LATIN -AMERICA BEYOND THE CRISIS

Document Sample
LATIN -AMERICA BEYOND THE CRISIS Powered By Docstoc
					                      
                      
                      
                      

  LATIN‐AMERICA BEYOND THE CRISIS 
    IMPACTS, POLICIES AND OPPORTUNITIES 
                        
AMÉRICA LATINA MÁS ALLÁ DE LA CRISIS 
    IMPACTOS, POLÍTICAS Y OPORTUNIDADES 
                      
                      
                      




                      
 




     
 

                                                            Table of Contents 
 
LATIN‐AMERICA BEYOND THE CRISIS—IMPACTS, POLICIES AND OPPORTUNITIES— A SYNTHESIS 
     Marcelo M. Giugale .............................................................................................................................. 1 
AMÉRICA LATINA MÁS ALLÁ DE LA CRISIS—IMPACTOS, POLÍTICAS Y OPORTUNIDADES—UNA SÍNTESIS 
    Marcelo M. Giugale .............................................................................................................................. 7 
 
PART I ‐ WORKING PAPERS 
 
1.  THE GLOBAL FINANCIAL AND ECONOMIC STORM: HOW BAD IS THE WEATHER IN LATIN AMERICA AND THE 
    CARIBBEAN? 
    Augusto de la Torre............................................................................................................................. 13 
2.     REGULATORY REFORM: INTEGRATING PARADIGMS 
       Augusto de la Torre and Alain Ize ....................................................................................................... 23 
3.     HOW HAS POVERTY EVOLVED IN LATIN AMERICA AND HOW IS IT LIKELY TO BE AFFECTED BY THE ECONOMIC CRISIS? 
       Joao Pedro Azevedo, Ezequiel Molina, John Newman, Eliana Rubiano and Jaime Saavedra............. 55 
4.     LABOR MARKETS AND THE CRISIS IN LATIN AMERICA AND THE CARIBBEAN (A PRELIMINARY REVIEW FOR SELECTED 
       COUNTRIES) 
       Samuel Freije‐Rodríguez and Edmundo Murrugarra .......................................................................... 81 
 
PART II ‐ TECHNICAL NOTES 
 
5.  HOW MUCH ROOM DOES LATIN AMERICA AND THE CARIBBEAN HAVE FOR IMPLEMENTING COUNTER‐CYCLICAL FISCAL 
    POLICIES? 
    Cesar Calderón and Pablo Fajnzylber.................................................................................................. 97 
6.     CRISIS IN LAC:  INFRASTRUCTURE INVESTMENT AND THE POTENTIAL FOR  EMPLOYMENT GENERATION 
       Laura Tuck, Jordan Schwartz and Luis Andres .................................................................................. 108 
7.     HOW WILL LABOR MARKETS ADJUST TO THE CRISIS? A DYNAMIC VIEW 
       William Maloney............................................................................................................................... 115 
8.     WHAT IS THE LIKELY IMPACT OF THE 2009 CRISIS ON REMITTANCES AND POVERTY  IN LATIN AMERICA AND THE 
       CARIBBEAN? 
       Gabriel Demombynes, Hector Valdés Conroy, Ezequiel Molina and Amparo Ballivián .................... 123 
9.     WILL FDI BE RESILIENT IN THIS CRISIS? 
       Cesar Calderon and Tatiana Didier ................................................................................................... 129 
10.  PATTERNS OF FINANCING DURING PERIODS OF HIGH RISK AVERSION: HOW HAVE LATIN FIRMS FARED IN THIS CRISIS 
     SO FAR? 
     Tatiana Didier ................................................................................................................................... 135 
 



                                                                              
 

                 Additional References: World Bank Documents on the Current Global Crisis 

World Bank Reports 
•   Global Development Finance 2009: Charting a Global Recovery. The World Bank, Washington DC, 2009. 
    http://web.worldbank.org/WBSITE/EXTERNAL/EXTDEC/EXTDECPROSPECTS/EXTGDF/EXTGDF2009/0,,contentMDK:222183
    27~menuPK:5924239~pagePK:64168445~piPK:64168309~theSitePK:5924232,00.html 
•   Global Monitoring Report 2009: A Development Emergency. The World Bank, Washington DC, 2009. 
    http://web.worldbank.org/WBSITE/EXTERNAL/EXTDEC/EXTGLOBALMONITOR/EXTGLOMONREP2009/0,,contentMDK:2214
    9019~pagePK:64168445~piPK:64168309~theSitePK:5924405,00.html 

Macroeconomics and Finance 
•    “Global Financial Crisis and Implications for Developing Countries.” G20 Finance’s Ministers Meeting. Sao Paulo, Brazil. 
    November, 2008. World Bank.           http://www.worldbank.org/html/extdr/financialcrisis/pdf/G20FinBackgroundpaper.pdf  
•   “Weathering the Storm: Economic Policy Responses to the Financial Crisis.” Poverty Reduction and Economic Management 
    Network, World Bank, Washington DC. November, 2008.                 
    http://siteresources.worldbank.org/NEWS/Resources/weatheringstorm.pdf  
•   Borchert, Ingo and Mattoo, Aaditya. “The Crisis‐Resilience of Services Trade.” Policy Research Working Paper 4910. 
    November, 2008. World Bank, Washington DC.  
    http://econ.worldbank.org/external/default/main?ImgPagePK=64202990&entityID=000158349_20090428090316&menu
    PK=64210521&pagePK=64210502&theSitePK=544849&piPK=64210520  
•   Caprio Jr, Gerard, Demirgüç‐Kunt, Asli and Kane, Edward J. “The 2007 Meltdown in Structured Securitization: Searching for 
    Lessons, Not Scapegoats.” Policy Research Working Paper 4756. October, 2008. Finance and Private Sector Team, World 
    Bank, Washington DC. 
    http://econ.worldbank.org/external/default/main?pagePK=64165259&piPK=64165421&theSitePK=469372&menuPK=642
    16926&entityID=000158349_20081125132435  
•   Development Research Group. “Lessons from World Bank Research on Financial Crises.” Policy Research Working Paper 
    4779. November, 2008. World Bank, Washington DC. 
    http://econ.worldbank.org/external/default/main?pagePK=64165259&theSitePK=469372&piPK=64165421&menuPK=641
    66093&entityID=000158349_20081216093241  
•   Financial Crisis Website. The World Bank, Washington DC, 2009. http://www.worldbank.org/html/extdr/financialcrisis/ 
•   Lin, Justin Yifu. “The Impact of the Financial Crisis on Developing Countries.” Korea Development Institute. October, 2008. 
    World Bank, Washington DC.            http://siteresources.worldbank.org/DEC/Resources/Oct_31_JustinLin_KDI_remarks.pdf 
•   World Bank Financial Systems and Development Economics Department. “The Unfolding Crisis: Implications for Financial 
    Systems and Their Oversight.” Financial Systems and Development Economics Departments, World Bank, Washington DC. 
    October, 2008.  http://www.worldbank.org/html/extdr/financialcrisis/pdf/UnfoldingCrisis.pdf 

Social Impact 
•   “How Should Labor Market Policy Respond to the Financial Crisis?” Human Development and Poverty Reduction and 
    Economic Management Networks, World Bank, Washington DC. 2009.   
    http://siteresources.worldbank.org/INTLM/Resources/Note‐LM_Crisis_Response_26April.pdf 
•   “The Financial Crisis and Mandatory Pension Systems in Developing Countries.” Human Development Network, World 
    Bank, Washington DC. 2008.           http://siteresources.worldbank.org/INTPENSIONS/Resources/395443‐
    1121194657824/PRPNote‐Financial_Crisis_12‐10‐2008.pdf 
•   Ravallion, Martin. “Bailing out the World’s Poorest.” Policy Research Working Paper 4763. October, 2008. Development 
    Research Group, World Bank, Washington DC. http://www-
    wds.worldbank.org/external/default/WDSContentServer/IW3P/IB/2008/12/16/000158349_2
    0081216092058/Rendered/PDF/WPS4763.pdf 
    http://econ.worldbank.org/external/default/main?pagePK=64165259&piPK=64165421&theSitePK=469372&menuPK=642
    16926&entityID=000158349_20081216092058  



                                                                
 




     
    LATIN‐AMERICA BEYOND THE CRISIS—IMPACTS, POLICIES AND OPPORTUNITIES—A SYNTHESIS 
                                                              
                                                 Marcelo M. Giugale1 
 
Introduction and Summary 
Over  the  past  five  years,  good  policies  and  good  luck  had  put  Latin‐America  on  a  path  to  prosperity.2  
Slowly  the  mass  of  its  poor  was  shrinking.    In  most  countries,  out  went  inflation,  default,  isolation, 
exclusion,  uncertainty.    In  came  budget  surpluses,  investment  grades,  free‐trade  agreements,  cash 
transfers,  institutions.    There  was  still  a  long  way  to  go,  but  progress  was  real.    But  just  when  things 
seemed on track, the first global financial crisis in almost a century reaches the region—and will hit it 
hard.  From fast growth, its economy will suddenly go in reverse.  During this difficult period, the World 
Bank has sought to assist its Latin‐American clients with a package of rapid financial assistance (it tripled 
its lending) and a large body of crisis‐related policy advice. 
This paper synthesizes that body of advice.3 It is organized around three core questions:   
      (i)     How will the crisis impact the region? Slowly and harshly, but without catastrophe;   
      (ii)    How  should  Latin  governments  respond?  With  focused  social  assistance,  tailored  macro 
              stimuli, support for the unemployed, and securing debt roll‐overs;   
      (iii)   What issues will dominate the post‐crisis regional agenda?  The rebalancing of the world’s 
              economy,  short‐term  growth  management,  the  middle‐class,  a  new  contract  between 
              people and the state, the regulation of finance, and global synergies. 
 
Impacts 
The  global  crisis  has  entered  Latin‐America  through  four  contractions—in  external  financing  (notably, 
private trade finance), demand for exports, commodity prices and remittances.  Different from previous, 
home‐grown  episodes,  there  have  been  no  massive  currency  devaluations,  bank  collapses,  debt 
defaults, inflationary spikes or capital flights.  In fact, most countries in the region had, and continue to 
have, liquid and solvent banking systems, primary fiscal surpluses, and manageable debt burdens.  Half a 
dozen of them also have central banks that have successfully committed to inflation targets, and now 
find themselves able to allow for flexibility in their foreign exchange rates. 
So, given the quality of its macroeconomic framework, what will be the main consequences of the crisis 
in Latin‐America?  There will be five.  First, recession.  The region’s average growth will shift from over 4 
percent p.a. in 2008 to minus 2‐2.5 percent in 2009.  These averages hide important differences across 


1
    The author is the World Bank’s Director of Poverty Reduction and Economic Management for the Latin‐American 
and Caribbean region.  The views expressed in this note are his own, and do not necessarily represent those of the 
World Bank Group, its Board of Executive Directors, or its member countries. 
2
    This paper uses the term “Latin‐America” as a short‐hand for Latin‐American and the Caribbean region. 
3
    The technical notes presented in this compilation can be found in the LCR Crisis Briefs Series at: 
http://go.worldbank.org/2IWPN6MH20.   


                                                            1 
countries, but very few of them will escape the downturn (Panama, Peru). Growth will return in 2010, 
but it is likely to be slow (1‐2 percent p.a.) and uneven. 
Second,  poverty  will  increase.    The  World  Bank  estimates  that  the  crisis  will  push  eight  million  Latin‐
Americans into poverty.4  To put that in perspective, sixty million of them had left poverty during 2002‐
2008, thanks to faster growth, smarter social policies, and larger remittances.  But the crisis is expected 
to be unusually harsh on the region’s middle class—mostly because of the fall in the demand for non‐
traditional exports that employ formal, urban, technologically‐more‐advanced workers. 
Third, unemployment will also increase.  All countries for which timely data is available, show short‐term 
rises in unemployment rates—so far between half and a full percentage point. But the reasons for the 
rise vary.  In some cases (Brazil, Chile, Mexico), it is primarily salaried workers who either lost their jobs 
or saw job openings shrink; in others (Colombia), it is the self‐employed who are suffering the brunt of 
the recession.  Wages are falling in some sectors in real terms. Informality is expected to expand, and 
productivity may suffer as a result. 
Fourth, there will be less foreign financing.  By the time the global crisis broke out (last quarter of 2008), 
Latin‐American  sovereign  borrowers  had  by  and  large  secured  the  foreign  financing  they  needed  for 
2009.  Corporations, on the other hand, face a much tighter financial outlook.  This is not surprising as 
net  private  capital  flows  to  emerging  markets  for  the  year  are  projected  to  dive  to  less  than  US$200 
billion—a  fraction  of  its  almost  one  trillion  dollars  peak  in  2007.    More  importantly,  foreign  direct 
investment towards Latin‐America may no longer show the resilience of previous crisis, for the flow of 
mergers and acquisitions that sustained it then (“fire‐sale FDI”) will not be forthcoming now. 
Fifth, there will be less remittances.  In 2008, the 20 million Latin‐Americans living abroad managed to 
send home some US$60 billion (a third to Mexico).  This made remittances one of the region’s largest 
foreign currency earners.  Those flows will decline between 4 and 8 percent in 2009, and may continue 
to decline as long as the housing market in the G7 does not recover. And, if the global recovery does not 
materialize in 2010, a significant number of Latino migrants might return to their countries of origin. 
 
Policy Responses – Today’s Priorities 
Latin‐American  governments  reacted  swiftly  to  the  crisis  and,  on  the  whole,  appropriately.  This  has 
defined  a  short‐term  policy  agenda  that  is  not  entirely  similar  to  the  one  observed  among  G7 
countries—and rightly so.  For the region, the first priority continues to be to avoid a permanent loss of 
human capital.  This is because its countries have a fairly advanced system of social assistance (thirteen 
of them make direct cash transfers to their poor) but lack a comprehensive system of social insurance 
(both  unemployment  and  pensions  benefits  cover  only  a  fraction  of  the  population).    The  latter 
automatically  reacts  to  falls  in  income;  the  former  doesn’t.    As  a  result,  past  crises  in  Latin‐America 
quickly  translated  into  increases  in  malnutrition,  high‐school  drop‐outs,  and  interruptions  in  the 
provision  of  preventive  and  primary  health  care.  In  other  words,  the  crises  translated  into  losses  of 
cognitive  capacity  amongst  young  children,  a  life  of  informal  work  for  more  teenagers,  and  jumps  in 
mortality  rates  among  adults—even  in  otherwise  middle‐income  countries.    The  mechanisms  to  avoid 
those  impacts  are  in  place  (from  school  feeding  programs  to  decentralized  health  budgets),  and  the 
costs involved are relatively small (possibly less than a tenth of one percent of GDP).  
At the same time, Latin‐American governments will need to see through the various stimulus packages 
that they have put in place. By necessity, those packages have had a limited scope.  On the fiscal side, 

4
     Poverty is defined here as US$4 PPP per day. 


                                                          2 
room for counter‐cyclical policies is small in all but a few countries (Chile, Brazil, Colombia).  This is due 
to  a  combination  of  traditionally  low  tax  collection,  insufficient  institutional  capacity  to  implement 
additional  public  investment  quickly  enough,  and  a  dearth  of  lenders  willing  to  finance  enlarged  fiscal 
deficits  at  a  time  of  global  crisis.  Put  differently,  fiscal  stimulus  has  been  easier  for  those  that  saved 
during the years of bonanza.  Things look better on the monetary side.  Several countries in the region 
have built their inflation‐fighter  credentials during the period of fast growth and now find  themselves 
able to cut interest rates and let their currencies depreciate to stimulate domestic and external demand, 
without  risking  a  rise  in  inflationary  expectations.5  More  fundamentally,  Latin‐America  as  a  whole  has 
not resorted to state ownership as a means of stimulus: governments have not had to take over private 
corporations,  and  central  banks  have  not  had  to  open  their  balance  sheets  to  fund  either  of  them 
directly.  There have been no “bail‐outs” and no “quantitative easing”. The institutional equilibrium built 
over the past decade has been largely preserved. 
However, the crisis is beginning to seriously challenge Latin‐America on two fronts—unemployment and 
debt.    As  mentioned  before,  job  losses  have  so  far  not  been  massive.  But,  as  global  export  demand 
continues  to  stagnate  through  2010  and,  perhaps,  beyond,  non‐extractive  export  industries  will  shed 
labor at accelerating speed.  This will raise political pressure for government action, not least because 
the shedding will disproportionally affect the middle class.  And few countries in the region have in place 
unemployment  insurance  systems  with  sufficient  coverage.    Some  have  worked  on  expanding  that 
coverage (Brazil, Mexico).  But, for the most part, efforts have focused on labor intermediation services, 
training,  tax  relief  for  small  enterprises,  subsidies  to  youth  employment,  state‐led  temporary 
employment,  and  larger  budgets  for  cash  transfer  programs.  Whether  these  interventions  work  will 
depend on what form the recession takes.  A short‐and‐sharp “V” shape downturn argues for transitory 
transfers  to  smooth  the  temporary  fall  in  income,  while  a  longer  “U”  or  “L”  shape  contraction  that 
causes changes in the productive structure calls for programs that facilitate inter‐sectoral adjustments—
like retraining. 
Independently of the shape of the recession (as of now, an unknown), the region’s governments have 
turned to public investment as an employment generation tool. They have pledged some US$ 25 billion 
in  additional  public  works  over  2009;  data  on  actual  execution  is  not  available  yet.    The  World  Bank 
estimates  that,  on  average,  implementing  US$  1  billion  of  additional  infrastructure  outlays  in  Latin‐
America  employs  40,000  people,  depending  on  the  mix  of  sectors,  technology,  wages  and  leakage  to 
imports.6 And the number of permanent jobs created in the economy as a result of those outlays can 
reach several times that figure.    
For all the difficulties involved in employment generation, they may be dwarfed by, and will be framed 
in, the region’s financing needs.  The World Bank estimates that, in 2010, Latin‐American governments 
will need to borrow between US$350 and 400 billion dollars. That assumes no major fiscal deterioration. 
It  is  mostly  driven  by  amortizations  coming  due.  For  their  part,  private  corporations  will  need  an 
estimated US$200 billion next year.  Little or no funding has so far been secured by either sovereign or 
private  borrowers—unlike  what  happened  during  2008  with  2009  obligations.  At  the  same  time,  the 
international  supply  of  finance  will  be  constrained,  even  for  investment‐grade  borrowers,  by  the 
crowding‐out  effect  of  the  borrowing  done  by  developed  nations  to  pay  for  their  own  stimulus 
packages.    And  many  of  the  traditional  intermediaries  of  Latin‐American  debt  (notably  investment 
banks) are currently out of commission or out of business.  All this will shift some, perhaps as much as 

5
   Brasil, Chile, Colombia, Guatemala, México, Perú and Uruguay have set up formal inflation‐targeting 
arrangements. 
6
   Rural road maintenance appears to be the outlay with the largest employment impact: 200,000 to 500,000 jobs 
per billion dollars. 


                                                            3 
half, of the borrowing towards domestic sources—in the few countries that can count on those sources.  
But  it  still  leaves  a  large  gap.    And  the  ability  to  roll‐over  debt  remains  the  largest  single  risk  in  the 
region’s short‐term horizon. 
 
Policy Responses – Tomorrow’s Opportunities 
For  all  the  problems  the  crisis  will  cause  to  Latin‐America,  it  can  also  become  the  event  that  finally 
unleashes the region’s enormous potential.  A broad agenda of reforms may now, or soon, be possible, 
based  on  an  unprecedented  constellation  of  new  economic  realities,  political  will  and  technical 
advances.  
The  first  of  those  realities  is  that  world  growth  will  no  longer  be  driven  by  G7  countries  consuming 
beyond their means.  At the margin, emerging markets will need to rebalance their export‐led growth 
models towards domestic absorption.  In Latin‐America, this will be easier for the larger countries, but 
will put smaller economies to the test.  Many, large and small, will see their currencies uncomfortably 
appreciate.  All of which will put a new premium on trade competitiveness—even to preserve the same 
slice  of  a  smaller  trade  cake.    Many  of  the  long‐delayed  reforms  that  make  integration  worthy,  from 
infrastructure and logistics to tertiary education and property rights, will now become inescapable. 
At the same time, the crisis has brought about a new faith in the power of public investment to affect 
growth in the short term. This may transform that investment, for it will cease to be a de facto source of 
funding—cut whenever revenues fall or current expenditures rise. Much as in the early 1990s concerns 
about inflation forced the region’s governments to surrender money printing as a source of fiscal deficit 
financing,  concerns  about  recession  may  now  force  them  to  formally  link  public  investment  to  short‐
term growth prospects—systematically doing more in the downturn and saving during upturns.  It may 
also  lead  the  marginal  dollar  of  public  investment  towards  projects  that  bring  bigger  private 
contributions,  as  they  will  have  the  largest  total  impact  on  growth.  And  it  may  usher  a  much‐needed 
improvement in implementation capacity. Of course, the technical and institutional issues around giving 
public  investment  a  growth  stabilization  role  are  not  minor.  But  the  core  principle  of  saving  in  good 
times to spend in bad ones made its debut in Latin‐America during this crisis (in Chile), and it has proven 
a success that many will seek to replicate. 
The  crisis  may  also  transform  social  policy  in  Latin‐America,  making  it  much  more  about  equity  than 
equality, that is, more about giving all the same opportunities rather than the same rewards. This will 
help  the  region  progress  beyond  a  debate  that  has  for  far  too  long  been  politically  divisive  and 
strategically  paralyzing—a  debate  about  whether  the  very  purpose  of  the  state  is  to  protect  private 
property  or  to  pursue  wealth  redistribution.    A  combination  of  factors  will  account  for  the 
transformation.    On  the  one  hand,  the  crisis  revealed  that  the  region’s  social  assistance  systems  are 
insufficient  to  respond  to  sudden  economy‐wide  contractions  in  income,  especially  among  the  middle 
classes.    On  the  other,  the  technology  to  measure  inequality  of  opportunities  has  recently  become 
available  and,  more  critically,  operational.7  Both  realities  will  unlock  a  long  overdue  effort  to  focalize 
universal  subsidies—why  should  the  state  continue  to  pay  for,  say,  the  heating,  gasoline  or  college 
education consumed by the rich?  The end result will be a pattern of social policy more focused on giving 
the same chances to all.  



7
  See Barros, R. P. de; F. H. G. Ferreira, J. R. Molinas Vega, and J. Saavedra Chanduvi, 2009,  Measuring Inequality of 
Opportunity in Latin American and the Caribbean.  New York: Palgrave Macmillian and Washington, DC: The World 
Bank. 


                                                              4 
More broadly, the role of the state will change worldwide, and Latin‐America will be no exception. What 
is different in the region is that the relationship between its states and its people has long been one of 
mistrust—a manifestation of which is Latin‐Americans’ idiosyncratic reluctance to pay taxes.  The crisis 
may become an opportunity to change that relationship, to reach a new contract.  At a time when less 
resources  will  be  available  to  the  state  but  more  will  be  expected  of  it—from  regulating  finance  to 
facilitating job creation—the door opened  to begin to base  public sector management on results. The 
technology  is  now  available  to  connect  public  action,  and  more  particularly  public  expenditures,  to 
specific outcomes—in education, in health, in infrastructure, in public services. Several countries of the 
region  were  moving  that  way  before  the  crisis,  at  both  federal  and  sub‐national  levels.    That  move  is 
now likely to become the norm. 
Result‐based management of the state will put a framework to its interventions in many sectors where 
it  had  been  less  active  in  the  past.  Nowhere  will  that  be  clearer  than  in  finance.    By  and  large,  Latin‐
America avoided many of the mistakes that led to, and triggered, the implosion of financial markets in 
the developed world—no subprime lending, no off‐balance‐sheet risks, no exotic instruments. Much of 
this is due to over a decade of laborious improvements in regulatory and supervisory institutions.  Those 
institutions will now be challenged by the sweeping reforms that the global financial industry is about 
undergo.  Systemic risk regulation, capital requirements, the use of credit ratings, accounting norms and 
consumer protection are just some of the parameters of the industry that will change worldwide.  How 
Latin‐America adopts and adapts those parameters may prove critical for a region that will increasingly 
have to rely on its own savings to develop.8 
Finally,  the  crisis  has  revealed  the  breadth  of  global  interconnectedness—witness  the  viral  speed  at 
which financial and trade flows collapsed across the world.  The externalities created by the actions of 
individual  countries  have  become so patent  that quickly  triggered the appearance of new  or renewed 
mechanisms for global coordination and support.  Many of those mechanisms are critical for post‐crisis 
Latin‐America, from the G20 (where Argentina, Brazil and Mexico participate) to the increases in lending 
capacity of multilaterals to a trade regime that remains open, fair and clean.  Making the most of them 
is the opportunity of a generation. 
 
Conclusion ‐ The Day After Tomorrow, Latin‐America May Be Better 
So, as thresholds go, 2009 may be remembered as the year in which Latin‐America’s latest growth run 
abruptly ended.  Or as the year in which an unprecedented global crisis shook the region onto a faster 
development  path.    Which  way  it  goes  will  depend  on  how  its  policy‐makers  respond,  whether  they 
tailor their reactions to their reality, see the opportunity behind the crisis, and proactively take on the 
issues that were holding Latinos back  well before subprime became a household term.  Clearly, Latin‐
American  problems  are  not  solely  economic.  The  institutions  that  underpin  politics  are  not  fully 
cemented. Violence and the drugs trade that fuels it have their own dynamics. And nobody knows what 
development policies will work best in the post‐crisis world.  But it remains true, and somewhat ironic, 
that a region that could not quite take off when the world was booming, could now make it on its own 
terms when the world tumbled. 




8
  For a comprehensive framework of  ideas on the new regulation of finance see De la Torre, A. and A. Ize, 2009, 
Regulatory Reform: Integrating Paradigms, World Bank Policy Research Working Paper 4842, February. 


                                                            5 
 

 




    6 
 

AMÉRICA LATINA MÁS ALLÁ DE LA CRISIS—IMPACTOS, POLÍTICAS Y OPORTUNIDADES— SÍNTESIS 

                                                           
                                               Marcelo M. Giugale9 
 
Introducción y Resumen 
Durante  los  últimos  cinco  años,  buenas  políticas  y  buena  suerte  pusieron  a  América  Latina  en  un 
sendero  de  prosperidad.10  Lentamente  la  masa  de  pobreza  se  redujo.    La  mayoría  de  los  países 
comenzaron  a  dejar  atrás  la  inflación,  la  bancarrota,  el  aislamiento,  la  exclusión,  y  la  incertidumbre.  
Aparecíeron  los  superávit  fiscales,  los  grados  de  inversión,  los  tratados  de  libre  comercio,  las 
transferencias directas a los pobres, las instituciones.  Había todavía mucho camino por recorrer, pero el 
progreso era real y tangible. Pero cuando las cosas finalmente parecían estar en el camino correcto, la 
primera  crisis  financiera  global  en  casi  un  siglo  llega  a  la  región—y  la  va  golpeará  con  fuerza.    Su 
economía pasará del crecimiento rápido a la recesión.  Durante este periodo indudablemente difícil, el 
Banco  Mundial  ha  buscado  apoyar  a  sus  clientes  Latino‐americanos  con  un  paquete  de  asistencia 
financiera  rápida  (triplicó  su  volumen  de  préstamos)  y  un  compendio  de  análisis  de  políticas  públicas 
para responder a la crisis.  
Este ensayo sintetiza ese compendio.11  Esta organizado alrededor de tres preguntas centrales:   
    (i)      ¿Cómo afectará la crisis a la región? Lenta y duramente, pero sin catástrofe.   
    (ii)     ¿Cómo  deberían  responder  los  gobiernos  latino‐americanos?    Con  asistencia  social 
             focalizada, estímulos macroeconómicos a medida, apoyo a los desempleados, y asegurando 
             el refinanciamiento de deudas.   
    (iii)    ¿Cuáles son los temas que dominarán la agenda regional después de la crisis?  El rebalanceo 
             de la economía mundial, el manejo del crecimiento de corto plazo, la clase media, un nuevo 
             contrato entre el estado y la gente, la regulación financiera, y las sinergias globales.  
 
