Walkable Bermuda Run Plan 05.20.09 by oxu36335

VIEWS: 9 PAGES: 44

									                              


    WALKABLE BERMUDA RUN
                 A PLAN FOR SIDEWALKS, BIKE
                LANES, AND SHARED USE PATHS
      
      
                              
                              
                              
                              
                              
 
 
 
 
 
                              
                              
                              
                              
                              
                              
                              




                                   Adopted March 2009

    Walkable Bermuda Run                                Page i
                             Town Council
                              John Ferguson, Mayor
                                    Ed Coley
                                   Al Barnett
                                    Ron Hoth
                                 Frank Sweeten
                                 John Guglielmi


          Planning Board
          Janet Smith, Chair                  Richard Heriot, Vice Chair
          John Russell                        James Beeson
          Ken Dohlenman                       Avalon Potts, Alternate
          Bette Krause, Alternate


          Town Staff
          Ron Bell, Town Manager


          Consulting services provided by
          Rhea Consulting, Inc.




Page ii                                                      Town of Bermuda Run
                 Table of Contents
1. Why Do We Need A Plan? ......................................................................................................... 1
   1.1  Purpose and Intent ............................................................................................................ 1
   1.2  The Plan Elements and Process........................................................................................ 2
   1.3  The Planning Area............................................................................................................ 2
   1.4  Growth Trends ................................................................................................................. 3
        Map 1: Town Jurisdiction ............................................................................................... 5
   1.5  Complete Streets .............................................................................................................. 7
   1.6  Pedestrians ....................................................................................................................... 7
        Chart 1: Percent of Trip Lengths on Most Recent Day Walked ..................................... 8
        Chart 2: Primary Purpose of Walking Trips ................................................................... 9
        Chart 3: Facilities Used for Walking Trips .................................................................. 10
   1.7  Cycling ........................................................................................................................... 10
        Chart 4: Percent of Trip Lengths on Most Recent Day Bicycled .................................. 11
        Chart 5: Facilities Used for Bicycling Trips ................................................................. 11
   1.8  Shared Use Paths and Greenways .................................................................................. 12
2. What Do We Want To Accomplish? ....................................................................................... 13
   2.1   Plan Goal ........................................................................................................................ 13
   2.2   Plan Objectives .............................................................................................................. 13
3. Where Are Facilities Required? .............................................................................................. 15
   3.1   The Importance of Place ................................................................................................ 15
         Table 1: Bermuda Run Street Classification ................................................................. 16
   3.2   Roadway Classifications ................................................................................................ 17
   3.3   Town Standards.............................................................................................................. 17
   3.4   Cross Sections ................................................................................................................ 21
         Figure 1: Arterials—Shared Use Path Option .............................................................. 21
         Figure 2: Arterials—Sidewalk and Bike Lane Option .................................................. 22
         Figure 3: Collector Streets in the Town Center ............................................................ 23
         Figure 4: Local Streets in the Town Center and Commercial Mixed-Use Areas ......... 24
         Figure 5: Collector Streets in Commercial and Residential Mixed-Use Areas ............ 25
         Figure 6: Collector Streets in Club Residential Areas.................................................. 26
         Figure 7: Local Streets in Club Residential and Residential Mixed-Use Areas ........... 27
   3.5   Tabular Summary of Requirements ............................................................................... 28
         Table 2: Summary of Requirements for New Infrastructure ......................................... 28
   3.6   Pedestrian and Bicycle Crossing Requirements ............................................................. 29
4. How Will This Plan Be Implemented? .................................................................................... 32
   4.1  Existing Policies ............................................................................................................ 32
   4.2  Exceptions to Applicability............................................................................................ 32
   4.3  Waivers .......................................................................................................................... 33
   4.4  Developer Installed Facilities ........................................................................................ 34
   4.5  Public Installation of Facilities....................................................................................... 35
   4.6  Priority Facilities............................................................................................................ 36
   4.7  Facilities Required for Voluntary Annexation ............................................................... 36
5. Glossary of Terms ..................................................................................................................... 37

Appendix A: Planning Board Recommendations for Walkable Projects


Walkable Bermuda Run                                                                                                                   Page iii
Page iv   Town of Bermuda Run
1 Why Do We Need A Plan?
                                         Vision 
  To provide the citizens of Bermuda Run and its planning jurisdiction with a safe,  
 effective, coordinated and connected alternative transportation network consisting  
             of sidewalks, bicycle lanes, shared use paths, and greenways.   
                                               
1.1   Purpose and Intent 
 
Establishing and maintaining a comprehensive non‐motorized transportation sys‐
tem, an alternative to the automobile, is important to the health, safety, and livability 
of Bermuda Run.  A well planned system can: 
 
• Improve the safety of our roadways and streets 
•   Improve access for citizens who cannot drive 
•   Encourage a more healthy lifestyle 
•   Reduce water, air, and noise pollution 
•   Improve the aesthetics of roadways by encouraging or requiring the addition of 
    landscaping and medians that improve pedestrian safety and create a better walk‐
    ing environment 
•   Reduce the need for parking 
•   Foster community by encouraging greater interaction with neighbors and other 
    citizens 
•   Reduce dependence on and use of fossil fuel 
• Create a sense of place and community identity 
 
The purpose of this plan is to provide a vision for the town’s alternative transporta‐
tion network and to establish guidelines and policies for its development.  The spe‐
cific facility recommendations, as indicated on the plan map, represent a vision or 
master plan level evaluation of suitability.  Prior to proceeding with the installation 
of any of the recommended facilities indicated on the map, a corridor level assess‐
ment to determine existing conditions, rights‐of‐way, obstacles and opportunities 
will need to be completed to fully investigate the appropriateness of the proposed 
facility.  Some modification in location or design may be necessary to accommodate 
the results of such an assessment. 


Walkable Bermuda Run                                                                 Page 1
The guidelines for development of specific facility types included within this plan are 
intended to establish the town’s policies for such improvements and to serve as stan‐
dards for construction.  Whenever private development of a portion of the non‐
motorized network is required by town ordinance as part of the land development 
process, these guidelines shall be met.  
 
1.2   The Plan Elements and Process 
 
This plan is divided into five parts:  1) Introduction, 2) Background Information, 3) 
Town Policies, 4) Sidewalk Location Map, and 5) Glossary of Terms.  Within these 
parts there are four main plan elements that form the backbone of the plan.  These are 
the vision, the goal, the objectives, and the policies. 
 
The plan addresses four types of transportation facilities:  1) streets, 2) sidewalks,  
                                  3) bike lanes, and 4) shared use paths.  While design 
                                  and detail for streets is not included in this plan, how 
               Vision
                                  alternative systems function within and intersect streets 
                                  is included.  These four elements are the foundation of 
               Goal
                                  Bermuda Run’s future transportation network and 
                                  must, like puzzle pieces, fit together to meet the intent 
             Objectives           of this plan and the needs of the citizens. 
                                   
            Town Policies         This plan was pre‐
                                  pared by the Bermuda                              STREETS
                                  Run Planning Board 
                                                                  SHARED USE PATHS
with assistance from Rhea Consulting, Inc.  It’s crea‐
tion was a deliberative and thought‐provoking proc‐
ess that began in the summer of 2007 and culminated                 BIKE LANES     SIDEWALKS

with its adoption in 2008. 
 
