VIABLE DDT ALTERNATIVES FOR MALARIA CONTROL – THE KENYAN by acm63157

VIEWS: 28 PAGES: 22

									BY PAUL SAOKE
    PSR‐KENYA
Malaria situation in Kenya
• Malaria is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in Kenya .
• 25 million out of a population of 34 million Kenyans are at risk of malaria. 
• It accounts for 30‐50% of all outpatient attendance and 20% of all admissions 
    to health facilities. 
•   An estimated 170 million working days are lost to the disease each year (MOH 
    2001). 
•   Malaria is also estimated to cause 20% of all deaths in children under five 
    (MOH 2006). 
•   The most vulnerable group to malaria infections are pregnant women and 
    children under 5 years of age. 
•   In collaboration with partners, the government developed the 10‐year Kenyan 
    National Malaria Strategy (KNMS) 2001‐2010 (link) which was launched in 
    April 2001. The goal of the National Malaria Strategy is to reduce morbidity 
    and mortality associated with malaria by 30% by 2006 and to maintain it to 
    2010
Malaria situation cont.
•   Low malaria risk‐ these areas cover highlands within Central Province and Nairobi province. 
    Several areas experience almost no malaria risk e.g. Nairobi , Nyeri and Nakuru. 
•   Impact of the Malaria Control Interventions
    DOMC, with support from various partners, has been monitoring the burden of malaria 
    through several channels including health information data from hospitals and clinics, 
    sentinel sites surveys of communities and health facilities in 4 districts and national surveys 
    including the Kenya Demographic Health Survey. Evidence from these sources now points 
    towards increased coverage of interventions with a downward trend in disease burden 
    demonstrated by community reported cases of malaria, hospital admissions and deaths due to 
    malaria and childhood deaths from the diseases. There is believed to be 44% reduction in 
    childhood mortality. 
    Scaling up of malaria control interventions, notably distribution of ITNs has contributed 
    towards reversing the declining health trends in the country specifically between 2002‐2007. 
    In year 2006 there was mass distribution of LLITNS in 46 districts. Others have been 
    distributed through clinics and social marketing. The graphs below depict some of the other 
    achievements. 
KENYAN STRATEGY
 Access to prompt and effective case management 
 Prevention of anaemia and malaria in pregnancy.
 Malaria epidemic preparedness and response 
 Promotion of the use of ITNs/LLINs and other vector 
 control methods. 
Case management

•   Objective of the Case Management Strategic intervention is the provision of good 
    quality, safe and effective treatment for malaria patients.
•   Prompt diagnosis and Rx of malaria cases.
•   Use of ACTs as first line malaria Rx .
•   ACTs used in uncomplicated malaria ‐ Artemether‐ Lumefantrine (Coartem ® ) tablets 
    packed differently for the different weight categories 
•   Severe malaria ( IV/ IM phase ) Quinine Dihydrochloride injection 



•   The approach addresses the provision of malaria prevention measures and treatment of 
    pregnant women. 
•   Vector control
•   This approach's intention is to ensure use of insecticide treated nets by at risk 
    communities, to significantly reduce rates of the disease and other methods through 
    Integrated Vector Management. 
•   Epidemic Preparedness and Response (EPR)
Summary of Rx
   Condition                   Medication                Strength                Formulation

   Uncomplicated malaria       Artemether-               20mg Artemether + 120   Tablets single dose
                               Lumefantrine (Coartem     mg Lumefantrine         packed for the different
                               ® ) tablets packed                                weight categories
                               differently for the
                               different weight
                               categories
   Severe malaria              Quinine Dihydrochloride   600mg / 2 ml            Vials
   ( IV/ IM phase )            injection
   Severe malaria              Quinine dihydrochloride   300 mg                  Tablets
   (continuation phase), all
                               Quinine bisulphate        300 mg
   trimesters of pregnancy
   and children below 5 kg     Quinine Sulphate          300 mg

                               Quinine hydrochloride     300 mg



   Intermittent Preventive     Sulphadoxine/             500 mg Sulphadoxine +   Tablets
   Treatment                   pyrimethamine             25 mg pyrimethamine
   Prophylaxis non immune      Mefloquine hydrochloride 250 mg                   Tablets
   visitors
                               Atovaquone – Proguanil    250 mg Atovaquone +
                               adult                     100 mg Proguanil
                               Doxycycline               100 mg                  Tablets / Capsules
                               hydrochloride
Rx cont.
Condition        Medication      Strength          Formulation


Prophylaxis for  Proguanil       100 mg            Tablets
sickle cell      hydrochloride
disease patients
and persons with
splenomegaly