Impactos 
La  crisis  global  ha  entrado  en  América  Latina  a  través  de  cuatro  contracciones—en  financiamiento 
externo (en especial para el comercio internacional privado), demanda por exportaciones, precios de las 
materias primas, y remesas. A diferencia de episodios nacionales anteriores, no ha habido devaluaciones 
masivas  de  la  moneda,  colapsos  bancarios,  bancarrotas,  picos  inflacionarios  o  fuga  de  capitales.      De 
hecho,  la  mayoría  de  los  países  de  la  región  tenían,  y  siguen  teniendo,  sistemas  bancarios  líquidos  y 


9
   El autor es el Director de Política Económica y Programas de Reducción de Pobreza del Banco Mundial para 
América Latina.  Las opiniones expresadas en este documento le pertenecen, y no necesariamente reflejan las del 
Grupo Banco Mundial, su Directorio, o las de sus países miembros. 
10
     En este documento, el término «América Latina» se usa como abreviación de « América Latina y el Caribe ». . 
11
     La colección completa de notas técnicas contenidas en este compendio son parte del LCR Crisis Briefs Series y 
pueden encontrarse en:  http://go.worldbank.org/2IWPN6MH20.   


                                                          7 
solventes,  superávit  fiscales  primarios,  y  deudas  manejables.    Media  docena  de  ellos  también  tienen 
bancos centrales que se han comprometido exitosamente con metas de inflación, y como consecuencia 
pueden ahora permitirse flexibilidad en sus tasas de cambio.  
Dada esa calidad en el marco macroeconómico, ¿cuáles serán las consecuencias principales de la crisis 
para  América  Latina?    Serán  cinco.  Primero,  recesión.  El  crecimiento  promedio  de  la  región  pasara  de 
más de 4 por ciento en el 2008 a menos 2‐2.5 en el 2009. Estos promedios disimulan grandes diferencias 
entre países, pero muy pocos escaparan la caída en el producto (Panamá, Perú). El crecimiento volverá 
en el 2010, pero es probable que sea lento (1‐2 por ciento anual) y no uniforme. 
Segundo, la pobreza se incrementará.  El Banco Mundial estima que la crisis empujará a ocho millones 
de latino‐americanos a la pobreza.12  Para poner ese número en perspectiva, sesenta millones de ellos 
habían salido de la pobreza en el periodo 2002‐2008, gracias al crecimiento más rápido, a las mejores 
políticas sociales, y a las mayores remesas.  Pero se espera que la crisis sea inusualmente dura con la 
clase media—por la caída en la demanda por exportaciones no  tradicionales  que  tienden  a emplear a 
trabajadores formales, urbanos y tecnológicamente más avanzados.   
Tercero, el desempleo también se incrementará. Todos los países para los que existen datos puntuales, 
muestran  un  aumento  de  corto  plazo  en  las  tasas  de  desempleo—hasta  ahora,  de  entre  medio  y  un 
punto porcentual.  Pero las razones detrás del aumento varían.  En algunos casos (Brasil, Chile, México), 
son  mayormente  los  trabajadores  en  relación  de  dependencia  (“asalariados”)  los  que  han  perdido  su 
empleo  o  encuentran  menos  oportunidades  de  empleo;    en  otros  (Colombia),  son  los  trabajadores 
independientes  los  que  parecen  estar  sintiendo  más  el  impacto  de  la  recesión.    Los  salarios  están 
cayendo  en  algunos  sectores  en  términos  reales.    Se  espera  que  la  informalidad  se  expanda,  y  que  la 
productividad sufra como resultado. 
Cuarto,  habrá  menos  financiamiento  externo.  Al  momento  en  que  se  detonó  la  crisis  global  (último 
trimestre del 2008), los deudores Latino‐americanos soberanos, en su mayoría se habían ya asegurado  
el  financiamiento  externo  que  necesitaban  para  el  2009.    Las  corporaciones,  en  cambio,  enfrentan  un 
panorama financiero mucho más difícil.  Esto no es muy sorprendente, pues las proyecciones del flujo 
neto de capital privado hacia los países emergentes para este año muestran un verdadero derrumbe—
pasarán de un pico de casi un millón de millones de dólares en el 2007, a menos de 200,000 millones. 
Aun mas importante, la inversión extranjera directa  hacia América Latina tal vez no siga mostrando la 
estabilidad que tuvo durante crisis anteriores, porque el flujo de fusiones y adquisiciones que la sostenía 
(“compras de remate”) ya no se harán presentes. 
Quinto, habrá menos remesas. En el 2008, los 20 millones de latino‐americanos que viven en el exterior 
enviaron  unos  60,000  millones  de  dólares  (un  tercio  de  ese  dinero  fue  a  México).  Esto  convirtió  a  las 
remesas en una de las más grandes fuentes de divisas de la región. Esos flujos se reducirán entre un 4 y 
un  8  por  ciento  en  el  2009,  y  pueden  continuar  cayendo  mientras  no  se  recupere  la  industria  de  la 
vivienda  en  los  países  G7.    Y,  si  la  recuperación  global  no  se  materializa  en  el  2010,  un  número 
significativo de migrantes latinos podría volver a casa. 
 
 
 
 


12
      La pobreza se define aquí como US$4 PPP por día o menos.  


                                                          8 
Respuestas de Política Pública – Las Prioridades de Hoy.  
Los gobiernos latino‐americanos reaccionaron rápidamente a la crisis y, en general, lo hicieron en forma 
adecuada.  Esto ha definido una agenda de políticas públicas de corto plazo que no es exactamente igual 
a la que implementaron los países G7—y es acertado que así sea. Para la región, la primera prioridad 
continua siendo evitar una pérdida permanente de capital humano.  La razón es que sus países tienen 
sistemas  de  asistencia  social  bastante  desarrollados  (trece  de  ellos  hacen  transferencias  directas  en 
efectivo hacia sus ciudadanos pobres) pero carecen de un sistema de seguridad social comprensivo (los 
beneficios por desempleo y por pensión solo cubren una pequeña porción de la población).  Este último 
reacciona  automáticamente  cuando  el  ingreso  familiar  cae;    el  anterior  no  lo  hace.    No  es  casualidad 
entonces  que,  en  el  pasado,  las  crisis  latino‐americanas  se  hayan  traducido  en  aumentos  en 
desnutrición, deserción en escolaridad secundaria, e interrupciones en los servicios de medicina básica y 
preventiva. En otras palabras, las crisis se traducían en pérdida de capacidad cognitiva entre los niños, 
una vida de trabajo informal para mas adolescentes, y un salto en la tasa de mortalidad entre adultos—
aun en países que se consideran de ingreso medio.  Los mecanismos para evitar esos impactos están ya 
en  su  lugar  (desde  comedores  escolares  hasta  presupuestos  de  salud  descentralizados),  y  el  costo  es 
relativamente bajo (posiblemente menos de una décima de uno por ciento del PIB).  
Al mismo tiempo, los gobiernos latino‐americanos tendrán que implementar los paquetes de estimulo 
que han puesto en marcha. Por necesidad, el alcance de esos paquetes es limitado.  Del lado fiscal, el 
espacio para hacer políticas “contra‐cíclicas” es pequeño en casi todos los países (Chile, Brasil, Colombia 
parecen ser la excepción). Esto se debe a una combinación de recaudación impositiva tradicionalmente 
baja,  insuficiente  capacidad  institucional  para  ejecutar  inversión  pública  adicional  con  rapidez,  y 
ausencia de acreedores dispuestos a financiar expansiones en el déficit fiscal durante un tiempo de crisis 
global.  Dicho de otra forma, el estimulo fiscal ha sido más fácil para aquellos que ahorraron durante los 
tiempos de bonanza.  Las cosas lucen mejor del lado monetario. Varios países de la región han ganado 
credibilidad en su lucha contra la inflación durante el periodo de crecimiento rápido y son ahora capaces 
de bajar sus tasas de interés y devaluar sus monedas para estimular la demanda domestica y externa sin 
arriesgar  un  repunte  en  expectativas  inflacionarias.13    Mas  fundamentalmente,  América  Latina  en  su 
conjunto no  ha recurrido  a la propiedad pública como instrumento de estimulo: los gobiernos no han 
tomado  control  de  empresas  privadas,  y  los  bancos  centrales  no  han  abierto  sus  balances  a  fondear 
directamente  a  ninguno  de  los  dos.    No  ha  habido  ni  rescates  (“bail‐outs”)  ni  emisiones  monetarias 
directas (“quantitative easing”).  El equilibrio institucional laboriosamente construido durante la última 
década ha sido preservado.  
Sin embargo, la crisis comienza a presentar dos serios desafíos para América Latina—el desempleo y la 
deuda.  Como se mencionó antes, la pérdida de puestos de trabajo aún no ha sido masiva.  Pero, en la 
medida  en  que  la  demanda  mundial  por  exportaciones  continúe  estancada  durante  el  2010  y,  tal vez, 
más  allá  del  2010,  las  industrias  de  exportación  no  extractivas  acelerarán  su  tasa  de  despidos.  Esto 
incrementara  la  presión  política  para  que  los  gobiernos  actúen,  especialmente  porque  los  despidos 
afectaran desproporcionalmente a la clase media. Y pocos países de la región tienen sistemas de seguro 
de  desempleo  con  suficiente  cobertura.  Algunos  han  estado  trabajando  en  expandir  esa  cobertura 
(Brasil,  México).    Pero,  en  general,  las  intervenciones  se  han  concentrado  en  los  servicios  de 
intermediación  de  trabajo,  entrenamiento,  exenciones  impositivas  para  pequeñas  empresas,  subsidios 
al empleo de jóvenes, programas de empleo temporal, y mayores presupuestos para los programas de 
transferencias directas en efectivo.  El éxito que tengan esas intervenciones dependerá de la forma que 
tome la recesión.  Una recesión profunda pero corta (en “V”) apunta a transferencias transitorias para 

13
   Brasil, Chile, Colombia, Guatemala, México, Perú y Uruguay han establecido sistemas formales de metas de 
inflación.  


                                                         9 
suavizar  la  caída  temporaria  en  el  ingreso  como  la  mejor  opción,  mientras  que  una  caída  más 
prolongada  en  el  producto  (en  “U”  o  en  “L”)  con  cambios  permanentes  en  la  estructura  productiva 
necesitará de políticas que faciliten el ajuste inter‐sectorial‐‐‐como los programas de re‐entrenamiento. 
Independientemente  de  la  forma  que  tome  la  recesión  (una  variable  hasta  ahora  desconocida),  los 
gobiernos  de  la  región  ha  buscado  usar  a  la  inversión  publica  como  instrumento  de  generación  de 
empleo.  En total, han anunciado unos 25,000 millones de dólares en obras publicas adicionales para el 
2009;    los  datos  de  ejecución  efectiva  todavía  no  están  disponibles.  El  Banco  Mundial  estima  que,  en 
promedio,  implementar  1,000  millones  de  dólares  en  gastos  de  infraestructura  en  América  Latina 
requiere  emplear  40,000  trabajadores,  dependiendo  de  la  mezcla  de  sectores,  tecnologías,  salarios  y 
necesidades de importación. 14  Y el número de puestos de trabajo permanentes creados en la economía 
como resultado de esos gastos puede llegar a varias veces esa cifra. 
Las dificultades que significa crear empleo se comparan con, y estarán enmarcadas en, las dificultades 
para  asegurar  el  financiamiento  de  la  región.    El  Banco  Mundial  ha  estimado  que,  en  el  2010,  los 
gobiernos de América Latina necesitaran pedir prestados entre 350,000 y 400,000 millones de dólares. 
Esto supone que no habrá mayores deterioros fiscales.  Esta primeramente basado en los vencimientos 
de deuda que ocurrirán ese año.  Por su parte, las corporaciones privadas necesitarán aproximadamente 
200,000 millones de dólares.  Pocos de esos fondos, públicos y privados, han sido asegurados hasta el 
momento—a  diferencia  de  lo  ocurrido  en  el  2008  con  respecto  a  las  obligaciones  del  2009.  Al  mismo 
tiempo, la oferta internacional de fondos estará limitada, aún para deudores con grado de inversión, por 
el  efecto  de  desplazo  (“crowding‐out”)  que  causará  el  endeudamiento  en  el  que  incurrirán  los  países 
desarrollados  para  pagar  por  sus  propios  paquetes  de  estimulo.    Y  muchos  de  los  intermediarios 
tradicionales de la deuda latino‐americana (en particular, bancos de inversión) están al momento fuera 
de  actividad  o  en  bancarrota.  Todo  esto  conducirá  parte,  tal  vez  la  mitad,  del  las  necesidades  de 
financiamiento  hacia  fuentes  domésticas—en  los  países  que  cuentan  con  esas  fuentes.  Pero  aún  así 
habrá una amplia brecha.  Y la capacidad de refinanciar deuda (“debt roll‐over”) se constituye como el 
riesgo individual más grande que existe en el horizonte de corto plazo de la región.  
 
Respuestas de Política Pública – Las Oportunidades de Mañana 
Por todos los problemas que la crisis causará a América Latina, puede también convertirse en el evento 
que finalmente libera el enorme potencial de la región.  Una amplia agenda de reforma podría ahora, o 
muy  pronto,  hacerse  viable  en  base  a  una  constelación  sin  precedentes  de  nuevas  realidades 
económicas, voluntad política y avances técnicos.  
La primera de esas realidades es que el crecimiento del mundo ya no estará motorizado por países G7 
consumiendo  más  allá  de  sus  recursos.    Al  margen,  los  países  emergentes  necesitarán  balancear  sus 
modelos  de  crecimiento  exportador  con  mayor  participación  de  la  absorción  doméstica.    En  América 
Latina,  eso  será  más  fácil  de  hacer  para  países  grandes,  pero  pondrá  a  prueba  a  las  economías  más 
pequeñas. Muchas, grandes y pequeñas, verán sus monedas apreciarse incómodamente.  Todo lo cual 
dará un valor adicional a la competitividad comercial—aún para preservar la misma porción de un pastel 
más chico. Muchas de las postergadas reformas que hacen que la globalización rinda frutos—desde la 
infraestructura y la logística hasta la educación terciaria y los derechos de propiedad—se harán ahora 
inevitables. 



14
  El mantenimiento de caminos rurales parece ser el gasto en infraestructura que conlleva la mayor necesidad de 
empleo : entre 200,000 y 500,000 trabajadores por cada 1000 millones de dólares de gasto implementado. 


                                                        10 
Al mismo tiempo, la crisis ha generado una nueva fe en el poder de la inversión pública para afectar el 
crecimiento de corto plazo.  Esto puede transformar a esa inversión, pues dejará de ser, de facto, una 
fuente de financiamiento—que se corta cuando caen los ingresos o aumentan los gastos corrientes.  Así 
como  al  principio  de  los  90s  la  preocupación  por  la  inflación  forzó  a  los  gobiernos  de  la  región  a 
abandonar la impresión de moneda como fuente de financiamiento del déficit fiscal, preocupación por 
la  recesión  puede  ahora  forzarlos  a  ligar  formalmente  la  inversión  pública  con  el  panorama  de 
crecimiento  de  corto  plazo—sistemáticamente  invirtiendo  más  cuando  el  ciclo  productivo  cae  y 
ahorrando  cuando  sube.    Esto  también  llevaría  el  dólar  marginal  de  inversión  pública  hacia  proyectos 
que  movilicen  mayores  contribuciones  privadas,  pues  tendrían  mayor  impacto  en  el  crecimiento.    Y 
detonaría  las  mejoras  necesarias  en  la  capacidad  de  implementación.    Por  supuesto,  los  problemas 
técnicos  e  institucionales  de  dar  a  la  inversión  pública  el  rol  de  estabilizador  del  crecimiento  no  son 
menores.  Pero el principio central de ahorrar en los tiempos buenos para gastar en los malos hizo su 
debut en América Latina durante esta crisis (en Chile), y ha probado ser un éxito que muchos buscarán 
replicar.  
La  crisis  podría  también  transformar  la  política  social  de  América  Latina,  dirigiéndola  más  hacia  la 
equidad que hacia la igualdad, esto es, más en dar a todos las mismas oportunidades que en dar a todos 
los  mismos  premios.    Esto  ayudaría  a  la  región  a  dejar  atrás  un  debate  que,  por  décadas,  ha  sido 
políticamente  divisivo  y  estratégicamente  paralizante—un  debate  sobre  si  el  propósito  mismo  del 
estado  es  proteger  la  propiedad  privada  o  redistribuir  la  riqueza.  Una  combinación  de  factores  dará 
cuenta  de  la  transformación.  Por  un  lado,  la  crisis  reveló  que  los  sistemas  de  asistencia  social  de  la 
región  no  son  suficientes  para  responder  una  contracción  súbita  del  ingreso  a  través  de  la  economía, 
especialmente en las clases medias.  Por otro, la tecnología para medir la desigualdad de oportunidades 
ha sido recientemente desarrollada, está disponible, y es operacional.15  Ambas realidades destrabarán 
los esfuerzos para focalizar los subsidios universales—¿porque debe el  estado continuar  pagando por, 
digamos,  la  calefacción,  la  gasolina  o  la  educación  universitaria  que  consumen  los  ricos?    El  resultado 
final será una matriz de política social más enfocada en dar a todos las mismas chances.   
Más ampliamente, el rol del estado cambiara en el mundo entero, y América Latina no será la excepción. 
Lo que es diferente en la región es que la relación entre sus estados y sus pueblos ha por mucho tiempo 
sido  una  de  desconfianza—una  manifestación  de  lo  cual  es  la  resistencia  idiosincrática  de  los  latino‐
americanos a pagar impuestos.  La crisis podría tornarse en una oportunidad para cambiar esa relación, 
para llegar a un nuevo contrato.  En un momento en que habrá menos recursos para el estado, más se 
esperará de él—desde regular más las finanzas a crear más empleo—y la puerta se abrirá para comenzar 
a  basar  la  gestión  del  estado  en  resultados.  La  tecnología  ya  está  disponible  para  conectar  la  acción 
pública, y más particularmente el gasto público, con resultados específicos—en educación, en salud, en 
infraestructura, en servicios públicos.  Varios países de la región se estaban moviendo en esa dirección 
antes de la crisis, tanto a nivel federal como sub‐nacional.  Ese movimiento probablemente se convertirá 
ahora en la norma. 
La  gestión  del  estado  por  resultados  pondrá  un  marco  a  sus  intervenciones  en  sectores  donde  era 
menos activo en el pasado.  El caso más claro es el sector financiero.  En general, América Latina evitó 
muchos  de  los  errores  que  llevaron  a,  y  detonaron,  la  implosión  de  los  mercados  financieros  en  el 
mundo desarrollado—no hubo endeudamiento “subprime”, ni acumulación riesgos fuera de balance, ni 
instrumentos  exóticos.    Mucho  de  eso  se  debe  a  más  de  una  década  de  meticulosas  mejoras  en  las 
instituciones regulatorias y de supervisión. Esas instituciones enfrentarán ahora el desafío de las grandes 

15
  Ver Barros, R. P. de; F. H. G. Ferreira, J. R. Molinas Vega, and J. Saavedra Chanduvi, 2009,  Measuring Inequality 
of Opportunity in Latin American and the Caribbean.  (Midiendo la Desigualdad de Oportunidades en América 
Latina y el Caribe). New York: Palgrave Macmillian and Washington, DC: The World Bank. 


                                                          11 
reformas  de  las  que  será  sujeto  la  industria  financiera  global.    La  regulación  del  riesgo  sistémico,  los 
requerimientos  de  capital,  el  uso  de  calificaciones  de  deuda,  las  normas  contables,  y  la  protección  al 
consumidor  son  solo  algunos  de  los  parámetros  de  la  industria  que  cambiaran  alrededor  del  mundo. 
Como  adopta  y  adapta  América  Latina  esos  parámetros  será  critico  para  una  región  que,  con  mayor 
frecuencia, deberá recurrir al ahorro domestico para desarrollarse.16 
Finalmente, la crisis ha revelado el alcance de la interconexión global—basta con ver la velocidad viral a 
la que colapsaron los flujos financieros y comerciales alrededor del mundo.  Las externalidades creadas 
por las acciones de países individuales han sido tan patentes que han llevaron a la aparición de nuevos o 
renovados mecanismos globales de coordinación y apoyo.  Muchos de esos mecanismos son esenciales 
para la America‐Latina de post‐crisis, desde el grupo G20 (donde Argentina, Brasil y México participan) a 
los incrementos en la capacidad de préstamo de los organismos multilaterales a un régimen de comercio 
internacional  abierto,  justo  y  sustentable.    Aprovecharlos  al  máximo  es  la  oportunidad  de  esta 
generación.    
 
Conclusiones – Pasado Mañana, América Latina Puede Estar Mejor  
Como hito, el 2009 podría ser recordado como el año en el cual otro brote de crecimiento en América 
Latina llegó a un abrupto fin.  O como el año en el cual una crisis global sin precedentes puso a la región 
sobre un sendero de desarrollo mucho más rápido, y más duradero.  Cuál de los dos resultados se haga 
realidad, dependerá de cómo respondan sus líderes, si adaptan sus respuestas a las capacidades de sus 
economías, si ven la oportunidad detrás de la crisis, y si pro‐activamente abordan los problemas que 
frenaban a los latino‐americanos mucho antes que “subprime” fuera una palabra de uso común.  
Claramente, los problemas de América Latina no son solo económicos.  Las instituciones sobre las que se 
basan sus sistemas políticos todavía no están completamente consolidadas.  La violencia y el narco‐
tráfico que la alimenta tienen una dinámica propia. Y nadie realmente sabe que políticas de desarrollo 
funcionaran mejor en el mundo post‐crisis.  Pero por eso no deja de ser cierto, y un tanto irónico, que la 
región que no había podido despegar cuando el mundo estaba en auge, podría hacerlo ahora que el 
mundo tambalea. 

 




16
  Para acceder a un marco conceptual comprensivo de ideas sobre la nueva regulación financiera, ver De la Torre, 
A. and A. Ize, 2009, Regulatory Reform: Integrating Paradigms  (Reforma Regulatoria: Integrando Paradigmas), 
World Bank Policy Research Working Paper 4842, February. 


                                                          12 
                         1. THE GLOBAL FINANCIAL AND ECONOMIC STORM: 
                    How Bad is the Weather in Latin America and the Caribbean? 
                                                Augusto de la Torre 
                                                   April 2009* 
 
                                                Executive Summary 
                                                             
The  current  crisis,  originated  in  the  advanced  financial  markets  of  the  center,  has  generated  alarming 
ripple effects throughout the periphery.  No emerging economy has remained immune to its destructive 
power, which intensified dramatically in the 4th quarter of 2008 after the failure of Lehman Brothers.  The 
crisis  is  far  from  over  and  its  rapid  spread  to  the  Latin  America  and  the  Caribbean  (LAC)  is  occurring 
through mutually reinforcing channels (financial, remittances, terms of trade, export demand), leading to 
a  sharp  downturn  in  economic  activity.    Nevertheless,  LAC  is  better  prepared  than  in  the  past  to 
withstand  the  global  storm.    Its  traditional  sources  of  vulnerability  and  magnification  of  external 
shocks—local currency, fiscal stance, financial system, external sector—are  this time around, and by and 
large, not part of the problem.  As a result, LAC may be able to avert a systemic financial crisis at home 
and a number of LAC countries enjoy some space for counter‐cyclical policy, particularly in the monetary 
field.  However, the magnitude of the shock is such that LAC will inevitably endure an economic recession 
so  long  as  the  global  crisis  lasts.    Moreover,  LAC  remains  vulnerable  to  a  recession‐induced  reversal  in 
social gains.  Arguably, such a reversal would be a more difficult affair to manage in a period of electoral 
contests  and  considering  that  social  indicators  in  the  region,  while  having  registered  significant 
improvements  in  recent  years,  remain  generally  well  below  those  of  middle‐income  countries  in  other 
regions.    This  puts  a  premium  on  preventing  an  undue  contraction  in  vital  public  spending  in  health, 
education, basic infrastructure, and social programs.  The recovery path for LAC depends crucially on the 
ability of rich countries and key emerging economies to successfully contain and recover from the current 
crisis.  It also hinges on the availability of substantial financial support from multilateral institutions and 
on the prudency and effectiveness of LAC’s own policy responses. 
 
The Big Storm that originated in the center… 
The  current  crisis  affecting  the  world  economy  is  of  historical  dimensions  and  is  re‐shaping  the 
international economic and financial landscape, including the traditional dividing lines between center 
and  periphery.    The  eye  of  the  storm  is  in  the  advanced  economies,  where  the  crisis  has  resulted  in 
colossal failures of financial institutions, massive deleveraging, and a staggering collapse in asset values 
(some  US$  18  trillion  in  G‐7  stock  market  capitalization  has  vanished  relative  to  the  admittedly 
overvalued pre‐crisis peaks). The turmoil has also produced enormous job losses (total employment in 
the US and Euro area has shrunk by about 6.5 million jobs since the beginning of the recession) and a 
sharp  contraction  in  economic  activity  (in  the  4th  quarter  of  2008,  GDP  fell  at  an  annualized  quarterly 
rate of 6.3% in the U.S. and the Euro Area, and 12.1% in Japan).  In an effort to restore confidence in 
financial markets and pull the economy out of the hole, governments in rich countries have resorted to 
large‐scale  financial  rescue  and  fiscal  stimulus  packages—raising  the  degree  of  state  intervention  in 
private markets to levels not seen since the Great Depression.   

*Prepared for the IMf/World Bank Spring Meeting of April 2009. 



                                                          13 
 
… has reached deeply into the periphery 

The ripple effects of the crisis on the periphery are in full swing and acting through multiple transmission 
channels.    These  include  the  sharply  reduced  availability  of  international  market  finance  (debt  and 
equity), the deterioration of terms of trade for net commodity exporters, the decline in remittances, and 
the  pronounced  contraction  of  external  demand  for  emerging  economies’  goods  and  services.    As  a 
result,  the  periphery  is  being  forced  into  painful  adjustments  and  the  entire  world  is  in  crisis.    Global 
trade is declining for the first time in 25 years and world GDP is expected to fall by nearly 2 percent in 
2009.  The International Labor Organization predicts that global unemployment could reach 38 million 
workers in 2009, up from 14 million in 2008.   
Furthermore, the globalization of this crisis has accentuated the feedback loops between the mentioned 
transmission  channels.    For  example,  the  world  recession  keeps  commodity  prices  and  exports  down, 
causing  loan  quality  to  decay.    In  turn,  this  threatens  employment,  weakens  profit  expectations,  and 
undermines credit flows, all of which further undercuts private investment and consumption, and so on.   
 
