California Fire Safe Council 2006 Proposal for State Funding by oneroomschool

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									PROPOSAL FOR GENERAL BUDGET FUNDING OF
    CALIFORNIA’S FIRE SAFE COUNCILS
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY ............................................................................................................ 3
  Need/Fund Allocation .............................................................................................................. 3

I.     HISTORY OF CALIFORNIA FIRE SAFE COUNCIL ...................................................... 6

II. CALIFORNIA FIRE SAFE COUNCIL FUNDING, ACCOMPLISHMENTS AND
NEED ............................................................................................................................................. 8

III. PROPOSAL: FUNDING OF CALIFORNIA AND LOCAL FIRE SAFE COUNCILS
THROUGH THE CFSC FROM STATE BUDGET 2007-2012 ............................................ 10

IV. CALIFORNIA FIRE SAFE COUNCIL ORGANIZATIONAL FRAMEWORK.............. 13

Appendix A – Programs and Funding ..................................................................................... 15
  California Fire Safe Council Major Funding Sources 1993-2005 ............................... 16
  Growing Gap in NFP Funding.................................................................................... 18

Appendix B – Accomplishments .............................................................................................. 20
  2003-2004 Report (attachment)................................................................................. 20
  2005 Accomplishments.............................................................................................. 21

Appendix C – Subgrants ........................................................................................................... 29
  California Fire Safe Council Subgrants 2003-2005.................................................... 29

Appendix D – California’s Current Fire Safe Councils ......................................................... 34

Appendix E – Contacts.............................................................................................................. 38




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EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

The Governor’s Blue Ribbon Fire Commission’s Multi-Jurisdictional Recommendation 9,
report, p. 24, “recommends that federal, state and local policymakers consider creating
a stable funding infrastructure for the California Fire Alliance and Fire Safe Councils.”

The California Fire Safe Council (CFSC) currently receives no State funding, and is
98% federally funded. The federal grant funding is unstable as the National Fire Plan
matures and demand for federal dollars for other critical national needs grows.
Simultaneously, capacity in California is increasing. The result is a widening gap
between funding and capacity/need from $6.3 million in 2001 to $23.4 million in 2005.
In 2006, the gap is approximately $26 million.

The CFSC and a network of approximately 130 local Councils are now a vital fire
preparedness friend to all Californians, and with their growth and good work, funding
should be made available from 2007 onward. Therefore, the California Fire Safe
Council requests that consideration be given by Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger to
placing a budget for the activities of the California Fire Safe Council to administer for the
years 2007-2012 in the amount of $26 million each year.

The dollars will fund wildfire-related educational programs, wildfire hazard mitigation
projects, wildfire protection planning, capacity building and operational activities of the
CFSC and local Fire Safe Councils throughout California.

The CFSC is the right group to fund because of our philosophy and operational set-up.

We are the state’s leading community-based resource for wildfire preparedness, as are
local Councils in their communities. We believe fire prevention and loss reduction are
everyone’s business. We try to reduce the stress on the firefighting resources and
associated costs by engaging neighbors to take personal responsibility for making their
communities better able to withstand the effects of wildfire. Wildfire is an integral part of
California’s environmental health -- a fact of life in California. We believe it’s time
California becomes proactive instead of reactive. We want to change behavior from
thinking that when a fire starts, all we have to do is call the fire department. This sole
reliance on fire suppression will only contribute to growing suppression costs and
community losses. By engaging people to get prepared before the fire, we can create
significant savings for families, businesses and governments. This, in turn, will
contribute to firefighter safety and suppression effectiveness.

Need/Fund Allocation

The funding will be allocated to local Fire Safe Councils using the already established
and successful multi-agency, cooperative Fire Safe California Grants Clearinghouse
System that is a competitive grants application system for wildfire safety projects of
community-based organizations. The Clearinghouse is under the leadership of the
California Fire Alliance (Alliance). The Alliance is composed of the CFSC, California’s



                                                                                              3
fire and land management agencies, the Regional Council of Rural Counties and
California Fire Chief’s Association. Its goal is to remove institutional barriers to “pre-fire
management,” which are activities to reduce the potential effects of wildfire.

Under the Clearinghouse program, the Council assumed the role of National Fire Plan
community assistance grants facilitator in California. The majority of funding for
community-based wildfire preparedness projects selected then flows through the CFSC
to get the projects “on the ground.”

Centralizing funding through the CFSC has led to efficiencies and consistencies in
compliance with grants management regulations through increased training
opportunities the Council offers and auditor scrutiny, resulting in strong stewardship of
taxpayer dollars. The CFSC undergoes annual audits to examine compliance with
Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP), Generally Accepted Government
Auditing Standards (GAGAS), and program-specific and other regulations. The Council
has had positive reports. In addition, the Council’s grants management of the
Clearinghouse has been examined by the Department of Interior Office of Inspector
General as a model program for other states.

Project selections will be based on the already-established criteria of the clearinghouse.

Through the Clearinghouse in 2005, the CFSC managed 186 projects in 2005 with a
staff of four full-time and one part-time employee. The CFSC received $4.8 million in
federal grants in 2005 -- 93 cents of every dollar went to programs. Since its inception
in 1993, the CFSC has been fortunate to receive approximately $16.5 million in support;
the lion’s share comes from the National Fire Plan. Since 2001, our programs and
subgrants have leveraged $2.8 million in nonfederal matching value, mostly from in-kind
services of project partners.

California Fire Safe Council Grants Accomplishments 2001-2005

Acres Improved for Fire Safety                                            14,701
Community Fire Plans                                                         196
Community-based Educational Projects                                       2,480
Homes Protected                                                          431,217
Home Values Protected                                           $ 21,640,530,945

Despite this success, on average 61% of potential projects fall victim to lack of funding.
The problem has grown from 42% in 2001 to 70% in 2005.

In 2005, lack of funds meant leaving 47,838 acres untreated, not funding communities
eager to create 54 Community Wildfire Protection Plans, and forgoing the opportunity to
help more Californians take personal responsibility for fire safety through 27,323
educational products, programs and workshops.

Because of population growth expected in California in the next decade, vast miles of
natural forestland and wildland urban interface areas will see correlating home building



                                                                                                 4
growth. Because of this growth, it is imperative that the CFSC and local Councils
continue to help prevent wildfires and save lives by implementing and maintaining
wildfire preparedness and loss mitigation programs in every county.




                                                                                    5
I. HISTORY OF CALIFORNIA FIRE SAFE COUNCIL

The California Fire Safe Council began as the Fire Safe Council (FSC) in 1993. It
formed as an adjunct to the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection’s
(CDF) statewide Fire Prevention Education program. The earliest members of the
Council were CDF, and the building, insurance and landscape industries.

Charged with communicating fire prevention educational messages to 33 million
Californians, the education program’s responsibility far exceeded its annual budget of
$250,000, which equated to less than one penny per person. With many of the fastest
growing communities located in areas served by CDF, the department could no longer
rely on its resources alone to meet its educational mission. The FSC became a new
way of spreading fire safety messages – grassroots neighbor-to-neighbor, instead of
prescriptive government-to-citizen.

The FSC formed around the concept of an organization whose members understood
California’s wildfire threat and participated in fostering wildfire safety across the state.
Prior to the FSC, no organization had been successful at consistently drawing the
cooperative participation of disparate groups. The founders brought these diverse
interests together and inspired them to deliver a uniform call to action to Californians to
get prepared for wildfire.