Pre-referral     Artemether      80 mg / ml adult Vials 
treatment        injection
                                 20 mg / ml
                                 pediatric
                 Artesunate      60 mg /ml
                 injection
                 Artesunate rectal 100 mg or 400
                                                   Suppositories
                 caps              mg
Prevention of anaemia and malaria in pregnancy
• Approximately 1.5 million women become pregnant each 
  year in Kenya , majority live in areas of moderate to 
  intense transmission of malaria.
• Pregnancy related maternal mortality is estimated at 
  414/100,000(KDHS 2003). 
• Hemorrhage complicating Malaria related anemia during 
  pregnancy contributes significantly to maternal mortality. 
• Severe maternal anemia 2 – 15% is attributable to Malaria, 
  low birth weight 8 – 14% is attributable to Malaria, 
  preterm‐LBW 8‐36%, intrauterine growth retardation –
  LBW‐13‐70%, increased infant Mortality of 3 – 8%/ year 
MIP
• 42 endemic districts have each a micro plan on which 
  future implementation plans will be based, 
• Training of Health workers, 
• Cascade training has proved to be effective in orientation 
  of Health Workers, 
• Provision of IPT as DOT has gained acceptance 
• There is increased access to free IPT in districts. 
• Development and Dissemination of IEC materials 
• Revision and update of orientation manuals 
• Counseling during ANC visits. 
• 36% pregnant women accessing nets 
• 24% pregnant women accessing IPT 
Malaria epidemic preparedness
• Malaria epidemics in Kenya occur in two malaria 
  epidemiological zones – the western highlands and the 
  arid, semi‐arid lowlands of northern Kenya. 
• The epidemics are associated with unusual climatic 
  conditions especially rainfall accompanied by other factors 
  like suitable temperatures that favour breeding and longer 
  survival of the malaria vectors.
• Prediction methods for epidemics to alert implementers to 
  either undertake epidemic prevention measures like 
  indoor residual spraying (IRS) or prepare to control the 
  epidemic are still at developmental stages. 
MEP
• Since 2005, there has been a shift from “preparedness 
  and Response” approach to epidemic prevention and 
  control approach.
• The use of IRS as lead intervention in averting malaria 
  epidemic in the highlands is priority for the Ministry 
  of Health. 
• The Division of Malaria Control has been 
  implementing a timed and well coordinated Indoor 
  Residual Spraying (IRS) campaigns in the 16 districts 
  classified as Highland Epidemic Prone. 
IRS
• IRS (with synthetic pyrethroids) used in the control of 
  epidemic malaria
• The Division of Malaria Control has been 
  implementing a timed and well coordinated Indoor 
  Residual Spraying (IRS) campaigns in the 16 districts 
  classified as Highland Epidemic Prone. 
• IRS has been progressively scaled up from epidemic 
  epicentres to eventually cover whole districts.
Vector Control Strategies
•   The vector control strategies being deployed include but are not limited to; Indoor 
    Residual Spraying (IRS) with insecticides, personal protection measures, larval control, 
    and environmental Management. 
•   Personal protection measures are based on insecticide‐impregnated materials such as 
    ITNs/LLINs and materials mainly. It has been demonstrated that if they are properly 
    applied they can provide a 30 to 60 percent reduction in malaria morbidity, and can be 
    useful in terms of preventing drug resistance.
•   Larval control, given the nature of the vectors, which tend basically to breed everywhere 
    in a small amount of water on the surface of the ground, this approach can be 
    acceptable only under suitable mapping and characterization of breeding sites, and will 
    work mainly in urban and peri‐urban areas. Larval control can be attained through 
    environmental management, large space coverage, and community participation, and 
    can be done through chemical or biological control.
•   Environmental control is used to prevent breeding, nesting, and feeding of vectors by 
    source reduction and even through better housing, windows, doors, screening. 
    Environmental changes from road, dam, or pipeline construction, deforestation, 
    agriculture, and irrigation can generate larval breeding sites. Environmental control can 
    mostly be used in urban and peri‐urban areas, and mostly require community 
    participation and inter‐sectoral collaboration.
IPM APPROACHES (ICIPE)
• Linking malaria vectors to agriculture
• Use of larvicides like Bti and Bs. The two products provided almost 100% 
    control over 48 hours. 
•   Linking village activities and health
•   In the highlands of Kisii in western Kenya, ICIPE conducted a census of 
    fishponds, 186 of which were active and 76 abandoned. The majority of the 
    larvae collected (68%) were found in the abandoned ponds without fish, 
    natural predators of mosquito larvae. Three‐quarters of the abandoned ponds 
    contained A. gambiae larvae, the most common of all the mosquitoes found in 
    this highland region (> 2000 m) at 60% of the total. Anopheles funestus was 
    also fairly common at 28% of the total. Introduction of tilapia fingerlings 
    brought the mosquito numbers down by 80%, demonstrating a simple but 
    effective malaria prevention strategy. 
•   Habitat management for mosquito and malaria control can be targeted to 
    areas where larval density is greatest, thus lowering costs and causing minimal 
    habitat disturbance.
•   (Source ICIPE)
Recent innovations
• The Pyrethrum Board of Kenya has recently produced 
  pylarvex, pymos and pynet to be used in different 
  settings in the control of malaria vector.
• According to published data (Sum, et al. 2002) the 
  three pyrethrum products exacted high mortality on 
  mosquitoes and would be suitable for malaria control 
  in stable transmission areas.
THANKS

								
To top