Timely policy responses are called for, but constraints vary across emerging countries 

The  recessionary  implications  of  the  external  shock  call  in  principle  for  timely  responses,  including 
counter‐cyclical  macroeconomic  policies,  scaling  up  of  social  protection  and  basic  infrastructure 
programs, and significant real exchange realignments to dampen the output and employment sacrifices 
involved in the adjustment.  However, the capacity of emerging economies to respond in practice along 
these dimensions depends not just on the availability of financial resources from multilateral institutions 
but also on key policy and structural factors that determine the degree of vulnerability to the shocks as 
well as  the scope for policy maneuver.  These factors include:  
    a. The extent of pre‐existing macroeconomic and financial policy weaknesses;  
    b. The extent of poverty and inequality, and the degree of social conflict;  
    c. Structural  features,  such  as  the  diversification  of  trade,  the  degree  of  trade  and  financial 
       openness, the extent of integration of the local economy to the global production chain, and the 
       allocation of labor between tradable and non‐tradable sectors.   
 
LAC is better prepared in the macro‐financial area, compared to its own past… 

LAC’s history has been marked by frequent and devastating financial crises.  In previous episodes (such 
as the debt crisis in the early 80s, the Tequila crisis in 1995, and the Asian and Russian crises of the late 
90s),  LAC  countries  were  usually  caught  with  substantial,  home‐grown  macroeconomic  and  financial 
vulnerabilities—reflected  in  high  inflation,  overvalued  currencies,  ample  fiscal  and  current  account 
deficits, and widespread maturity and currency mismatches (Figures 1 and 2).  These conditions sapped 
LAC’s ability to undertake counter‐cyclical policies.  LAC was instead compelled to raise interest rates or 
deeply  cut  fiscal  spending  in  the  midst  of  the  crises  in  order  to  keep  investors  from  fleeing,  but 
exacerbating output and employment losses.  In several past episodes, such desperate measures were 
unable to prevent financial meltdowns. 
Fortunately, the pains from past crises have led to significant institutional and policy improvements in 
LAC’s macroeconomic and financial areas.  More specifically, LAC’s vulnerability to shocks has fallen in 
tandem  with  the  emergence  of:  (i)  sounder  and  more  flexible  currencies;  (ii)  more  resilient  financial 
systems;  (iii)  better  fiscal  and  public  debt  management;  and  (iv)  stronger  external  positions.    These 



                                                           14 
improvements are perhaps most noticeable in countries that have been able to build credible inflation 
targeting regimes. 
Regarding  local  currencies,  an  increased  number  of  countries  in  the  region  have  moved  to  flexible 
exchange  rate  arrangements  (Figure  3).    The  effectiveness  of  these  regimes  has  risen  in  line  with  a 
reduction  in  the  pass‐through  —implying  that  exchange  rate  movements  now  coexist  with  low  and 
stable  inflation—and  the  deepening  of  local  currency  debt  markets—implying  that  exchange  rate 
movements  now  generate  much  less  adverse  balance  sheet  effects.    Similarly,  the  resiliency  of  LAC’s 
financial  systems  has  increased,  reflecting  significant  reforms  in  financial  legislation,  regulation,  and 
infrastructure  that  were  introduced  following  the  crises  of  the  late‐1990s.  These  reforms  have  led, 
among other things, to a virtuous combination of financial deepening and a rising share of loans funded 
by local currency deposits (Figure 4).   
LAC’s fiscal and external conditions have also registered improvements.  To be sure, much of the good 
fiscal and external outcomes were driven by good luck. That is, LAC countries benefited from the benign 
external  environment  of  the  recent  past,  characterized  by  abundant  liquidity,  booming  commodity 
prices, and vigorous global growth.  Nevertheless, better policy frameworks are part of the story too.  In 
the area of public finances, enhanced debt management systems and greater discipline in fiscal policy 
contributed  to  reductions  in  government  debt  burdens  and  improvements  in  the  currency  and  term 
structure of such debts (Figures 5 and 6).  The result was greater fiscal sustainability, even if, with the 
notable exception of Chile, LAC governments did not save sufficiently during the good times.  Finally, in 
the external front, there was a substantial accumulation of international reserves across LAC countries, 
which was due not just to terms‐of‐trade windfall gains but also to efforts to self‐insure against capital 
flow reversals (Figure 7).  
In sum, improved policy frameworks in LAC have contributed to reducing the weaknesses that used to 
be  incubated  in  the  monetary,  financial,  fiscal,  and  external  fronts.    These  vulnerabilities  tended  to 
greatly  magnify  the  adverse  effects  of  external  shocks.    In  the  current  crisis,  such  vulnerabilities  are 
tamed and are, thus, not an independent source of shock amplification.  As a result, many LAC countries 
are likely to avert a systemic financial crisis at home.  However, this reduced vulnerability is insufficient 
to  prevent  bad  consequences—the  storm  spreading  from  the  center  to  the  periphery  is  of  such  a 
formidable  magnitude  that  its  recessionary  impact  is  already  being  felt.    Moreover,  if  the  global  crisis 
becomes  more  acute  or  extends  beyond  2009,  fiscal  and  financial  conditions  can  weaken  to  a  point 
where  they  could  well  become  an  increasing  part  of  the  problem.    Finally,  while  vulnerabilities  have 
decreased for the LAC region as a whole, there is considerable heterogeneity across LAC countries.  A 
few countries are still saddled with significant fiscal and public debt complications which limit budgetary 
maneuvering room.  Many others, particularly among the smaller countries in Central America and the 
Caribbean,  have  heavily‐managed  or  pegged  exchange  rates  and  cannot  therefore  undertake  counter‐
cyclical monetary policy.   
  
… and perhaps also, at least in some respects, compared to other emerging regions 

Unlike many past experiences, some evidence suggests that LAC was this time in a relative good position 
vis‐à‐vis other emerging regions when the crisis hit.  For instance, countries in LAC had on average lower 
inflation rates and were equipped with more flexible exchange rate arrangements compared to Eastern 
Europe and East Asia (Figures 8 and 9).  Furthermore, in contrast with large current account deficits in 
Eastern Europe and South Asia, LAC was running current account surpluses before the crisis.  Also, while 
significantly  below  South  Asia,  LAC’s  ratio  of  international  reserves  to  short‐term  external  debt 
compared favorably to those of East Asia and was above that of Eastern Europe (Figure 10).  Moreover, 



                                                          15 
financial systems in LAC, although smaller on average than in other emerging regions, had a larger share 
of loans backed by local deposits, a factor contributing to resiliency to reversals in capital inflows.  East 
and South Asia had a lower loan to deposit ratio while in Eastern Europe a very high share of credit was 
funded by foreign inflows (Figure 11).   
 
LAC will most likely endure a recession this year 

The 4th quarter of 2008 marked a clear point of inflexion for LAC and the world economy.  Prior to that, 
LAC (a net commodity‐exporting region) had been enjoying a short‐lived decoupling stage underpinned 
by an accelerated rise in commodity prices.  During that stage, even as the subprime crisis and economic 
slowdown  spread  through  the  economies  of  the  center,  LAC  currencies  strengthened,  foreign  direct 
investment  continued  flowing  in,  and  growth  kept  apace.    The  key  policy  concern  for  LAC  then  was 
inflation, which was being pushed by rising international prices of foods and fuels.  That situation began 
turning  around  as  commodity  prices  fell,  and  came  to  an  abrupt  end  with  the  financial  devastation 
unleashed  by  the  failure  of  Lehman  Brothers  in  September  2008.    As  a  result,  financial  flows  and 
economic activity throughout the world took a highly synchronized nose dive, and LAC fell into a sort of 
global economic whirlpool.  
The overall deterioration of economic conditions that was registered in the 4th quarter of 2008 has been 
unprecedented.  During that quarter, on average for LAC, the cost of international borrowing for firms 
doubled;  corporate  issues  of  debt  and  equity  securities  came  to  a  virtual  halt;  the  flow  of  credit  by 
private  banks  stagnated;  remittances  began  contracting  sharply;  exports  and  imports  shrunk  by  about 
30 and 25 percent, respectively, as trade surpluses vanished; and industrial production fell by about 12 
percent (Figures 12 and 13).   
As these developments were linked to tectonic shifts in the advanced economies, LAC countries that are 
closely linked to the U.S. economy (including Mexico and the small open economies of Central America 
and the Caribbean) have felt a more direct and stronger initial impact.  For other countries in the region, 
the  repercussions  are  being  felt  with  a  lag.    But  in  all  cases,  growth  prospects  for  2009  have  been 
downgraded  dramatically  as  news  on  economic  performance  of  advanced  and  developing  countries 
were  revealed  on  the  4th  quarter.    For  instance,  as  of  August  2008  the  Consensus  Forecasts  put  GDP 
growth for LAC in 2009 at around 3.7 percent; by contrast, the most recent Consensus Forecasts (March 
2009) sees LAC growth this year in the negative territory, at around ‐0.7 percent.   
While  the  range  of  growth  forecasts  is  wide—reflecting  the  more  general  uncertainty  about  world 
growth—few  doubt  that  2009  would  be,  at  a  minimum,  a  year  of  economic  stagnation  for  LAC  as  a 
whole and, perhaps more likely, a year of recession.    
 
LAC is especially vulnerable to a recession‐induced reversal of social gains  

Poverty and inequality figures, as well as other social indicators, improved markedly in LAC during the 
last decade.  For instance, infant mortality declined to 21.4 deaths per 1000 live births in 2006 from 36.1 
in 1995, which is closely related to a larger access of the population to improved water and sanitation.  
Similarly, during the strong growth period of 2002‐2008, almost 60 million people in LAC were lifted out 
of  poverty  (measured  at  PPP‐adjusted  US$4  a  day)  and  41  million  left  the  ranks  of  extreme  poverty 
(measured  at  US$2  a  day).    However,  LAC  still  lags  considerably  other  emerging  regions  in  social 
dimensions.  For instance, infant mortality is higher, educational achievement lower, basic infrastructure 
much  less  developed,  and  income  distribution  much  more  unequal  in  LAC  compared  to  East  Asia  and 
Eastern  Europe  (Figures  14‐16).    Given  LAC’s  unique  combination  of  vibrant  electoral  processes  with 


                                                         16 
high  income  and  wealth  inequality,  these  deficits  in  social  indicators  suggest  that  a  reversal  in  the 
recently  achieved  social  gains  might  be  a  comparatively  more  complicated  affair  to  handle  for  LAC.  
Hence, there is a premium on preventing an undue contraction in public spending in health, education, 
basic infrastructure, and other social programs. 
 
The scope for counter‐cyclical policy responses varies considerably across LAC countries  

Perhaps  the  greatest  scope  for  counter‐cyclical  policy  is  in  the  monetary  arena.  LAC  countries  with 
robust  inflation  targeting  regimes  (Brazil,  Chile,  Colombia,  Mexico,  and  Peru)  are  clearly  in  a  better 
position,  with  exchange  rate  flexibility  and  high  international  reserves  affording  them  maneuvering 
margins.  These countries have in fact entered into aggressive monetary policy easing, especially since 
January 2009 (Figure 17).  Some of them have also used actively their public banks to offset the decline 
in  private  bank  credit.    Monetary  easing  has  helped  cushion  the  decline  in  economic  activity  through 
two  main  channels.    First,  by  lowering  policy  interest  rates,  it  dampens  the  fall  in  investment  and 
consumption.    Second,  by  allowing  the  currency  to  depreciate,  it  helps  curb  imports  while  redirecting 
demand towards locally produced goods and services.  Unfortunately, as noted earlier, many countries 
in LAC—particularly the small open economies in Central America and the Caribbean—lack the ability to 
conduct counter‐cyclical monetary policy. 
The main challenge for fiscal policy in LAC is to manage the inevitable fall in tax collection (related to the 
economic  downturn  and  fall  in  commodity  prices)  so  as  to  protect  expenditures  in  education,  social 
security,  and  infrastructure.    These  expenditures  are  necessary  to  prevent  a  rise  in  poverty  and 
inequality and lay the foundations for future growth.  In practice, however, the maneuvering room for 
counter‐cyclical  fiscal  policy  varies  considerably  among  LAC  countries  (Figure  18).    It  is  greater  in 
countries where: (i) savings were accumulated during good times (Chile is an indisputable leader in this 
regard);  (ii)  expenditures  are  not  unduly  rigid  and  can  thus  accommodate  suitable  changes  in 
composition;  (iii)  the  debt  situation  is  such  that  there  is  scope  for  prudent  borrowing;  and  (iv)  local 
financial markets are relatively deep.  However, given that the shortfall in fiscal revenues is likely to be 
substantial,  a  major  achievement  for  LAC  would  already  be  to  maintain  fiscal  spending  at  the  initially 
planned level while protecting vital social and infrastructure programs.     
Some countries in the region have already announced fiscal stimulus packages.  Nevertheless, there is a 
great deal of heterogeneity across countries with respect the composition and size of these packages.  
For instance, some countries have focused predominantly on tax cuts (Brazil), while others have planned 
to  raise  infrastructure  spending  (Mexico,  Chile,  and  Peru).    Moreover,  some  countries  are  reinforcing 
their social protection networks (Argentina and Chile) whereas others are providing incentives to non‐
traditional  exports  (Peru).    The  size  of  these  packages  also  varies  widely,  ranging  from  0.3  percent  of 
GDP  for  Brazil  to  2.2  percent  for  Chile.    It  is  difficult  however  to  ascertain  the  extent  to  which  the 
announced  fiscal  stimulus  adds  to  already  existing  plans  or  reallocates  already  budgeted  spending.  
Furthermore,  the  effectiveness  of  some  the  fiscal  measures  announced  (e.g.,  tax  cuts)  will  depend  on 
the private sector’s willingness to spend. 
Closing thoughts 

The world is gripped by the broadest, deepest, and most complex crisis since the Great Depression.  As 
the  current  crisis  was  originated  in  the  advanced  world,  its  resolution  mainly  depends  on  the  policies 
implemented  there,  particularly  on  the  success  of  the  fiscal  stimulus  and  financial  rescue  packages.  
There is still no consensus on the effectiveness of such policies or on when things will bottom out.  What 
is clear is that the crisis is far from over, although the rate of decline seems to be slowing down in some 



                                                           17 
respects.    In  any  case,  the  global  nature  of  the  crisis  mutes  two  channels  that  have  helped  emerging 
markets rebound quickly from past crises—namely, the ability to export to the center and attract foreign 
direct  investment from it.  This time around, the real devaluations in LAC will not have those salutary 
effects on exports as long as the economies of the center and key emerging countries, particularly China, 
remain in crisis.  In all, whether the large economies of the world rebound, remains stagnant, or further 
deteriorate will greatly determine the periphery’s prospects in the medium term.   
While all emerging regions are being hit hard, the impact of the crisis has been very heterogeneous.  The 
crisis is creating havoc in the financial systems of emerging countries where pre‐existing macro‐financial 
weaknesses  were  substantial—the  most  notable  case  is  that  of  several  countries  in  Eastern  Europe.  
Emerging  countries,  where  such  weaknesses  were  low  or  non‐existent,  are  better  able  to  avert  a 
systemic financial crisis at home.  LAC, fortunately, appears to be, by and large, in this latter category, 
thanks  to  significant  institutional  and  policy  improvements  in  macroeconomic  and  financial  arenas 
achieved in recent years.  These are now affording a number of LAC countries some room for counter‐
cyclical policy responses.   
However  no  emerging  country,  regardless  of  how  well‐prepared  or  managed,  is  escaping  the 
recessionary  effects  of  the  global  crisis.    The  propagation  of  these  effects  is  also  marked  by 
heterogeneity.  For instance, countries that are tightly linked to world trade and highly integrated to the 
global  production  chain  have  experienced  more  severely  the  first‐round  effects  of  the  crisis  on 
manufacturing production and employment.  In contrast, the impact is lagged in countries where growth 
was  supported  mainly  by  domestic  demand.    Unemployment  effects  have  also  tended  to  be  initially 
smaller in countries with a higher share of labor in the non‐traded sector.   
Finally, while LAC seems well‐positioned for a fast post‐crisis growth rebound, the recessionary effects 
of the current crisis threaten to reverse important social gains achieved in recent years.  Such a reversal 
can be highly problematic for democratic‐but‐unequal LAC.  The availability of financial resources as well 
as technical and policy advice from multilateral institutions can be highly relevant in this regard.  It can 
help  LAC  countries  in  maintaining  their  spending  plans,  or  adequately  recomposing  them,  to  protect 
vital infrastructure and social protection programs in the face of falling revenues. 




                                                         18 
 
                                     Figure 1                                                                           Figure 2


                                      Inflation in LAC                                                           Current account balance in LAC
                                      annual variation                                                                    as % of GDP
 50%                                                                                  4%
                                           280
 45%                                                                                  3%


 40%                                                                                  2%


 35%                                                                                  1%


 30%                                                                                  0%


 25%                                                                                  ‐1%

 20%                                                                                  ‐2%

 15%                                                                                  ‐3%

 10%                                                                                  ‐4%

    5%                                                                                ‐5%

    0%                                                                                ‐6%
              1981                 1994                      1996              2007              1981                1994                   1996          2006




                                     Figure 3                                                                           Figure 4


                        LAC countries with exchange rate flexibility                                              Loan to Deposits Ratio in LAC
                                     as % of the sample                                                                      in %
 60%                                                                                      125%



 50%                                                                                      120%



                                                                                          115%
 40%

                                                                                          110%
 30%

                                                                                          105%

 20%
                                                                                          100%


 10%
                                                                                          95%


    0%                                                                                    90%
             1981                  1994                     1996              2007                 1981               1994                  1996          2007




                                                                                       
                                     Figure 5                                                                           Figure 6


                                  Total Pubic Debt in LAC                                                        Share of Domestic Debt in LAC 
                                        as % of GDP                                                                 as % of total public debt
 39%                                                                                  65%


 37%
                                                                                      60%

 35%
                                                                                      55%

 33%

                                                                                      50%
 31%


                                                                                      45%
 29%



 27%                                                                                  40%



 25%
                                                                                      35%
                        1996                                           2007
                                                                                                          1996                                     2007




  
LAC figures usually calculated using data of LAC‐7 countries. Source: WDI and IFS




                                                                                          19 
                                            Figure 7                                                                                                                                   Figure 8


                                     International Reserves in LAC                                                                                                         Inflation in selected regions
                                              as % of GDP                                                                                                                         annual variation
15%                                                                                                    12%


14%                                                                                                    11%


13%                                                                                                    10%


12%                                                                                                    9%


11%                                                                                                    8%


10%                                                                                                    7%


    9%                                                                                                 6%


    8%                                                                                                 5%


    7%                                                                                                 4%
                1981                      1994                      1996                2007                                        LAC                                               ECA                               East Asia and Pacific                                  South Asia



          Regional aggregates are calculated as simple averages for 2007. LAC figures                             Regional aggregates are calculated as simple averages for 2007. LAC figures 
          usually calculated using data of LAC‐7 countries. Source: WDI and IFS                                   usually calculated using data of LAC‐7 countries. Source: WDI and IFS 

                                            Figure 9                                                                                                                                  Figure 10


                       Countries with exchange rate flexibility in selected regions                                                                       International Reserves in selected regions
                                           as % of the sample                                                                                                  as % of short‐term external debt
60%                                                                                                    1000%

                                                                                                       900%
50%
                                                                                                       800%

                                                                                                       700%
40%
                                                                                                       600%

30%                                                                                                    500%

                                                                                                       400%
20%
                                                                                                       300%

                                                                                                       200%
10%
                                                                                                       100%

    0%                                                                                                   0%
                LAC                       ECA               East Asia and Pacific     South Asia                                     LAC                                              ECA                              East Asia and Pacific                                  South Asia




          Regional aggregates are calculated as simple averages for 2007. LAC figures                             Regional aggregates are calculated as simple averages for 2007. LAC figures 
          usually calculated using data of LAC‐7 countries. Source: WDI and IFS                                   usually calculated using data of LAC‐7 countries. Source: WDI and IFS 

                                                                                                    
                                           Figure 11                                                                                                                                  Figure 12


                                Loan to deposit ratio in selected regions                                                                                                        Industrial Production
                                                  in %                                                                                                                             Annual variation
130%                                                                                                     20%
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  East Asia
                                                                                                         15%
120%
                                                                                                         10%                                                                                                                                      South Asia

110%
                                                                                                             5%
                                                                                                                                               LAC
100%                                                                                                         0%

                                                                                                         ‐5%
    90%
                                                                                                        ‐10%

    80%
                                                                                                        ‐15%
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                            ECA

    70%
                                                                                                        ‐20%

                                                                                                        ‐25%
                                                                                                                  Jan‐06

                                                                                                                           Mar‐06

                                                                                                                                      May‐06

                                                                                                                                                Jul‐06

                                                                                                                                                         Sep‐06

                                                                                                                                                                  Nov‐06

                                                                                                                                                                             Jan‐07

                                                                                                                                                                                            Mar‐07

                                                                                                                                                                                                     May‐07

                                                                                                                                                                                                              Jul‐07

                                                                                                                                                                                                                       Sep‐07

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                Nov‐07

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                         Jan‐08

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   Mar‐08

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                            May‐08

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     Jul‐08

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 Sep‐08

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                           Nov‐08

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    Jan‐09




    60%
                 LAC                      ECA               East Asia and Pacific     South Asia



          Regional aggregates are calculated as simple averages for 2007. LAC figures                             Regional aggregates are calculated as weighted averages. Source: World Bank 
          usually calculated using data of LAC‐7 countries. Source: WDI and IFS                                   DECPG 




                                                                                                        20 
                                                                                                                 Figure 13                                                                                                                                                                                                             Figure 14


                                                                             Imports and Exports of Goods Growth in LAC                                                                                                                                                                                                     Income inequality in selected regions
                                                                                    Annual variation as of Feb‐09                                                                                                                                                                                                                       Gini index 
    10%                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   55


        0%

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                          50
‐10%


‐20%
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                          45
‐30%


‐40%
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                          40

‐50%


‐60%                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                      35

‐70%


‐80%                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                      30
                            ARG                     BRA                    CHI                        COL                 CRI               ECU                    MEX                        PER                GTM                            SLV                  PAN                                     LAC                                 ECA                              EAP‐7



                            Source: Haver Analytics and National Authorities                                                                                                                                                                                                                     Regional aggregates are calculated as simple averages for 2005. LAC figures 
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 usually calculated using data of LAC‐7 countries. Source: WDI.  


                                                                                                                 Figure 15                                                                                                                                                                                                             Figure 16


                                                                 Persistence to last grade of primary in selected regions                                                                                                                                                                                                    Mortality rate in selected regions
                                                                                    total as % of cohort                                                                                                                                                                                                                       infant per 1,000 live births
100                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                       25


    98                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    23

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                          21
    96

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                          19
    94
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                          17
    92
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                          15
    90


    88
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                          13

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                          11

    86
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                          9

    84                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    7

    82                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    5
                                                        LAC                                                                                 ECA                                                                                      EAP‐7                                                                   LAC                                 ECA                              EAP‐7




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 Regional aggregates are calculated as simple averages for 2005. LAC figures 
                            Regional aggregates are calculated as simple averages for 2005. LAC figures                                                                                                                                                                                          usually calculated using data of LAC‐7 countries. Source: WDI.  
                            usually calculated using data of LAC‐7 countries. Source: WDI.  

                                                                                                                 Figure 17                                                                                                                                                                                                             Figure 18


                                               Monetary Policy Rates                                                                                                                    Monetary Policy Rates
                                                      in %                                                                                                                                     in %                                                                                                        Index of constraints to implement counter‐cyclical fiscal police
18                                                                                                                                           9                                                                                                                                             1.0
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                             Debt burden               Primary deficits         Commodity dependence
                                                                                                                                             8
16                                                                                                                                                                                                                        MEXICO                                                                             Expenditure rigidity      Financing constraints    Financing costs
                             BRAZIL
                                                                                                                                             7
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                           0.8
                                                                                                                                                                                                                      CHILE
14
                                                                                                                                             6
                                                                                                                                                                                                                           PERU
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                           0.6
12
                                                                                                                                             5




10
                                                                                                                                             4
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                           0.4
                                                                                                                                             3
    8
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    US
                 COLOMBIA                                                                                                                    2
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                           0.2
    6
                                                                                                                                             1



    4                                                                                                                                        0                                                                                                                                             0.0
                                                                                                                                                 Jan‐06

                                                                                                                                                          Apr‐06

                                                                                                                                                                   Jul‐06

                                                                                                                                                                            Oct‐06

                                                                                                                                                                                     Jan‐07

                                                                                                                                                                                               Apr‐07

                                                                                                                                                                                                        Jul‐07

                                                                                                                                                                                                                 Oct‐07

                                                                                                                                                                                                                            Jan‐08

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                       Apr‐08

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  Jul‐08

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                           Oct‐08

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    Jan‐09

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                             Apr‐09
        Jan‐06

                   Apr‐06

                             Jul‐06

                                      Oct‐06

                                               Jan‐07

                                                        Apr‐07

                                                                  Jul‐07

                                                                           Oct‐07

                                                                                    Jan‐08

                                                                                             Apr‐08

                                                                                                        Jul‐08

                                                                                                                 Oct‐08

                                                                                                                          Jan‐09

                                                                                                                                   Apr‐09




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   Chile           Brazil   Colombia      Peru         Mexico   Argentina    Ecuador      Venezuela


                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 This index is the weighted average of the relative score of the six different categories. The 
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 index as well as each category take values between 0 and 1. Higher values indicate higher 
                            Source:  Bloomberg – National Authorities                                                                                                                                                                                                                            constraints on the scope for counter‐cyclical fiscal police. Source: LCRCE Office calculations 
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 based on National Authorities data. 

 



                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                           21 
 




    22 
                               2. REGULATORY REFORM: INTEGRATING PARADIGMS 
                                            Augusto de la Torre and Alain Ize 
                                                      April 2009* 
 
                                                          Abstract 
The  Subprime  crisis  resulted  from  the  interplay  of  information  asymmetry  and  control  problems  with 
failures to internalize systemic risk and recognize the implications of Knightian uncertainty. A successful 
reform  of  prudential  regulation  will  thus  need  to  integrate  more  harmoniously  the  three  paradigms  of 
agency,  externalities,  and  mood  swings.  This  is  a  tall  order  because  each  paradigm  has  different  and 
often  inconsistent  regulatory  implications.  Moreover,  efforts  to  address  problems  under  one  paradigm 
can exacerbate problems under the others. To avoid regulatory arbitrage and ensure that externalities 
are  uniformly  internalized,  all  prudentially  regulated  intermediaries  should  be  subjected  to  the  same 
capital  adequacy  requirements,  and  unregulated  intermediaries  should  be  financed  only  by  regulated 
intermediaries.  Reflecting  the  importance  of  uncertainty  and  mood  swings,  the  new  regulatory 
architecture  will  also  need  to  rely  less  on  market  discipline  and  more  on  “holistic”  supervision,  and 
incorporate countercyclical norms that can be adjusted in light of changing circumstances.  
 