The Council quickly grew to include: Allstate Insurance Company, American Society of
Landscape Architects, Association of California Insurance Companies, Association of
Contract Counties, Bureau of Land Management, California Air Resources Board,
California Association of Nurserymen, California Association of REALTORS, California
Association of Resource Conservation Districts, California Board of Forestry and Fire
Protection, California Building Industry Association, California Cattlemen’s Association,
California Department of Conservation, CDF, California Department of Insurance,
California Department of Parks and Recreation, California FAIR Plan Association,
California Farm Bureau Federation, California Fire Chiefs Association, California
Integrated Waste Management Board, California Landscape Contractors Association,
California State Association of Counties, California State Automobile Association,
California State Fire Marshal’s Office, California State Firefighters Association,
California Urban Forests Council, Chemco, Chubb Insurance, Council for a Green
Environment, Farmers Insurance Group of Companies, Federal Emergency
Management Agency, Fire Districts Association of California, Fireman’s Fund Insurance
Company, Governor’s Office of Emergency Services, Insurance Information Network of
California, Insurance Services Office, League of California Cities Fire Chiefs, National
Audubon Society, National Fire Protection Association, PG&E, Personal Insurance
Federation of California, Planning and Conservation League, Safeco Insurance, Society
of American Foresters, Southern California Edison Co., State Farm Insurance Co.,
Thermo-Gel, USAA Property & Casualty Insurance, USDA Forest Service, 21st Century
Insurance.




                                                                                               6
The members rallied around the FSC’s mission: to preserve and enhance California's
manmade and natural resources by providing leadership and support that mobilizes all
Californians to protect their homes, communities and environment from wildfires.
Utilizing the combined expertise, in-kind resources and distribution channels of its
members the Council united its diverse membership to speak with one voice about fire
safety. Since its inception, the Council has distributed fire prevention education
materials to Californians and industry leaders, evaluated legislation pertaining to fire
safety and empowered grassroots organizations to spearhead fire safety programs.

Examples of early successes include award-winning educational programs such as a
public education, multi-media campaign in response to El Nino, “El Fuego,” that
increased homeowner compliance with defensible space regulations; forming active
local Fire Safe Councils reflecting the same divergent groups on the statewide Council
that helped neighbors get prepared for wildfire; and enlisting the participation and
support of both government and private sector in a common goal.

Although the Fire Safe Council formed as a statewide organization in 1993 with no
thought of local counterparts, it began helping form local Fire Safe Councils in the mid-
1990s in response to public interest in the mission and in support of CDF’s Fire Plan.
By the late 1990s, there were approximately 50 local Councils operating in
approximately 20 counties, an amazing statistic since there was no funding for these
groups available from the statewide FSC and they grew organically out of local interest
as bottom-up organizations. Local Councils included citizens, and representatives of
government and industry, which served to expand the ability of the FSC to meet its
mission.

As CDF’s public education program and priorities changed over the years to focus more
directly on CDF activities, the FSC became independent of the agency. It incorporated
as the California Fire Safe Council (CFSC), a 501(c)3 nonprofit public benefit
corporation, in 2002. Local Councils remain separate and are either unincorporated
organizations or incorporated as nonprofits.

Beyond helping communities establish Fire Safe Councils by providing information, an
organizational framework and encouragement, the California Fire Safe Council (CFSC)
became a voice through which local Fire Safe Councils could unite and speak. The
CFSC helped troubleshoot and resolve problems at the request of local groups. By
2000, there were approximately 90 local Fire Safe Councils in California operating in
approximately 35 counties. They were generally funded, if at all, by small, private-
sector grants. The Councils focused on educating homeowners on fire risks and how to
mitigate, with an emphasis on defensible space (PRC 4291). Most work was
accomplished through volunteer and coordinated efforts of members, and the California
Fire Safe Council provided educational materials, training and guidance.

To maintain its activities, the CFSC receives 98% of its funding from National Fire Plan
grants. These grants from federal agencies fund the CFSC’s major program, a multi-



                                                                                            7
agency public benefit cooperative grants clearinghouse. The Fire Safe California
Grants Clearinghouse includes subgrants managed by the CFSC and awarded to local
community groups for hazard mitigation, wildfire safety planning and educational
programs. Private grants support the remainder of the CFSC’s efforts to fulfill our
mission.

The CFSC currently receives no State funding. Some local Councils have received
funding from CDF under Proposition 40, although the grant program has been affected
by changing requirements.

The Governor’s Blue Ribbon Fire Commission’s Multi-Jurisdictional
Recommendation 9 from its final report, p. 24, “recommends that federal, state
and local policymakers consider creating a stable funding infrastructure for the
California Fire Alliance and Fire Safe Councils.”

II. CALIFORNIA FIRE SAFE COUNCIL FUNDING, ACCOMPLISHMENTS AND
NEED

The California Fire Safe Council started as an information-sharing organization. As the
effectiveness of the organization and the promise of the mission have consistently been
demonstrated, the Council has grown to be an opinion-leader in community fire safety
and a facilitator that helps grow personal responsibility among neighbors to be prepared
for wildfire, including helping foster formation of approximately 130 local Councils.

Doing a lot with a little is the hallmark of the California and local Fire Safe Councils. For
example, the CFSC managed 186 projects in 2005 with a staff of four full-time and one
part-time employee. The CFSC received $4.8 million in federal grants in 2005 -- 93
cents of every dollar went to programs. Since its inception in 1993, the CFSC has been
fortunate to receive approximately $16.5 million in support; the lion’s share comes from
the National Fire Plan. Since 2001, our programs and subgrants have leveraged $2.8
million in nonfederal matching value, mostly from in-kind services of project partners.

Since the CFSC began receiving National Fire Plan funding in 2001, we have exceeded
expectations on accomplishments through our own programs and subgrants to
community-based entities:

California Fire Safe Council Grants Accomplishments 2001-2005

Acres Improved for Fire Safety                                            14,701
Community Fire Plans                                                         196
Community-based Educational Projects                                       2,480
Homes Protected                                                          431,217
Home Values Protected                                           $ 21,640,530,945

Examples of specific project accomplishments from a recently completed $2.66 million
grant to the CFSC from the USDI Bureau of Land Management that included subgrants
to local Fire Safe Councils and other community groups:



                                                                                            8
   •   5,507 acres treated (140% of projected)
   •   Protected 153,000 homes valued at $8.7 billion
   •   Gave greater peace of mind and protection to 1.72 million Californians
   •   Created 62 fire plans and 174 risk assessments
   •   Participated in 1,395 workshops and other community activities
   •   Butte County Chipper Project
          o $39 million property value saved in Oregon Fire
   •   Hwy 168 FSC Fire Safe Project Coordinator
          o 30% greater compliance with hazard reduction clearance regulations
          o 20% reduction in preventable fire starts
          o Community Wildfire Protection Plan written
          o Fire ecology taught in elementary & high schools
          o Helped local Boy Scout earn Eagle Scout status
   •   N. Fork Rancheria Tribal Fuel Reduction
          o Every $1 in grant $ protects $20 property value – 20:1 ROI

The backdrop to this success is growing funding instability as the National Fire Plan
matures and the demand for federal dollars for other critical national needs grows. At
the same time, capacity in California is increasing. The result is a widening gap
between funding and capacity/need from $6.3 million in 2001 to $23.4 million in 2005.
In 2006, the gap is approximately $26 million.

Some Councils in the state will close if nothing is done to bridge the gap. The CFSC
itself faces this threat since 98% of its activity is federally funded. Still others may have
to cut back on their vigorous fire prevention programs that contribute to the
accomplishments above. This cannot happen.

We cannot continue to give wildfire the upper hand as we leave an average of 180
projects each year unfunded. On average 61% of potential projects fall victim to lack of
funding. The problem has grown from 42% in 2001 to 70% in 2005.

In 2005, lack of funds meant leaving 47,838 acres untreated, not funding communities
eager to create 54 Community Wildfire Protection Plans, and forgoing the opportunity to
help more Californians take personal responsibility for fire safety through 27,323
educational products, programs and workshops.

Because of the growth of population expected in California in the next decade, vast
miles of natural forestland, and wildland urban interface areas of the state will also see
correlating home building growth. Because of this anticipated growth, it is imperative
that the CFSC and local Fire Safe Councils continue to play a major role in helping to
prevent wildfires and save lives by implementing and maintaining wildfire preparedness
and loss mitigation programs in every county in the state.