1.3   The Planning Area 
 
This plan covers the entire planning jurisdiction of the Town of Bermuda Run.  This 
includes all land within the corporate limits as well as the extraterritorial planning ju‐
risdiction as depicted on Map 1.  Many of the standards apply to certain areas of town 
specified by zoning district.  For the most up‐to‐date reference regarding these dis‐
tricts, please refer to the Official Zoning Map for Bermuda Run. 
 
 
 

Page 2                                                                 Town of Bermuda Run
1.4   Growth Trends 
 
Incorporated by act of the General Assembly in 1999, Bermuda Run is poised to be‐
come one of the fastest growing towns in the Triad.  While the area inside the corpo‐
rate limits is predominately residential, there is a substantial amount of nonresidential 
development immediately adjacent to the corporate limits, including the area desig‐
nated as the Town Center.  The lack of public sewer capacity in eastern Davie County 
has limited development in the past, but sewer capacity is expected to increase sub‐
stantially in the near future. 
 
Bermuda Run was founded as a medium density gated golf course community located 
in a largely low density agricultural area of the county.  At the time of its inception 
there was very little reason for anyone to use non‐motorized transportation except for 
recreational purposes, but recent and future growth is expected to change this.  More 
and more destinations are locating within a one‐half mile radius of established resi‐
dential areas. 
 
The intersection of NC 801 and US 158 has become a center of commercial and office 
activity.  Much of this land has been recently incorporated at the request of the owners, 
but a significant amount is still in the unincorporated area of the town’s jurisdiction.  
Located between NC 801 and the Yadkin River, the still developing Kinderton Com‐
mercial Center is another destination for many residents within the Bermuda Run area.  
North of I‐40 along US 801, the Kinderton Place Retail Center contains the newest gro‐
cery store, restaurants and small retail shops.  Large undeveloped parcels directly 
across from this center along NC 801 provide more than sixty acres of prime develop‐
ment property that 
may be slated for a 
new medical com‐
plex including a hos‐
pital and retail cen‐
ter.  All of these are 
and will be impor‐
tant destinations 
within the commu‐
nity. 
             
            




Walkable Bermuda Run                                                               Page 3
Page 4   Town of Bermuda Run
                  Bermuda Run Zoning Districts, May 2009




Walkable Bermuda Run                                       Page 5
Page 6   Town of Bermuda Run
1.5   Complete Streets 
 
There is a national push toward “complete streets.”  These are streets that accommo‐
date all users:  motorists, cyclists, and pedestrians.  Most streets built since World 
War II have focused almost exclusively on the motorist with little thought given to 
the cyclist or pedestrian.  This has created environments that are generally hostile 
and dangerous to all forms of non‐motorized transportation.  
 
The rise of the automobile as the primary, if not exclusive, form of travel for most 
Americans has isolated low income communities, the elderly, the handicapped and 
the young—basically everyone who cannot or does not own or drive a car.  It is also 
cited as one of the primary reasons that the rate of obesity, and all of the diseases as‐
sociated with it, have increased dramatically in the U.S. even in the last twenty years.  
The Centers for Disease Control (http://www.cdc.gov/nccdphp/dnpa/obesity/) re‐
ports that obesity rates more than doubled for adults between the 1976‐1980 survey 
and a similar survey conducted in 2003 and 2004.  Perhaps more alarming, the same 
surveys indicate that obesity rates among children tripled during this same period. 
 
As many health‐conscious Americans have 
tried to maintain or regain fitness and health 
in recent years, the lack of good, safe pedes‐
trian and bicycle facilities has become a con‐
                                                        US Pedestrian Statistics, 2005 
cern.  Even those communities who have yet 
to acknowledge the health implications of           • 4,881 pedestrians were killed in 
their growth patterns and transportation sys‐           traffic crashes in the United States 
tems are realizing that traffic congestion in           — a decrease of 13 percent from the 
many places is caused by citizens forced to             5,584 pedestrians killed in 1995. 
make short trips by automobile because suit‐        • On average, a pedestrian is killed 
able alternative transportation options do not          in a traffic crash every 108 minutes 
exist.  Therefore it is imperative to provide a         and one is injured every eight  
network of safe, accessible pedestrian and bi‐          minutes. 
cycle facilities that are well connected to im‐     • There were 64,000 pedestrians  
portant community centers.                              injured in traffic crashes. 
 
                                                      •   Most fatalities occurred in urban 
1.6   Pedestrians                                         areas (74%), at non‐intersection lo‐
                                                          cations (80%), in normal weather 
In 2002, the National Highway Traffic Safety              (89%), and at night (67%). 
Administration, Bureau of Transportation Sta‐                                


tistics completed the National Survey of Pedes‐            National Center for Statistics and  
trian and Bicyclist Attitudes and Behaviors.  This        Analysis, Traffic Safety Facts, 2005. 


Walkable Bermuda Run                                                                          Page 7
survey indicated that twenty‐seven percent of all walking trips were .25 miles or less 
as indicated on Chart 1.  However, the same study showed that the average walking 
trip is 1.2 miles. 
                                            Chart 1: 
                      Percent of Trip Lengths on Most Recent Day Walked 
                                                     Mean = 1.2 miles 

    30.0%
                  26.9%

    25.0%
                                                              20.7%
                                       19.6%
    20.0%                                                                        18.0%
                                                                                                      14.8%
    15.0%

    10.0%

     5.0%

     0.0%
            .25 miles or less       .26 - .5 miles          .51 - 1 mile      1.1 - 2 miles      More than 2 miles


NOTE:  Estimates are based on total trips taken on most recent day walked. 
SOURCE:  National Survey of Pedestrian and Bicyclist Attitudes and Behaviors, 2002. National Highway Traffic Safety 
  Administration (NHTSA) and Bureau of Transportation Statistics (BTS). 

 
                                            
The health benefits of walking are well documented.  For example, the Centers for Dis‐
ease Control reports that among adults with diabetes, those who walked for exercise at 
least two hours a week lowered their mortality rate from all causes by as much as 
thirty‐nine percent! (http://www.cdc.gov/diasbetes/pubs/pdf/walking.pdf) 

 
                                                                             While most walking trips
                                                                             are short in length, the
                                                                             benefits of walking are well
                                                                             documented. Creating a
 
                                                                             walkable community is the
                                                                             first step toward community
                                                                             fitness.
 
      
 
 
 
                                                                                   www.pedbikeimages.org /  
                                                                                              Dan Burden 


Page 8                                                                                        Town of Bermuda Run
                                                     Chart 2: 
                                         Primary Purpose of Walking Trips 



    30.0%
             27.0%

    25.0%

    20.0%                   17.3%
                                            15.3%
    15.0%                                                                                                       12.3%
                                                         10.2%
    10.0%                                                               8.8%

                                                                                      5.1%
                                                                                                    4.0%
    5.0%

    0.0%
            exercise or   run personal     recreation   to go home   visit a friend commuting to walk the dog   other
              health         errands                                  or relative     school or
             reasons                                                                    work



SOURCE:  National Survey of Pedestrian and Bicyclist Attitudes and Behaviors, 2002. National Highway Traffic Safety 
  Administration (NHTSA) and Bureau of Transportation Statistics (BTS). 

 




                                                                                Walking for transportation, such as
                                                                                walking to school, helps to ensure
                                                                                that we meet the Centers for Dis-
                                                                                ease Control’s recommended thirty
                                                                                minutes of exercise daily.




