PARTICIPATORY BUDGETING � A PROGRESSIVE AGENDA by bullsonparade

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									PARTICIPATORY BUDGETING – A
PROGRESSIVE AGENDA




 Initiative Africa is a non-profit organisation
 specialising in spreading good governance
 across public and private services in Africa,
 especially in Ethiopia.
    THIS PRESENTATION



•   Introduction of Participatory Budgeting
•   Levels of PB
•   Benefits and limits of PB
•   Success factors
  Conceptual Framework and Practice in DB


• The participatory budget is a process of direct,
  voluntary and universal democracy,
• It provides the population with the opportunity to
  discuss budgetary issues and public policies.
• Participatory budgeting (PB) brings local communities
  closer to the decision-making of a public budget.
    Participatory budgets are based on four
                   principles

These are:
• Re-directing public resources for the benefit of the
  poorest;
• Creating a new relationship between municipalities and
  citizens (i.e. a new form of governance);
• Re-building social ties and social interest;
• Inventing a new democratic culture and promoting
  active citizenship.
 Governments and citizens initiate these
            programs to:


• Promote public learning and active
  citizenship,
• Achieve social justice through improved
  policies and resources allocation, and
• Reform the administrative apparatus.
    IT ALL STARTED IN




•  The Brazilian city of Porto Alegre initiated the
  first participatory budgeting process in 1989,
•    It was driven by active social movements
  and a leftist local government.
• Today, participatory budgeting in Porto Alegre
  has developed into an annual process of
  deliberation and decision-making, in which
  thousands of city residents decide how to
  allocate part of the municipal budget.
SINCE ITS EMERGENCE IN PORTO ALEGRE


• Participatory budgeting has spread to
   hundreds of Latin American cities, and
   dozens of cities in other continents.
  In Europe, towns and cities in France, Italy,
   Germany, Spain and England have initiated
   participatory budgeting processes.
   Similar budget processes have been used in
   communities in India and Africa.
• How? – in a series of neighborhood, regional,
   and citywide assemblies, residents and elected
   budget delegates identify spending priorities
   and vote on which priorities to implement.
  Varieties of participatory budgeting



The diversity of PB experiences can be
categorised on the basis of:

1) Participation mechanisms and the depth of
   participation

2) Extent of the budget subject to consultation

3) Geographical scale of PB
  Levels of PB

1. Modest PB – participatory community
   chests/kitties
2. Intermediate level of PB (A) – prioritising public
   spending at neighbourhood level
3. Intermediate level of PB (B) – prioritising public
   spending city-wide for a specific issue or
   stakeholder group
4. 'Classical' model of PB– prioritising ALL public
   spending at city-wide level
5. Fully-fledged PB – involving citizens in
   designing the methodology of the PB process
   and monitoring of the budget execution
  BENEFITS AND LIMITS OF
  PARTICIPATORY BUDGETING

Benefits
• High degree of citizen engagement
• Improves community cohesion
• Involved citizens understand that trade-offs have to
  be made
• Politicians make better decisions because they know
  the preferences of citizens
• Investments make a visible impact on the
  neighbourhood as a whole Improves Quality of Life of
  specific target groups (young people, disadvantaged)
Limits



• Involves only small numbers of citizens
• PB as a one-off event
• Participants get little information on overall budget
  and public services
• Citizens have difficulties in seeing the overall
  picture, at least in the first stages of the process
• Allocated sums of money are too small to make
  significant impact beyond target groups
  Success factors

• Public meetings have to be made “user-
  friendly”
• There has to be ample opportunity for debate
• Good communication is key to PB
• Most importantly, the local council needs to
  give a clear account to all participants.
   LESSONS FOR ETHIOPIA


• PB does have to start with “small pots of extra
  money”;

• PB should go beyond political parties and should not
  be just a “leftist” idea;

• “Seeing is believing” – The Debre Birhan experience
  has inspired many people!

                      CONCLUSION
      PB is not just a consultation exercise, but an
      embodiment of direct, deliberative democracy.
                                            THANK YOU!
   Contact



Abayneh Mengistu
SeniorTechnical Advisor
Email: abayneh.mengistu@initiativeafrica.net
Web: www.intiativeafrica.org

   Feb 18,2008

								
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