                                                                                            9
III. PROPOSAL: FUNDING OF CALIFORNIA AND LOCAL FIRE SAFE COUNCILS
THROUGH THE CFSC FROM STATE BUDGET 2007-2012

The CFSC and network of local Councils are now a vital fire preparedness friend to all
Californians, and with their growth and good work, funding should be made available
from 2007 onward. Therefore, the California Fire Safe Council requests that
consideration be given by Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger to placing a budget for the
activities of the California Fire Safe Council for the years 2007-2012 in the amount of
$26 million each year. With 35 million Californians, this equates to approximately
75cents per citizen per year.

The dollars will fund wildfire-related educational programs, wildfire hazard mitigation
projects, wildfire protection planning, capacity building and operational activities of the
CFSC and local Fire Safe Councils throughout California.

The California Fire Safe Council is the right organization to fund because of our
philosophy and operational set-up.

We are the state’s leading community-based resource for wildfire preparedness, as are
local Councils in their communities. We believe fire prevention and loss reduction are
everyone’s business. To that end, we try to reduce the stress on the firefighting
resources and associated costs by engaging neighbors to take personal responsibility
for making their communities better able to withstand the effects of wildfire. Wildfire is
an integral part of California’s environmental health -- a fact of life in California. We
want to change behavior from thinking that when a fire starts, all we have to do is call
the fire department. This sole reliance on fire suppression will only contribute to
growing suppression costs and community losses. By engaging people to get prepared
before the fire, we can create significant savings for families, businesses and
governments. This, in turn, will contribute to firefighter safety and suppression
effectiveness.

We believe Californians who voluntarily take on the mission are more effective than
those who see fire safety as a government-imposed burden. People who take personal
responsibility sustain the benefits long-term because they’ve freely chosen to do the
activity. When the community embraces the mission, we’ve seen achieving that mission
takes on its own energy and momentum. For example, CDF analyzed its LE-38
inspection program and found that since the Mariposa County Fire Safe Council formed
in 1998, violations of PRC 4291 have dropped 31 percent in the county.

The funding will be allocated to local Fire Safe Councils using the already established
and successful multi-agency, cooperative Fire Safe California Grants Clearinghouse
System that is a competitive grants application system for wildfire safety projects of
community-based organizations. The Clearinghouse is under the leadership of the
California Fire Alliance (Alliance). The Alliance is composed of the Council, California’s
fire and land management agencies, the Regional Council of Rural Counties and




                                                                                              10
California Fire Chief’s Association. Its goal is to remove institutional barriers to “pre-fire
management,” which are activities to reduce the potential effects of wildfire.

Under the Clearinghouse program, the Council assumed the role of National Fire Plan
community assistance grants facilitator in California. Applicants apply for grants
through the Clearinghouse, an innovative web site the Council designed in coordination
with agencies. The lion’s share of funding for community-based wildfire preparedness
projects selected then flows through the CFSC to get the projects “on the ground.” It is
part of a cooperative effort between the Council and the agencies that fund it.

The Clearinghouse is innovative because the Council worked with the agencies to break
down institutional barriers to create a system that makes it easier for community groups
with little staff and funding to find and apply for the grants. The agencies agreed to stop
using their individual grant applications and multiple deadlines. They agreed to one
concept paper and one deadline for all grant programs. This eliminated the time and
expense it took to fill out up to five different grant applications averaging 6-10 pages
each.

With the funding centralized through one entity, it also has led to efficiencies and
consistencies in compliance with grants management regulations through increased
training opportunities the Council offers and auditor scrutiny, resulting in strong
stewardship of taxpayer dollars. The CFSC undergoes annual audits to examine
compliance with Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP), Generally Accepted
Government Auditing Standards (GAGAS), and program-specific and other regulations.
The Council has had positive reports. In addition, the Council’s grants management of
the Clearinghouse has been examined by the Department of Interior Office of Inspector
General as a model program for other states.

Project selections will be based on the already-established criteria of the clearinghouse:

   •   Will reduce hazardous fuels by treating acres in wildland urban interface areas
   •   Will create, or are linked to, a community wildfire protection plan (CWPP)
   •   Benefit one or more communities-at-risk (reference pages 43387-43391 of
       http://www.fireplan.gov/reports/351-358-en.pdf)
   •   Have a clearly defined need
   •   Are located in Condition Class 2 or 3
   •   Are located in Fire Regime III, IV or V
   •   Have clearly defined work plans that demonstrate involvement of key partners
       and identify unit costs of each task shown
   •   Have clearly defined budgets with matching commitments that reflect partners’
       capabilities
   •   Will build community capacity to help itself plan and implement strategic
       objectives
   •   Address long-term sustainability




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Project selections will be made by the Clearinghouse grant review committee, a
volunteer-based group of knowledgeable professionals in wildfire
prevention/suppression and philanthropy, selected and convened annually by the
California Fire Safe Council. The review committee is supported by staff from
government agencies to provide technical assistance during the selection process.

The benefits of the system are:

   •   No more research to identify specific grant programs, requirements and
       deadlines – there is one deadline for all programs put through the Clearinghouse.
   •   No more writing multiple, extensive applications just to be considered. The
       clearinghouse’s concept paper cuts out the extensive paperwork by phasing the
       application process. Fill out one concept paper per project and it’s considered for
       various grant programs. Then, only groups with projects selected for funding will
       have to provide more information.
   •   Less paper – Concept papers are accepted electronically, giving organizations
       more time to complete them, and saving the cost of photocopies and postage.
   •   Concept papers live on – The clearinghouse banks projects that aren’t funded
       the first time for another chance at funding if additional funds become available
       during the Clearinghouse cycle. And organizations can resubmit unfunded
       projects for two additional funding cycles without having to retype the information.
   •   Better planning – For the first time, the clearinghouse gives a landscape look at
       projects across ownership boundaries and is in compliance with the California
       Fire Plan. Timing projects to complement each other can potentially lead to
       landscape-scale improvements.

Improved success reporting –For grants passed through the California Fire Safe
Council, the Clearinghouse includes a centralized progress reporting system.

The California Fire Safe Council and local Councils have played a major role in helping
prevent the loss of life and property throughout California for more than 13 years. The
Governor’s Blue Ribbon Fire Commission recognized the effectiveness and promise of
the California Fire Safe Council model when it recommended creating a stable funding
base.

The federal government has taken up the charge of the Commission by providing
funding, although it is not stable. To help shore up funding, the Council managed to
travel to Washington D.C. in 2004 to meet with funding agencies and lawmakers despite
almost nonexistent resources for advocacy. The result of the only visit the organization
has been able to make was a $3.9 million earmark to California’s Fire Safe Councils in
federal fiscal year 2006 for hazard mitigation and community safety planning, thanks to
Senator Dianne Feinstein.

We need the state of California to take up the charge as well through funding to the
California Fire Safe Council. Our accomplishments demonstrate we have the systems




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and capabilities in place to make a positive impact in our state, we just need California’s
help.

Our preference is to receive funding in as direct a manner possible that complies with
California regulations so that we can put the funding to work as quickly as possible.

IV. CALIFORNIA FIRE SAFE COUNCIL ORGANIZATIONAL FRAMEWORK

As a 501(c)3 nonprofit corporation, the California Fire Safe Council is governed by a
volunteer-board of directors. The CFSC bylaws designate a minimum of seven and
maximum of 17 directors. The bylaws say that the board of directors shall have at least
one representative from each of the following sectors: California Fire Alliance, California
Coast Local Fire Safe Council, California Sierra Local Fire Safe Council, and Southern
California Local Fire Safe Council.

In addition to the representatives listed above, the following list is for the purpose of
identifying various agencies, associations, private sector professions and other job
descriptions, from which directors shall be drawn:
Insurance                           Agriculture
Range                               Air
Real Estate                         Water
Building                            Non-Industrial Forest Landowner
Utility                             Industrial Forest Landowner
Conservation                        Urban Forestry
At-large Member

The purpose of a diverse board base is to maintain a level of diversity of opinion and
interaction that the unincorporated FSC had. By having geographic and expertise
diversity on the board, it results in better representation of community fire safety
throughout the state. The important role of governments, industry and other experts
cannot be discounted. Through their day-to-day operations, fire service, other
agencies, industry and issue experts provide the expertise Fire Safe Councils need to
be effective, which is why these authorities are on the board of the California Fire Safe
Council and many local Councils. The Council also would welcome having a
Governor’s appointee on its non-voting advisory board should funding be made
available.