                                                                                  www.pedbikeimages.org / Dan Burden 




Walkable Bermuda Run                                                                                                  Page 9
                                                  Chart 3:
                                     Facilities Used for Walking Trips



    50.0%
              45.1%
    45.0%
    40.0%
    35.0%
    30.0%
                             24.8%
    25.0%
    20.0%
    15.0%
                                             8.4%           8.0%
    10.0%                                                                   5.8%             4.9%
                                                                                                           3.0%
    5.0%
    0.0%
             sidewalks     paved roads    shoulders of   unpaved roads      bicycle      grass or fields   other
                                          paved roads                    paths/walking
                                                                          paths/trails


SOURCE:  National Survey of Pedestrian and Bicyclist Attitudes and Behaviors, 2002. National Highway Traffic Safety 
  Administration (NHTSA) and Bureau of Transportation Statistics (BTS). 


As development patterns across the country have changed how we move about our 
communities, walking for transportation has declined significantly.  For example, it 
has been reported that in 1969, forty‐two percent of children aged 5—15 years  
walked to school.  This figure declined to around sixteen percent in 2001. (http://
www.walktoschool. org).   
 
 
1.7   Cycling 
 
According to the National Survey of Pedestrian and Bicyclist Attitudes and Behaviors the 
average length of a bicycling trip taken on a typical summer day was 3.9 miles; how‐
ever, as indicated in Chart 4 more than thirty‐eight percent of all trips were one mile or 
less in length.   The same study indicates that most cyclists use paved roads (Chart 5). 
 
Bike lanes along roadways provide a marked location for cyclists who prefer the con‐
venience and safety of road travel.  Cycling on sidewalks is not recommended since 
driveway and street intersections along sidewalks are not designed for bicycle safety 
and motorists may not see cyclists before it is too late to stop. 
 




Page 10                                                                                       Town of Bermuda Run
                                               Chart 4:
                         Percent of Trip Lengths on Most Recent Day Bicycled

  45.0%
                  38.6%
  40.0%
  35.0%
  30.0%
                                                                23.8%
  25.0%
                                          18.5%
  20.0%
  15.0%                                                                                   11.8%
  10.0%                                                                                                            7.3%
   5.0%
   0.0%
               1 mile or less           1.1 - 2 miles        2.1 - 5 miles             5.1 - 10 miles        More than 10 miles


SOURCE:  National Survey of Pedestrian and Bicyclist Attitudes and Behaviors, 2002. National Highway Traffic Safety 
  Administration (NHTSA) and Bureau of Transportation Statistics (BTS). 




                                                      Chart 5:
                                        Facilities Used for Bicycling Trips

  60.0%
             48.1%
  50.0%

  40.0%

  30.0%

  20.0%                         13.6%          13.1%         12.8%
  10.0%                                                                         5.2%              5.2%
                                                                                                                   2.1%
   0.0%
           paved roads      sidewalks         bicycle      shoulders of      bicycle lanes   unpaved roads         other
                                           paths/walking   paved roads         on roads
                                            paths/trails


SOURCE:  National Survey of Pedestrian and Bicyclist Attitudes and Behaviors, 2002. National Highway Traffic Safety 
  Administration (NHTSA) and Bureau of Transportation Statistics (BTS). 




Walkable Bermuda Run                                                                                                       Page 11
  The 2.5 mile Avon/
  Catawba Creek Green-
  way in Gastonia, NC.




  Rhea Consulting, Inc.



1.8   Shared Use Paths and Greenways 
 
Shared use paths provide a safe location for pedestrians, cyclists and personal vehicles 
for the handicapped.  They can accommodate baby strollers, tricycles, skaters, walkers, 
joggers and other common non‐motorized users safely.  While shared use paths can 
occur anywhere that it is safe for users, including next to roadways with limited drive‐
way and cross‐road traffic, greenways are a special kind of shared use path that are 
located away from roads and development often in areas such as floodways that can‐
not or should not be used for other purposes. 
 
Bermuda Run is located next to the Yadkin River, one of the largest and most signifi‐
cant river systems in the state.  While segments of greenway systems along the river 
have been built or planned for Wilkesboro and Elkin, there are no riverside greenways 
in the Bermuda Run area.  Greenways are planned in Forsyth County that would ex‐
tend from Lewisville and Clemmons to the river and Tanglewood Park. 
 
There is a significant amount of bottom land along the river in Bermuda Run’s jurisdic‐
tion adjacent to the newly constructed Twin City Youth Soccer Association complex.  If 
this land were developed as a public park, a greenway would be an excellent addition, 
perhaps providing access to the soccer fields, Kinderton residential, the Club Residen‐
tial areas of town and, possibly, connection to Forsyth County greenways. 


Page 12                                                             Town of Bermuda Run
2          What Do We Want To
           Accomplish?
2.1   Plan Goal 
 
The goal of this plan is simple and straightforward: 
 
                Make active transportation within the jurisdiction of 
                       Bermuda Run safe, convenient, and fun. 
               
We can accomplish this by fulfilling the following objectives: 



2.2   Plan Objectives 
        
       1.  Integrate non‐motorized transportation into the existing transportation  
           infrastructure. 
           The existing transportation network within Bermuda Run is automobile oriented 
           and connected mainly by US 158 and NC 801.  In order for the town to have a well 
           connected network of non‐motorized transportation facilities, sidewalks, bike lanes 
           and, in some cases, shared use paths will have to be installed along existing road‐
           ways and within existing neighborhoods. 

       2.  Provide safe and convenient non‐motorized connections between  
           destinations in every part of the town’s jurisdiction, such as residential, 
           commercial, and recreational areas. 
           Office, retail, and commercial centers, Bermuda Run, Bermuda Run West, Kinder‐
           ton Residential, and the Twin City Youth Soccer Association are all important exist‐
           ing destinations within Bermuda Run.  Future destinations include the Town Cen‐
           ter, a major medical complex with additional retail and hospitality businesses near I‐
           40 and NC 801, and a public park along the Yadkin River.  In order for Bermuda 
           Run to become a town offering true alternative transportation options for its citizens 
           and visitors, it will have to connect all of these destinations with pedestrian and bi‐
           cycle facilities. 
            



Walkable Bermuda Run                                                                      Page 13
              
          3.  Require non‐motorized infrastructure as an integral part of new land  
              development projects. 
             While the town and the state will be responsible for installing certain facilities along 
             existing roadways, new development must be made to extend and connect to 
             planned facilities at the time of occupancy.  Non‐motorized transportation facilities 
             must be treated with the same level of importance as motorized facilities if Bermuda 
             Run is to implement this plan as envisioned. 

          4.  Improve safety and accessibility for all pedestrians with a special concern 
              for the disabled, elderly, children, and low income residents. 
             Ensuring safe and accessible facilities means not only proper design and construc‐
             tion of pathways but care and concern about where these pathways intersect drive‐
             ways, streets, parking lots, and similar transitional areas.  Safe crossings will help 
             to ensure that people will use the facilities and that motorists will proceed with cau‐
             tion in areas where pedestrians and cyclists share the roads.  While safety and acces‐
             sibility is a concern for all pedestrians, the disabled, the elderly, and children need 
             special consideration to insure that facilities are designed to protect them and make 
             them feel safe when walking in Bermuda Run. 