Introduction 

As in the case of the other two large financial crises in modern U.S. history, the Great Depression and 
the  Savings  &  Loan  (S&L)  crisis,  the  Subprime  crisis  was  triggered  by  the  inability  of  financial 
intermediaries  to  withstand  large  macroeconomic  price  volatility.17  In  the  Great  Depression,  banks 
started failing when the stock market crash induced losses on their equity investments or the loans they 
had given to investors towards the purchase of stocks. In the S&L crisis, the main trigger was the rise in 
deposit  rates  that  accompanied  the  increase  in  inflation  of  the  late  1970s  and  the  subsequent,  sharp 
tightening of monetary policy. For the Subprime crisis, the trigger was the decline in housing prices. In 
all three cases, the crisis resulted from a rapidly rising wedge between the underlying value of financial 
intermediaries’  assets  and  liabilities,  which  prevented  them  from  honoring  the  implicit  insurance 
commitments they had made to their clients. High leverage and liquidity on demand, which limited the 
size of the buffers available against shocks, made these wedges lethal. 
While  the  proximate  triggers  of  these  crises  are  fairly  clear,  the  most  interesting  question  is  why 
financial  intermediaries  continue  to  contract  such  huge  implicit  insurance  commitments  while  failing 
recurrently  at  honoring  them,  in  the  U.S.  or  elsewhere.  Going  back  to  the  fundamentals  of  financial 
decision  making,  three  possible  explanations  spring  to  mind:  (i)  managers  of  financial  institutions 
understood the risks they were taking but made the bet because they thought they could capture the 
upside  windfalls  and  leave  the  downside  risks  to  others  (the  agency  paradigm);  (ii)  managers 
understood the risks they were taking, yet went ahead because they did not internalize the social risks 


* World Bank Policy Research Working Paper 4842 
17
     Throughout  this  paper  we  use  the  term  “Subprime  crisis”  to  denote  the  current,  broader  crisis  of  structured 
securitization and its propagation across financial markets and borders. 


                                                              23 
and  costs  of their  actions  (the  externalities  paradigm);  and  (iii)  managers  did  not  fully  understand  the 
risks they were running into; instead, they reacted emotionally to a constantly evolving, uncertain world 
of rapid financial innovation, with an excess of optimism on the way up and, once unexpected icebergs 
were  spotted  on  the  path,  a  gripping  fear  of  the  unknown  on  the  way  down  (the  mood  swings 
paradigm).  
These  three  paradigms  reflect  human  condition  in  a  nutshell.  In  the  agency  paradigm,  the  better 
informed are constantly tempted to take advantage of the less informed and, ultimately, the state. By 
contrast, in the externalities paradigm, financial intermediaries are free agents whose decisions do not 
necessarily coincide with the public good, or in the case of group coordination failures, with their own 
good. In the mood swings paradigm, like all market participants, managers of financial institutions have 
bounded capacity to deal with the genuine uncertainty lying ahead, which is naturally associated with 
bouts  of  risk  euphoria  (“this  time  around,  things  are  really  under  control…”)  followed  by  episodes  of 
sudden alarm and deep risk retrenchment. 
The next question that naturally comes to mind is why such similarly triggered crises have continued to 
recur notwithstanding the development over the last eighty years or so of a formidable set of prudential 
regulations precisely designed to prevent systemic failures. Not only has regulation failed abysmally but 
attempts to seek a safer regulatory path ahead seem in some cases to have made matters subsequently 
worse. For example, a key piece of regulatory legislation coming out of the  Great Depression was the 
Glass‐Steagall  Act  that  sought  to  shield  commercial  banks  from  stock  market  price  fluctuations  by 
barring  them  from  investment  banking.  In  turn,  the  S&L  crisis  launched  the  regulatory  push  towards 
securitization as a way to pass on to markets much of the risk associated with housing and other longer 
term finance. Yet, investment banks and securitization are precisely two ingredients at the epicenter of 
the Subprime crisis.  
This  paper  argues  that  the  failure  of  regulation  largely  resulted  from  a  piecemeal  approach  to  reform 
that  looked  at  one  paradigm  at  a  time.  In  trying  to  address  the  central  problem  under  one  paradigm, 
they made the problems under the others worse. Thus, the creation of the Federal Reserve System in 
1914  and  introduction  of  deposit  insurance  after  the  Great  Depression,  which  set  the  stage  for  the 
public lender‐of‐last‐resort function and were meant to alleviate the instability resulting from recurring 
runs on the banking system (a problem of externalities), exacerbated the agency‐moral hazard problem. 
In  turn,  the  strengthening  of  prudential  norms  after  the  S&L  crisis,  meant  to  address  the  acute  moral 
hazard  manifestations  observed  during  that  crisis,  indirectly  exacerbated  the  externalities  problem—it 
drove much of the intermediation outside the prudentially more tightly regulated sphere of commercial 
banking; once there, participants had less incentives (regulatory‐induced or otherwise) to internalize the 
externality  and  hold  systemic  buffers  (liquidity  or  capital).  This  last  problem  of  course  came  back  to 
haunt us in the Subprime crisis. 
Moreover, while following this game of tag and run between moral hazard and externalities, regulation 
missed all along another central suspect: asset bubbles growing and bursting under the impact of rapidly 
shifting animal spirits. In the Great Depression, the bubble and crash were driven by stock prices; in the 
Subprime crisis, they were driven by housing prices and the weaknesses of subprime mortgage lending 
suddenly  emerging  from  the  fog.  To  reconcile  theory  and  facts,  the  third,  missing  (or  much  less 
developed)  paradigm—which  puts  Knightian  uncertainty  and  the  associated  mood  swings  (more  than 
incentive misalignments) at center stage—needs to be recognized and dealt with. 
Looking ahead, regulatory reform is largely complicated by the fact that the internal logic of each of the 
three  paradigms  leads  to  different  and  often  inconsistent  regulatory  implications.  In  the  pure  agency 
paradigm,  the  only  task  of  the  regulator  is  to  mitigate  principal‐agent  problems  by  fostering  market 
discipline—mainly through the disclosure of ample, reliable information and by ensuring that financial 


                                                         24 
intermediaries’ “skin in the game” is sufficient to maintain their incentives aligned in the right direction. 
A properly set regulatory framework should thus eliminate the risk of systemic crises.  
By  contrast,  in  the  pure  externalities  paradigm,  as  markets  of  their  own  cannot  close  the  wedge 
between private and social costs and benefits, the relevant regulation cannot be “market friendly” and 
the supervisor’s role becomes more central. Moreover, because of the high cost associated with crisis‐
proofing, the system’s exposure to some tail risk (akin to “one hundred year floods”) is likely to remain. 
The  ex‐ante  crowd  coordination  and  control  role  of  the  supervisor  needs  therefore  to  double  up,  if  a 
crisis materializes, with an ex‐post fireman role.  
Finally,  in  the  pure  mood  swings  paradigm  there  are  no  incentive  distortions  but  market  participants 
cannot fully visualize the dynamic and systemic risk implications of market completion and innovation. 
Hence, markets are unlikely to provide efficient pricing signals. Unless effective safeguards can be put 
into  place,  this  severely  undermines  the  Basel  II‐type,  risk‐based  regulatory  architecture  where  every 
risk  can  presumably  be  assessed  and  translated  into  an  efficient  prudential  norm.  By  the  same  token, 
the mood swings paradigm boosts the role (and responsibility) of the supervisor, who has to become a 
scout  and  a  moderator,  constantly  looking  for  possible  systemic  trouble  ahead  and  slowing  down  the 
system when uncertainty becomes too large.  
To be successful, any reform of prudential regulation will need to integrate the key insights and sidestep 
the  main  pitfalls  of  all  three  paradigms  in  a  way  that  limits  inconsistencies  and  maintains  a  proper 
balance between financial stability and financial development. Overcoming these tensions will require a 
dialogue  between  researchers  and  policy  makers  whose  perception  of  the  world  may  be  colored  by 
different paradigms. One of the aims of this paper is to contribute to this dialogue.  
The paper also proposes a set of basic objectives that any regulatory reform should seek to fulfill in a 
multi‐paradigm world. Reflecting the main current pitfall of un‐internalized externalities, the reform will 
need  to  improve  the  alignment  of  incentives  by  internalizing  (at  least  partially)  systemic  liquidity  risk, 
thereby  lessening  the  likelihood  of  crises.  However,  it  should  do  so  in  a  way  that  ensures  regulatory 
neutrality  and  leaves  room  for  prudentially  unregulated  intermediaries  to  enter  and  innovation  to 
thrive.  At  the  same  time,  reflecting  the  pitfalls  of  uncertainty  and  mood  swings,  the  reform  will  also 
need  to  pay  more  attention  to  the  risks  of  financial  innovation  and  rebalance  the  monitoring  roles  of 
markets and supervisors, with the latter acquiring more responsibilities but also more powers. Since in a 
world of externalities and uncertainty‐driven mood swings even the best regulation and supervision are 
unlikely to fully eliminate the risk of systemic crises, improving the systemic features of the safety net 
will continue to be an essential objective. 
Consistent  with  these  objectives,  we  propose:  (i)  making  prudential  norms  also  a  function  of  the 
maturity structure of the intermediary’s liabilities; (ii) giving prudentially unregulated intermediaries the 
choice  between  becoming  regulated  (with  the  same  capital  adequacy  requirements  as  commercial 
banks)  or  remaining  unregulated  subject  to  the  condition  of  not  funding  themselves  in  the  capital 
markets  (in  other  words,  prudentially  unregulated  intermediaries  could  only  borrow  from  regulated 
intermediaries);18 (iii) giving the regulator more powers to authorize innovations and norm instruments; 
(iv) enabling the supervisor (through appropriate statutory powers, accountability, and tools) to play a 
more  “holistic”  role  by  focusing  more  on  the  system  (its  risks,  evolution,  links,  etc.),  and  to  set  and 
calibrate  (within  bounds)  countercyclical  prudential  requirements  depending  on  changing 
circumstances,  much  as  the  interest  rate  is  calibrated  by  monetary  authorities;  and  (v)  revisiting  the 

18
    The  obvious  complement  to  this  approach  would  be  to  ensure  that  all  the  direct  and  indirect  credit  risk 
exposures (on‐ and off‐balance sheet) of the regulated intermediaries are backed by capital (“skin‐in‐the‐game”), 
at a level which ensures regulatory neutrality. 


                                                            25 
deposit insurance to incorporate systemic risk, rethinking the LOLR as a risk absorber of last resort, and 
examining  the  feasibility  of  pairing  them  with  a  systemic  insurance  subscribed  by  all  financial 
intermediaries.19 
The  rest  of  the  paper  is  organized  as  follows.  Section  2  goes  back  to  the  foundations  and  pitfalls  of 
intermediary‐based finance and briefly retraces the steps and objectives of modern regulation. Sections 
3  to  5  present  alternative  interpretations  of  the  Subprime  crisis  from  the  perspective  of  each  of  the 
three paradigms. Section 6 sums up the main failures of regulation and emphasizes the deep contrasts 
that exist between the three paradigms when one tries to address these failures. Section 7 concludes by 
laying  down  a  minimum  set  of  basic  objectives  that  would  need  to  be  met  in  order  to  ensure  a  more 
harmonious integration of the three paradigms. 
 
The Foundations of the Current Prudential Framework 

Finance  seeks  to  bridge  three  basic  gaps  (Chart  1).  First,  there  is  an  information  and  control  gap  (a 
principal‐agent  problem)  that  reflects  fund  suppliers’  exposure  to  the  idiosyncratic  risks  and  costs 
involved in properly screening and monitoring fund users, and enforcing contracts with them. Second, 
there is a price volatility‐uncertainty gap that reflects fund suppliers’ aversion to becoming exposed to 
aggregate risks (market‐specific or systemic) over which they have no control. Third, there is a liquidity‐
maturity gap that reflects fund suppliers’ “opportunistic” desire to maintain access to their funds and a 
quick  exit  option  at  all  times.  This  third  motive  responds  both  to  idiosyncratic  risks  (a  quick  exit 
disciplines fund users and mitigates agency problems) and aggregate risks (liquid portfolios and flights to 
cash mitigate exposure to uncertainty and mood shifts). 
Reflecting transaction costs and borrower size, the bridging of these gaps takes on different forms along 
a continuum that goes from direct market contracting to intermediated contracting (Table 1). At the one 
extreme, markets bridge the principal‐agent gap through hard public information (arms‐length lending), 
the liquidity gap through the ability to trade financial contracts easily in deep markets, and the volatility 
gap through derivative contracts. Asset managers (mutual funds, pension funds, brokers, etc.) cover the 
middle  ground.  They  help  fund  suppliers  fill  the  agency  gap  through  expert  screening  and  continuous 
monitoring (including through  direct board room participation),  the liquidity gap through  pooling, and 
the volatility gap through diversification. At the other extreme are financial intermediaries that engage 
in  leverage.  Commercial  banks—the  prototypical  financial  intermediaries—bridge  the  agency  gap 
through soft private information (relationship lending), debt contracts (a disciplining device), and capital 
(skin‐in‐the‐game). They absorb the volatility gap and liquidity gap by funding themselves through debt 
redeemable at par and on demand, respectively, and by absorbing the ensuing risks through capital and 
liquidity buffers.20 Remarkably, debt and capital (hence leverage) play a key role in intermediaries’ ability 
to deal with each of the three gaps. 




19
     Needless  to  say,  to  avoid  exacerbating  cross‐border  arbitrage,  any  such  reform  would  require  broad 
international agreement on the essence of the reforms and their modalities of implementation across borders. 
20
    In addition, intermediaries, unlike markets, can offer “incomplete” contracts that provide more ex‐post flexibility 
in adjusting to unforeseen circumstances that can lead to failures in honoring the contracts. See Boot et al. (1993) 
and Rajan (1998). 


                                                          26 
                                                                                   encounters
                     Chart 1. The gaps finance seeks to bridge and the pitfalls it encounters


                       Risk                 Gap                   Response          Market Failure

                                                             Pick and monitor
                                          Information                                    Agency
                                                                 borrowers
                                            Control                                     problems
                                                              Contract agent
                     Idiosyncratic


                                            Liquidity          Stay liquid
                                                                                       Externalities
                                            Maturity        Grab opportunities


                      Aggregate
                                                             Adjust portfolio
                                           Volatility
                                                             to risk appetite          Mood swings
                                          Uncertainty
                                                            Contract insurance

                                                                                                        7
                                                                                                             
                                            Table 1.  Filling the finance gaps  

                                                                        Gap 
     Channel of finance 
                                Information/Control           Liquidity/Maturity             Volatility/Uncertainty 

                               Hard information and          Deep, liquid secondary 
          Markets                                                                              Derivative markets 
                               governance standards                  markets 

                              Expert screening, direct 
      Asset Managers          board participation and                 Pooling                    Diversification 
                              monitoring the monitors 

                                                            Pooling, demandable 
                              Relationship lending, debt                                    Diversification, debt and 
      Intermediaries                                      debt and capital/liquidity 
                              and capital (skin in game)                                        capital (buffer)  
                                                                  (buffers) 
 
By  interposing  their  balance  sheet  between  borrowers  (through  assets  whose  underlying  value 
fluctuates with economic conditions) and investors (through liabilities whose value is fixed by contract), 
financial intermediaries become exposed to systemic risk. They may fail to address this risk in a socially 
optimal way, reflecting market failures that map all three gaps and paradigms portrayed in this paper. 
While we will describe these failures more fully in each of the three subsequent sections, a brief preview 
here will help establish the historic setting and rationale for the current regulatory framework.  
Principal‐agent problems  give rise to a variety of malfeasance manifestations, most importantly moral 
hazard.21 Should all depositors be well informed, banks could eliminate moral hazard to the satisfaction 

21
    The  list  of  malfeasance  manifestations  with  which  bankers  and  other  financial  intermediaries  have  been 
associated over the ages also includes adverse selection, predatory lending, outright fraud and pyramid schemes 
(Ponzi finance). In this paper, we will broadly lump together all forms of malfeasance within the agency paradigm 


                                                            27 
of  depositors  by  holding  capital.22  But  the  mix  of  small  uninformed  depositors  and  larger,  better 
informed  investors  can  lead  to  inefficient  equilibria  in  which  banks  and  wholesale  investors  benefit  at 
the  expense  of  the  retail  depositors  (or  their  deposit  insurance).23  Governance  issues  compound  the 
problem  by  superposing  additional  layers  of  moral  hazard.  In  particular,  bank  managers  may  take 
decisions  that  benefit  them  in  the  upside  but  leave  the  downside  mostly  to  the  shareholders  or 
investors. 
The opportunistic behavior of fund suppliers or intermediaries faces an externalities problem. Financial 
intermediaries  are  exposed  to  runs  by  their  depositors  or  lenders,  triggered  by  self‐fulfilling  panics  or 
suspicions of intermediary insolvency. Even if they could limit this risk by holding sufficient capital and 
liquidity, their incentive to do so is limited by the fact that they do not internalize the social costs of a 
run, i.e., by the existence of externalities.24 
The  attitude  of  financial  intermediaries  (as  well  as  that  of  other  agents)  towards  price  volatility  also 
gives rise to a market failure in that  their decisions in the face  of uncertainty are influenced by mood 
swings.  They  incur  bouts  of  excessive  optimism  (exuberance)  during  the  upwards  phase  of  financial 
expansions and excessive pessimism (extreme uncertainty aversion) during contractions. In either case, 
this  compounds  price  volatility  and  can  lead  to  sharp  deviations  from  underlying  fundamentals 
(bubbles). 
Regulation has been designed to help intermediaries overcome the two first pitfalls, albeit not the third. 
The current regime rests on three key pillars: (i) prudential norms that seek to align incentives ex‐ante; 
(ii) an ex‐post safety net (deposit insurance and lender‐of‐last‐resort) aimed at enticing small depositors 
to join the banking system and forestalling contagious runs on otherwise solvent institutions; and (iii) a 
“line‐in‐the‐sand” separating the world of the prudentially regulated (mainly commercial banking) from 
that of the unregulated.  
In  turn,  the  line‐in‐the‐sand  rests  on  at  least  three  key  arguments.  First,  regulation  is  costly  and  can 
produce  unintended  distortions.  It  can  limit  innovation  and  competition,  and  it  needs  to  be 
accompanied by good, hence inherently costly, supervision. Second, extending bad oversight (oversight 
on the cheap) beyond  commercial banking can exacerbate moral hazard—it can give poorly regulated 
intermediaries an undeserved “quality” label (hence an edge in the market place) and an easy scapegoat 
(blame the regulator if there is a problem). Third, investors outside the realm of the small depositor are 

but  focus  primarily  on  moral  hazard  because  it  is  the  only  one  that  raises  “prudential”  issues,  i.e.,  issues  of  risk 
management. 
22
    Moral hazard is a reflection of limited liability (limited capital). There is an important literature that questions 
the  need  for  (and  optimality  of)  capital  requirements  imposed  from  the  outside.  See  in  particular  Kim  and 
Santomero (1988), Berger, Herring, and Szego (1995), Diamond and Rajan (2000), and Allen and Gale (2005). 
23
    The literature has mostly stressed the “bright side” of wholesale finance, where small depositors free ride on the 
monitoring  and  disciplining  services  of  larger  investors  (see  for  example  Calomiris  and  Khan,  1991).  However, 
Huang and Ratnovski (2008) recently showed that there is also a “dark side” to wholesale finance. In the presence 
of a noisy public signal on the state of the bank, wholesale investors may relax their monitoring and rely instead on 
an early exit as soon as there is any adverse change in the public signal, whether warranted or not. The fact that 
the smaller investors will stay put (which in their model reflects the presence of deposit insurance) facilitates the 
exit  of  the  large  investors.  In  this  context,  it  is  indeed  surprising  that  the  inherent  tension  within  the  deposit 
insurance  as  currently  conceived—meant  to  cover  only  small  depositors  in  non  systemic  events  but  de  facto 
exposed to systemic losses resulting from early runs by the large depositors—has not received more attention. 
24
    There is a vast and rapidly expanding literature on the underpinnings of the demand for liquidity and the drivers 
of liquidity crises. In all cases there is a basic externality at the core of the respective models: liquidity has public 
good features which liquidity providers cannot fully appropriate. See: Diamond and Dybvig (1983), Holmstrom and 
Tirole (1998), Diamond and Rajan (2000), and Kahn and Santos (2008). 


                                                                  28 
well informed and fully responsible for their investments. As a result, they should monitor adequately 
the  unregulated  financial  intermediaries,  making  sure  their  capital  is  sufficient  to  eliminate  moral 
hazard.  
Consistent with this line‐in‐the‐sand rationale, only deposit‐taking intermediaries are prudentially fully 
regulated  and  supervised  under  the  current  regulatory  architecture.  In  exchange,  and  reflecting  their 
systemic importance, they benefit from a safety net. Other financial intermediaries (and all other capital 
markets players) neither enjoy the safety net nor are burdened by full‐blown prudential norms. Instead, 
they  are  mostly  (if  not  only)  subject  to  market  discipline,  enhanced  by  well  known  securities  markets 
regulations focused on transparency, governance, investor protection, market integrity, etc.  
Interestingly, the early history of regulatory intervention, which was marked by the introduction of the 
safety  net,  was  more  closely  linked  to  externalities  than  to  agency  problems.  However,  subsequent 
regulatory developments came to be dominated by concerns about principal‐agent frictions, particularly 
moral hazard, which the safety net itself exacerbated. But at this point the logic of the line‐in the‐sand 
completely  missed  the  obvious  facts  that,  even  if  free  markets  take  care  of  principal‐agent  problems, 
they will (nearly by definition)  neither  internalize externalities nor temper mood swings and price risk 
appropriately where genuine uncertainty exists. Thus, the regulatory architecture that is in place today 
became seriously unbalanced.25 
In  fact,  the  line‐in‐the‐sand  became  porous  and  was  widely  breached  during  the  build‐up  to  the 
Subprime  crisis,  as  highly‐leveraged  intermediation  developed  outside  the  confines  of  traditional 
banking—in what has now become known as the world of “shadow‐banking”—and the safety net had to 
be  eventually  sharply  expanded,  from  the  regulated  to  the  unregulated.26  The  explosive  growth  of 
“shadow  banking”—driven  by  the  originate‐to‐distribute  model,  which  relied  on  the  securitization  of 
credit  risk,  off‐balance  sheet  transactions  and  vehicles,  and  fast  expansion  highly‐leveraged 
intermediation  by  investment  banks,  insurance  companies,  and  hedge  funds—has  been  so  well 
documented elsewhere that it is not necessary to reiterate the details here.27 It is only worth stressing 
that,  by  radically  expanding  the  interface  between  markets  and  intermediaries,  the  process  brought  a 
variety of new problems and issues. However, the same underlying pitfalls of agency problems, liquidity 
runs, and mood‐driven cycles reappeared with a vengeance.  
In what follows, we interpret the story behind this shift to “shadow banking”—its roots, dynamics, and 
implications—from the vantage point of each of the three paradigms. As many of the observed features 
of  the  Subprime  crisis  can  be  consistent  with  more  than  one  of  the  three  paradigms,  attribution  is 
inherently problematic and conclusive proofs are virtually impossible. Hence, the strategy is to work out 
the internal logic of each paradigm taken by itself, so as to illustrate its potential explanatory power as 
well  as  highlight  its  internal  limitations.  We  will  also  refer  to  structural  factors  such  as  financial 
innovation,  competition,  and  regulatory  arbitrage  when  useful  to  illustrate  the  inner  workings  of  a 
particular paradigm, albeit such factors affect all paradigms. On the other hand, although we certainly 

25
    In modern terms, the prudential framework can be seen as a “line of defense” or “buffer” that partially shields 
public funds from bank losses by reinforcing market discipline and putting a positive price on the safety net. While 
focusing  on  capital,  the  existing  prudential  framework  clearly  goes  beyond  capital—it  includes  liquidity 
requirements,  loan‐loss  provisioning,  fit  and  proper  rules,  loan  concentration  limits,  prompt  corrective  actions, 
bank failure resolution procedures, etc. 
26
    Key players in the Subprime meltdown included commercial banks (the prototypical financial intermediaries) and 
other intermediaries that blossomed outside the banking system and became hyper‐leveraged (mainly investment 
banks  but  also  insurance  companies,  hedge  funds,  as  well  as  commercial  banks  themselves  trespassing  into 
securities markets through off‐balance sheet special investment vehicles—SIVs). 
27
    See for example Adrian and Shin (2008), Brunnermeier (2008), Gorton (2008), and Greenlaw et al. (2008). 


                                                             29 
recognize  the  importance  of  macroeconomic  impulses  such  as  the  savings  glut  (and  related 
macroeconomic  imbalances)  and  the  “Greenspan  factor”  (the  long  period  of  low  interest  rates),  we 
restrict our attention to prudential failures because they are the ones that matter for regulatory reform. 
 
The Agency Paradigm 

The  moral  hazard‐agency  story  of  the  Subprime  crisis  is  arguably  the  most  popular.28  It  posits  that 
incentive  distortions  arising  from  unchecked  principal‐agent  problems  (the  heads‐I‐win‐tails‐you‐lose 
syndrome) are the source of trouble, inducing market participants to either pass on risks deceptively to 
the less informed or take on too much risk themselves with the expectation of capturing the upside or 
exiting on time and leaving the downside with someone else. The perversion of incentives can happen at 
one or several points of the credit chain between the borrower and ultimate investor, passing through 
the various intermediate links.  
However,  for  moral  hazard  to  start  driving  the  show,  it  must  be  the  case  that  the  expected  upside 
benefits  come  to  dominate  the  expected  downside  costs  (i.e.,  losing  one’s  capital  or  reputation).  This 
can occur under two plausible scenarios: (i) an innovation (perhaps facilitated by deregulation) opens a 
world  of  new  opportunities  (the  upside  widens),  or  (ii)  a  macro  systemic  shock  suddenly  wipes  out  a 
large part of the intermediaries’ capital (the downside shrinks).29 Indeed, one can argue that in the case 
of  the  Subprime  crisis  it  was  the  discovery  of  new  instruments  and  intermediation  schemes 
(securitization  and  shadow‐banking)  which  set  the  process  in  motion.30  The  expansion  of  upside 
opportunities led to a moral hazard‐induced under‐pricing of risk, encouraging participants to make the 
bet and take the plunge.31 This process, which Basel I regulation encouraged, can be explained in part by 
regulatory  arbitrage.32  However,  poor  regulation  (that  did  not  sufficiently  align  the  incentives  of 
principals  and  agents,  whether  the  risk  was  acquired  off  or  on  balance  sheet)  can  no  doubt  also  be 
blamed. 
Indeed, the build‐up phase of the crisis provided plenty of opportunities for all sorts of principal‐agent 
problems  to  expand  and  deepen.  The  multiplication  of  actors  (borrowers,  loan  originators,  servicers, 
securitization  arrangers,  rating  agencies,  asset  managers,  final  investors)  involved  in  the  originate‐to‐
distribute  model  not  only  reflected  the  increased  sophistication  and  complexity  of  intermediation  but 
also boosted the scope for accompanying frictions, including moral hazard, but also predatory lending, 

28
    See for example Caprio et al. (2008) and Calomiris (2008). 
29
    The sudden opening of profitable new business opportunities that set the cycle’s upswing into motion is what 
Fisher (1933) called a “displacement”. 
30
    By contrast, the S&L crisis can be viewed as driven by deregulation and the rise in interest rates that effectively 
de‐capitalized  the  system  (a  reduction  of  downside  risks),  unleashing  the  subsequent  rounds  of  “betting  for 
survival”.  The  process  was  exacerbated  by  the  lack  of  fair  value  accounting  (which  aggravated  information 
asymmetry  problems  while  allowing  insolvent  institutions  to  continue  operating  normally)  and  generous 
regulatory forbearance. 
31
    There is a body of literature emphasizing moral hazard‐caused deviations of asset prices from their fundamental 
values.  See  for  example  Allen  and  Gale  (1998).  While  these  deviations  may  be  interpreted  as  “bubbles”,  the 
underlying models are typically static. 
32
    Basel I prudential standards encouraged securitization through differential risk weights (a mortgage held on a 
bank’s balance sheet is charged with a 50 percent risk weight, against only 20 percent if securitized). At the same 
time,  although  Basel  I  did  incorporate  some  off‐balance  sheet  commitments,  conversion  factors  limited  their 
impact on capital. Banks could also circumvent regulation through innovations such as tranching and indirect credit 
enhancements, the use of the trading book rather than the banking book, and other balance sheet adjustments. 
See Tarullo (2008). 