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Current board members are:



Bruce Turbeville
Chairman                                       Jerry Davies
Calif. Fire Alliance Rep.                      Insurance Rep.
CDF, Ret.                                      Personal Insurance Federation of Calif.

Ken Blonski                                    Tracy Katelman, RPF
Vice Chair                                     Member-At-Large
Coast Region FSCs Rep.
East Bay Regional Parks Fire                   Cheryl Miller
Department                                     Amphion Environmental Inc.
                                               Landscape Architect
David Horne, Ph.D.                             Member-At-Large
Treasurer
So. Cal. Region FSCs Rep.                      Ellen Pollema
Wildfire Survivor and Professor,               Member-At-Large
California State University at Long
Beach                                          Frank Stewart, RPF
                                               Sierra Region FSCs Rep.
Pat Kidder
Secretary                                      Jay Watson
Member-At-Large                                Conservation Rep.
USDA Forest Service, Ret.                      Student Conservation Association

Dave Bischel                                   Troy Whitman
Large Forest Landowners                        Utility Rep.
California Forestry Assoc.                     SCE

Organizational structure of the CFSC to local Councils:


                                                   CFSC Proposed Organizational Model
 CFSC Current Organizational Model
                 California                                        California
                   FSC                                               FSC




                                                                 County FSCs
  Local FSCs (county, regional, town, HOA,
                   etc.)




                                                          Local FSCs (Town, HOA, etc.)
                                                                                         14
Appendix A – Programs and Funding

The purpose of the nonprofit California Fire Safe Council is to analyze, plan, and
coordinate available resources to reduce fire hazards and improve public safety,
through a combination of projects, including creating, publishing, and disseminating
public interest educational materials; and conducting public interest educational and
community programs in California. Within the context of this general purpose, the
primary objectives and purposes of this corporation are to preserve and enhance
California's natural and manmade resources by mobilizing all Californians to make their
homes, neighborhoods and communities fire safe. California Fire Safe Council, Inc.’s,
goals include:

   •   Reduce the potential for damage and loss from wildfire throughout the state of
       California
   •   Promote healthy ecosystems
   •   Educate the public about wildfire threat and fire safety measures
   •   Foster a greater understanding of fire’s role in nature, and humans’ role in
       preserving California’s natural and manmade resources
   •   Enable local Fire Safe Councils to improve fire safety in their communities
   •   Encourage the creation of local Fire Safe Councils throughout California
   •   Be a leader in fostering relationships among stakeholders at all levels, federal,
       state and local that lead to reducing the potential for wildfire loss in California
   •   Operate through in-kind donations, financial contributions and grant funding

With our web site, firesafecouncil.org as our storefront, we have an ongoing mechanism
for distributing educational materials to the general public. Grants from a variety of
groups have enabled us to create new programs on a periodic basis to ensure our
educational effort remains as current as funding allows. For example we recently
completed a wildfire preparedness DVD in cooperation with OES, FEMA and CDF that
was aired on KVIE-TV, Sacramento, and distributed through Fire Safe Councils, fire
departments, libraries and Netflix. The KVIE airing alone helped us reach more than 1
million Californians. We host monthly general meetings that are designed to be idea-
sharing sessions. We feature guest speakers to educate community groups and the
public about wildfire-related topics, including forest health, fire-resistant roofing,
environmental laws and more.

As a model for community-based fire safety, we have helped Nevada and Montana form
Fire Safe Councils. Our model has been so successful in Nevada that the state
legislature voted to fund the Council because of the shrinking availability of federal
grants, a trend we foresee in California.




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               California Fire Safe Council Major Funding Sources 1993-2005
                     Funding                                                         Current
  Funding Org.        Period         Amount                Purpose                   Status

California                                      Support of the Council when it
Department of                                   was a departmental program
Forestry & Fire                                 (value is estimated to average
Protection         1993-2000     $    700,000   $100,000/yr.)                      Complete
California FAIR
Plan                      1997   $    25,000    Public Service Announcements       Complete
USDI Bureau of
Land                                            Capacity Building and
Management         11/01-4/03    $    320,343   Administration                     Complete
USDI Bureau of
Land                                            Capacity Building and
Management         8/02-12/03    $    396,440   Administration                     Complete
USDI Bureau of                                  Educational Programs, e.g.
Land                                            Web site redesign, Wildfire
Management         11/01-4/03    $    396,332   Awareness Week, PSAs               Complete
USDI Bureau of                                  Educational Programs, e.g.,
Land                                            brochures, how-to booklet,
Management         8/02-12/03    $    198,500   FireWise conference                Complete

                                                Educational Programs, e.g.,
                                                National Fire Safe Council
                                                Conference, preparedness
                                                calendar, Fire Safe Council
USDI Fish &                                     management course, Camp
Wildlife Service   10/02-7/03    $    326,800   Smokey exhibit at State Fair       Complete
                                                Educational Programs --
                                                California Living Fire Safe home
                                                & community wildfire
PG&E               1/03-12/05    $    200,000   preparedness DVD                   Complete
USDI Bureau of                                  Educational Programs --
Land                                            Wildfire Awareness Week and
Management         11/02-10/04   $    70,840    Grants website development         Complete
                                                Educational Program -- Camp
USDI Fish &                                     Smokey exhibit at California
Wildlife Service   7/03-9/07     $    40,000    State Fair                         Complete
USDA Forest                                     Grants Clearinghouse -- Set-up
Service            8/03-8/05     $    60,292    and operation                      Complete
                                                Grants Clearinghouse --
USDI Bureau of                                  Subgrants, grants
Land                                            management, clearinghouse
Management         10/03-12/05   $ 2,650,410    operations                         Complete
                                                Educational Program --
                                                Defensible Space brochures
Allstate                                        supporting compliance w/PRC
Insurance          12/04-10/05   $    25,000    4291                               Complete
                                                Educational Program -- Wildfire
State Farm         10/04-8/05    $    100,000   Awareness Week                     Complete



                                                                                               16
                                              Grants Clearinghouse --
                                              Subgrants, grants
USDI Fish &                                   management, clearinghouse   Grant In
Wildlife Service   7/03-9/07    $   260,020   operations                  Progress
                                              Grants Clearinghouse --
                                              Subgrants, grants
USDA Forest                                   management, clearinghouse   Grant In
Service            3/04-3/07    $ 2,481,405   operations                  Progress
                                              Grants Clearinghouse --
USDI Bureau of                                Subgrants, grants
Land                                          management, clearinghouse   Grant In
Management         10/04-9/07   $ 2,316,990   operations                  Progress
                                              Grants Clearinghouse --
USDI Bureau of                                Subgrants, grants
Land                                          management, clearinghouse   Grant In
Management         9/05-12/07   $ 2,351,480   operations                  Progress
                                              Grants Clearinghouse --
                                              Subgrants, grants
USDI National                                 management, clearinghouse   Grant In
Park Service       9/05-9/06    $   250,000   operations                  Progress
                                              Grants Clearinghouse --
                                              Subgrants, grants
USDA Forest                                   management, clearinghouse   Grant In
Service            5/05-5/08    $ 3,347,067   operations                  Progress
TOTAL                           $16,516,919




                                                                                     17
                                       Growing Gap in NFP Funding
2001
                                                                                            Non-
Year   Agency             Grant Program                Requests           Funded           Funded
                                                          #       $(mm)     #      $(mm)     #           $(mm)


2001   USFS     Economic Action                           96      $6.0      57     $2.8      39          $3.2
                Wildland Urban Interface (CDF)            29      $1.4      29     $1.4      0           $0.0
        BLM     Community Assistance                     151      $6.2     101     $4.1      50          $2.1
                Community Protection (CDF)                12      $1.4      9      $0.4      3           $1.0
                               FY-2001 Totals ----->     288      $15.0    196     $8.7      92          $6.3


2002
                                                                                            Non-
Year   Agency             Grant Program                Requests           Funded           Funded
                                                          #       $(mm)     #      $(mm)     #           $(mm)