          5.  Continue to support and require pedestrian‐friendly land use such as 
              mixed‐use zoning, connectivity and infill. 
             Bermuda Run adopted a Zoning Ordinance that supports alternative transportation 
             by encouraging and allowing mixed‐use developments designed to complement and 
             frame public spaces.  It also prohibits most forms of insular development by requir‐
             ing street connectivity, and it promotes sensitive and appropriate infill in existing 
             neighborhoods.  These aspects of the town’s land use program must be supported 
             and maintained to ensure the best environment for the use of alternative transporta‐
             tion systems.  

          6.  Establish a procedure for the town to construct necessary paths and  
              linkages. 
             While much of Bermuda Run’s jurisdiction is undeveloped or likely to redevelop 
             within the next twenty years, most of the existing residential areas are not expected 
             to change.  The installation of sidewalks and bike lanes in these areas, as well as 
             linkages in existing commercial areas, will be the responsibility of the citizens and 
             the town.  Deciding how and when these facilities are constructed will be an impor‐
             tant process and is critical to the overall successful implementation of this plan.  
             Annual priorities shall be recommended by the Planning Board as a list of priorities 
             for the Capital Improvements Plan adopted, as funding permits, by Town Council. 
Page 14                                                                        Town of Bermuda Run
3 Where Are Facilities
  Required?
3.1   The Importance of Place 

An underlying theme of the town’s Zoning Ordinance is the establishment of a sense 
of place for Bermuda Run.  While sense of place means different things in different 
places, in Bermuda Run it means an authentic, unique character that defines our 
community.  A critical component of our sense of place is walkability and interaction 
with the built environment.  How buildings are designed and placed greatly affects 
our perception of safety and level of interest in moving about without automobiles.  
However, the town has not developed with walkability or bicycle movement in 
mind.  This needs to change if we are to develop into and remain a cohesive commu‐
nity. 
 
Bermuda Run is divided into residential, Residential Mixed‐Use, Commercial Mixed‐
Use, Town Center, and commercial areas.  Each of these environments has different 
needs related to non‐motorized transportation.  Planning, therefore, must account for 
and respect these distinct areas.  Alternative transportation systems within these ar‐
eas and connections between them should be continuous, providing a complete net‐
work of facilities.  In each area, there should also be an attractive street appearance 
and a strong sense of safety for anyone using a sidewalk, bike lane, or shared path. 
 
Our future Town Center will be the heart of our community.  Walking in and around 
Town Center should be an enjoyable experience.  There should be a continuous net‐
work of wide sidewalks, since pedestrian movement in the Town Center will be al‐
                         most entirely by sidewalk.  Cyclists will share the road with 
                         motorized vehicles and use bike lanes whenever possible.  The 
                         close proximity of established residential areas and other com‐
                         mercial areas dictates that Town Center infrastructure coordi‐
                         nate and complement similar facilities in these areas. 
                          
                         Our alternative transportation plan for commercial areas, in‐
                         cluding Commercial Mixed‐Use, calls for a mixture of side‐
                         walks, bicycle lanes, and possibly a shared use path. Walking 
                         and cycling in and around our residential areas should be 
                         equally safe and enjoyable.  Moving about in this environment 
                         may take the pedestrian from sidewalks to low volume streets, 

Walkable Bermuda Run                                                              Page 15
to shared paths and greenways.  Cyclists will, in most cases, share the roadway with 
automobiles.  Connectivity to nearby and adjacent residential and commercial areas is 
critical. 
 
While a continuous network of sidewalks, bicycle lanes, shared use paths and green‐
ways is our goal, we realize that the network outlined in this plan will be put into 
place in phases.  Many segments will be installed by developers as they develop or re‐
develop properties along designated transportation corridors.  Other segments within 
the corporate limits may be installed by the town as funds permit.  The priority for town
‐installed segments will be existing residentially developed areas and linkages in exist‐
ing commercial areas to address gaps in the network.  NCDOT may also install facili‐
ties as it improves state roads. 
 
All facilities outlined by this plan will be publicly owned and maintained by either the 
town or the state except those within the extraterritorial planning jurisdiction, which 
may be maintained by either the state, a business or a property owners association, 
and those along private streets, which shall be maintained by a property owners asso‐
ciation.  The town will not own or maintain facilities outside its corporate limits.   
 
While AASHTO guidelines are cited throughout this plan as the source of design stan‐
dards for all facilities, NCDOT may have standards that supersede AASHTO guide‐
lines.  Where this occurs, NCDOT standards shall prevail.  The ultimate location, de‐
sign, and type of facility are subject to the review and approval of the Town of Ber‐
muda Run regardless of who has responsibility for ownership and maintenance of the 
facility.  

                              Table 1: Bermuda Run Street Classification 

               Arterial Streets             Collector Streets               Local Streets 

          •   NC HWY 801              •    Bermuda Run Drive         • All other public 
          •   US HWY 158              •    Bing Crosby Boulevard        streets 
                                      •    Bridge Street 
                                      •    Commerce Drive 
                                      •    Glen Arbor Drive 
                                      •    Gun Club Road 
                                      •    Kinderton Boulevard 
                                      •    Old Towne Drive 
                                      •    Orchard Park Drive 
                                      •    Peachtree Lane 
                                      •    Riverbend Drive 
                                      •    Town Park Drive 
                                      •    Yadkin Valley Road 

Page 16                                                                          Town of Bermuda Run
3.2   Roadway Classifications 
The standards set forth in the following sections are based upon roadway classifica‐
tions.  For the purposes of this plan, the classifications listed in Table 1 shall be used. 

3.3   Town Standards 
In order to ensure a consistent, coordinated, and interconnected network of non‐
motorized transportation facilities in the Town Center, the town hereby adopts the fol‐
lowing standards for new facilities in developing areas.  Standards for retrofitting 
sidewalks in existing areas will be determined on a case‐by‐case basis. 
 
3.3.1 Sidewalks 
 
1.  Sidewalks shall be installed on both sides of all streets.  Collector streets in the 
    Town Center shall have a sidewalk of a minimum of ten feet in width.  Sidewalks 
    along local streets in the Town Center and Commercial Mixed‐Use areas shall be a 
    minimum of six feet in width.  Collector streets in the Commercial Mixed‐Use and 
    Residential Mixed‐Use districts shall have sidewalks that are a minimum of six feet 
    in width.  Sidewalks along collector streets in Club Residential districts shall be a 
    minimum of six feet in width.  Sidewalks shall be installed along both sides of all 
    other local streets at a minimum width of six feet.  In Open Space areas, streets in 
    planned subdivisions containing new local streets shall meet local street standards 
    for sidewalks. 

2.  Sidewalks shall be constructed of concrete, except that the town may approve side‐
    walks constructed of brick or stone paving materials on a case‐by‐case basis or 
    when consistent with an adopted town streetscape plan. 

3.  Sidewalks shall remain clear of obstructions.  In the Town Center, sidewalks along 
    collector streets shall maintain an eight foot horizontal throughway at all 
    times.  Outside of the throughway, the town may permit sandwich board signs, 
    street furniture, planters, and similar items to be placed on the sidewalk on a case‐
    by‐case basis whenever, in the town manager’s opinion, such items would not pose 
    a threat to the health, safety or general welfare of the public using the sidewalk or 
    adjacent street.  Application to place any such items on a public sidewalk shall be 
    made in writing to the town manager prior to placement. 

