people exposed above the OEL            10.00%         9.09%       9.09%           8.33%
# of people                                         200           220         220             240
# of people exposed above the OEL                    20            20          20              20




Summary: Although the same number of people has been exposed for each of the
last four years, our overall rate has gone down, as we have added additional
personnel in key production areas where these exposures historically existed.

								
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