2002   USFS     Economic Action                           78      $3.4      52     $1.7      26          $1.7
                Community Protection                      54      $5.5      20     $1.7      34          $3.8
                Wildland Urban Interface (CDF)            16      $0.9      16     $0.9      0           $0.0
        BLM     Community Assistance                     171      $8.3      91     $3.8      80          $4.5
                Community Protection (CDF)                27      $1.5      27     $1.5      0           $0.0
                               FY-2002 Totals ----->     346      $19.6    206     $9.6     140          $10.0


2003
                                                                                            Non-
Year   Agency             Grant Program                Requests           Funded           Funded
                                                          #       $(mm)     #      $(mm)     #           $(mm)


2003   USFS     Economic Action                           57      $1.7      27     $1.0      30          $0.7
                Community Protection                      91      $8.9      28     $1.7      63          $7.2
                Wildland Urban Interface (CDF)            14      $0.7      14     $0.7      0           $0.0
        BLM     Community Assistance                      83      $4.7      75     $3.5      8           $1.2
                Community Protection (CDF)                20      $1.2      20     $1.2     $0.0         $0.0
                               FY-2003 Totals ----->     265      $17.2    164     $8.1     101          $9.1




                                                                                                    18
2004
                                                                                                       Non-
 Year   Agency               Grant Program                  Requests              Funded              Funded
                                                                  #     $(mm)           #    $(mm)         #        $(mm)


 2004    USFS    Community Protection                         124        $6.5          27     $2.0      97          $4.5
                 Earmark So. Cal Fire Damage Areas
                 (SFA)                                           73      $18.0         26     $2.2      47          $15.8
                 Wildland Urban Interface (CDF)                  23      $1.3          23     $1.3         0        $0.0
                 Community Assistance                         180        $3.8          44     $2.6     136          $1.2
        BLM      Community Protection (CDF)                      11      $0.9          11     $0.9         0        $0.0
                                    FY-2004 Totals ----->     411        $30.5      131       $9.0     280          $21.5


2005
                                                                                                      Non-
Year    Agency              Grant Program                 Requests               Funded              Funded
                                                             #         $(mm)       #        $(mm)      #            $(mm)


2005    USFS     Community Protection                       153        $14.3       29       $2.5      124           $11.8
                 Wildland Urban Interface (CDF)                        $1.1                 $1.1       0             $0.0
                 Earmark Pvt. Land -- San Bern. NF
                 (SFA)                                       17        $4.3        17       $4.3       0             $0.0
         BLM     Community Assistance                       186        $13.0       27       $1.8      159           $11.2
                 Community Protection (CDF)                  10        $0.8        8        $0.4       2             $0.4
                                  FY-2005 Totals ----->     366        $33.5       81       $10.1     285           $23.4




                                                                                                               19
Appendix B – Accomplishments

2003-2004 Report (attachment)




                                20
    2005 Accomplishments




•    FSC funds Incident Commander to manage Camp Smokey multi-agency exhibit operations
     through USDI Fish & Wildlife Service grant
•    15,000+ kids tour Camp Smokey and learn:
     •   Stop, Drop & Roll,
     •   Matches safety
     •   Dial 911



                                                                                 21
• Partnered with private company and government to produce and
distribute HGTV-style fire safety DVD for homeowners
•Aired on KVIE-TV, Sacramento (1.3 million households)
•20,000 copies of DVD produced
•Distributed to local FSCs, libraries, fire departments, other local gov.
agencies, Netflix




                                                                      22
3 flyers – defensible space, inside & out, evacuation
8 newspapers and distribution through local FSCs

Riverside Press-Enterprise, San Bernardino Sun, Eureka Times-Standard, Marin
Independent Journal, Chico Enterprise-Record, El Dorado County Mountain
Democrat, Nevada County Union, Auburn Journal,

   •   Reached 602,000 Californians
   •   Half aware of FSC
   •   74% prepared for fire season
   •   48% discussed or passed along the information in the flyers




                                                                         23
•60,000 brochures
•Distributed to local FSCs, homeowners, fire departments,
Allstate agents




                                                            24
CFSC Chairman &
CEO Bruce
Turbeville greets
First Lady Maria
Shriver. Turbeville
represented the
CFSC at the launch
of the statewide
disaster
preparedness
campaign in
Chatsworth.




               25
CFSC Executive Director Erica Bisch joins L.A. County Sheriff Lee Baca, the
American Red Cross, and Pasadena and L.A. County fire departments at a
holiday safety news conference in Pasadena. Bisch encouraged residents to
get prepared for fire season.

In 2005, Bisch taped a wildfire evacuation segment with KCBS-TV for a
consumer awareness report and spoke on a public affairs show on 92-FM, Los
Angeles.




                                                                              26
        Sparking Citizen Support Squelches Wildfire

A grant from the Bureau of Land Management (BLM)
through the California Fire Safe Council helped
harmonize community wildfire safety efforts in the
Fresno County area served by the Highway 168 Fire
Safe Council. The result of the grant, “Community Fire
Safe Project Coordinator,” has been an increase in
citizen participation and support for fire safety projects.

 “This project was more successful than anticipated
largely as a result of enthusiastic community
participation,” said Richard Bagley, Highway 168 Fire
Safe Council president.
                                                               Sierra high school student Daniel Foster
                                                               earned Eagle Scout status for his fire
Fanning the flames of volunteer support, a rapidly             safety project that included installing mile
spreading wildfire that threatened some 100 homes and          markers along a remote road and using
barns in an area south of Shaver Lake during the project       GPS to map most of the home addresses
cycle hit a fuel break, demonstrating the effectiveness of     in the area. Foster gave a copy of the
fire hazard mitigation.                                        map to each fire station in his home area.

 “The wildfire hit the recently completed Council fuel break and the fire ‘went to ground,’
burning only on the forest floor where fire personnel were able to stop its spread and save
all the homes,” said Bagley.



                                                                Thanks to its education
                                                                programs and the combined
                                                                efforts of the community, the
                                                                Council reports a 30 percent
                                                                greater compliance with
                                                                hazard reduction clearance
                                                                regulations and a 20 percent
                                                                reduction in preventable fire
Volunteers manned the Highway 168 Fire Safe Council
booth at the 2005 Fire Safe Festival in Prather, CA.            starts.
Council President Richard Bagley credits the enthusiastic
participation of volunteers with an increased focus on fire
safety in the Council’s area.


Other Council achievements include: coordinating and completing a Community Wildfire
Protection Plan (CWPP), incorporating fire safety and fire ecology in elementary and high
school curricula, hosting an annual community Fire Safe Festival and helping a local teen
become an Eagle Scout, an honor earned by only approximately two percent of all Boy
Scouts.

More information: California Fire Safe Council Sierra Region Grants Manager, Brenda Rightmyer,
800/257-7066.
                                                                                                 27
           Owl Creek Residents Pitch in to Make Sure
                 History Doesn’t Repeat Itself

Owl Creek Road is located in Western
Nevada County where one of California’s
most damaging wildfires burned 312 homes
and more than 33,000 acres in 1988. The
Fire Safe Council of Nevada County (FSCNC)
has been working to make sure the type of
damage caused by the 49er Fire doesn’t
happen again. And residents have taken up
the mission.

The residents of the Owl Creek road area
liked the fire safe changes done by the
FSCNC so much that they continued work on                                                 Before
their own after the grant that funded those
changes ended. The FSCNC’s Owl Creek
hazardous fuel reduction project was funded   Owl Creek Road, in the 49er Fire burn area, shows
by a grant from the Bureau of Land            encroaching brush growth along the evacuation
Management through the California Fire        corridor that is also an ingress route for firefighters.
Safe Council.

                                          The project provided 30 acres of clearing
                                          along six miles of roadway to create safer
                                          evacuation routes for residents and viable
                                          ingress routes for firefighters. The FSCNC
                                          coordinated with 68 landowners who
                                          agreed to allow clearing on their land.