4.  Vertical clearance along all sidewalks shall be at least eight feet. 

5.  All sidewalks shall be constructed to meet AASHTO guidelines and ADA access 
    requirements. 
     


Walkable Bermuda Run                                                                   Page 17
3.3.2 Shared use paths 
 

1.  A shared use path should be installed by the town along the north side of U.S. 158 
    and the west side of N.C. 801, south of I‐40, at a minimum width of eight feet.  No 
    more than eight crossings (driveways or streets) per mile should be permitted 
    where shared use paths are installed.  Otherwise, a sidewalk shall be installed on 
    both sides of these arterials at a minimum width of six feet where curb and gutter 
    are installed.  Shared use paths may be installed along other streets at a minimum 
    width of eight feet as permitted by the town. 
     
2.  Shared use paths shall be paved with asphalt. 
     
3.  Vertical clearance along all shared use paths shall be at least ten feet. 
     
4.  Use of shared use paths shall be limited to non‐motorized users, except as noted 
    herein, and may include but are not necessarily limited to:  bicyclists, in‐line skat‐
    ers, roller skaters, scooters (non motorized only), wheelchair users (both non‐
    motorized and motorized), four‐wheel electric golf carts,  personal transporters 
    and pedestrians, including walkers, runners, people with baby strollers, people 
    walking dogs, and similar types of users. 
     
5.  Unless otherwise designated and approved by the town, all shared use paths shall 
    be designed for two‐way travel. 
     
6.  Where shared use paths run immediately adjacent to US 158, NC 801, or other 
    roadways; 
     
    a.  Driveway cuts across the path shall be limited and shall be clearly marked for 
        both the user of the path and the motorist entering or exiting the driveway. 
     
    b.  Path termini shall direct bicycle traffic to the appropriate side of the street. 
     
    c.  Sight distances applicable to the roadway shall also be applicable to the shared 
        use path. 
         
7.  Shared use paths shall meet AASHTO and NCDOT design requirements and be 
    located in a public right‐of‐way unless privately‐owned and maintained. 
     




Page 18                                                               Town of Bermuda Run
3.3.3 Bike lanes 
                                        
1.  Bikes shall share the road along all local streets and collector streets.  New vehicle 
    travel lanes and improvements shall be wide enough (twelve—fourteen feet) to ac‐
    commodate the cyclist.  Where bikes share the road, signs shall be installed along 
    roads at regular intervals reminding motorists to watch for cyclists.  Unless a 
    shared use path is installed, bike lanes shall be designated and installed on arterials 
    by NCDOT or the town as funding and right‐of‐way permit. 
     
2.  Vertical clearance along all bike paths shall be at least ten feet. 
 
3.  Bike lanes shall meet AASHTO design requirements and be located in a public 
    right‐of‐way. 
     
3.3.4 Buffers 
 
1.  Buffers between sidewalks or paths and vehicle travel lanes shall be as follows: 
     
    a.  Buffers shall be located within the street right‐of‐way.  

   b.  Local streets, unless otherwise noted, shall have a buffer at least four feet in 
       width. 
        
   c.  All arterials shall have a buffer of at least seven feet in width. 

   d.  All collector streets in the Town Center, Commercial Mixed‐Use and Residential 
       Mixed‐Use districts, and collector streets in the Club Residential district shall 
       have a buffer of at least six feet in width.   

   e.  Local streets in the Town Center and Commercial Mixed‐Use districts shall have 
       a buffer of at least six feet. 

    f.  All roads in the Open Space area not associated with a planned residential sub‐
        division shall not be required to have buffers.  Roads in planned residential sub‐
        divisions within the Open Space district shall meet local street standards.  
         
2.  Buffers shall be planted and shall include canopy trees, except that along collector 
    streets the town may approve a combination of vegetation and paving materials 
    consistent with an overall site design or adopted streetscape plan.  Planting require‐
    ments for street trees shall meet the standards established by the Zoning Ordinance 
    (see “Streetyards” and supplemental information). 
     

Walkable Bermuda Run                                                                  Page 19
3.  Buffers in the Town Center district may include above and below ground utilities 
    and, on the day of trash pickup, trash cans. Street furniture (benches, waste recepta‐
    cles, etc. ) and mail boxes are permitted provided they are free of advertising or at‐
    tribution.  Signage of any kind is forbidden, except for identification signs erected 
    by the town. 

4.  Buffers in districts other than the Town Center may include above and below 
    ground utilities, mail boxes, identification signs, and trash cans on the day of pick‐
    up. 

5.  Parking in buffers shall be prohibited. 

3.3.5 Greenways 

1.  Greenways shall be at least ten feet in width and be located in a public easement or 
    right‐of‐way. 

2.  Greenways shall be paved with asphalt, concrete, or finely crushed stone or granite 
    screening (rock dust).  Boardwalks may also be used in wet areas. 

3.  A minimum ten foot vertical clearance shall be maintained for the travel way and a 
    two foot shoulder along all greenways. 

4.  Greenways shall meet AASHTO design requirements for shared use paths. 

3.3.6 Signalization, Crossings and Traffic Calming 

1  All sidewalks, bike lanes, and shared use paths shall use pavement markings, sign‐
   age and signalization that conforms to the standards set forth in the Manual on Uni‐
   form Traffic Control Devices. 

2.  All road crossings shall be designed to safely and conveniently accommodate all 
    users of the facility intersecting the roadway. 

3.  All crossings shall be designed to conform to AASHTO guidelines and shall meet 
    NCDOT requirements on state maintained roadways.  The town may require raised 
    crossings and crossings made of different materials in high traffic areas. 

4.  Midblock crossings shall be required along local streets and collector streets where 
    the town determines that the length of the street and/or the amount of non‐
    motorized traffic demand such a crossing and where such crossing can be installed 
    safely. 

5.  Traffic calming design and devices are encouraged and may be required along cer‐
    tain streets where the town or NCDOT determines that the potential speed of mo‐
    torized traffic may be dangerous or discouraging to non‐motorized traffic. 



Page 20                                                                Town of Bermuda Run
3.4   Cross Sections 
The following diagrams and photographs are intended to illustrate and complement 
the standards set forth in Section 3.3.  If conflicts are found, the text of Section 3.3 shall 
govern. 



                                        Figure 1:
                             Arterials—Shared Use Path Option

                                                                       Along arterials, princi‐
                                                                       pally U.S. 158 and N.C. 
                                                                       801, a shared use path 
                                                                       may be installed on one 
                                                                       or both sides of the 
                                                                       road, if approved by the 
                                                                       town, that measures at 
                                                                       least eight feet in width.  
                                                                       A minimum seven foot 
                                                                       buffer is also installed 
                                                                       between the vehicular 
                                                                       lane and the path.  A six 
                                                                       foot sidewalk and five 
                                                                       foot bike lane shall be 
         shared use      buffer               vehicle lane             installed where shared 
          path 8’          7’                                          use paths are not          
                                                                               used. 




                                                             Shared use path on Sanibel 
                                                             Island, Florida 
                                                              
                                                              
                                                              
                                                              
                                                              
                                                              
                                                              
                                                              
                                                                  www.pedbikeimages.org /  
                                                                             Dan Burden 




Walkable Bermuda Run                                                                          Page 21
                                       Figure 2:
                        Arterials—Sidewalk and Bike Lane Option

                                                                 Along arterials, princi‐
                                                                 pally U.S. 158 and N.C. 
                                                                 801, a sidewalk and des‐
                                                                 ignated bike lane are in‐
                                                                 stalled on both sides of 
                                                                 the road where curb and 
                                                                 gutter exist, unless a 
                                                                 shared use path has been 
                                                                 approved by the town.  
                                                                 The sidewalk is at least 
                                                                 six feet in width and the 
                                                                 bike lane five feet in 
                                                                 width.  A minimum 
                                                                 seven foot buffer is also 
                                                                 installed between the 
     sidewalk 6’   buffer        bike     vehicle lane
                     7’          lane                            vehicular lane and the 
                                  5’                             path. 




