A COMPARISON OF SERVICE-LEARNING AND EMPLOYEE VOLUNTEERING PROGRAMS

Document Sample
A COMPARISON OF SERVICE-LEARNING AND EMPLOYEE VOLUNTEERING PROGRAMS Powered By Docstoc
					                                                                                                             1

       A COMPARISON OF SERVICE-LEARNING AND
         EMPLOYEE VOLUNTEERING PROGRAMS
                    Glenn A. Bowen, Western Carolina University
                    Debra D. Burke, Western Carolina University
                Beverly L. Little, Horry Georgetown Technical College
                    Paul H. Jacques, Western Carolina University


                                                ABSTRACT

        A growing recognition of the social responsibilities of organizations to their communities has
resulted in a significant increase in volunteer activities in the United States. Two types of structured
programs that promote social engagement are service learning in higher education and employee
volunteering programs (EVPs) in business organizations. Such programs are generally considered beneficial
to the participants (students or employees), the community, and the sponsor. This paper explores the
purposes of such programs and comments on their structures, activities, and outcomes. Lessons that EVP
organizers can learn from service-learning programs and recommended steps for creating an EVP are
included.

                                             INTRODUCTION

         Volunteering is on the rise in the United States. About 61.2 million people in the United States,
representing 26.7 percent of the population, volunteered through or for an organization at least once between
September 2005 and September 2006 (Bureau of Labor Statistics, 2007). Volunteering has rebounded to a
30-year high today – rising by more than 32 percent over the past 16 years – after declining between 1974
and 1989 (Corporation for National & Community Service [CNCS], 2006).
         At the same time, an interesting new trend that involves purposeful volunteer activities is developing
in both education and business practices simultaneously. Increasingly since the last decade, many colleges
and universities have been encouraging a pedagogical approach known as service learning, in which
structured community service activities are incorporated into the curriculum (Bowen, 2005; Bringle &
Hatcher, 1996). Volunteerism and community service are the vehicles for service learning. Not surprisingly,
therefore, college student volunteering increased by approximately 20 percent between 2002 and 2005 – from
2.7 million to nearly 3.3 million students (Dote, Cramer, Dietz, & Grimm, 2006). Students participate in two
kinds of volunteering: “regular” volunteering (volunteering 12 or more weeks a year with their main
organization) and what Macduff (1991) termed “episodic” volunteering (volunteering fewer than two weeks
a year with their main organization). They volunteer in a variety of organizations: religious, educational or
youth service; civic, political, professional, or international; hospital or other health; social or community
service; sport, hobby, cultural, or arts. A marked increase in episodic volunteering since 1989 is driven
largely by teenagers (67.9 percent are episodic volunteers) and adults ages 45 to 64 (57.7 percent are episodic

                          Academy of Educational Leadership Journal, Volume 13, Number 3, 2009
2

volunteers), the two
				
DOCUMENT INFO
Description: A growing recognition of the social responsibilities of organizations to their communities has resulted in a significant increase in volunteer activities in the United States. Two types of structured programs that promote social engagement are service learning in higher education and employee volunteering programs (EVPs) in business organizations. Suchprograms are generally considered beneficial to the participants (students or employees), the community, and the sponsor. This paper explores the purposes of such programs and comments on their structures, activities, and outcomes. Lessons that EVP organizers can learn from service-learning programs and recommended steps for creating an EVP are included. [PUBLICATION ABSTRACT]
BUY THIS DOCUMENT NOW PRICE: $6.95 100% MONEY BACK GUARANTEED
PARTNER ProQuest LLC
ProQuest creates specialized information resources and technologies that propel successful research, discovery, and lifelong learning.