                                          More than 18 months later, Owl Creek’s
                                          residents are keeping up the good work by
                                          clearing along roads and near their
  During
                                          homes. The FSCNC supports these
                                          efforts by providing free processing of
                                          biomass under a separate grant program.


 More information: California Fire
 Safe Council Sierra Region Grants
 Manager, Brenda Rightmyer 800/257-
 7066.




                                                                                      After
                                                                                              28
Appendix C – Subgrants

                          California Fire Safe Council Subgrants 2003-2005
                                                                                 Match
Organization                                                      Grant Amount   Amount         County
Claremont Canyon Conservancy                                      $     50,000   $     15,000   Alameda
Claremont Canyon Conservancy                                      $     36,000   $     10,500   Alameda
Claremont Canyon Conservancy                                      $     40,000   $     19,000   Alameda
Diablo Fire Safe Council                                          $     79,000   $     20,300   Alameda
Alpine Fire Safe Council                                          $     25,000   $      2,800   Alpine
Amador Fire Safe Council                                          $     65,000   $      6,500   Amador
Amador Fire Safe Council                                          $     60,000   $      6,000   Amador
Amador Fire Safe Council                                          $    225,000   $     45,000   Amador
Amador Fire Safe Council                                          $     50,000   $      5,000   Amador
Butte County Fire Safe Council                                    $     85,000   $     15,300   Butte
Butte County Fire Safe Council                                    $     90,000   $      9,050   Butte
Butte County FSC                                                  $     79,670   $      8,000   Butte
Paradise Fire Safe Council                                        $    120,590   $     18,350   Butte
Yankee Hill Fire Safe Council                                     $     25,000   $      4,375   Butte
Calaveras Foothills Fire Safe Council                             $     53,943   $      9,170   Calaveras
Calaveras Foothills Fire Safe Council                             $     66,200   $     13,477   Calaveras
Diablo Fire Safe Council                                          $     53,084   $      6,370   Contra Costa
Diablo Fire Safe Council                                          $     31,000   $      3,100   Contra Costa
Del Norte Fire Safe Council                                       $     69,601   $      2,400   Del Norte
Del Norte Fire Safe Council                                       $     22,000   $      7,500   Del Norte
Auburn Lake Trails Property Owners Association                    $     16,450   $     16,982   El Dorado
El Dorado County Fire Safe Council                                $    100,000   $   142,638    El Dorado
El Dorado County Fire Safe Council                                $     40,000   $      4,800   El Dorado
El Dorado County Fire Safe Council                                $    100,000   $   100,000    El Dorado
El Dorado County FSC                                              $    106,500   $   106,500    El Dorado
Meeks Bay Fire Prot. District                                     $     13,890   $      2,100   El Dorado
Meeks Bay Fire Protection District                                $     78,191   $     60,150   El Dorado
Tahoe Resource Conservation District                              $     44,419   $      5,500   El Dorado
Highway 168 Fire Safe Council                                     $     77,500   $     15,000   Fresno
Institute for Sustainable Forestry & Southern Humboldt FireSafe
Council                                                           $    54,521    $     8,329    Humboldt
Lower Mattole Fire Safe Council                                   $   115,642    $    12,721    Humboldt
Lower Mattole Fire Safe Council                                   $    82,428    $     8,280    Humboldt
Mattole Restoration Council/ Lower Mattole Fire Safe Council      $    70,000    $    10,503    Humboldt
Middle Mattole Conservancy                                        $    65,000    $     6,500    Humboldt
So. Humboldt FSC/ Institute for Sustainable Forestry              $    30,000    $    11,278    Humboldt
So. Humboldt FSC/ Institute for Sustainable Forestry              $    35,000    $     9,142    Humboldt
Van Duzen Watershed Fire Safe Council                             $    40,000    $     1,600    Humboldt
Bishop Indian Tribal Council                                      $    61,335    $    42,935    Inyo
Ft. Independence Indian Reservation                               $    32,604    $     7,900    Inyo
Greater Tehachapi Area Fire Safe Council                          $    35,000    $     7,000    Kern
Greater Tehachapi Area Fire Safe Council                          $    95,000    $    95,000    Kern
Kern River Valley Fire Safe Council                               $   128,000    $    16,640    Kern
Kern River Valley Fire Safe Council                               $    85,000    $    11,900    Kern
Mt. Pinos Communities Fire Safe Council                           $    30,000    $     6,000    Kern
Mt. Pinos Communities Fire Safe Council                           $    80,000    $     8,000    Kern
PMCPOA                                                            $    40,000    $    33,000    Kern
Hidden Valley Lake Association                                    $    60,000    $    16,245    Lake
Janesville Fire Safe Council                                      $    50,000    $    15,500    Lassen



                                                                                                        29
Janesville Fire Safe Council                           $    90,000   $    25,500   Lassen
Lassen County Fire Safe Council                        $    80,000   $    40,000   Lassen
Lassen County Fire Safe Council                        $    90,000   $    18,900   Lassen
Lassen County Fire Safe Council                        $   100,000   $   135,000   Lassen
Angeles Forest Valleys & Lakes Fire Safe Council       $    24,700   $     2,500   Los Angeles
Angeles Forest Valleys & Lakes FSC                     $   138,000   $    15,180   Los Angeles
Horizon Hills Property Owners Association              $    52,000   $    27,560   Los Angeles
Monrovia Fire Safe Council / Fire Dept.                $    45,000   $    75,000   Los Angeles
Eastern Madera FSC                                     $    61,747   $    67,250   Madera
Eastern Madera FSC                                     $    63,420   $    18,400   Madera
North Fork Rancheria                                   $   101,500   $    10,150   Madera
Mariposa Fire Safe Council                             $    86,953   $    12,280   Mariposa
Mariposa Fire Safe Council                             $    24,000   $    46,000   Mariposa
Yosemite Foothills Fire Safe Council                   $    30,000   $     5,700   Mariposa
Yosemite Foothills Fire Safe Council                   $    35,363   $    38,843   Mariposa
Yosemite Foothills Fire Safe Council                   $    40,000   $    30,095   Mariposa
Yosemite West Property & Homeowners Inc. Fire Safety
Committee                                              $    20,000                 Mariposa
Yosemite West Property & Homeowners Inc. Fire Safety
Committee                                              $    36,000                 Mariposa
Mendocino County Fire Safe Council                     $    53,324   $    28,583   Mendocino
Mendocino County Fire Safe Council Inc.                $    35,000   $    11,400   Mendocino
Mendocino County Fire Safe Council Inc.                $    22,250   $    24,000   Mendocino
Mendocino County Fire Safe Council Inc.                $    73,054   $    39,090   Mendocino
Fort Bidwell Indian Reservation                        $    20,442   $    20,442   Modoc
Fort Bidwell Indian Reservation                        $    12,428   $        -    Modoc
Modoc Fire Safe Council                                $   125,620   $     2,512   Modoc
Modoc Fire Safe Council/ North Cal-Neva RC&D Council   $    30,000   $        -    Modoc
Antelope Valley Fire Safe Council                      $     9,556   $    19,845   Mono
Devil's Gate/Swauger Creek FSC                         $    25,000   $     8,250   Mono
Mammoth Lakes Fire Safe Council                        $    20,225   $     4,560   Mono
Monterey Fire Safe Council                             $    65,000   $    48,000   Monterey
Circle Oaks HOA                                        $    50,000   $    29,038   Napa
Circle Oaks Homes Association                          $    25,000   $    15,000   Napa
Fire Safe Council of Nevada County                     $    75,000   $   125,000   Nevada
Fire Safe Council of Nevada County                     $    50,000   $     6,360   Nevada
Fire Safe Council of Nevada County                     $    15,000   $    10,110   Nevada
Fire Safe Council of Nevada County                     $    25,000   $     2,500   Nevada
Fire Safe Council of Nevada County                     $    67,500   $    11,000   Nevada
Fire Safe Council of Nevada County                     $    78,840   $    15,200   Nevada
Nevada County FSC                                      $   115,210   $    93,585   Nevada
Nevada County FSC                                      $    39,320   $     8,420   Nevada
Greater Laguna Coast Fire Safe Council                 $    10,000   $     2,000   Orange
Greater Laguna Coast Fire Safe Council                 $    30,000   $    10,800   Orange
Inter-Canyon League Fie Safe Council                   $    26,900   $    19,500   Orange
Inter-Canyon League Fire Safe Council                  $    38,052   $    15,509   Orange
SEDD / Greater Auburn FSC                              $    94,550   $    92,288   Placer
Plumas County Fire Safe Council                        $    50,000   $     7,500   Plumas
Mountain Communities Fire Safe Council                 $   150,000   $    15,000   Riverside
Mountain Communities Fire Safe Council                 $   125,000   $    31,250   Riverside
Mountain Communities Fire Safe Council                 $   125,000   $    31,250   Riverside
Mountain Communities Fire Safe Council                 $   125,000   $    31,250   Riverside
Southwest Riverside County FireSafe Council            $    11,912   $   214,220   Riverside
Southwest Riverside County FireSafe Council            $     5,953   $     6,660   Riverside