                                                         Sidewalk and bicycle lane in Tallahas‐
                                                         see, Florida.  NOTE:  the buffer and 
                                                         the sidewalk in this photo are less than 
                                                         the width required by this plan. 

                                                          

                                                          
                                                          
                                                          
                                                             www.pedbikeimages.org / Dan Burden 




Page 22                                                                   Town of Bermuda Run
                                          Figure 3:
                            Collector Streets in the Town Center

                                                                       Along collector 
                                                                       streets in the Town 
                                                                       Center, there are des‐
                                                                       ignated bike lanes 
                                                                       along the roadways, 
                                                                       and sidewalks are on 
                                                                       both sides of the road 
                                                                       at a minimum width 
                                                                       of ten feet. Buffers are       
                                                                                   six feet. 




                 sidewalk       buffer      marked    vehicle lane
                    10’           6’          bike
                                            lane 5’




                                                          Downtown Greenville, South 
                                                          Carolina. 

                                                           

                                                           

                                                           

                                                           

                                                           
                                                           
                                                           
                                                                      Rhea Consulting, Inc. 




Walkable Bermuda Run                                                                           Page 23
                                      Figure 4:
          Local Streets in the Town Center and Commercial Mixed-Use Areas


                                                               Along these roads, 
                                                               bicycles share out‐
                                                               side lanes with mo‐
                                                               torized vehicles.  
                                                               Sidewalks are a mini‐
                                                               mum of six feet in 
                                                               width and located on 
                                                               both sides of the 
                                                               road.  Buffers are six 
                                                               feet. 




                sidewalk    buffer         bicycle shares
                   6’         6’            vehicle lane




                                                               Sidewalks in Kinderton 
                                                               Commercial. 

                                                                

                                                                

                                                                

                                                                

                                                                                            

                                                                                            

                                                                                            

                                                                                            

                                                                      Rhea Consulting, Inc. 




Page 24                                                            Town of Bermuda Run
                                       Figure 5:
            Collector Streets in Commercial and Residential Mixed-Use Areas


                                                                      Along collector 
                                                                      streets in Commer‐
                                                                      cial and Residential 
                                                                      Mixed‐Use areas, 
                                                                      there are designated 
                                                                      bike lanes and side‐
                                                                      walks along both 
                                                                      sides of the road.  
                                                                      Sidewalks are a mini‐
                                                                      mum of six feet in 
                                                                      width. Buffers are six 
                                                                                  feet. 

                       sidewalk   buffer    marked     vehicle lane
                          6’        6’     bike lane
                                              5’




                                                                          Buffer and bicycle 
                                                                          lane.  NOTE:  the 
                                                                          buffer in this photo is 
                                                                          less than the eight foot 
                                                                          buffer required by this 
                                                                          plan. 

                                                                           

                                                                           

                                                                           

                                                                           

                                                                           




                                                                           

                                                                              www.pedbikeimages.org 
                                                                                       /Dan Burden 




Walkable Bermuda Run                                                                      Page 25
                               Figure 6:
              Collector Streets in Club Residential Areas


                                                                        Along collector 
                                                                        streets in Club Resi‐
                                                                        dential areas, there 
                                                                        are designated bike 
                                                                        lanes along both 
                                                                        sides of the road.  
                                                                        Sidewalks are a mini‐
                                                                        mum of six feet in 
                                                                        width on both sides 
                                                                        of the road. Buffers 
                                                                        are six feet. 




          sidewalk       buffer           bicycle shares outside
             6’            6’               lane with vehicle




                  

                 www.pedbikeimages.org / Dan Burden and ITE Pedestrian Bicycle Council 


Page 26                                                                      Town of Bermuda Run
                                        Figure 7:
            Local Streets in Club Residential and Residential Mixed-Use Areas

                                                                  Along local streets in 
                                                                  Club Residential and 
                                                                  Residential Mixed‐
                                                                  Use areas, bicycles 
                                                                  share the road with 
                                                                  vehicles.  Sidewalks 
                                                                  are a minimum of six 
                                                                  feet in width on both 
                                                                  sides of the road. 
                                                                  Buffers are four feet. 

                         sidewalk buffer       bicycle shares
                            6’      4’       lane with vehicles




                                                                    Kinderton Residential 

                                                                     

                                                                     

                                                                     

                                                                     

                                                                     

                                                                     

                                                                     




                                                                     
                                                                     
                                                                     
                                                                     
                                                                        Rhea Consulting, Inc. 




Walkable Bermuda Run                                                                  Page 27
3.5   Tabular Summary of Requirements 

The following table is a summary of the standards set forth in Section 3.3 and illus‐
trated in Section 3.4.  If conflicts are found, the text of Section 3.3. shall govern. 

                                        Table 2:
                      Summary of Requirements for New Infrastructure
                                                         Facility Recommendations
                         Roadway                            Sidewalk/                      Buffer
    Zoning District
                       Classification        Type           Path Mini-      Bikeway        Mini-
                                              and             mum           Minimum        mum
                                            Location          Width          Width         Width
                                        Shared use path
                                        along one side or   8 foot path/
          All            Arterials      sidewalk and bike   6 foot side-   5 feet marked    7 feet
                                        lanes along both       walk
                                        sides of roadway
                                        Sidewalk and
                                        marked bike lanes
     Town Center         Collectors                           10 feet      5 feet marked    6 feet
                                        along both sides
                                        of roadway
     Town Center
                                        Sidewalk along                     Bikes share
         and
                        Local streets   both sides of          6 feet      outside lane     6 feet
     Commercial
                                        roadway                            with vehicles
      Mixed-Use
                                        Sidewalk and
   Commercial and
                                        marked bike lanes
     Residential         Collectors                            6 feet      5 feet marked    6 feet
                                        along both sides
     Mixed-Use
                                        of roadway
                                        Sidewalk and
                                                                           Bikes share
        Club                            marked bike lanes
                         Collectors                            6 feet      outside lane     6 feet
      Residential                       along both sides
                                                                           with vehicles
                                        of roadway
     Residential                        Sidewalk along                     Bikes share
   Mixed-Use and        Local streets   both sides of          6 feet      outside lane     4 feet
   Club Residential                     roadway                            with vehicles

                                        Greenways where                                     2 foot
          NA                NA                                10 feet          NA
                                        installed                                          shoulder

 
All sidewalks, bike lanes, and shared use paths including greenways shall be built 
according to the latest AASHTO standards for construction.    




Page 28                                                                         Town of Bermuda Run
3.6    Pedestrian and Bicycle Crossing Requirements 

Providing a safe and efficient non‐motorized transportation network requires special 
attention to where those facilities cross streets and driveways.  Any place where 
these facilities intersect is a potential place for accidents and should be planned and 
constructed with care.  In all cases, such crossings must be built to the standards in 
the Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices and shall be well marked and 
signed.  Crossings shall be planned for at each street intersection and may be con‐
structed mid‐block where the town determines that such crossings are necessary and 
safe.  Where non‐motorized paths cross driveways for non‐residential uses and pri‐
vate streets, crossings shall also be marked and signed to remind motorists to watch 
for pedestrians.  Contrasting materials and colors that visually distinguish the cross‐
ing work well as do raised crossings in certain places. 
 