                                                           30 
mortgage fraud, adverse selection, and other principal‐agent problems.33 The widespread preference of 
unregulated intermediaries to lever up on the basis of mainly short‐term funds can also be interpreted 
as  driven  by  moral  hazard.  Managers  (at  least  some  of  them  and  particularly,  but  not  only,  asset 
managers)  also  seemed  to  have  danced  eagerly  to  the  moral  hazard  tune.  While  enjoying  the  high 
returns of the good times, they let their shareholders and investors deal with the losses in the bad times 
under the convenient excuse that everybody shared the same miseries.34 
A good case can also be made that the state promoted moral hazard on the way up. Some argue, for 
example,  that  the  widespread  subsidies  and  guarantees  provided  to  the  house  financing  sector  in  an 
effort to boost access (exacerbated by Fannie Mae’s and Freddie Mac’s “quasi‐mandated” foray into the 
sub‐prime sector) can be blamed for launching the ball and boosting its moral hazard momentum once 
in play.35 The failure to control the build‐up phase can then be attributed to the regulator’s inability to 
win the cat‐and‐mouse game of regulatory arbitrage. Banks managed to stay on top by swiftly moving to 
the  shadow‐banking  world,  with  regulators  hardly  able  to  keep  up.36  The  extreme  fragmentation  and 
overlapping  mandates  of  agencies  that  comprise  the  U.S.  supervisory  system  was  of  course  the  final 
blow. Had the regulators been aware and statutorily able to do something, the necessary coordination 
was just too much to handle.  
The agency paradigm is self‐contained in that it carries the seeds of its own demise. Once participants 
have taken the plunge, they have little or nothing more to lose by taking on additional risk. A dynamic 
could  be  thus  unleashed  that  pushed  bets  higher  and  higher  as  less  risky  investment  opportunities 
became  gradually  exhausted.  Indeed,  there  is  good  evidence  that  risk  taking  by  mortgage  originators 
mushroomed  over  the  cycle  as  less  and  less  creditworthy  borrowers  were  gradually  let  in.37  Such 
dynamics should be naturally unstable and eventually collapse on their own weight.38 
Once the crisis hit, the liberal unfolding of the safety net under the gun of systemic contagion (lender‐of‐
last‐resort by the Fed and bail outs by the Treasury) clearly validated any moral hazard incentives that 
might have led to the crisis. In particular, it facilitated the early exit of at least some of the well‐informed 
large  investors,  rewarding  those  who  had  lent  imprudently  (and  allegedly  knowingly).  Another  moral 




33
     Ashcraft  and Schuerman (2008)  analyze the  “seven  deadly  frictions  of  asymmetric  information” that  unfolded 
with a vengeance in the originate‐to‐distribute world. 
34
     The  managers  masquerading  their  excessive  tail‐risk  taking  as  clever  investment  moves  are  dubbed  by  Rajan 
(2008a)  as  “fake‐alphas”.  The  perfect  excuse  for  the  bad  times  is  defined  by  Calomiris  (2008)  as  “plausible 
deniability”. Reflecting their greater concern for the short‐term bottom line than for the potential longer term risks 
(perhaps  reflecting  mostly  backward  looking  compensation  schemes),  operational  managers  seem  to  have  paid 
insufficient attention to the concerns of risk managers. On issues of managerial compensation and the scope for 
managerial  “abuse”,  see  also  Dewatripont  and  Tirole  (1994),  Brunnermeier  (2008),  and  Gorton  and  Winston 
(2008). 
35
     Fannie  Mae  and  Freddie  Mac—the  giant  mortgage  government‐sponsored  enterprises—could  meet  their 
mandated social housing goals by buying eligible subprime mortgages. For a summary of public policy actions to 
promote housing finance see Calomiris (2008). 
36
    For good narratives along these lines, see Caprio et al. (2008), and Calomiris (2008). 
37
    On the propensity for increased risk taking, see Dell’ Ariccia et al. (2008), and Keys et al. (2008). Leamer (2008) 
goes further to argue that there was a gradual shift from hedge finance to speculative finance and then to outright 
Ponzi finance during the recent housing cycle. 
38
    In the end, the trigger for the crisis under the pure agency paradigm should still be a stochastic event (moral 
hazard  would  cease  to  operate  if  there  was  no  longer  a  possible  upside,  as  unlikely  as  it  might  be).  That  event, 
however, can be so small that it ceases to be relevant. 


                                                                31 
hazard booster in the ex‐post unfolding of the safety net was that, for the most part, large institutions 
were not closed and, perhaps more importantly, managers were allowed to stay in charge.39 
In sum, the moral hazard tune does ring true in many respects. However, important questions remain. 
First, for shadow banking to be explainable by moral hazard, it must have allowed commercial banks to 
pile  on  more  risk.  However,  whether,  on  balance,  commercial  banks  ended  up  shedding  or  piling  risk 
through  securitization  is  not  entirely  clear,  albeit  some  evidence  seems  to  militate  in  favor  of  the 
latter.40 As intended by the early promoters of securitization, the sale of mortgage‐backed securities to 
investment banks should in and of itself, have reduced (not increased) commercial banks’ riskiness. In 
reality,  however,  much  of  the  risk  was  never  really  divested  away.  Instead,  commercial  banks 
repurchased  good chunks  of the instruments  they sold, for reputational as well as business continuity 
reasons,  and  remained  committed  to  support  investment  banks  through  their  back‐stop  liquidity 
facilities (they were lenders of first resort to capital markets players). Moreover, they generally retained 
the more risky assets (or the more risky tranches) while shedding away the less risky ones.41 At the same 
time,  they  moved  down  the  credit  market  to  take  on  new  and  arguably  higher  risks  associated  with 
consumer,  mortgage,  and  SME  lending.  They  also  accumulated  more  risk  by  engaging  in  widespread 
rating arbitrage (shopping for the most favorable ratings).42 
Moreover, even if one believes that banks did accumulate more risk, it does not necessarily follow that 
this was induced by moral hazard. Indeed, commercial banks could have genuinely bought the risk under 
the presumption that it was safe for them to store it (they perceived the regulations to be too tight and 
their capital more than enough to cover the associated risks). Under this interpretation, to which we will 
come  back  under  the  externalities  paradigm,  commercial  banks  ventured  into  new  markets  and  new 
instruments simply because they had a comparative advantage in doing so.  
Perhaps  more  importantly,  the  main  piece  of  the  puzzle  that  does  not  quite  fit  this  paradigm  is  the 
blatant asymmetry between the smart ones who are alleged to have consciously caused havoc and all 
the rest of the financial market participants who were not paying attention. In particular, why did the 
markets  (informed  investors  and  shareholders)  fail  to  discipline  financial  intermediaries?  In  the  end, 
many investors surely got it wrong and lost tons of money; a multitude of bank shareholders got wiped 
out; and many managers likely have had second thoughts about having played so eagerly the alpha card. 
In this context, supervisors must surely also be thinking that it is unfair to treat them as if they were the 
only ones asleep at the wheel.  
The moral hazard story inherently requires a strong agency problem, caused either by high enforcement 
costs or deep crevices of information asymmetry. Arguably, principals (shareholders and large investors) 
lacked the incentives or regulatory tools that might have helped them align the actions of their agents 
(managers).  However,  it  is  difficult  to  believe  that  principals  would  not  have  taken  early  disciplinary 
action, if only by voting with their feet, had they really understood the risks agents were taking. Thus, 
setting  aside  the  problem  faced  by  the  regulators  as  regards  the  growth  of  the  unregulated  sector, 
enforcement costs are not really consistent with the lengthy gestation of the build‐up to the crisis nor 
with the short‐term nature of the financing that supported that build‐up. A better case can perhaps be 
made  for  the  intensification  of  information  asymmetry  resulting  from  the  opacity,  complexity,  and 

39
    Curiously, while deposit insurance fully protected the small depositor, much less was done to protect the small 
borrower (that has been an important asymmetry as regards consumer protection). 
40
     Rajan  (2005)  presents  evidence  that  suggests  some  increase  in  overall  banking  risk,  as  indicators  of  banks’ 
distance to default have not risen in many developed countries and bank earnings variability has not fallen in the 
United States. Instead, the risk premium implicit in bank stocks appears to have risen. 
41
    See for example Ambrose et al. (2005). 
42
    See Brunnermeier (2008). 


                                                              32 
interconnectedness of the new age housing finance market.43 Arguably, this could have provided a cover 
under which the ones at the top of the pack could have hidden their operations. Yet, it still remains hard 
to  fathom  that  this  “scam”  would  take  place  for  such  a  long  period,  during  which  the  asymmetry 
between  those  who  were  “in”  and  those  who  were  “out”  would  linger  unabated,  and  that  this  would 
happen in a market place where tips, news, and information are produced by the ton every minute. 
 
The Externalities Paradigm 

Externalities,  the  mirror  image  of  individual  opportunism,  clearly  play  a  major  role  in  the  collapsing 
phase of any crisis. Seeking to save oneself by running for the exits puts the others at increased risk of a 
major  meltdown  with  extreme  social  costs,  thereby  exacerbating  the  violence  of  the  downturn.  But 
externalities also play a key role during the build up stage, making the system inherently more fragile. 
The  failure  to  internalize  the  costs  of  a  systemic  crisis  is  at  the  core  of  the  insufficient  demand  for 
prudential buffers, including in particular liquidity, which has features of a public good. Externalities can 
also  induce  bubble‐type  deviations  of  asset  prices  from  their  fundamentals.44  They  can  also  result  in 
under‐production  of  information  and  monitoring  (free‐riding)  and  over‐extension  of  credit  during 
upswings,  over‐contraction  during  downswings  (in  both  cases,  the  marginal  lender  can  “sour  the 
market”,  increasing  the  vulnerability  of  other  lenders  to  a  default).  Last  but  not  least,  coordination 
failures  (a  form  of  un‐internalized  externalities)  can  also  play  an  important  role  in  lengthening  and 
aggravating the upwards phase of the cycle. Market participants may know it is in their best interest to 
prevent  an  asset  bubble  yet  fail  to  do  so  because  doing  the  right  thing  would  only  be  optimal  if 
everybody  else  in  the  group  did  it  too.  Supervisors,  both  across  agencies  and  across  countries,  are 
similarly vulnerable to such coordination failures. For example, tightening regulation in  isolation has a 
high cost, as business will quickly flow to the less regulated sectors or countries. 
The  lack  of  sufficient  buffers  was  indeed  at  the  core  of  the  severity  of  the  collapse.  As  in  the  case  of 
traditional  banking,  shadow  banking  was  financed  mostly  through  short‐term  obligations  (and  largely 
perceived to be redeemable at par), much of it through overnight repos. The potential for a bank‐type 
run  was  therefore  there  from  the  outset.  But  two  additional  factors  made  for  a  much  more  explosive 
situation. First, the financing came mainly from ready‐to‐run wholesale investors, thereby introducing a 
new, more unstable layer to the intermediation process. Second, the capital and liquidity buffers held by 
most shadow‐banking intermediaries to protect their short‐term liabilities from price fluctuations in the 
final asset (housing) were much smaller than in traditional commercial banking. This reflected the high 
leverage  of  self‐standing  investment  banks  and  (to  a  less  extent)  hedge  funds,  as  well  as  the  lack  of 
capital  put  in  by  the  final  borrowers  who  benefited  from  high  loan‐to‐value  ratios  and  second 
mortgages. Thus, as documented elsewhere in detail, once a tail‐risk event materialized and pressures 




43
   See for example Gorton (2008). 
44
   Because individual agents do not internalize the general equilibrium impact on asset prices of fire sales under 
financial  distress,  they  can  bid  up  the  price  of  these  assets  in  excess  of  their  socially  optimal  value.  Lorenzoni 
(2007) develops a model along these lines and shows that competitive financial contracts can result in excessive 
borrowing  ex‐ante  and  excessive  volatility  ex‐post.  As  in  Holmstrom  and  Tirole  (1998),  agents  cannot  insure 
themselves against aggregate liquidity shocks due to a limited ability to commit to future repayments (this in turn 
reflects agency frictions). Korinek (2008) develops a paper along the same lines but applied to capital flows rather 
than domestic intermediation (in his model, agents borrow too much because they do not internalize the potential 
impact of an exchange rate move on a systemically‐induced need for sudden repayment). 


                                                                33 
to  sell  started  to  build  up,  the  devastating  downward  spiral  quickly  dried  up  liquidity  and  brought 
markets to a standstill.45 
In the shadow banking world, the externality pitfall of traditional banking operated with a vengeance, as 
everyone counted on everyone else’s for support but no one adequately internalized the systemic risks 
of such cross‐support. Investment banks counted on commercial banks (both for liquidity and for asset 
repurchases);46  commercial  banks  counted  on  market  liquidity  (why  hold  liquid  backing  against  assets 
which  you  can  sell  at  any  time  in  the  market  place?);  and  leveraged  intermediaries  counted  on  credit 
default  swaps  and  other  forms  of  insurance  issued  by  other  leveraged  institutions.    In  the  process,  a 
great  fallacy  of  composition  developed—leading  market  players  (and  supervisors)  wrongly  to  believe 
that  risk  protections  at  the  individual  level  would  add  up  to  systemic  risk  protection.  Yet,  markets  for 
individual risk protection instruments could only continue functioning if some intermediary was willing 
to continue “making the market”.47 
The extreme systemic fragility of such interconnectedness has by now become obvious.48 By unloading 
(selling)  risk—for  example  through  credit  default  swaps—to  other  financial  institutions  such  as 
insurance  companies,  intermediaries  further  intensified  the  negative  systemic  externalities.49  Such 
transactions might have reduced the exposure of institutions individually but increased the exposure of 
the system as a whole. Yet, this move was openly encouraged by regulators (insured assets had a low or 
zero risk weight), who viewed it as a way to reinforce market discipline (again, an example where moral 
hazard  and  externality  containment  directly  collided).  The  possible  systemic  costs  of  trading  credit 
derivatives  over  the  counter  (without  a  central  clearing  counterparty  or  protocols  for  multilateral 
netting), rather than on an exchange, were not internalized either.   
While the fragility brought about by externalities has received much attention in the crisis literature, an 
equally important consequence of un‐internalized externalities that has received much less attention is 
their implication for regulatory arbitrage. As in the case of moral hazard, the growth of shadow banking 
can also be explained as externality‐induced incentives to circumvent regulation. The key difference is 
one of intent. From an externality viewpoint, intermediaries were “doing nothing wrong” by finding new 
ways to take on more risk. Instead of seeking to take one‐sided bets with someone else’s money, as in 
the  agency  paradigm,  the  intermediaries  engaged  in  regulatory  arbitrage  under  the  externalities 
parading  were  just  searching  for  ways  to  match  more  closely  their  risk  taking  with  their  risk  appetite, 
and they were doing so in a way which, from their own (limited) perspective, was sufficiently safe. From 
their individual viewpoint, regulations were “unnecessarily binding”. 
In  this  sense,  the  intent  of  the  Glass‐Steagall  Act—to  shift  risk  away  from  regulated  intermediaries  to 
capital  markets  and  unregulated  intermediaries—was  fundamentally  misguided.  While  it  could  have 
solved the agency problem (by shifting risks to the land of the well informed) if it had been done cleanly 
enough (i.e., without dragging the banking system into the mud and the safety net over the line‐in‐the‐
sand), it exacerbated the externalities problem. Well‐informed investors can monitor the intermediaries 
to make sure they do not “cheat them” (play the moral hazard card). However, they have no incentives 


45
    See Greenlaw et al. (2008), Adrian and Shin (2007 and 2008), and Brunnermeier (2008). 
46
    Yet, there were no capital charges for such “reputational” credit lines (see Brunnermeier, 2008). 
47
     The  linkages  between  securities  market  liquidity  and  funding  liquidity,  and  the  resulting  increased  scope  for 
liquidity spirals are analyzed by Brunnermeier and Pedersen (2008). 
48
    The fact that most intermediaries traveled along the same path on both the way up and the way down, driven by 
similar  incentives  and  risk  management  models,  further  boosted  the  systemic  impact  of  these  externalities.  See 
Brunnermeier (2008). 
49
    Allen and Gale (2005) discuss the possible implications for systemic risk of such transfers. 


                                                              34 
to  “internalize”  the  liquidity  and  other  externalities.50  Instead,  their  incentive  is  to  play  it  safe  by 
investing very short and running at the first signal of trouble and to increase leverage by as much as is 
privately (not socially) optimal.  
To  be  sure,  reflecting  regulatory  shortcomings  in  the  internalization  of  systemic  liquidity  risk  (see 
below), incentives were not much better aligned for the regulated intermediaries. Nonetheless, capital 
in  the  regulated  sector  substantially  exceeded  that  in  the  unregulated  sector,  reflecting  systemic 
concerns  of  regulators  for  the  commercial  banking  sector.51  Thus,  the  side‐by‐side  existence  of  a 
regulated  sector—where  systemic  concerns  were  partially  factored  in—and  an  unregulated  sector—
where externalities were not at all internalized—created a wedge in returns between the two worlds, 
giving rise to a fundamentally unstable construct. Investors left in droves the regulated intermediaries to 
join  the  world  of  the  less  regulated,  highly  leveraged  and  short  funded  intermediaries,  rapidly  raising 
their relative size and boosting systemic risk in the process. Moreover, because it involved sophisticated 
and  unsophisticated  investors,  the  exodus  spread  moral  hazard  throughout  the  presumably  moral‐
hazard free unregulated (or less regulated) world.  
The resulting competitive pressures on commercial banks ultimately motivated the repeal of the Glass‐
Steagall  Act.52  However,  by  challenging  commercial  banks  to  compete  head‐on  with  the  blown‐up 
investment banks and on their turf, the repeal induced the former to find creative ways to shed their 
regulatory burden outside their balance sheet. Thus, oddly enough, the Glass‐Steagall Act resulted in a 
one‐two  punch  on  the  soundness  of  financial  intermediaries.  Its  introduction  boosted  systemic  risk 
outside commercial banking. Once this was done, its repeal boosted systemic risk within it. 
As in the agency paradigm, supervisors come out severely bruised. They did not realize that their own 
well‐meaning  regulation  was  setting  into  motion  a  deadly  process  of  regulatory  arbitrage  that  shifted 
intermediation  to  a  field  where  inducements  to  internalize  externalities  were  weaker  or  nonexistent, 
thereby contributing to asset over‐pricing and spreading liquidity risk all over the financial system. And 
even when supervisors caught up, they were unable to do much because in the cat‐and‐mouse game of 
regulatory arbitrage the mouse had trespassed over the line‐in‐the‐sand to a territory where prudential 
regulation was not unreasonably reluctant to enter. Investment banks, hedge funds, and the like were 
thus simply left out of reach.53 Moreover, even within the regulated world, the Basel‐inspired wave of 
prudential regulation focused little on liquidity. And when the norms addressed liquidity issues, they did 
so  from  a  purely  idiosyncratic  perspective.54  To  his  defense,  however,  the  externality‐conscious 

50
    A similar point was made by Bernanke (2006). 
51
    For example, investment banks’ leverage of around 25—compared to commercial banks’ leverage of only about 
10—gave the former an obvious advantage. Although the SEC, as lead regulator, applied to investment banks the 
same Basel capital rules as for commercial banks, the differences in leverages resulted from the much lower capital 
requirements on  “trading  books”  than  on  “banking  books”  and  the  fact  that  limits  on  gross  leverage  ratios  only 
applied to commercial banks. 
52
    Pushed by the forces of competition and deregulation, commercial and investment banks seemed to have met 
somewhere  in  the  “regulatory  middle”.  As  the  repeal  of  the  Glass‐Steagall  Act  allowed  commercial  banks  to 
encroach more directly on investment banks’ traditional fee‐based business, the former took on more fees in order 
to offset losses in intermediation margins. Also, and partly as a result of the deregulation of commissions for stock 
trading in the 1970s (that allowed low‐cost brokers to encroach on investment banks’ brokerage activities), self‐
standing  investment  banks  gradually  shed  their  fee‐based  business  in  favor  of  a  highly‐leveraged  margin‐based 
business. See Eichengreen (2008). 
53
    The move towards consolidated supervision of financial conglomerates was as far as prudential regulators were 
willing to extend their reach to protect the core banking system from capital market risks. 
54
     For  example,  liquidity  norms  generally  advocate  minimum  ratio  of  liquid  assets  to  liabilities  to  limit  maturity 
mismatches. But this is simply not good enough from a systemic viewpoint where even short‐maturity assets can 


                                                                35 
supervisor  may  argue  that  systemic  events  such  as  the  Subprime  crisis  are  akin  to  “one‐hundred  year 
floods”.  They  are  too  rare  and  unpredictable  to  be  usefully  internalized  in  prudential  regulations.  The 
social cost of doing so (note here the italics) would  simply exceed the social  benefits. Hence, a better 
option is to have a prompt correction regime and an efficient public rescue system. 
The missing piece in this paradigm, which is otherwise convincing enough, relates to its dynamics. To be 
sure,  the  lack  of  sufficient  internalization  of  systemic  risks  can  lead  as  easily  as  moral  hazard‐based 
incentives  to  a  more  fragile  and  vulnerable  system.  Yet,  unlike  in  the  agency  case,  the  externalities 
paradigm  in  and  of  itself  lacks  inherent  dynamics  that  gradually  increase  the  precariousness  of  the 
equilibrium over time and eventually bring the system so close to the edge that the tiniest exogenous 
shock  would  throw  it  over.55  In  the  pure  externalities  paradigm,  intermediaries  continue  to  “manage” 
their  risk,  adjusting  it  to  what  is  privately  optimal  and  then  just  staying  there.  The  large  shock  that 
eventually  sent  the  financial  system  over  the  edge  must  have  therefore  come  out  of  “left  field”—an 
exogenous act of god, whose probability was independent of the degree of vulnerability of the system. 
However, as far as one can see, there was no such shock in the case of the Subprime crisis.  
One  could  argue  that,  instead  of  an  exogenous  shock,  the  engine  driving  the  financial  system  to  its 
eventual  collapse  was  a  real  sector‐driven  business  cycle.  However,  prudential  norms  are  supposedly 
designed  to  allow  financial  systems  to  navigate  unscathed  through  the  ups  and  downs  of  the  regular 
business  cycle.  Hence,  this  could  only  be  a  satisfactory  explanation  if  the  magnitude  of  the  downturn 
was unprecedented and truly unexpected. Again, however, this does not seem likely. The financial crisis 
was  unleashed  in  full  force  much  before  there  was  a  marked  real  sector  decline,  with  causality  going 
mostly in the opposite direction.  
Alternatively,  one  could  tease  out  some  endogenous  dynamics  within  the  externalities  paradigm  by 
associating  the  externalities  driving  the  system  to  a  prisoner’s  dilemma.  What  market  participants  do 
individually  (i.e.,  join  the  feast  in  the  boom  and  the  stampede  in  the  bust)  is  clearly  harmful  to 
themselves and  the group, but each participant would stop only if everyone else in  the group did  the 
same.  That  this  type  of  coordination  failure  can  generate  some  cyclical  fluctuation  stands  to  reason.56 
That  it  can  lead  to  a  catastrophic  and  expected  systemic  collapse  is  more  difficult  to  accept.  In  the 
absence of a non‐externalities related factor—either moral hazard (perhaps boosted by managers’ short 
incentive horizon) or a truly unexpected unfolding of events (a much bigger or much sooner meltdown 
than anyone could reasonably have expected)—one would think that at some point the downside risk to 
each individual participant of remaining in the game should dominate the upside risk. At that point, self‐
preservation should de facto force coordination, keeping the group some distance away from the edge 
of the cliff. 
 




become  illiquid.  Norms  have  failed  to  focus  on  systemic  rollover  risk,  which  is  at  the  core  of  intermediaries’ 
vulnerability to runs. 
55
    Some recent analysis of the unfolding of the Subprime crisis stresses the extreme market fragility resulting from 
an unexpected market realignment in a context where all the large traders have similar underlying risk models and 
objectives (Khandani and Lo, 2008). However, it is not obvious that traders would have continued to operate so 
close to the edge if they had understood the true fragility of the environment in which they were operating and 
the huge potential costs of a meltdown. 
56
     For  example,  Abreu  and  Brunnermeier  (2003)  develop  a  model  in  which  asset  bubbles  persist  despite  the 
presence of rational arbitrageurs because the latter cannot temporarily coordinate their selling strategies due to a 
dispersion of opinions. 