                                                                                          30
Southwest Riverside County FireSafe Council      $     8,929   $     9,230   Riverside
Southwest Riverside County FireSafe Council      $    30,000   $    23,700   Riverside
San Benito Fire Safe Council                     $    45,000   $     5,500   San Benito
San Benito Fire Safe Council                     $    30,256   $     3,026   San Benito
San Benito FSC                                   $    57,092   $     7,500   San Benito
                                                                             San
Arrowhead Communities Fire Safe Council          $   100,000   $    10,000   Bernardino
                                                                             San
Arrowhead Communities Fire Safe Council          $   103,500   $     8,000   Bernardino
                                                                             San
Big Bear Valley Firesafe Council                 $     6,240   $     2,500   Bernardino
                                                                             San
Big Bear Valley Firesafe Council                 $    15,484   $     6,000   Bernardino
                                                                             San
Big Bear Valley FSC                              $    16,850   $    21,228   Bernardino
                                                                             San
Camp Wrightwood                                  $    73,000   $    26,074   Bernardino
                                                                             San
Carbon Canyon Fire Safe Council                  $    62,164   $     9,449   Bernardino
                                                                             San
Greyback Disaster Preparedness Group             $    47,260   $    24,745   Bernardino
                                                                             San
Lytle Creek Fire Safe Council, Inc.              $    28,725   $     2,873   Bernardino
                                                                             San
Lytle Creek Fire Safe Council, Inc.              $    32,300   $     3,230   Bernardino
                                                                             San
Morongo Valley Fire Safe Council                 $    54,880   $    19,200   Bernardino
                                                                             San
Mountain Communities Fire Safe Council           $   200,000   $    68,408   Bernardino
                                                                             San
Mountain Communities Fire Safe Council           $   200,000   $    68,408   Bernardino
                                                                             San
Mountain Communities Fire Safe Council           $   200,000   $    68,408   Bernardino
                                                                             San
Mountain Rim Fire Safe Council, Inc.             $    29,000   $     2,900   Bernardino
                                                                             San
Mountain Rim Fire Safe Council, Inc.             $    16,000   $     2,000   Bernardino
                                                                             San
Mountain Rim Fire Safe Council, Inc.             $    25,000   $     2,500   Bernardino
                                                                             San
Mountain Rim Fire Safe Council, Inc.             $    21,500   $     6,000   Bernardino
                                                                             San
San Antonio Canyon Town Hall                     $   128,798   $    44,674   Bernardino
                                                                             San
San Bernardino National Forest Association       $     8,780   $     6,600   Bernardino
                                                                             San
Strawberry Flats Property Owners Association     $   101,250   $    70,100   Bernardino
                                                                             San
Weesha Club, Inc                                 $    23,552   $    23,560   Bernardino
Carveacre Ranch Estates Homeowners Association   $    38,146   $    41,140   San Diego
Carveacre Ranch Estates Homeowners Association   $    62,300   $    64,380   San Diego
Chimney Canyon Fire Safe Council                 $   170,888   $   164,679   San Diego
Chimney Canyon Fire Safe Council                 $    73,543   $    70,483   San Diego
Chimney Canyon Fire Safe Council                 $    20,052                 San Diego
Fallbrook Fire Safe Council                      $   100,000   $    10,000   San Diego
Fire Safe Council of Greater Julian              $     7,700   $     6,000   San Diego
Mt. Laguna Fire Safe Council                     $    90,000   $    90,000   San Diego
Mt. Laguna Fire Safe Council                     $    32,000   $    32,000   San Diego
Palomar Mountain fire safe council               $    57,009   $    11,402   San Diego



                                                                                     31
Palomar Mountain fire safe council                              $   158,200   $    19,400   San Diego
Palomar Mountain fire safe council                              $   100,000   $    30,000   San Diego
People for Trees                                                $   225,075   $     7,062   San Diego
Ranches of Palo Verde FSC                                       $    70,589   $    16,250   San Diego
RCD of Greater San Diego County                                 $   200,000   $   171,358   San Diego
RCD of Greater San Diego County                                 $   100,000                 San Diego
Resource Conservation District of Greater San Diego Co. & FSC
of San Diego County                                             $   278,750   $   314,196   San Diego
Resource Conservation District of Greater San Diego Co. & FSC
of San Diego County                                             $   100,000   $   214,392   San Diego
                                                                                            San Luis
San Luis Obispo Community Fire Safe Council                     $    77,400   $     7,740   Obispo
                                                                                            San Luis
San Luis Obispo FSC                                             $    24,000   $     3,000   Obispo
                                                                                            San Luis
San Luis Obispo FSC                                             $    28,000   $     3,000   Obispo
Fire Safe San Mateo                                             $    29,247   $    30,000   San Mateo
                                                                                            Santa
Mission Canyon Association                                      $    37,100   $    75,680   Barbara
                                                                                            Santa
The C.R.E.W.                                                    $   112,500   $   112,500   Barbara
                                                                                            Santa
Wildland Residents Association (WRA)                            $    57,500   $     5,000   Barbara
Santa Clara County FireSafe Council                             $    10,000   $     2,700   Santa Clara
Santa Clara Fire Safe Council                                   $    26,110   $    28,350   Santa Clara
Santa Clara FSC                                                 $    25,500   $     6,200   Santa Clara
Santa Cruz County RCD                                           $    12,016                 Santa Cruz
Cottonwood Creek Watershed Group (CCWG)                         $    26,305   $    21,805   Shasta
Western Shasta RCD                                              $    15,257   $     1,600   Shasta
Western Shasta RCD                                              $    52,000   $     1,894   Shasta
Western Shasta RCD                                              $    75,000   $       638   Shasta
Western Shasta RCD                                              $    35,000   $       700   Shasta
Sierra County Fire Safe & Watershed Council                     $    80,000   $    10,461   Sierra
County of Siskiyou                                              $    40,000   $     4,000   Siskiyou
Fire Safe Council of Siskiyou County                            $    61,175   $     9,718   Siskiyou
Fire Safe Council of Siskiyou Cty                               $    58,850   $     6,500   Siskiyou
Happy Camp Fire Safe Council Inc.                               $    78,608   $    15,761   Siskiyou
LSPOA                                                           $    15,000   $    13,140   Siskiyou
McCloud Fire Safe Council, Inc                                  $    35,000   $    16,929   Siskiyou
McCloud Fire Safe Council, Inc                                  $     3,760   $     7,900   Siskiyou
Mt. Shasta Vista Volunteer Fire Company                         $     7,500   $     7,500   Siskiyou
Northern California Resource Center                             $    95,500   $    23,775   Siskiyou
Orleans-Somes Bar Fire Safe Council                             $    40,000   $    11,457   Siskiyou
Orleans-Somes Bar Fire Safe Council                             $    70,000                 Siskiyou
Orleans-Somes Bar FSC                                           $    23,978   $     5,380   Siskiyou
Salmon River Restoration Council (fiscal sponsor)               $    47,000   $     6,622   Siskiyou
Salmon River FSC                                                $    34,738   $     5,957   Siskiyou
Fort Ross Volunteer Fire Department                             $    40,000   $     8,004   Sonoma
Cottonwood Creek Watershed Group (CCWG)                         $    70,000   $   154,600   Tehama
Cottonwood Creek Watershed Group (CCWG)                         $   100,000                 Tehama
Sunflower Coordinated Resource Management Plan (CRMP)           $   139,600   $   119,876   Tehama
Tehama County Resource Conservation District                    $    30,000   $     8,524   Tehama
Iowa Hill Fire Dept                                             $    43,930   $    35,000   Trinity
Trinity County RCD                                              $    45,000   $     4,500   Trinity
Trinity County Resource Conservation District                   $    53,775   $     6,000   Trinity




