Improving the Retention of Child Welfare Workers by Strengthening Skills and Increasing Support for Supervisors by ProQuest

VIEWS: 20 PAGES: 20

Increasingly, effective supervision has been found to be critical in the retention of child welfare workers. In 2006 the State of Missouri Children's Division implemented a supervisory strategic plan to concentrate on supervisory training and effectiveness, with the expectation that emphasis on supervision would improve the retention of frontline workers. Using annual responses to the survey of organizational excellence and retention data, this study examines perceptions of child welfare workers and supervisors on three workplace constructs. Analyses support hypotheses that retention of workers improved in the year following the implementation of the supervisory plan, and measures of supervisor effectiveness, team effectiveness, and job satisfaction also increased. Explanations of primary findings are provided and implications for practice and policy are discussed. [PUBLICATION ABSTRACT]

More Info
									         Improving the Retention of
         Child Welfare Workers by
         Strengthening Skills and
         Increasing Support for
         Supervisors

         Lynette M. Renner, Rebecca L. Porter, and Steven Preister

         Increasingly, effective supervision has been found to be
         critical in the retention of child welfare workers. In 2006
         the State of Missouri Children’s Division implemented a
         supervisory strategic plan to concentrate on supervisory
         training and effectiveness, with the expectation that
         emphasis on supervision would improve the retention of
         frontline workers. Using annual responses to the survey
         of organizational excellence and retention data, this study
         examines perceptions of child welfare workers and
         supervisors on three workplace constructs. Analyses
         support hypotheses that retention of workers improved in
         the year following the implementation of the supervisory
         plan, and measures of supervisor effectiveness, team
         effectiveness, and job satisfaction also increased.
         Explanations of primary findings are provided and
         implications for practice and policy are discussed.




Lynette M. Renner PhD, MSW is Assistant Professor, The University of Iowa School of
Social Work, Iowa City, Iowa. Rebecca L. Porter MSW is a Management Analysis Special-
ist, Missouri Children’s Division, Jefferson City, Missouri. Steven Preister PhD, MSW is
Associate Director, National Child Welfare Resource Center for Organizational Improve-
ment, Muskie School of Public Service, University of Southern Maine, Portland, Maine.
0009–4021/2009/0509109-127 CWLA                                                      109
110                                               CHILD WELFARE • VOL. 88, #5




T
        he child welfare workforce is “arguably the most pivotal
        in terms of child outcomes” (An
								
To top