                                                              36 
The Mood Swings Paradigm 

The  starting  point  of  the  mood  swings  paradigm  is  the  endogeneity  of  financial  innovation  within  a 
broad  process  of  financial  development.  The  shift  from  traditional  banking  to  shadow  banking  can  be 
interpreted  as  the  natural  evolution  of  a  rapidly  deepening  financial  system  in  which  markets  and 
intermediaries  increasingly  complemented  each  other.57  Banks  commoditized  credit  risk  through  the 
originate‐to‐distribute model and retained some credit risk to overcome agency problems.58 At the same 
time,  they  used  their  ability  to  provide  first  resort  liquidity  to  help  markets  overcome  the  remaining 
liquidity gap associated with the yet nascent and still overly heterogeneous instruments. The pressures 
of competition, boosted by the steady entry and rapid growth of unregulated (or less regulated) brokers 
and  intermediaries  (particularly  investment  banks),  were  clearly  at  the  heart  of  such  a  remarkable 
process of financial deepening and market completion. 
However, the creation of new instruments and forms of intermediation went faster than the ability of 
market  participants  and  supervisors  to  fully  comprehend  their  implications  and  handle  the  risks  and 
uncertainty  associated  with  such  a  rapidly  changing  world.  The  opacity,  complexity,  and  hidden 
interconnectedness of the Subprime world can thus be seen in the mood swings paradigm as bad side 
effects  of  an  innovative  process,  but  side  effects  that  were  either  not  intended  or,  if  intended,  not 
necessarily maliciously pursued.59 The inability to think through the potential systemic implications and 
fragilities of the new universe was the fundamental and critical failure.  
This  problem  was  compounded  by  a  failure  to  fully  comprehend  the  links  between  financial  sector 
dynamics  and  the  underlying  asset  price  dynamics,  and  to  adequately  understand  the  feedback  loop 
between rising asset prices and expanding credit. The possibility of a large and nation‐wide synchronized 
decline  in  housing  prices  (and  the  devastating  implications  this  would  have  for  the  risk  correlation 
assumptions underlying the presumed safety of credit default protections) was unthinkable because it 
had  never  happened  since  the  Great  Depression.60  Moreover,  when  delinquency  rates  on  mortgages 
started  to  rise  during  the  mini‐recession  of  2002,  the  losses  on  mortgages  were  minimal  because  the 
housing market continued to boom.61 From this perspective, falling housing prices and their implications 
for the housing finance market appear not as “tail risk” but as a “black swan” event, a new reality that 
could not be anticipated from historical series.62 
Faced with the world of the new and unknown, market participants involved in the Subprime process no 
longer  had  a  steady  frame  of  reference.  On  the  way  up,  they  found  themselves  in  a  truly  new  and 
wonderful  territory  which  fueled  a  mood  of  optimism  and  exuberance.  This  was  reinforced  by  the 
decline  in  observed  macro‐financial  volatility,  predictable  pricing  and  deep  market  liquidity,  which 
further fed risk appetites  and gave rise to pro‐cyclical leveraging.63 The low volatility environment not 

57
    Through securitization, markets benefit from the screening done by intermediaries and the latter benefit from 
the more efficient parceling and tailoring of risk carried out through the markets. See Gorton and Winston (2002), 
and Song and Thakor (2008). 
58
    This was certainly not a minor achievement—it involved standardizing the credit risk screening (through scoring 
and  rating),  breaking  it  up  (through  stripping  and  tranching)  and  dispersing  it  (by  selling  it  to  a  wider  base  of 
investors and spreading it around through a new breed of credit risk derivatives). 
59
     Information  got  lost  through  the  “chain  of  complexity”  and  banks  became  exposed  in  the  process  to  heavy 
“pipeline risk”. See Brunnermeier (2008) and Gorton (2008). 
60
    See Gorton (2008) and Coval, Jurek, and Stafford (2008). 
61
    See Calomiris (2008). 
62
    See Taleb (2007). 
63
     Unlike  commercial  banks  that  targeted  a  constant  leverage  throughout  the  cycle,  investment  banks’  leverage 
was heavily pro‐cyclical. See Adrian and Shin (2007 and 2008). 


                                                                37 
only had the immediate mechanical effect of reducing values at risk but also, the more it persisted, the 
more it fed the feeling that “this time around, things are different and the good times are here to stay”. 
New  forms  of  macro‐financial  management  and  oversight,  including  the  ever  more  sophisticated  risk 
modeling,  widespread  divestment  of  risk  through  risk  derivatives,  and  more  effective  and  successful 
monetary  management,  were  all  major  contributors  to  this  optimistic  picture.64  Feelings  such  as 
“everything is being taken care of”, “good men are now in charge”, and “systemic volatility is a memory 
of the past which has now been vanquished even by the Mexicos and Brazils of this world” became so 
prevalent that few really questioned them.  
On  the  way  down,  the  brutal  downward  swing  in  the  prevalent  market  mood  also  fed  the  collapse.  A 
significant dissonance would be enough to initiate the mood swing. In the Subprime crisis, the swing was 
arguably triggered when the CBX credit swap index on sub‐prime based instruments started going south, 
colliding with the still rosy assessments of the rating agencies.65 As long as there was widespread market 
agreement on a price vector, ensuring that instruments could continue to be unloaded on short notice, 
markets could go on functioning unperturbed (whether prices actually matched fundamentals was not 
that  important  as  long  as  they  were  uncontested).  However,  by  questioning  the  uniformity  of  market 
assessments,  the  drop  in  the  CBX  index  suddenly  raised  the  specter  of  “hidden  icebergs  lying  ahead”. 
From euphoria, the mood shifted into acute Knightian uncertainty, where risk aversion swelled, driven 
by  the  fear  of  the  unknown.66  The  frenzied  recoiling  of  investors  was  compounded  by  general  market 
opacity—including  the  knowledge  that  intermediaries  were  deeply  interconnected  coupled  with  utter 
ignorance  on  the  nature  and  specific  details  of  this  interconnectedness.  Opacity  thus  intensified  the 
massive  sell  out  of  securities  and  simultaneous  flight  to  cash,  with  the  resulting  market  collapse  and 
evaporation of price signals further accentuating the downward spiral.67 
In this paradigm, well‐meaning public policy also played a central role, both on the way up and on the 
way down. On the way up, a key and justifiable role for policy is to promote market completion within 
an  evolutionary  financial  development  process.68  Indeed,  the  set  of  policies  designed  to  promote 
housing  finance  by  jump‐starting  the  markets  for  new  instruments  such  as  securitization  through 
guarantees and subsidies can be viewed as sowing the earliest seeds of the crisis. The Subprime crisis 
grew, in effect, in the “shadow” of the guaranteed world of Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac. While such 
policies can help overcome natural impediments to market development—particularly where collective 
action is difficult and network and scale effects are significant—they can also help promote the illusion 
that risk has been reduced to a point where it ceases to be a predominant concern. Public intervention 
also played (and continues to do so) a critical role on the way down. In a world of uncertainty and acute 
swings in risk aversion, only the State has the shoulders needed to function as the risk‐absorber‐of‐last‐
resort during episodes of acute, systemic failure.69 In this view, the ex‐post unfolding of unprecedented 

64
    As Greenspan (1998) famously declared, the “management of systemic risk is properly the job of central banks” 
and “banks should not be required to hold capital against the possibility of an overall financial breakdown”. 
65
    See Gorton (2008). 
66
    Uncertainty aversion came on top of (and interacted with) increased volatility. See Brunnermeier (2008). 
67
     Panics  end  when  information  recomposes  and  becomes  available.  Intermediary‐based  finance  is  in  this  sense 
much more vulnerable than market‐based finance, since prices are less likely to vanish in markets that do not rely 
on market‐making institutions. 
68
     A  theoretical  justification  for  government  intervention  in  a  context  of  incomplete  markets  can  be  found  in 
Geneakoplos and Polemarchakis (1986). Gale (2004) shows that in the presence of incomplete markets there exists 
an implicit pecuniary externality that generally requires the imposition of capital requirements. 
69
    The seminal contribution as regards the role of the State as the residual absorber of risk is that of Arrow and Lind 
(1970). See also Caballero (2009) for a recent reinterpretation of the insurance role of the State in systemic crisis 
conditions.  An  intriguing  argument  can  however  also  be  made  that  instead  of  spreading  risk  over  taxpayers 


                                                             38 
Fed’s  lender‐of‐last‐resort  activity  and  the  U.S.  Treasury’s  bail  out  operations  can  be  interpreted  as  a 
way to drain away from the system sufficient systemic risk so as to allow markets to spring back up to 
life and intermediaries to continue operating. 
All  in  all,  the  mood  swings  paradigm  presents  a  more  rounded  overall  story  than  the  other  two 
paradigms, and a story with far‐reaching implications at that. Unlike the agency paradigm, it does not 
require  a  gigantic  and  unyielding  asymmetry  of  information  between  market  participants  that  are  in‐
the‐know and those that are out. Rather, it is a democratic paradigm where everybody was fooled. And 
unlike the externalities paradigm, it does not require a vengeful god to intervene exogenously with tail‐
risk  events  to  unleash  the  dynamics  of  a  downward  spiral.  Instead,  it  has  its  own  fully  endogenous 
dynamics, with favorable returns and optimism feeding each other on the way up, adverse returns and 
pessimism on the way down. The dynamics are akin to Schumpeter’s creative destruction, where cycles 
are a natural part of the evolutionary process. However, unlike the traditional Schumpeterian process, 
where some do well while others perish at every point in the cycle, the dynamics in the mood swings 
paradigm are more like “Schumpeter on steroids”, as financial innovation cycles can have a devastating 
systemic impact because everyone follows the same path, up the bubble and down the abyss.   
The  mood  swings  paradigm,  however,  is  not  free  of  puzzles  and  difficulties.  In  particular,  uncertainty‐
driven mood swings are easy to invoke but harder to model.70 To be sure, one would expect rationality 
(even  if  bounded)  and  path  dependence  to  constrain  feasible  outcomes.  However,  unlike  incentive 
distortions under the moral hazard and externalities paradigms, which are firmly grounded in traditional 
economic  theory,  modeling  mood  shifts  may  require  some  departure  from  orthodox  theory.71  In  any 
event,  it  is  also  rather  surprising  that  market  participants  were  seemingly  oblivious  to  the  risks 
underlying the process of financial innovation. Did such obliviousness simply reflect a difficulty to look 
outside  the  box  and  connect  the  dots?  Did  such  difficulty  reflect  the  fact  that  markets  do  not  reward 


(current and future), risk might be more efficiently spread over existing debt holders by using debt equity swaps as 
an alternative to unconditional bail outs (see Veronesi and Zingales, 2008). 
70
    The importance of mood swings for financial bubbles and panics has been widely recognized. It finds its roots in 
Keynes’ animal spirits and Hyman Minsky’s writings on financial crises (see Minsky, 1975).  More recently, it was 
popularized  by  Kindleberger  (1996)  and  Shiller  (2006).  While  many  attempts  have  been  made  to  model  mood 
driven‐cycles  within  the  traditional  world  of  rational  expectations  with  full  information  (see  the  seminal 
contribution of Azariadis, 1981), the conditions for such rational bubbles to exist have been shown to be rather 
limited  (Santos  and  Woodford,  1997).  However,  moods  play  a  much  more  important  role  once  one  assumes 
problems with the information (imprecision or uncertainty) or the way one deals with it, which, in turn, may (or 
may not) require abandoning the assumption of full rationality. Epstein and Wang (1994), and more recently Fostel 
and Geneakoplos (2008), showed that multiple priors can lead to models where beliefs influence asset prices in a 
fully  rational  world.  In  addition,  Geweke  (2001)  and  Weitzman  (2007)  showed  that,  when  there  is  too  much 
uncertainty,  fully  rational  human  behavior  may  not  conform  to  the  precepts  of  traditional  economic  theory  as 
defined by the standard expected‐utility framework. Abandoning the assumption of full rationality opens up the 
scope  for  innate  biases  in  the  way  economic  agents  process  information  and  make  decisions  (see  the  recent 
surveys  of  behavioral  finance  in  Barberis  and  Thaler,  2003,  and  Della  Vigna,  2007).  Attempts  to  explore  the 
implications of such limitations for finance and credit cycles are making some headway. For example, Shleifer and 
Vishny  (1997)  showed  that  inefficient  asset  pricing  driven  by  noise  traders  can  persist  despite  the  presence  of 
rational arbitrageurs. Lo (2004) proposed an evolutionary approach to economic interactions. De Grauwe (2008) 
showed that it is possible to generate endogenous cycles when agents use simple heuristic rules to interpret the 
dynamics of a model they do not fully comprehend. 
71
     For  example,  they  may  be  associated  with  biased  perceptions  under  bounded  rationality,  or  shifts  in  risk 
appetite under rational expectations, a non trivial distinction since one would expect risk pricing to be biased in 
the first case but not in the second. Another key modeling difficulty is the extent to which uncertainty goes beyond 
the underlying environment to include group behavior. 


                                                              39 
systemic risk gazing (a theme to which we will come back in the next section)? Or was something more 
sinister at play, either moral hazard or non internalized externalities? In particular, absent externalities, 
one wonders whether uncertainty alone could pack so much punch, particularly on the way down.  
In sum, the overall picture one gets from systematically reviewing the three paradigms is that they all 
provide broadly plausible stories. Hence, they must all contain important grains of truth. Moreover, the 
paradigms  seem  to  interact  and  feedback  on  each  other  in  complex  ways,  one  triggering  the  other  or 
becoming  more  predominant  at  different  stages  of  the  cycle.  Hence,  a  fully  rounded  story—one  that 
does  not  leave  key  questions  unanswered  and  fully  accounts  for  the  complexity  of  real  life—requires 
combining  the  paradigms.  However,  multi‐dimensionality  makes  the  challenges  of  policy  reform  that 
much more difficult.  To these issues we now turn. 
 
Paradigms and Regulation 

In this section, we will briefly summarize what we perceive to have been the main failures of regulation 
and illustrate in broad terms how policy prescriptions to fix them will often not be independent of the 
paradigm of choice.  
The  great  failures  of  prudential  regulation  evidenced  by  the  Subprime  crisis  can  be  classified  into:  i) 
failures of scope; ii) failures of focus;  and iii) failures of dynamics. Take the  failures of scope first. The 
“line‐in‐the‐sand” philosophy simply did not work. The prevailing thinking was that opening a wide room 
for unregulated intermediaries to thrive was of little consequence to systemic stability. Knowledgeable 
investors  would  maintain  them  in  line.  Moreover,  they  were  too  small  to  be  systemically  important. 
Both  assumptions  turned  out  to  be  deadly  wrong.  The  failure  to  internalize  externalities  in  the 
unregulated  world  created  a  bias  in  favor  of  unregulated  intermediaries  that  drew  in  unsophisticated 
investors  in  droves  and  made  them  grow  explosively.  In  turn,  this  competitive  bias  induced  banks  to 
elude regulation by pushing risk outside their balance sheet and turn a somewhat blind eye to the risks 
taken  by  their  borrowers.  Thus,  not  only  was  risk  not  adequately  internalized  ex‐ante  but  also 
prudentially unregulated (or less regulated) intermediaries quickly grew to the point where they became 
systemically  relevant  players  and,  hence,  had  to  be  admitted  ex‐post  to  the  safety  net,  no  questions 
asked. 
Consider  next  the  failures  of  focus.  First,  the  prevailing  regulatory  framework  established  a  neatly 
dividing line between the ex‐ante prudential norms and the ex‐post safety net. The ex‐ante regulatory 
framework focused on maintaining the soundness of assets, the ex‐post safety net on maintaining the 
liquidity of liabilities. The obvious loose end was the lack of ex‐ante internalization of systemic liquidity 
risk. Second, prudential regulation focused on the soundness of each institution under the assumption 
that  the  sum  of  sound  institutions  was  equivalent  to  a  sound  system.  However,  as  noted  earlier,  the 
Subprime crisis showed that this approach constituted a major fallacy of composition. It turned instead 
the approach on its head: the system is what matters most to the soundness of each institution.72 Third, 
traditional regulation focused on statistically observable risks and made much out of the sophisticated 
and  complex  risk  modeling  techniques  that  fed  on  these  statistics.  Yet,  the  Subprime  crisis 



72
  Basel‐style regulation rewarded those institutions that covered their risks with products and services offered by 
other  institutions.  Yet,  the  Subprime  crisis  showed  those  atomized  protections  to  be  not  only  irrelevant  (they 
provided  a  false  sense  of  security,  unraveling  when  most  needed)  but  possibly  counterproductive  as  well  (they 
exacerbated contagion and the risk of overall systemic failure). 


                                                             40 
demonstrated  that  what  you  do  not  see  is  what  will  kill  you  (tail  risks,  black  swans,  and  endogenous 
risk).73 
Finally, consider the failures of dynamics. Basel‐style regulation was essentially static. Norms were time 
invariant (cycle independent) and the mandated capital buffers were assumed to be sufficient to carry 
the system through the business cycle.74 The Subprime crisis proved that approach wrong: static norms 
turned out to be pro‐cyclical, too loose on the way up, too tight on the way down. Last but not least, 
Basel‐style  regulation  failed  to  adequately  incorporate  the  dynamic  links  between  monetary  and 
prudential policies. The central bank’s job adhered to ensuring macro stability and providing lender‐of‐
last‐resort services, the supervisor’s to ensure financial prudency, and the two did not need to interact 
much.  Yet,  the  insufficient  attention  of  monetary  authorities  to  the  implications  of  their  actions  on 
financial  developments,  coupled  with  the  insufficient  attention  of  the  supervisors  to  macro  dynamics, 
deeply contributed to the crisis.75 
A major problem when seeking to address these regulatory failures is that the best fix will most often 
depend on the paradigm. How one sees reform is thus essentially a function of the lens one uses. Table 
2  synthesizes  this  discussion.  The  first  questions  in  the  table  (under  “foundations”)  refer  to  the 
objectives of regulation. Although both the aims (reducing principal‐agent frictions or internalizing social 
costs) and the means (see below) differ, the need to align incentives through ex‐ante prudential norms 
is clear and uncontroversial under either the agency paradigm or the externalities paradigm. Instead, in 
the  mood  swings  paradigm,  the  aim  is  to  maintain  innovation  under  control  and  to  temper  mood 
swings.  While  there  is  no  obvious  inconsistency  between  the  two,  aligning  incentives  and  tempering 
moods are nonetheless clearly of a different nature. 
In either case, the key question as regards the respective roles of markets and supervisors in achieving 
the mentioned objectives of regulation is whether risk can be priced (which in turn largely depends on 
whether systemic crises can be avoided). The answer is “yes” in the agency paradigm. Anyone who has 
enough  “skin”  invested  in  his  own  game  will  have  incentives  to  maintain  risk  taking  within  socially 
acceptable bounds. Similarly, anyone with enough skin invested in somebody else’s game (and this can 
also  be  mandated  by  regulation)  will  have  an  incentive  to  look  for  the  earliest  signs  of  malfeasance. 
Markets  can  thus  deliver  efficient  signals  and  function  as  early  smoke  detectors.  Once  principal‐agent 
problems are kept under control, systemic crises should not occur and historical statistics can become 
the  bread‐and‐butter  of  day‐to‐day  micro‐prudential  risk  management  (i.e.,  help  price  risk  across 
borrowers, institutions, and instruments). Accordingly, the main role of the agency supervisor is to put 
in place the  necessary apparatus for markets to conduct their  monitoring role effectively. Once  this is 
done, his only residual role is one of compliance checking and crime policing (misrepresentation, fraud, 
looting, etc.). 




73
     While  the  regulatory  framework  has  attempted  to  reduce  the  gap  between  risk  and  regulation  (by  upgrading 
from  Basel  I  to  Basel  II),  the  Subprime  crisis  has  brought  into  evidence  severe  issues  of  opacity,  excessive 
complexity, and a misleading sense of control. See Tarullo (2008). 
74
     Spanish  regulators  were  the  only  ones  in  the  developed  world  that  explicitly  dealt  with  cyclical  dynamics  by 
introducing the so‐called “statistical provisions”—i.e., provisions that are built out of income during the upswing of 
the  credit  cycle  and  can  be  converted  into  specific  provisions  in  the  downward  part  of  the  cycle.  This 
commendable approach was never embraced as part of the Basel creed, however. 
75
     Borio  (2003),  Goodhart  et  al.  (2004),  Rajan  (2005),  and  White  (2006)  were  among  the  few  providing  early 
forewarnings of the dangers of this approach. 


                                                               41 
 
                Table 2. A Synthetic Overview of Regulatory Issues and General Policy Responses 

                                                                               Paradigm 
       Dimensions                  Issue                   Agency             Externalities       Mood Swings 
                                                                             Opportunistic 
                                                        Betting with                             Mood swings in 
                          What is the main                                   behavior that 
                                                       someone’s else                             an uncertain, 
                          problem?                                         conflicts with the 
                                                          money                                  evolving world 
                                                                              social good 
                                                                            Align incentives 
                                                       Align incentives                           Temper moods 
                          What should ex‐ante                                   through 
                                                       through skin in                           and domesticate 
                          prudential norms do?                               internalizing 
                                                          the game                                  creativity 
                                                                             externalities 
     
                                                                           Probably not fully       Probably not 
    Foundations           Can risk be priced?                Yes             (one hundred         (unless Moses‐
                                                                              year floods)        like supervisor) 
                                                                               Ineffective          Ineffective 
                                                                              (inability to        (inability to 
                          How effective is market      Potentially very 
                                                                              estimate or        comprehend or 
                          discipline?                     effective 
                                                                                withstand           withstand 
                                                                             systemic risk)       systemic risk) 
                                                       Enhancer of                                   Scout‐
                          What is the role of the                           Crowd manager‐
                                                     market discipline‐                            moderator‐
                          supervisor?                                           fireman 
                                                       crime police                                 fireman 
                          Should the line in the 
    Scope                                                       No                Yes             Not necessarily 
                          sand be redefined? 
                                                                                 No, it               No, it 
                          Does fair value                 Yes, it is 
                                                                              exacerbates          exacerbates 
                          accounting help?              fundamental 
                                                                              externalities        mood swings 
    Focus                 Are systemic liquidity 
                                                                No            Perhaps Yes          Probably Yes 
                          norms needed? 
                          How important to look 
                                                       Not important        Very important         Fundamental 
                          at the system? 
                          Should prudential and 
                                                        Yes, but not 
                          monetary authorities                                   Tightly           Very tightly 
                                                          tightly 
                          coordinate? 
    Dynamics 
                          Are dynamic, macro‐
                                                                                                  Yes, judgment‐
                          prudential norms                      No          Yes, rule‐based 
                                                                                                       based 
                          needed? 
 
By contrast, the scope for market help is marginal at best in the externalities paradigm, where the key 
dimension of risk is dynamic rather than cross sectional. It is likely to be socially too expensive to put in 
place  fully  crisis‐proof  prudential  buffers.  If  so,  risks  of  one  hundred  year  floods  (truly  extraordinary 
events) will persist and markets can only help internalize externalities (i.e., provide systemic insurance) 
if they are able to calibrate the risks and costs of such events, and to withstand their strains. Neither is 
likely,  however.  For  one  thing,  tail  risks  are  unlikely  to  be  estimated  with  precision,  even  when  a 


                                                          42 
sufficiently long statistical history is available. For another, given the contrast between the huge scale of 
a systemic crisis and its low probability, this is an aggravated case of catastrophe insurance. In view of 
the difficulties that the latter has faced, it is dubious that full‐blown, market‐based systemic insurance 
will see the light of day any time soon.76 
The  scope  for  market  assistance  is  limited  even  further  in  the  mood  swings  paradigm.  As  in  the 
externalities  paradigm,  risk  is  systemic  and  dynamic.  However,  rather  than  tail  risks  that  can  be 
ultimately  modeled,  exceptional  bumps  ahead  are  more  in  the  nature  of  “black  swans”  (observations 
that cannot be inferred from previous data series) or “endogenous risk” (risk endogenously created by 
market  participants).77  Hence,  risk  pricing  becomes  inherently  difficult,  not  only  because  statistical 
history  provides  few  clues  as  to  what  might  be  popping  up  ahead,  but  also  because  markets  that  are 
shaped  by  alternative  bouts  of  euphoria  and  despair  are  unlikely  to  provide  efficient,  fundamentals‐
based pricing signals. Thus, absent an effective oversight to prevent such financial system drifts (which, 
as  argued  below,  will  need  to  rely  on  greatly  expanded  supervisory  skills  and  powers),  Basel  II’s 
aspiration  to  make  regulation  rest  on  internal  risk  management  models,  bolstered  by  risk‐rating 
agencies and market valuations, crumbles. This aspiration presupposes that risk dominates uncertainty 
and markets are efficient, two premises that an unbridled mood swings paradigm debunks.78 
The only scope for markets to play a role in the mood swings paradigm would be taking bets on whether 
the system as a whole is headed in the right direction or likely to crash. While dedicated and well trained 
observers may well be able to detect an incoming iceberg through the fog, grasping how the system is 
wired  and  understanding  the  possible  cracks  is  likely  to  require  hefty  investments  and  sophisticated 
skills. Hence, “systemic risk gazing” is unlikely to be a profitable market activity and should be viewed 
instead  as  a  public  good.  Upgrading  the  role  of  the  supervisor  to  provide  such  “holistic  supervision” 
should therefore become a key component of reform. However, as discussed below, this will require, in 
addition to sound judgment and vision, sufficient independence and accountability—a tall order indeed.  
Consider next some of the key implications for the nature of prudential regulation. As regards the scope 
of  regulation  (the  “line  in  the  sand”),  the  discrepancies  between  the  three  sides  are  obvious.  A 
supervisor  grounded  in  the  agency  paradigm  would  insist  that  allowing  unregulated  intermediaries  to 
operate  freely  is  the  proper  thing  to  do.  Informed  investors  will  naturally  migrate  to  the  unregulated 
world where innovation can thrive, risks and returns will likely be higher, and—as long as information is 
timely and reliable—users of funds will be appropriately disciplined. However, for the reasons already 
noted  above,  his  externalities  colleague  would  be  dead  set  against  the  idea  of  allowing  prudentially 
unregulated  intermediaries  to  operate  side  by  side  with  the  regulated  sector.  The  mood  swings 
supervisor  would  be  of  a  more  mixed  mind.  Unregulated  intermediaries  could  make  his  life  more 
difficult as uncontrolled innovation, pushed along by the forces of competition and regulatory arbitrage, 
could set eventually the system on the wrong track. However, provided all innovation is regulated, he 
might find this to be manageable. 
As regards the focus of regulation, the discrepancies across paradigms as regards the scope for market 
discipline  have  profound  implications  for  the  way  risk  is  both  reported  and  managed.  Consider 
accounting issues first. In the agency paradigm, fair value accounting is clearly the superior alternative. 
Ensuring  that  changes  in  market  values  are  immediately  reflected  in  balance  sheets  is  essential  to 
contain the risk of a moral hazard‐driven bubble where undercapitalized intermediaries are allowed to 

76
     However,  as  proposed  by  Kashyap,  Rajan,  and  Stein  (2008),  it  might  be  feasible  to  set  up  private  partial 
insurance schemes in the form of additional capital becoming available under stressful systemic events. 
77
    See Danielsson and Shin (2002). 
78
    De Grauwe (2008) makes a similar point. 