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Trinity County Resource Conservation District               $    65,170   $    7,300   Trinity
Trinity County Resource Conservation District               $    35,000   $   35,000   Trinity
Kern River Valley Fire Safe Council                         $    30,000   $    6,000   Tulare
Tulare County RCD                                           $   215,800   $   24,000   Tulare
Concerned Resource & Environmental Workers (The C.R.E.W.)   $    45,000   $    5,000   Ventura
Ojai Valley Fire Safe Council                               $    17,250   $    1,917   Ventura
Ojai Valley Fire Safe Council                               $    14,976   $    1,399   Ventura
Ventura County Fire Department                              $    40,125   $   13,375   Ventura
High Sierra Resource Conservation & Development Area        $    43,000   $    5,000   Yuba
High Sierra Resource Conservation & Development Area        $    39,600   $   35,125   Yuba
Dobbins-Oregon House Fire Protection District               $    52,000   $    6,000   Yuba




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Appendix D – California’s Current Fire Safe Councils

California Fire Safe Council
Diablo FireSafe Council
Orinda Fire Safe Committee
Fire Safe Marin
Mount Veeder Fire Safe Council
Devonshire Canyon Fire Safe Committee
Fire Safe San Mateo County
Half Moon Bay Coastside Foundation
San Mateo Fire Safe Committee
Santa Clara County Fire Safe Council
Pineridge Fire Safe Council
Santa Cruz County Fire Safe Council
Fire Safe Sonoma County
Lake County Fire Safe Council
South Lake Fire Safe Council
Mendocino County Fire Safe Council
Big Sur Fire Safe Council
Monterey Fire Safe Council
San Benito Fire Safe Council
San Luis Obispo County Community FireSafe Council
Butte County Fire Safe Council
Cohasset Community Association
Forest Ranch Preservation Alliance
Oroville Community Association
Shasta West Watersheds Community Fire Safe Project
Yankee Hill Fire Safe Council
Highway 168 Fire Safe Council
Mountain Area Fire Safe Council
Tulare County Fire Safe Council (TCFSC)
Del Norte Fire Safe Council
Humboldt County Fire Safe Council
Lower Mattole Fire Safe Council
Orleans/Somes Bar Fire Safe Council
Southern Humboldt Fire Safe Council
Willow Creek Fire Safe Council
Day/Lassen Bench Fire Safe Council, Inc.
Janesville Fire Safe Council
Lassen County Fire Safe Council
Tionesta Basin Advisory Group
Modoc Fire Safe Council
Almanor Basin Fire Safe Council
Plumas County Fire Safe Council
Cottonwood Creek Watershed Fire Safe Council
Lakehead Fire Safe Council



                                                       34
Shasta County Fire Safe Council
Shingletown Community Fire Safe
Tehama-Glenn Fire Safe Council
Copco Lake/Bogus Fire Safe Council
French Creek Fire Safe Council
Greater Weed Area Fire Safe Council
Happy Camp Fire Safe Council
Klamath River Fire Safe Council
Lake Shastina Fire Safe Council
Lower Scott River Fire Safe Council
McCloud Fire Safe Council
Mt. Shasta Area Fire Safe Council
Quartz Valley Area Fire Safe Council
Rattlesnake Creek Watershed Fire Safe Council
Salmon River Fire Safe Council
Scott Bar Fire Safe Council
Seiad Valley Fire Safe Council
Siskiyou County Fire Safe Councils
South Yreka Fire Safe Council
Trinity County Fire Safe Council
Alpine Fire Safe Council
Amador Fire Safe Council
El Dorado Fire Safe Council
Tahoe Basin Fire Safe Council
Eastern Madera County Fire Safe Council Inc
Mariposa County Fire Safe Council
Fire Safe Council of Nevada County
Alta Fire Safe Council
Foresthill Area Fire Safe Council
Greater Auburn Area Fire Safe Council
Greater Colfax Area Fire Safe Council
Iowa Hill Fire Safe Council
Placer County Fire Safe Alliance
Placer Hills Fire Safe Council
Placer Sierra Fire Safe Council
Ponderosa Fire Safe Council
Sierra County Fire Safe and Watershed Council
Calaveras Foothills Fire Safe Council
Highway 108 Fire Safe Council
Yosemite Foothills Fire Safe Council
Yuba Watershed Protection and Fire Safe Council
Aspendell Fire Safe Council
Benton Fire Safe Council
Eastern Sierra Regional Fire Safe Council
Lone Pine Fire Safe Council
Pine Glade Fire Safe Council (MONO)



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South Fork Bishop Creek Fire Safe Council (INYO)
Wheeler Crest Fire Safe Council
Kern River Valley FSC
Angeles Forest Valleys & Lakes Fire Safe Council
Big Santa Anita Fire Safe Council
LA County Fire Safe Council
Monrovia Fire Safe Council
Rancho Cucamonga FSC
Topanga Citizen's Firesafe Committee
Greater Laguna Coast Fire Safe Council
Inter Canyon Fire Safe Council
O.C. Fire Safe Council
Mountain Communities Fire Safe Council
Southwest Riverside County Fire Safe Council
Angelus Oaks Fire Safe Council
Arrowhead Communities Fire Safe Council
Big Bear Valley Fire Safe Council
Carbon Canyon Fire Safe Council
Lytle Creek Fire Safe Council, Inc.
Millcreek Canyon Fire Safe Council
Mountain Rim FSC
Mountain Rim FSC: Crest Forest Chapter
Mountain Rim FSC: RS/AB/GVL Chapter
Oak Glen Fire Safe Council
Wrightwood Fire Safe Council
Banner Fire Safe Council
Barrett Junction Fire Safe Council
Carveacre Fire Safe Council
Chihuaha Valley FSC
Chimney Canyon FSC
Corte Madera FSC
Crest FSC
Cuyamaca Woods Fire Safe Council
Deer Springs FSC
Descanso Fire Safe Council
Encanto FSC
Fallbrook Fire Safe Council
FireSafe Council of Greater Julian
Harrison Park Fire Safe Council
Julian Estates Fire Safe Council
Kentwood II Fire Safe Council
Kentwood in the Pines Fire Safe Council
Lake Cuyamaca Fire Safe Council
Mountain Empire FSC
Mt. Woodson FSC
Mt. Laguna Fire Safe Council



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Palomar Mountain Fire Safe Council
Pine Hills Fire Safe Council
Potrero FSC
Ramona FSC
San Diego County Fire Safe Council
Scripps Ranch FSC
Sherilton Valley Fire Safe Council
Talmadge FSC
The Ranches of Palo Verde
Vista FSC
Vista Valley Country Club FSC
Whispering Pines Fire Safe Council
Wynola Fire Safe Council
Santa Barbara County Fire Safe Council
Santa Barbara South Coast Fire Safe Council
Ojai Valley Fire Safe Council
Ventura County Fire Safe Council




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Appendix E – Contacts

Bruce Turbeville, Chairman & CEO
916/838-0680 ph.
Turbs57@aol.com

Erica Bisch, Executive Director
P.O. Box 2106
Glendora, CA 91740
502 W. Route 66, Suite 18
Glendora, CA 91740
626/335-7426 ph.
626/335-4678 fax
ericabisch@verizon.net

Jerry Davies, Director, Chair of Advancement Committee
Personal Insurance Federation of California
980 9th St., Suite 2030
Sacramento, CA 95814
916/442-6646 ph.
916/442-8458 fax
jdavies@pifc.org




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