In some cases, it may be necessary for the town to require that streets and intersec‐
tions incorporate traffic calming design and devices to insure that motorized traffic 
moves at speeds that are safe and non‐threatening to pedestrians.  Design considera‐
tions might include shorter block lengths.  Design devices may include chicanes and 
bulb‐outs, although such devices should be carefully thought out and planned to 
avoid endangering cyclists using the road. 




       
       
       
 

                               Midblock crossing diagram.   
                                             
                                                    Federal Highway Administration. 



Walkable Bermuda Run                                                                   Page 29
          Planted medians provide a refuge for pedestrians crossing the street.   
                                                                                               
                                                                             PBIC Dan Burden 




                                                                        Raised mid‐block crossings 
                                                                        may make sense on long 
                                                                        local streets.  Raised cross‐
                                                                        ings may also help to slow 
                                                                        traffic.   
                                                                         
                                                                                         
                                                                                         
                                                                                         
                                                                                         
                                                                                         
                                                                                         
                                                                                         
                                                                                         
                                                                                         
                                                                                         
                                                                                     PBIC Dan Burden 




Page 30                                                                       Town of Bermuda Run
                                                                                   A change in the color and 
                                                                                   texture of pavement may 
                                                                                   help to remind motorists to 
                                                                                   watch for pedestrians.   
                                                                                    
                                                                                    
                                                                                    
                                                                                    
                                                                                    
                                                                                    
                                                                                    
                                                                                    
                                                                                    
                                                                                    
                                                                                   ITE Pedestrian Bicycle Council 




   Safe crossings for bicycle lanes also require planning and special marking,  
   such as this painted crossing in Germany.   
                                                                                                        
                                                                                    PBIC Michael King 




Walkable Bermuda Run                                                                                       Page 31
4           How Will This Plan Be
            Implemented?
4.1       Existing Policies  
 
The only policies that the town currently has related to the construction of alternative 
transportation facilities is the Zoning Ordinance and the Subdivision Regulations for 
the town.  These ordinances require sidewalks in certain locations and the Zoning Or‐
dinance refers to this plan for guidance in most cases.  Where there are conflicts be‐
tween the requirements of any ordinance and this plan, the more stringent regulation 
shall prevail.   
 
The town did not have any policies related to the construction of shared use paths or 
bike lanes at the time this plan was written. 
 
4.2   Exceptions to Applicability 

The standards and requirements set forth in this plan shall not apply to developer in‐
stalled facilities as follows: 
 
       1.  Only developments along existing streets where curb and gutter exist shall 
           be required to install sidewalks along the existing street. 

          2.  All existing single‐family residential development and any new single‐
              family development on existing lots of record located on existing streets 
              shall be exempt from the requirements set forth herein.   

          3.  All existing duplex and multi‐family residential developments shall be ex‐
              empt from the requirements set forth herein.   

          4.  All new duplex and multi‐family residential developments with less than 
              five units per acre shall be exempt from meeting the standards set forth 
              herein along any existing street. 

          5.  New single‐family residential subdivisions shall be required to meet all side‐
              walk standards set forth herein for any new street constructed and to extend 
              facilities along existing streets abutting the new subdivision whenever such 
              streets intersect the new street(s) and such extensions will connect the new 
              subdivision to an existing or planned sidewalk network.  Where more than 

Page 32                                                                 Town of Bermuda Run
           one existing street abuts the property, the Planning Board may waive the re‐
           quirement for facilities along one of these streets as outlined in Section 3.7. 

       6.  Existing non‐residential development shall be exempt from the require‐
           ments set forth herein; however, unless otherwise exempt, redevelopment of 
           the site into a new commercial retail or office use shall subject the new de‐
           velopment to all requirements that may apply. 

       7.  All properties within the General Business and Open Space districts are ex‐
           empt from the requirements set forth herein. 

       8.  Bicycle lanes shall not be required along any existing street, but may be con‐
           structed by the town or NCDOT as funding permits. 

       9.  Greenways shall not be required, but may be permitted according to the 
           standards set forth herein. 

 
4.3   Waivers 

       1.  The Planning Board may waive any of the requirements contained within 
           this plan where, in its opinion, such waiver is consistent with the vision of 
           this plan and does not disrupt or impair the non‐motorized network.  Waiv‐
           ers shall be limited to the following: 
            
           a.  Infill development in neighborhoods or on streets where the sidewalks 
               and bicycle facilities should match the dominate pattern on the street or 
               in the neighborhood. 
                
           b.  Physical features of the area including the availability of existing or new 
               public rights‐of‐way (including NCDOT encroachment), grades, rocks/
               ledges, specimen trees or other important natural features which should 
               be preserved, etc.  In these cases, the Planning Board may approve alter‐
               nate locations, buffer widths, path widths, pavement, or path types.  
                
           c.  Shared use paths, including greenways, may be constructed using board‐
               walks in wet areas or finely crushed stone or granite screening (rock 
               dust) in low traffic areas. 
                
           d.  Sidewalks in the Club Residential area may be waived if the Planning 
               Board determines that a planned or existing greenway would serve the 
               same purpose. 
Walkable Bermuda Run                                                                 Page 33
                  
             e.  Sidewalks along cul‐de‐sacs may be waived if the board determines that 
                 street characteristics and nearby facilities will provide adequate levels of 
                 service for pedestrians. 
                  
             f.  Whenever the developer can demonstrate that imminent road or public 
                 improvements planned by NCDOT, the town, or a public utility would 
                 compromise or destroy a required sidewalk, path, or greenway, construc‐
                 tion of the facility may be delayed up to one year as long as the improve‐
                 ments are guaranteed with a surety bond, letter of credit or similar in‐
                 strument acceptable to the town. 

             g.  Whenever a new development occurs on a corner lot or is otherwise 
                 bounded by two or more existing streets, the Planning Board may waive 
                 the requirement for improvements on all but one of these streets where it 
                 determines that the requirement for extension along more than one street 
                 will not provide connectivity to a larger network of facilities. 
 
          2.  The Planning Board may also waive any of the requirements contained 
              within this plan if, and to the extent that, the Board finds that to require a 
              developer to construct the facilities called for in this plan along an existing 
              street would be to impose an obligation that is not roughly proportional to 
              the need for such facilities created by the proposed development. 
 
4.4   Developer Installed Facilities 
 
Most of the facilities envisioned by this plan will be built by developers as part of the 
development approval process. By adoption of this plan and statements contained 
within the zoning and subdivision ordinances, the town has declared that alternative 
transportation facilities are a public necessity and shall be required as public improve‐
ments on all new construction sites and along all new streets within all new subdivi‐
sions as directed by those ordinances and this plan unless otherwise permitted by the 
town to be constructed as private improvements.  Sidewalks and bike lanes, as re‐
quired, shall be installed as continuous networks in all new subdivisions.  As such, 
they shall be constructed as planned prior to the release of a certificate of occupancy or 
bonded for completion in the same manner as streets and other public infrastructure. 




Page 34                                                                    Town of Bermuda Run
4.5   Public Installation of Facilities 

Facilities as outlined in this plan may be planned and constructed by the town when 
and if funding is available.  It is the policy of the town to apply for any and all funds 
available for new facility construction and existing facility maintenance whenever 
practicable.   However, it is inevitable that the construction of sidewalks along existing 
streets will impose a financial burden on the town.  Therefore, the construction of side‐
walks on existing streets shall be based on a list of priorities determined by the Town 
Council on an annual basis.  The Planning Board’s recommended list for the Town 
Council’s consideration is attached as an appendix to this plan.  Facilities may also be 
considered upon petition by residents.    
 