                                                             43 
continue  operating  normally.  However,  fair  value  accounting  can  be  problematic  under  the  other  two 
paradigms.  By  enhancing  the  impact  of  one  intermediary’s  actions  on  the  balance  sheets  of  other 
intermediaries,  it  exacerbates  externalities.  At  the  same  time,  and  perhaps  more  importantly,  it 
magnifies the impact of liquidity or mood swing‐induced deviations in asset prices from their longer run 
fundamentals.  
Consider risk management issues next. Are systemic liquidity norms needed? Clearly “no” under moral 
hazard  (this  is  not  a  relevant  problem),  “perhaps”  under  externalities  (as  long  as  the  ex‐ante  social 
benefits  exceed  the  ex‐ante  social  costs),  and  “probably  yes”  under  mood  swings.  In  the  latter  case, 
because  crises  are  endogenous  events  rather  than  acts  of  god,  they  are  likely  to  be  more  recurrent. 
Hence,  unless  the  supervisor  is  convinced  that  he  will  be  able  to  always  navigate  the  ship  around  the 
icebergs,  taking  the  proper  systemic  precautions  is  a  good  idea  (multiple  layers  of  steel  against  water 
inroads will better protect the keel).  
How important is it to look at the system as a whole? In the agency case, this is not the proper way to 
look at the problem. Systemic events arise from individual malfeasance and this is where the emphasis 
should stay. Instead, in the externalities paradigm, a systemic perspective is naturally called for. Indeed, 
this is exactly what one does when one “internalizes the externalities”. In the mood swings paradigm, 
the  focus  on  the  whole  is  perhaps  even  more  fundamental.  Crises  are  manifestations  of  collective 
excesses and it is impossible to understand the dynamics of the whole by summing up the idiosyncratic 
risks and dynamic paths of individual institutions. 
In this context, the answer to the question “how tightly should the prudential and monetary authorities 
coordinate?”  is  rather  self‐evident.  In  the  agency  case,  not  much  coordination  is  needed.  Instead,  the 
Greenspan doctrine seems to apply: let the prudential authority make sure that incentives are properly 
aligned and  the monetary authorities  make sure that the ship is sailing at the proper speed  (i.e., take 
care of the cycle). In the externalities paradigm, the two authorities should instead closely consult each 
other  to  make  sure  that  intermediaries  are  not  unduly  vulnerable  to  tail‐risk  events  and  that  the 
supervisor is sufficiently aware of where the cycle might go. In the mood swings paradigm, there should 
be  very  tight  coordination  between  the  two  authorities  and  possibly  even  no  major  differentiation 
between  them.  By  contributing  to  mood  swings,  monetary  policy  becomes  an  integral  part  of  the 
prudential  story.  And  the  prudential  risks  ahead  become  a  key  dimension  of  monetary  policy  decision 
making. Hence, prudential and monetary adjustments are joined at the hip. 
Along similar lines, are macro‐prudential, dynamically adjusted norms needed? In the stationary moral 
hazard  world,  the  answer  is  clearly  negative.  Instead,  in  the  externalities  paradigm,  the  exposure  to 
exogenous  shocks  and  fluctuations  provides  a  good  basis  for  cycle‐adjusted  norms  because  it  allows 
prudential buffers to be real buffers, i.e., to be built up during the good times and used up during the 
bad  times.  In  addition,  these  norms  can  help  coordinate  the  actions  of  individual  agents  and  thus 
overcome  the  prisoner’s  dilemmas‐type  situations.  Given  that  the  externalities  are  known  (or 
knowable);  this  militates  in  favor  of  rules  over  discretion.  The  mood  swings  paradigm  also  makes  a 
strong  case  for  anti‐cyclical  prudential  norms  but  for  a  different  reason.  Rather  than  systematically 
limiting the ship’s speed under clear weather, the main motive in this case is to lift up the yellow flag 
when,  under  foggy  weather,  “icebergs  may  possibly  be  lying  ahead”.  Hence,  mood  swings  provide  a 
rationale for a judgment‐based anti‐cyclical framework, much as the one in effect for monetary policy—
a  framework  where  an  independent  body  would  have  the  discretion  to  calibrate  the  anti‐cyclical 
prudential instrument in light of evolving circumstances. 




                                                         44 
Consider  finally  the  need  for  (and  purpose  of)  a  safety  net  (Table  3).  To  a  large  extent,  this  question 
relates  to  the  scope  for  learning.  In  a  system  where  learning  is  possible,  it  may  be  preferable  to  let 
agents  face  the  hardships  of  financial  crises  and  learn  from  experience.79  In  the  agency  paradigm  the 
system  is  not  dominated  by  uncertainty  and  mood  swings  and,  hence,  should  be  broadly  stationary 
(even if subjected to innovation). Therefore, agents should eventually learn. This might take a few crises 
and significant bruises (which in turn require that the ex‐post safety net not systematically validate the 
ex‐ante expectation of bailouts) but wisdom should eventually arise from the pain.80 Correspondingly, it 
would  be  better  if  the  lender‐of‐last‐resort  (LOLR)  function  did  not  exist.  Bank  runs  are  healthy 
manifestations  of  market  discipline.  Stopping  runs  unnecessarily  protects  banks  that  should  fail  and 
aggravates the misalignment of incentives for all other banks. Similarly, deposit insurance  can only be 
justified  by  consumer  protection  but,  given  its  adverse  moral  hazard  implications,  a  pure  agency 
supervisor would probably conclude that, on balance, the world would be a better place without it.81 
By contrast, in the externalities paradigm, the nature of the problem makes learning irrelevant. As long 
as  externalities  are  not  internalized,  participants  only  see  their  side  of  the  story,  no  matter  what. 
Moreover, there is no possible learning from exogenous and random acts of god or from self‐fulfilling 
runs in a multiple equilibrium world. Thus, to the extent that it is too expensive for society to prevent 
runs through large ex‐ante buffer requirements, an efficient LOLR becomes a socially superior solution 
and  the  cornerstone  of  the  regulatory  edifice.  Also,  as  his  forebears  after  the  Great  Depression,  an 
externalities  supervisor  would  conclude  that  deposit  insurance  is  needed  to  induce  the  small 
uninformed depositors to join the banking system while preventing them from crying wolf and causing 
systemic  havoc  without  justification.  Again,  however,  having  fire  safety  only  a  911  call  away  hardly 
promotes  incentives  for  keeping  a  fire  extinguisher  at  home,  another  good  example  of  regulatory 
collision between the paradigms. 




79
    The scope for learning is crucial for determining the need for any regulation, not just the safety net. Indeed, a 
good case can be made that even without a regulatory reform crises should convince principals (shareholders and 
investors) that they need to improve their control on agents (managers). 
80
    The remaining question, of course, is whether such a system would be “fair” to the smaller and less educated 
consumers who might be scared away and remain forever on the fringes but in the end this is likely to be an issue 
of consumer protection more than systemic stability. 
81
     Indeed,  from  a  pure  moral  hazard  perspective,  the  expansion  of  the  safety  net  (particularly  the  creation  of 
deposit  insurance)  can  be  seen  as  a  mistaken  knee‐jerk  reaction  that  has  come  back  to  haunt  the  current 
regulatory architecture and the goal should be to get rid of it. See for example Herring and Santomero (2000), Gale 
(2004), and Calomiris (2008). 


                                                              45 
 
                                            Table 3.  The Need for A Safety Net 
                                                                        Paradigm 
                          Issue                Agency                 Externalities          Mood Swings 
                    Can players learn 
                                            Probably Yes                   No               Apparently not 
                     on their own? 
                    Is an ex‐post LOLR         No, it is             Yes, to provide         Yes, to absorb 
                         needed?          Counterproductive         systemic liquidity        systemic risk 
                    Is a deposit                                 Yes, to limit risks of  Yes, to limit impact 
                                            Probably not 
                insurance needed?                                   “wrong” runs          of mood swings 
 
Interestingly,  as  regards  the  scope  for  learning,  the  mood  swings  paradigm  lies  somewhere  in  the 
middle. The constantly evolving environment makes some learning possible but tricky. One would think 
that agents should learn to be more cautious and eventually come to realize that, even if the scope for 
the  truly  new  is  constrained  by  path  dependence,  nasty  surprises  can  emerge  and  that  “not  all  that 
glitters is gold”. History has amply demonstrated that this is not the case, however. Moreover, learning 
in  this  paradigm  is  somewhat  of  an  oxymoron.  Believing  that  one  has  finally  “learned  the  lesson”  can 
boost  over‐confidence  in  one’s  ability  to  navigate  through  the  obstacles,  thereby  setting  in  motion  a 
mood  swings‐induced  bubble.  The  uncertainty  conscious  supervisor  would  thus  agree  with  his 
externalities  colleague  as  to  the  core  importance  of  the  LOLR.  However,  as  already  noted,  he  would 
expect the LOLR mainly to absorb systemic risk rather than provide liquidity. Similarly, he would agree 
that a deposit insurance is needed to “calm down” the frayed nerves of investors when moods start to 
turn ugly. 
 
Towards a New Regulatory Framework  

The discussion in the previous sections suggests that the design of a proper regulatory architecture faces 
two  major  challenges.82  The  first  is  to  build  a  regulatory  framework  that  takes  into  account  all  three 
paradigms and avoids solving problems in one paradigm at the cost of making matters sharply worse in 
another. The second challenge is to find an adequate balance between financial stability and financial 
development.  Extreme  solutions—a  crisis‐proof  system  that  hardly  intermediates  or  a  thriving  system 
that frequently collapses of its own weight—are of course to be avoided.  
A fully specified reform proposal that meets these challenges lies much beyond the scope of this paper 
(even more so since the devil is in the implementation details). There is however a minimum set of basic 
objectives that, in our view, any new prudential architecture should seek to fulfill, either because they 
82
   A number of important and detailed proposals to fix the regulatory framework have already seen the light of 
day. See for example Financial Stability Forum (2008), Basel Committee on Banking Supervision (2008 a, and b, and 
2009), Institute for International Finance (2008), and Goldstein (2008). The November 2008 Declaration of the G‐
20  Summit  on  Financial  Markets  and  the  World  Economy  identifies  the  “root  causes  of  the  crisis”,  sets  out 
“common principles for reform of financial markets” and sketches an “action plan” to implement such principles. 
Rather than questioning the basic architecture and foundations of the current framework, these proposals have so 
far  and  for  the  most  part  sought  to  maintain  (and  build  upon)  this  framework.  While  this  approach  is  clearly 
understandable from a practitioner’s perspective, its longer term success will very much depend on the extent to 
which  the  key  issues  and  interactions  underpinning  all  three  paradigms  discussed  in  this  paper  are  satisfactorily 
addressed. 


                                                              46 
cut across paradigms or they are absolutely central to one of the paradigms. Given the popularity of the 
agency paradigm, the reform agenda will likely be strong in addressing principal‐agent issues (including 
through  governance  improvements,  changes  in  management  compensation  schemes,  and  increased 
skin‐in‐the‐game  requirements).  Hence,  we  focus  in  this  section  mainly  on  the  objectives  of  the 
regulatory reform needed to address central issues under the externalities and mood swings paradigms.  
The  first  objective,  which  is  particularly  relevant  to  the  externalities  paradigm  but  applies  to  all,  is  full 
regulatory neutrality. In a world where regulation is not applied uniformly, financial flows will sooner or 
later find  the line of least  resistance, giving unregulated financial institutions  a competitive advantage 
and making  them grow  to the  point where they become systemic behemoths. There are  two possible 
solutions  to  this  quandary.  One  is  to  make  all  financial  intermediaries  fit  within  the  universal  banking 
mode. This solution, however, would limit entry unduly and promote the preponderance of very large, 
too‐big‐to‐fail, financial conglomerates with limited creativity and large non‐competitive rents. 
The alternative—which we find to be superior—is to maintain a distinction between commercial banks 
and  other  non‐deposit  taking  financial  intermediaries,  but  make  the  latter  choose  between  being 
prudentially regulated or being unregulated. All regulated intermediaries would need to satisfy the same 
prudential requirements (capital adequacy in particular) as commercial banks and in exchange benefit 
from LOLR services.83 However, reflecting their reduced responsibilities towards retail investors and the 
payment system, regulated non‐bank intermediaries would be subject to a lower entry capital (i.e., the 
minimum  capital  needed  to  open)  and  less  cumbersome  fit‐and‐proper  tests  than  those  applicable  to 
commercial  banks  (otherwise  all  non‐bank  intermediaries  would  become  universal  banks).  The 
unregulated  intermediaries, by contrast, would not  need  to satisfy capital adequacy requirements nor 
be subjected to an entry capital threshold. In exchange, however, they would be restricted to funding 
themselves only from regulated intermediaries, banks or non‐banks (i.e., they could not borrow directly 
from—or acquire contingent liabilities with—the market).84 
This  proposal  has  many  benefits.  As  in  the  case  of  universal  banking,  it  would  comply  with  regulatory 
neutrality.  Because  unregulated  intermediaries  could  only  fund  themselves  from  regulated 
intermediaries,  a  dollar  lent  to  a  final  borrower  through  an  unregulated  intermediary  would  end  up 
paying the same capital charge as a dollar lent through a regulated intermediary. Hence, systemic risk 
would be evenly internalized across all possible paths of financial intermediation, whether they involve 
regulated intermediaries or not.85 


83
    Following the same logic of regulatory neutrality, all asset‐backed securities issued with some form of recourse 
(including reputational) to the regulated intermediary, or purchased by a regulated intermediary, should carry an 
equity tranche retained by the issuer at least equivalent to the uniform capital adequacy requirement imposed on 
the intermediation system. 
84
     Thus,  hedge  funds  that  wish  to  remain  unregulated  would  be  allowed  to  borrow  only  from  banks  or  other 
regulated  intermediaries.  In  addition,  they  (as  well  as  all  other  prudentially  unregulated  financial  institutions) 
would not be permitted to engage as counterparties in credit derivatives transactions and other forms of default 
hedging and insurance (these give rise to contingent liabilities whose payment at the time they fall due may exert 
systemic  stress  by  requiring  asset  fire  sales).  At  the  same  time,  a  clear  dividing  line  would  also  need  to  be 
established  between  financial  and  non‐financial  corporations,  with  the  latter  not  being  allowed  to  engage  in 
finance operations beyond basic trade credit 
85
     Some  regulatory  bias  between  intermediated  debt  and  direct  debt  issues  would  persist,  since  systemic  risk 
would be internalized only in the former case. However, because it would not involve leveraged intermediation or 
expose financial intermediaries, this residual bias should be much less problematic and more manageable. Notice 
also that our proposal is only meant to address the systemic risks associated with debt‐funded intermediation, but 
not  those  attached  to  unleveraged  asset  managers  such  as  mutual  funds,  whose  contribution  to  downward 


                                                              47 
At the same time, in contrast with universal banking, the proposed scheme would favor innovation and 
competition.  Because  they  would  not  need  to  meet  any  entry  capital  requirements,  unregulated 
intermediaries could start  from scratch. This would facilitate  the  entry of the  smaller players, possibly 
into “niche” or “boutique” intermediation. The most innovative and successful would eventually grow to 
become  regulated  and  gain  direct  access  to  the  capital  markets.  In  turn,  the  most  successful  of  the 
regulated non‐bank intermediaries could grow further to become universal banks, thereby authorized to 
tap deposits and take on full payment system responsibilities.86 The cost of oversight would remain low, 
however,  as  the  activities  of  the  unregulated  would  be  monitored  on  a  contractual  basis  by  the 
regulated  intermediaries  that  lend  to  them.87  This  would  effectively  “delegate”  supervision  to  the 
regulated  intermediaries,  creating  a  two‐tiered  “nursery”  system  in  which  the  start‐ups  could  prosper 
and grow under the watchful eye of the better‐established (and more experienced) institutions.  
Most importantly, this proposal does not rely on artificial boundaries set up by the regulator between 
“systemically  important”  and  “systemically  unimportant”  financial  intermediaries,  based  on  size, 
activity, or some risk‐based measure of systemic impact (such as the recently proposed CoVar).88 Such 
distinctions are bound to create unending distortions or be very difficult, if not impossible, to implement 
operationally.  If  the  distinction  is  based  on  a  simple  objective  criterion,  such  as  size,  unregulated 
intermediaries  could  multiply  and  engage  in  “systemic  herding”.  They  would  individually  benefit  from 
the lighter regulation by staying just below the size threshold but become just as systemically important 
as a whole as in the case where unregulated intermediaries of any size were allowed to operate. On the 
other hand, risk‐based distinctions, even if based on meaningful and uncontested models (by no means 
an obvious proposition), are bound to create grey zones with an uneven playing field as regards both the 
intensity of regulation and access to the safety net. In such a context, reclassifying institutions in and out 
of  the  systemically  important  list  is  likely  to  be  an  operational  and  political  conundrum.  Instead,  by 
treating all intermediaries equally subject only to a simple choice by the intermediary itself, our proposal 
is much simpler and operationally quite easy to implement. 
The  second  objective,  particularly  relevant  to  the  externalities  paradigm  but  also  consistent  with  all 
three paradigms, is to keep the system reasonably close to a stable path (hence enhancing the scope for 
prices  to  reflect  fundamentals)  through  a  better  alignment  of  incentives.  In  this  regard,  a  key  missing 
piece  in  the  current  framework  is  the  internalization  of  systemic  liquidity  risk.  Proposals  have  been 
made  to  penalize  maturity  mismatches  between  assets  and  liabilities.  However,  since  short  assets  are 
likely  to  become  as  illiquid  as  long  assets  under  systemic  events,  it  seems  preferable  to  focus  on  the 
maturity of the funding structure, irrespective of that of assets.89 By inducing final investors to hold at 
least part of the liquidity risk instead of pushing it back on the system, this should reduce the system’s 
exposure to liquidity events. In any event, a liquidity‐related norm would need to be properly calibrated 


liquidity spirals is tempered (albeit not eliminated, particularly under conditions of structural or temporary asset 
market illiquidity) by the marking‐to‐market of their liabilities. 
86
     In  this  scheme,  development  banks  could  play  a  particularly  important  and  relatively  novel  role.  They  could 
nurture  innovation  and  promote  competition  and  access  by  financing  unregulated  intermediaries  and  helping 
them grow. Their lower aversion to risk (supported by the State’s higher risk sharing capacity) would give them a 
natural edge over private regulated intermediaries. 
87
     Kambhu,  Schuermann,  and  Stiroh  (2007)  discuss  the  benefits  (and  limitations)  of  such  indirect  monitoring  of 
hedge funds by regulated entities and conclude that it is a preferable alternative to direct regulation. 
88
    See Brunnermeier et al. (2009). 
89
    Penalizing maturity mismatches could encourage intermediaries to lend short. This would push liquidity risk on 
to borrowers but would not eliminate it from the system as it would increase the risk of defaults under systemic 
stress. Moreover, when several banks lend to the same borrower, it could encourage run‐like loan recalls by banks 
that could further exacerbate systemic stress. 


                                                              48 
to reflect social costs and benefits, could take many  alternative forms (a special capital charge, a risk‐
adjusted insurance premium, or both), and would need to reconcile the inherent pro‐cyclicality of nearly 
any norm based on contemporaneous risk with the need for counter‐cyclical adjustments.90 None of the 
above is trivial.91 
The third (and closely related) objective is to continue improving the safety net, reflecting its centrality 
to  the  externalities  and  mood  swings  paradigms.  (Even  with  vigilant  supervision  and  sufficient 
internalization of externalities, the high social costs of crisis‐proof systems and the uncertain turns taken 
by  continually  evolving  financial  systems  render  the  full  elimination  of  crisis  a  socially  undesirable 
endeavor.)  The  objective  of  improving  the  safety  net  calls  for:  (i)  reviewing  the  pricing  of  deposit 
insurance schemes to better reflect their de facto systemic exposure; (ii) examining whether access to 
the  LOLR  should  be  paired  with  a  systemic  insurance  that  all  prudentially  regulated  intermediaries 
(whether deposit‐taking or not) should subscribe to; and (iii) rethinking the LOLR from a mood swings 
perspective,  i.e.,  as  a  risk  absorber  of  last  resort.  As  noted,  under  our  proposal  for  the  scope  of 
prudential  regulation,  all  regulated  intermediaries  would  have  equal  access  to  the  LOLR.  In  contrast, 
unregulated  intermediaries  would  be  allowed  to  fail  under  an  efficient  bankruptcy  code  (this  would 
allow the less successful intermediaries to exit promptly, thereby maintaining the vitality of the system). 
The fourth objective relates to the importance of keeping a tighter rein on the possible downstream risks 
of financial innovation, particularly (but not only) from a mood swings perspective. This would require 
giving  the  regulator  more  powers  to  regulate,  standardize,  and  authorize  all  forms  of  innovation 
(whether  in  instruments,  institutions,  or  markets)  and  to  subject  them  to  much  more  rigorous  pre‐
approval and road‐testing, much as in the case of new drugs for the FDA.92 
The  fifth  objective  is  realigning  the  respective  monitoring  roles  of  markets  and  supervisors  to  address 
the  underlying  weaknesses  of  market  discipline  under  both  the  externalities  and  mood  swings 
paradigms. Markets can no doubt continue to play an important ex‐ante role in helping align incentives 
with  respect  to  principal‐agent  frictions.  However,  it  would  be  foolish  to  expect  market  discipline  to 
prevent externality‐ or mood swings‐induced systemic crises. Moreover, imposing market discipline ex‐
post, once the system is deeply out of equilibrium and a crisis is unfolding, is fraught with danger.93 
By  contrast,  in  the  multi‐paradigm  world,  the  supervisor  would  be  naturally  expected  to  have  such  a 
tough and complex responsibility that reasonable doubts exist as to whether its implementation lies in 
the  feasible  range.  Unlike  in  the  pure  agency  paradigm,  he  can  no  longer  relax  and  concentrate  on 
relatively simpler policing tasks once he has put in place the necessary arrangements to promote market 
discipline  (hence,  self‐regulation).  Instead,  the  “holistic”  supervisor  of  the  mood  swings  paradigm 
provides  a  valuable  scouting,  moderating,  and  coordination  service  to  society  that  markets  cannot 
provide. To this end, he should be able to connect the dots, understand the forest beyond the trees, and 

90
    The direction towards which incentives need to be aligned (and moods tempered) shifts abruptly depending on 
the phase of the cycle: the upward phase calls for taking less risk and accumulating capital, the downward phase 
for taking more risk and using up capital. 
91
     Additional  ways  to  better  internalize  systemic  liquidity  risk  might  also  include  limits  on  gross  leverage,  an  in‐
depth review of the differentiated capital requirements on trading books versus banking books, and some form of 
liquidity  buffer  (i.e.,  a  prudential  norm  encouraging  the  holding  of  systemically  safe  assets).  On  the  latter,  see 
Morris and Shin (2008). 
92
    A very similar recommendation can be found in Buiter (2008). By the same token, the tight linkages between 
financial  innovation  and  deregulation  also  call  for  special  attention  to  the  potentially  destabilizing  market 
implications of regulatory reform (unduly exuberance or moral hazard‐induced dynamics). 
93
    The failure of Lehman Brothers provides a vivid recent illustration of the risks attached to 11th hour attempts to 
limit moral hazard by restricting access to the safety net. 


                                                                 49 
look  ahead  for  possible  systemic  trouble.  He  would  need  the  means  and  the  clout  to  help  coordinate 
expectations around systemically sustainable paths. This in turn calls for a deeper informational role—
i.e.,  to  provide  systemically  oriented  information  and  benchmarks  to  help  intermediaries  think 
systemically  and  fashion  their  risk  assessments  accordingly.  However,  deeds  will  need  to  be  added  to 
words,  which  will  require  boosting  the  supervisor’s  capacity  (and  skills)  to  exert  judgment‐based 
discretionary interventions to slow down credit cycles, or restrict specific forms of intermediation that 
may  become  riskier  as  they  develop.  Given  evolutionary  uncertainty,  macro‐prudential  regulation 
cannot be entirely rule‐based. Instead, counter‐cyclical prudential norms may have to be at least in part 
judgment‐based, calibrated discretionally in view of changing circumstances, much as the interest rate is 
calibrated by monetary authorities.94 Of course, what shape and form such an instrument could take is 
hardly a trivial issue. 
The stronger powers of the “holistic” supervisor would also be accompanied by a tougher responsibility 
and,  with  it,  a  risk  of  calamitous  failure.  If  things  go  well,  financial  market  participants  will  reap  the 
benefits and the supervisor would be an unsung hero. If things go wrong, moral hazard will have a field 
day: “it was the regulator’s fault, hence the state’s responsibility to pay for damages.” Moreover, initial 
success in stirring the system may breed complacency and irrational exuberance leading to a crash down 
the line. Avoiding these pitfalls will require combining hard‐wired rules (that maintain the system within 
reasonable bounds) with an institutional reform that is commensurate with the supervisor’s new terms 
of  reference  (including  his  enhanced  powers  and  responsibilities),  and  sufficiently  strong  to  overcome 
the  multiple  difficulties  associated  with  the  use  of  discretion.  Finding  the  right  implementation 
modalities and regulatory mix between rules and discretion is likely to be one of the toughest yet most 
central challenges of prudential regulatory reform in the years ahead.95 




94
    Indeed, reflecting more tenuous and complex links between the instrument and the final objective, a pure rule‐
based macro‐prudential policy could be even more elusive than a pure Taylor rule‐based monetary policy. Instead, 
having to explain and justify decisions could help promote progress on macro‐systemic prudential analysis, much 
as has been the case with inflation targeting for monetary policy. 
95
     In  this  context,  to  avoid  regulatory  capture,  a  particularly  hard  look  will  need  to  be  given  to  the  political 
economy  of  regulation  (see  Demirguc‐Kunt  and  Serven,  2009).  This  problem  can  become  trickier  when  the 
supervisor  needs  to  round  off  his  views  partly  based  on  those  who  are  closer  to  the  market,  including  financial 
intermediaries.  At  the  same  time,  however,  players  should  realize  that  systemic  adjustments  should  affect  all 
players equally (provided regulation is truly neutral) and are for the common good, which should ease the way for 
fruitful coordination, much as in the case of monetary policy. 