In constructing new sidewalks along existing streets, the Town Council may decide to 
cover the entire cost of construction using town monies, or it may ask the property 
owners along the street or within the neighborhood to bear or to share in the cost of 
construction.  If the cost is to be shared, the Town Council shall establish a policy for 
cost allocation and a plan for payment by property owners. 
 
Only town residents may petition for sidewalks and only streets within the corporate 
limits of Bermuda Run shall be eligible for public installation of sidewalks.  Petitions 
for new sidewalks or sidewalk extensions shall be submitted to the Town Council on 
forms provided at town hall.  All petitions shall contain the signatures of at least fifty‐
one percent of the property owners along the street where the sidewalk is requested.  
Petitions that lack sidewalk continuity will not be considered.  In other words, the re‐
quested improvements must extend from block to block or from the end of existing 
sidewalks to the terminus of a block or another section of sidewalk. 
 
The Town Council may refer the request to the Planning Board for its consideration 
and recommendation. If the Town Council determines that a sidewalk may be war‐
ranted, then it may commission an engineering study to evaluate feasibility, consider‐
ing factors such as:  
 
•   Available right‐of‐way or town easement for installation 
•   Traffic counts (required to determine priority) 
•   Terrain 
•   Existing obstructions, utility poles, landscaping, etc. 
•   Existing trees and the impact on trees 



Walkable Bermuda Run                                                                Page 35
•   Drainage conditions; and 
•   Cost estimates 
     
The results of the study will be made available to the public.  Based upon the results of 
this study, the Town Council will decide that it will or will not consider the construc‐
tion of sidewalks in the location requested.  If the street already has sidewalks along 
one side, then the Town Council may consider it a lower priority than other requests 
and deny or delay the request.  If the sidewalk would allow residents to connect to 
shopping areas, schools, government services and office locations, the Town Council 
may consider it a higher priority and place it before other requests. 
 
If the Town Council determines that a requested facility is not a priority for the town 
and that it will not consider public participation in its construction, the Town Council 
may permit the private installation of a public facility as long as its construction meets 
the minimum standards outlined herein and the facility and the land on which it and 
any associated buffers are constructed is dedicated by easement or right‐of‐way to the 
town. 
 
Shared use paths, including greenways, that are not required as part of a development 
project may be constructed entirely by the town or the town may enter into an agree‐
ment with any public, private or non‐profit entity to share the cost of construction. 
 
4.6   Priority Facilities 
 
Appendix A contains a recommended list of potential Capital Improvements Plan 
(CIP) projects for the public construction of new sidewalks, shared use paths, bike 
lanes and greenways, especially where such projects are needed to fill in system 
gaps.  The CIP priority list is prepared annually by the Planning Board for considera‐
tion by the Town Council as part of the budget process.  If accepted by the Town 
Council, such projects may need to undergo detailed corridor analysis to identify ob‐
stacles and opportunities and to estimate cost of construction. 
 
4.7   Facilities Required for Voluntary Annexation 
 
The Town Council may, at its discretion, require any petitioner requesting voluntary 
annexation to install sidewalks, signage, or pedestrian crossings consistent with the 
standards set forth herein as a condition of annexation.  The council may also alter or 
waive any standard, which, in its opinion, cannot reasonably be met by the petitioner. 


Page 36                                                               Town of Bermuda Run
5 Glossary of Terms
AASHTO – American Association of State Highway & Transportation Officials. 
 
ADA – American with Disabilities Act of 1990; broad legislation mandating provision 
of access to employment, services, and the built environment to those with disabili‐
ties. 
 
Arterial Street – roads providing intercounty connectivity or significant intracounty 
connectivity.  For the purposes of this plan, this term shall be limited to US 158 and 
NC 801. 
 
Bike Lane – a portion of the roadway designated for bicycle use.  Pavement striping 
and markings sometimes accompanied with signage are used to delineate the lane.   
 
Bulb‐out (also known as a choker, bulb, nub, neckdown or gateway) – a narrowing 
of a street, either at an intersection or mid‐block, in order to reduce the width of the 
traveled way. 
 
Buffer – a strip of land between a sidewalk or path and the back of curb of an adja‐
cent street.  
 
Capital Improvements Plan — a short‐term multi‐year plan that identifies capital 
projects, provides a schedule for implementation, and lists options for financing. 
 
Chicane – sequence of tight serpentine curves (usually an S‐shape curve) in a road‐
way to slow cars. 
 
Collector Streets – a street connecting local streets to arterials. 
 
Crosswalk – any portion of a roadway at an intersection or elsewhere that is dis‐
tinctly indicated for pedestrian crossing.  Where there are no pavement markings, 
there is a crosswalk at each leg of every intersection, defined by law as the prolonga‐
tion or connection of the lateral lines of the sidewalks. 
 
Cul‐de‐sac – a street closed at one end. 
 
Greenway – a shared use path normally located in a linear strip of preserved land set 
aside for recreational use or environmental protection. 

Walkable Bermuda Run                                                               Page 37
 
Infill – development or redevelopment of land in an urbanized area usually within an 
existing neighborhood or commercial area. 
 
Intersection – the area of a roadway created when two or more public roadways join 
together at any angle. 
 
Local Street – a street providing direct access to a limited number of parcels or uses.  
These streets are typically short in length, are designed for low speeds, and may termi‐
nate in a cul‐de‐sac. 
 
Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices, or MUTCD – defines the standards used 
by road managers nationwide to install and maintain traffic control devices on all 
streets and highways. The MUTCD is published by the Federal Highway Administra‐
tion (FHWA) under 23 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 655, Subpart F. 
 
Midblock Crossing – a crossing point positioned in the center of a block rather than at 
an intersection. 
 
NCDOT – North Carolina Department of Transportation. 
 
Path – a pedestrian walkway, other than a standard sidewalk, a greenway or a shared 
use path. 
 
Pedestrian – a person afoot; a person operating a pushcart; a person riding on, or pull‐
ing a coaster wagon, sled, scooter, tricycle, bicycle with wheels less than fourteen 
inches in diameter, or a similar conveyance, or on roller skates, skateboard, wheelchair 
or a baby in a carriage. 

Shared Roadway – where bicycles and vehicles share the roadway without any por‐
tion of the road specifically designated for the bicycle use.  Shared roadways may have 
certain undesignated accommodations for bicyclists such as wide lanes, paved shoul‐
ders, and/or low speeds. 
 
Shared Use Path – a wide pathway that is separate from a roadway that is shared by 
bicyclists, pedestrians, and other users specified within this plan. 
 
Sidewalk – an improved facility intended to provide for pedestrian movement; usu‐
ally, but not always, located in the public right‐of‐way adjacent to a roadway. 



Page 38                                                              Town of Bermuda Run
 
Streetyard – The area of land along the front property line parallel to a right‐of‐way 
reserved for tree planting and landscaping. 




Walkable Bermuda Run                                                               Page 39
                    Appendix A


          Annual Planning Board
           Recommendation for
            Walkable Projects


(This appendix is not adopted by the Town Board. Priorities
may be established by the Town Board as part of the annual
          budget or a capital improvement plan.)




Page 40                                      Town of Bermuda Run

								
To top