                                                                50 
References 

Abreu, Dilip and Markus Brunnermeier, 2003, “Bubbles and Crashes”, Econometrica, 71‐1, pp 173‐204. 
Adrian,  Tobias  and  Hyun  Song  Shin,  2007,  “Liquidity  and  Leverage”,  Mimeo,  Federal  Reserve  Bank  of 
         New York and Princeton University. 
Adrian,  Tobias,  and  Hyun  Song  Shin,  2008,  “Financial  Intermediaries,  Financial  Stability,  and  Monetary 
         Policy”, Federal Reserve Bank of New York Staff Report 346. 
Allen, Franklin and Douglas Gale, 1998, “Bubbles and Crises”, Wharton School Working Paper 98‐01. 
Allen,  Franklin,  and  Douglas  Gale,  2003,  “Capital  Adequacy  Regulation:  In  Search  of  a  Rationale”,  in 
         Economics for and Imperfect World by Joseph E. Stiglitz, Richard Arnott, Bruce Greenwald, and 
         Ravi Kanvur. MIT Press.  
Allen, Franklin, and Douglas Gale, 2005, “Systemic Risk and Regulation”, Wharton Financial Institutions 
         Center Working Paper No. 95‐24. 
Ambrose,  Brett,  Michael  Lacour‐Little,  and  Anthony  Sanders,  2005,  “Does  Regulatory  Arbitrage  of 
      Asymmetric Information Drive Securitization?”, Journal of Financial Services Research. 
Arrow,  Kenneth,  and  Robert  Lind,  1970,  “Uncertainty  and  the  Evaluation  of  Public  Investment 
        Decisions”, American Economic Review 60, pp 364‐378. 
Ashcraft,  Adam,  and  Til  Schuermann,  2008,  “The  Seven  Deadly  Frictions  of  Subprime  Mortgage  Credit 
        Securitization”, Mimeo, Federal Reserve Bank of New York. 
Azariadis, Costas, 1981, “Self‐Fulfilling Prophecies”, Journal of Economic Theory, 25, 380‐96. 
Barberis,  Nicholas,  and  Richard  Thaler,  2003,  “A  Survey  of  Behavioral  Finance”,  in  Handbook  of  the 
        Economics of Finance, George Constantinides, Milton Harris and Rene Stulz, editors, Elsevier. 
Basel Committee on Banking Supervision, 2008a, “Principles for Sound Liquidity Risk Management and 
        Supervision”, Bank for International Settlements, June. 
Basel  Committee  on  Banking  Supervision,  2008b,  “Proposed  Revisions  to  the  Basel  II  Market  Risk 
        Framework”, Bank for International Settlements, July. 
Basel Committee on Banking Supervision, 2009, “Proposed Enhancements  to  the Basel II Framework”, 
        Bank for International Settlements, January. 
Berger,  Allen,  Richard  Herring,  and  Giorgio  Szego,  1995,  “The  Role  of  Capital  in  Financial  Institutions”, 
         Wharton School Working Paper 95‐01. 
Boot,  Arnoud,  Stuart  Greenbaum,  and  Anjan  Thakor,  1993,  “Reputation  and  Discretion  in  Financial 
        Contracting”, American Economic Review, 83, pp 1165‐1183. 
Borio,  Claudio,  2003,  “Towards  a  Macroprudential  Framework  for  Financial  Supervision  and 
        Regulation?”, BIS Working Paper 128. 
Brunnermeier,  Markus,  2008,  “Deciphering  the  2007‐2008  Liquidity  and  Credit  Crunch”,  Journal  of 
       Economic Perspectives, (forthcoming). 
Brunnermeier, Markus, Andrew Crockett, Charles Goodhart, Avinash Persaud, and Hyun Shin, 2009, The 
       Fundamental Principals of Financial Regulation: 11th Geneva Report on the World Economy 




                                                          51 
Brunnermeier,  Markus,  and  Lasse  Pedersen,  2008,  “Market  Liquidity  and  Funding  Liquidity”,  NBER 
       Working Paper 12939. 
Buiter,  Willem,  2008,  “Lessons  from  the  Global  Credit  Crisis  for  Social  Democrats”,  Mimeo,  European 
         Institute (December). 
Caballero,  Ricardo,  2009,  “A  Global  Perspective  on  the  Great  Financial  Insurance  Run:  Causes, 
        Consequences, and Solutions”, Vox, January 23. 
Calomiris, Charles, 2008, “The Subprime Turmoil: What’s Old, What’s New, and What’s Next”, Mimeo, 
        Columbia University. 
Calomiris,  Charles,  and  Charles  Khan,  1991,  “The  Role  of  Demandable  Debt  in  Structuring  Optimal 
        Banking Arrangements”, American Economic Review 81, pp 497‐513. 
Caprio,  Gerard,  Asli  Demirguc‐Kunt,  and  Edward  Kane,  2008,  The  2007  Meltdown  in  Structured 
        Securitization”, World Bank Working Paper 4756. 
Coval,  Joshua,  Jakub  Jurek,  and  Erik  Stafford,  2008,  “The  Economics  of  Structured  Finance”,  Harvard 
         Business School Working Paper 09‐060. 
Danielsson, Jon, and Hyun Song Shin, 2002, “Endogenous Risk”, Mimeo, London School of Economics. 
De  Grauwe,  Paul,  2008,  “Lessons  from  the  Banking  Crisis”  A  Return  to  Narrow  Banking”,  Mimeo, 
       University of Leuven. 
De Grauwe, Paul, 2008, “Animal Spirits and Monetary Policy”, Mimeo, University of Leuven 
Dell’  Ariccia,  Giovanni,  Deniz  Igan,  and  Luc  Laeven,  2008,  “The  US  subprime  mortgage  crisis:  A  Credit 
          Boom Gone Bad?” Vox, February 4. 
Della Vigna, Stefano, 2007, “Psychology and Economics: Evidence from the Field”, NBER Working Paper 
        13420 
Demirguc‐Kunt, Asli, and Luis Serven, 2009, “Are All the Sacred Cows Dead?” World Bank Working Paper 
       4807. 
Dewatripont, Mathias, and Jean Tirole, 1994, The Prudential Regulation of Banks, MIT Press. 
Diamond,  Douglas,  and  Phillip  Dybvig,  1983,  “Bank  Runs,  Deposit  Insurance,  and  Liquidity”,  Journal  of 
      Political Economy 109, pp 287‐327. 
Diamond,  Douglas,  and  Raghuram  Rajan,  2000,  “A  Theory  of  Bank  Capital”,  Journal  of  Finance  55,  pp 
      2431‐2465. 
Eichengreen,  Barry,  2008,  “Origins  and  Responses  to  the  Crisis”,  Mimeo,  University  of  California, 
       Berkeley. 
Epstein,  Larry,  and  Tan  Wang,  1994,  “Intertemporal  Asset  Pricing  under  Knightian  Uncertainty”, 
        Econometrica, 62:2, pp 283‐322. 
Financial  Stability  Forum,  2008,  “Report  of  the  Financial  Stability  Forum  on  Enhancing  Market  and 
        Institutional Resilience”, Basel (April). 
Fisher, Irvin, 1933, “The Debt Deflation Theory of Great Depressions”, Econometrica Vol 1, pp 337‐57. 
Fostel,  Ana  and  John  Geneakoplos,  2008,  “Leverage  Cycles  and  the  Anxious  Economy”,  American 
         Economic Review 98:4, pp 1211‐1244. 



                                                        52 
Gale, Douglas, 2004, “Notes on Optimal Capital Regulation”, New York University, mimeo. 
Geneakoplos,  John,  and  Heracles  Polemarchakis,  1986,  “Existence,  Regularity  and  Constrained  Sub‐
      optimality of Competitive Allocations when the Asset Market is Incomplete”, in Essays in Honour 
      of K. J. Arrow, vol 3, Heller, W., Starret, D. and Starr, R. (Cambridge). 
Geweke, John, 2001, “A Note on Some Limitations of CRRA Utility”, Economic Letters, 71 (3): 341‐345 
Goldstein,  Morris,  2008,  “Addressing  the  Financial  Crisis”,  Peterson  Institute  for  International 
        Economics, Washington D.C.  
Goodhart,  Charles,  Boris  Hofman,  and  Miguel  Segoviano,  2004,  “Bank  Regulation  and  Macroeconomic 
      Fluctuations”, Oxford Review of Economic Policy 20(4), pp 591‐615. 
Gorton, Gary, 2008, “The Subprime Panic”, NBER Working Paper 14398. 
Gorton,  Gary  and  Andrew  Winston,  2002,  “Financial  Intermediation”,  Wharton  School  Working  Paper 
        02‐28. 
Greenlaw, David, Jan Hatzius, Anil Kashyap, and Hyun Song Shin, 2008, “Leveraged Losses: Lessons from 
       the Mortgage Market Meltdown”, US Monetary Policy Forum Report No. 2 , Rosenberg Institute, 
       Brandeis  International  Business  School  and  Initiative  on  Global  Markets,  University  of  Chicago 
       Graduate School of Business.  
Greenspan,  Alan,  1998,  “The  Role  of  Capital  in  Optimal  Banking  Supervision  and  Regulation”,  Federal 
       Reserve Bank of New York Economic Policy Review 4‐3, pp 163‐68. 
Herring,  Richard,  and  Anthony  Santomero,  2000,  “What  is  Optimal  Financial  Regulation?”,  Center  for 
        Financial Institutions Working Paper 00‐34, Wharton School. 
Holmstrom, Bengt, and Jean Tirole, 1998, “Private and Public Supply of Liquidity”, NBER Working Paper 
       5817. 
Huang, Rocco, and Lev Ratnovski, 2008, “The Dark Side of Bank Wholesale Funding”, Risk Analysis and 
       Management Conference, World Bank and IMF.  
Institute for International Finance, 2008, “Final Report of the IIF Committee on Market Best Practices: 
         Principles of Conduct and Best Practice Recommendations” July. 
Kashiap,  Anil,  Raghuram  Rajan,  and  Jeremy  Stein,  2008,  “Rethinking  Capital  Regulation”,  Mimeo, 
        University of Chicago and Harvard University. 
Khan,  Charles,  and  Joao  Santos,  2008,  “Liquidity,  Payment  and  Endogenous  Financial  Fragility”, 
        Conference on Liquidity: Concepts and Risks. 
Keys,  Benjamin,  Mukherjee  Tanmoy,  Amit  Seru,  and  Vikrant  Vig,  2008,  “Did  Securitization  Lead  to  Lax 
         Screening: Evidence from Subprime Loans 2001‐2006”, EFA 2008 Athens Meeting Paper. 
Khandani, Amir, and Andrew Lo, 2008, “What Happened to the Quants in August 2007: Evidence from 
      Factors and Transactions Data”, NBER Working Paper 14465. 
Kim, Deasik, and Anthony Santomero, 1988, “Risk in Banking and Capital Regulation”, Journal of Finance 
       43, pp 1219‐33. 
Kindleberger,  Charles,  and  Robert  Aliber,  1996,  Manias,  Panics,  and  Crashes:  A  History  of  Financial 
       Crises, Wiley Investment Classics. 
Korinek, Anton, 2008, “Regulating Capital Flows to Emerging Markets”, University of Maryland, Mimeo. 



                                                       53 
Leamer, Edgard, 2008, “Housing is the Business Cycle”, NBER Working Paper 13428. 
Lo,  Andrew,  2004,  “The  Adaptive  Markets  Hypothesis”,  The  Journal  of  Portfolio  Management,  30th 
        Anniversary Issue. 
Lorenzoni, Guido, 2007, “Inefficient Credit Booms”, NBER Working Paper 13639. 
Minsky, Hyman, 1975, John Maynard Keynes, Columbia University Press 
Morris, Stephen, and Hyun Song Shin, 2008, “Financial Regulation in a System Context”, Brooking Papers 
        on Economic Activity, Fall 2008 Conference Draft 
Rajan,  Raghuram,  1998,  “The  Past  and  Future  of  Commercial  Banking  Viewed  Through  an  Incomplete 
         Contract Lens”, Journal of Money, Credit and Banking 30, pp 524‐550. 
Rajan,  Raghuram,  2005,  “Has  Financial  Development  Made  the  World  Riskier?”  NBER  Working  Paper 
         11728 (November). 
Rajan, Raghuram, 2008a, “Bankers’ Pay is Deeply Flawed”, Financial Times, January 8. 
Rajan, Raghuram, 2008b, “A View of the Liquidity Crisis”, mimeo, University of Chicago. 
Santos,  Manuel,  and  Michael  Woodford,  1997,  “Rational  Asset  Pricing  Bubbles”,  Econometrica,  65:19‐
         57. 
Schumpeter, Joseph, 1934, The Theory of Economic Development, Harvard University Press. 
Shiller, Robert, 2006, Irrational Exuberance, Princeton University Press. 
Shleifer, Andre, and Robert Vishny, 1997, “The Limits of Arbitrage”, Journal of Finance, 52:35‐55  
Song, Fengshua, and Anjan Thakor, 2008, “Financial System Architecture and the Co‐evolution of Banks 
        and Capital Markets”, Pennsylvania State University and Washington University (Mimeo). 
Taleb, Nassim Nicholas, 2007, The Black Swan: The Impact of the Highly Improbable, Random House. 
Tarullo, Daniel, 2008, Banking on Basel, Peterson Institute for International Economics. 
Veronesi, Pietro, and Luigi Zingales, 2008, “Paulson’s Gift”, Mimeo, University of Chicago. 
Weitzman,  Martin,  2007,  “Subjective  Expectations  and  Asset‐Return  Puzzles”,  American  Economic 
      Review, 97(4): 1102‐1130. 
White, William, 2006, “Is Price Stability Enough?” BIS Working Paper 205 (April). 




                                                     54 
       3. HOW HAS POVERTY EVOLVED IN LATIN AMERICA AND HOW IS IT LIKELY TO BE 
                         AFFECTED BY THE ECONOMIC CRISIS? 
                Joao Pedro Azevedo, Ezequiel Molina, John Newman, Eliana Rubiano  
                                       and Jaime Saavedra 
                                                June 2009 
 
                                                 Abstract 
After establishing the recent history of what has happened to regional poverty in LAC, the note 
presents simulations of the potential poverty impact of the current crisis.  A range of simulations 
are  presented,  drawing  upon  alternative  specifications  of  the  relation  between  per  capita  GDP 
growth  and  poverty  and  a  range  of  estimates  of  how  GDP  per  capita  in  different  countries  is 
expected to evolve in 2009. 
For almost all of the 1980s and 1990s, the number of poor and extreme poor in Latin America 
and  the  Caribbean  rose.  Despite  the  growth  episodes  observed  in  the  nineties,      poverty  rates 
stagnated.    The  number  of  poor  climbed  from  160.5  million  in  1981  to  240.6  million  by  2002,  
and of extreme poor from 90 to 114 million.  But since 2002 the number of poor has decreased at 
unprecedented speed – so much so that in 2008 the number of poor is estimated to have fallen 
to 181.3 million and the number of extreme poor to 73 million.  That is, almost 60 million people 
moved  out  of  poverty  while  41  million  left  the  ranks  of  the  extreme  poor.  Unfortunately,  the 
recent  worldwide  recession  has  put  an  end  to  that  progress  and  the  number  of  poor  are  now 
projected to increase.  
Based on GDP growth forecasts for May 2009, the aggregate poverty rate for LAC is estimated to 
rise 1.1 points.  This would mean that there would be 8.3 million more poor people in 2009 than 
in 2008. A more pessimistic forecast will move the increase in the poverty rate to 2 points and 
increase in the number of poor to 13 million. The aggregate extreme poverty rate is estimated to 
rise 0.5 points.  This would mean a further 3.6 million would fall into extreme poverty. 
 
Introduction 
This note examines the recent evolution of poverty in Latin America and estimates what is likely 
to happen to poverty as a result of the current economic crisis.   It presents new estimates for 
the average poverty and extreme poverty rates and for the number of extreme poor and poor 
for  LAC,  based  on  PPP  $4  and  $2  international  poverty  lines.      While  the  World  Bank  uses 
international poverty lines of PPP $2 a day for poverty and PPP $1.25 a day for extreme poverty 
when reporting world figures, applying these lines yields a level of poverty in PPP terms that is 
too far below the national figures to be of interest in Latin American countries.  An analysis of 
the national poverty and extreme poverty lines used in Latin America suggest that  international 
poverty  lines  of    PPP$  4  a  day  for  poverty  and  PPP$    2  a  day  for  extreme  poverty  are  more 
appropriate (See Annex 1). 
After establishing the recent history of what has happened to regional poverty in LAC, the note 
presents simulations of the potential poverty impact of the current crisis.  A range of simulations 


                                                     55 
are presented, drawing upon alternative specifications of the relation between per capita GDP 
growth  and  poverty  and  a  range  of  estimates  of  how  GDP  per  capita  in  different  countries  is 
expected to evolve in 2009. 
Evolution of Poverty in LAC over the recent past 
Evolution of poverty rates and link to movements in per capita GDP 
Figure 1 illustrates how extreme poverty and per  capita GDP have evolved between 1981 and 
2008 in Latin America, while Figure 2 shows a similar evolution of poverty and per capita GDP96.  
The patterns are quite striking in both cases, as there are clearly four distinct periods.  In three 
of  the  periods,  the  evolution  of  poverty  rates  move  is  an  almost  exact  mirror  image  of  the 
evolutions  in  per  capita  GDP.      It  is  only  during  the  1990s  (a  “lost  decade”  in  LAC  in  terms  of 
poverty  reduction),  where  the  link  between  movements  in  per  capita  GDP  and  movements  in 
poverty is broken97.  Over that period, per capita GDP continued to grow as it had in the 1980s, 
but poverty rates did not decline. 
 




                                                                                                                       


96
    The data for 1981 to 2005 are taken from the WB’s regional aggregation module of POVCALNET, after 
setting the PPP international poverty lines at $2 and $4 a day.  This module weights the individual country 
data by their respective populations and interpolates  the data (as needed) so as to produce observations 
for  all  countries  for  every  3  years  between  1981  and  2005.    The  data  for  2006  were  calculated  by  the 
authors  using  2006  and  2007  individual  country  data  from  POVCALNET  from  Argentina,  Brazil,  Chile, 
Paraguay,  Uruguay,  Bolivia,  Colombia,  Peru,  Ecuador,  Venezuela,  Costa  Rica,  El  Salvador,  Guatemala, 
Honduras,  Mexico,  Nicaragua,  Panama,    the  Dominican  Republic  and  Jamaica.  The  sample  is 
representative  of  95.2%  of  the  population  in  Latin  America,  but  representative  of  only  40%  of  the 
population  in  the  Caribbean.      This  procedure  differs  from  the  data  used  in  the  regional  aggregation 
module  (i.e.  the  data  from  1981‐2005)  in  that  it  does  not  include  data  from  Guyana,  Haiti,  St  Lucia, 
Suriname  and  Trinidad  and  Tobago.    These  countries  together  make  up  a  small  fraction  of  the  total 
population in LAC.  Data for 2007 and 2008 are projections.
97
    Even with the break in the 1990s, the simple correlation between the LAC regional aggregates of per 
capita GDP and both extreme and moderate poverty rates is around ‐0.88. 


                                                           56
                                                                                                             
 
The  change  in  poverty  rates  and  per  capita  GDP  over  the  four  distinct  periods  can  be  seen 
clearly in Table 1. 
 
         Table 1.  Changes in Poverty and Per Capita GDP in LAC over different episodes 
Episode         GDP pc change  2 USD a day Poverty Change                  4 USD a day Poverty change 
1981‐1984             ‐2.88                          1.16                                 1.35 
1984‐1990              0.12                         ‐1.03                                ‐1.31 
1990‐2002              1.03                         ‐0.03                                 0.06 
2002‐2006              2.88                         ‐1.74                                ‐2.55 
2002‐2008*             3.01                         ‐1.40                                ‐2.16 
 
Annex 2 presents similar graphs of the trends in poverty and growth in GDP per capita for other 
regions of the world.  It is apparent that in no other region did one observe such a protracted 
period  of  significant  growth  in  GDP  per  capita  without  a  resulting  decrease  in  poverty  as  was 
observed in Latin America during the 1990s. 
The  aggregate  figures  are  heavily  affected  by  what  happened  in  Brazil,  Mexico  and  Colombia, 
which make  up 57.3 percent of the population of LAC. Figures 3‐4 present information on the 
behavior  of  per  capita  GDP  growth  and  changes  in  poverty  for  the  entire  distribution  of 
countries  in  Latin  America.  The  box  plots  show  the  minimum  and  maximum  values,  and  the 
values for the 25th, 50th and 75th percentiles.  The median value (50th percentile) is shown as a 
bar in the middle of the box. 
 




                                                     57
                       Fig. 3.  Distribution of Changes in Per Capita GDP in LAC 




                                                                                                               
 
                 Fig. 4.  Distribution of Changes in Poverty in LAC (At $4 a day PPP) 




                                                                                                           
 
During the period 1981‐1984, virtually all countries experienced declines in per capita GDP and 
increases in poverty.  Between 1984 and 1990, the growth in per capita GDP picked up to the 
point  where  the  median  value  was  slightly  above  zero.    Poverty  stopped  increasing  in  most 
countries, but the median value of changes in the poverty rate was close to zero. The decline in 
poverty  in  the  aggregate  figures  over  this  time  period  (Fig.  1  and  2)  indicates  that  it  was  the 
larger  countries  that  experienced  declines  in  poverty.    Over  the  1990s  there  was  a  better 
performance in per capita GDP growth, but a very wide dispersion in the poverty results.  It was 
not  until  2002‐2008  when  both  the  performance  in  per  capita  GDP  growth  and  in  poverty 
became strong across the entire distribution. 
 
 
 
 


                                                       58
Evolution in the number of poor 
Table 2 illustrates changes in the number of poor 1981 and 2008.  While there are six instances 
when extreme poverty and poverty rates declined (and 2 when they increased), there are fewer 
periods when the number of poor declined. During the eighties,  a period of weak growth and 
high volatility, poverty rates fell slightly, but the number of poor  increased.  During the nineties,  
a period of stronger growth,  the same pattern emerges, and, actually,  the number of poor is 
substantially higher by the end of the decade.  The big break in Latin America came in the period 
between  2002  and  2006.    Extreme  poverty  fell  6  points  and  36  million  people  moved  out  of 
extreme  poverty.    In  turn,  the  poverty  rate  fell  more  than  10  points  and  56  million  people 
moved out of poverty.  Projections for 2007 and 2008, show an additional decrease,  of at least 
two  additional  points  of  further  extreme  poverty  and  moderate  poverty  rates  reduction98. 
Hence, during the strong growth period 2002‐2008, almost 60 million people were lifted out of 
poverty, and 41 million left the ranks of extreme poverty. It should be noted that towards 2007 
and 2008 there seems to be already a deceleration on the rate of poverty reduction.  
 
        Table 2.  Poverty and Extreme Poverty ‐ Rates and Number of Poor  (1981‐2008) 
Year                Extreme  Poverty  Number          of  Poverty Rate      Number of Poor 
                    Rate               Extreme Poor       (PPP $4 a day)    (millions) 
                    (PPP $2 a day)     (millions) 
1981                24.6                 90.0             48.5              160.5 
1984                28.1               109.5              52.6              205.0 
1987                24.9               103.0              47.5              196.8 
1990                21.9                 95.8             44.7              196.0 
1993                20.7                 95.5             44.4              205.1 
1996                22.0               106.8              46.1              223.6 
1999                21.8               110.7              45.5              230.8 
2002                21.5               114.0              45.4              240.6 
2005                17.1                 94.2             38.8              213.6 
2006                14.6                 78.0             35.2              188.0 
2007*               13.6                 75.1             33.3              183.6 
2008*               13.1                 73.3             32.5              181.3 
* Projected 
 
The Rapidly Developing Worldwide Economic Crisis 
The increase in food and energy prices in 2007 and 2008 raised concerns that the continuation 
of  the  good  times  in  Latin  America  might  be  threatened.    The  arrival  of  the  worst  worldwide 
economic crisis since the Great Depression to Latin America has made it clear that the threat is 
now  a  reality.    The  period  of  rapid  per  capita  GDP  growth  that  Latin  America  experienced 
between 2002 and the middle of 2008 has come to an end.  The concern today is how long and 
how deep will the recession be and how severely will poverty be affected.  The downturn during 
the last quarter of 2008 was particularly dramatic and each month seems to bring worse news 
than  the  month  before.    While  the  industrialized  countries  were  the  first  to  experience  rapid 
downturns  in  projected  growth,  the  projections  of  GDP  growth  for  most  developing  countries 

98
   2007 and 2008 are still projections as not all large countries have data for 2007, and only a few  have 
infromation for 2008. 


                                                      59
(including those of Latin America) are now following the industrial countries downwards.  Figure 
5 indicates how the predictions for 2009 GDP growth in the US, Canada, the UK, the Euro Zone 
and  Japan  have  declined  every  month  since  January  2008.    There  is  no  indication  that  the 
bottom has been reached.  Figure 6 presents forecasts for Latin American countries which are 
covered by Consensus Forecasts.  A similar downward trend in the forecasts is evident. 
 
                           Figure 5: Trends in Consensus Forecasts for   2009 GDP growth in US$, 
                                              Canada, Euro Zone, UK and Japan 
                           4.0




                           2.0
          GDP (% change)




                           0.0




                           -2.0




                           -4.0




                           -6.0
                                  Jan 14, 2008


                                                 Feb 11, 2008


                                                                Mar 10, 2008




                                                                                                May 12, 2008


                                                                                                               Jun 09, 2008


                                                                                                                              Jul 14, 2008




                                                                                                                                                                             Oct 13, 2008


                                                                                                                                                                                            Nov 10, 2008


                                                                                                                                                                                                           Dec 08, 2008


                                                                                                                                                                                                                          Jan 12, 2009


                                                                                                                                                                                                                                         Feb 09, 2009


                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                        Mar 09, 2009
                                                                                                                                                              Sep 08, 2008
                                                                               Apr 14, 2008




                                                                                                                                              Aug 11, 2008




                                  Canada                                                      Euro zone                                                      Japan                                                UK                                              USA
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                         
         Source: Consensus Forecast 
 
                              Figure 6: Trends in LAC Consensus Forecasts for  2009 GDP growth 




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                         
        Source: Consensus Forecast 
 



                                                                                                                                             60
As  of  April  2009,  Brazil, Mexico,  Chile,  Ecuador,  Argentina  and  Venezuela  are  all  forecasted  to 
have negative GDP growth.  Moreover, given the rates of population growth that prevail in LAC 
many  more  countries  (15)  are  forecast  to  experience  a  negative  rate  of  growth  in  per  capita 
GDP.  As with the industrialized countries, every month the forecasted growth rates in GDP have 
been revised downwards and there is no clear indication that the bottom has been reached.  
The  dramatic  reversal  in  growth  rates  is  apparent  in  Figure  7  which  plots  the  number  of 
countries  that have experienced negative growth in any given year between 1980 and 200799. 
The figures for 2009 are the projected number of countries that, as of March 2009, are expected 
to experience negative per capita GDP growth.  It is apparent that after falling to unprecedented 
low  levels  between  2002  and  2007,  the  number  of  countries  that  are  now  projected  to  have 
negative growth in per capita GDP has shot up sharply in both LAC and the World.  
 
              Figure 7: Number of countries with negative growth in per capita GDP 
                                           90

                                           80

                                           70                                                      2009 Projected
                     Number of countries




                                           60

                                           50

                                           40

                                           30

                                           20

                                           10

                                           0
                                                1980   1983   1986    1989   1992    1995   1998    2001   2004   2007
                                                                              Year

                                                                     World                         LAC
                                                                                                                          
           Note: Year 2009 projected 
           Source: World Bank World Development Indicators 
 
Figure  8  provides  additional  detail  on  the  size  of  the  decline  in  per  capita  GDP  for  all  Latin 
American  countries  over  all  past  periods  when  per  capita  GDP  growth  was  negative.    The 
magnitude  of  the  decline  is  represented  by  both  the  size  of  the  bar  and  the  darkness  of  the 
color.  100   Larger declines in per capita  GDP are represented by larger bars and darker colors.  
For example, the shock in Argentina between 2001 and 2002 is represented by a large dark bar. 
Included in this figure are the 2009 projected growth rates in per capita GDP for those countries 
which are projected to have declines.  One can observe that, as of March 2009, these projected 
declines  have  not  yet  reached  some  of  the  past  levels.      However,  the  contrast  between  the 
period 2003‐2008 when then were virtually no countries with negative per capita GDP growth 
and 2009 when virtually all countries are expected to suffer negative growth in per capita GDP is 
dramatic. 

99
    The  figure  includes  those  countries  that  were  just  starting  in  a  given  year,  as  well  as  those  countries 
that were repeaters – ones that might have been in their second or more consecutive period of negative 
per capita GDP growth. 
100
      Using both the size of the bar and color to represent the magnitude is done to create a stronger visual 
impact and to make the periods of greatest decline stand out from the other periods.  


                                                                                61
62
Potential Impact of the Current Worldwide Recession on Poverty in LAC 
This note analyzes the potential impact on poverty in two ways: 
a) By describing what have been the changes in poverty during previous downturns; and 
b) By  estimating  elasticities  of  poverty  reduction    with  respect  to  changes  in  per  capita  GDP 
   and using those elasticities, together with projected growth rates to estimate likely changes 
   in poverty rates and the number of poor.  
All  of  this  analysis  is  subject  to  the  very  strong  caveat  that  we  may  be  facing  a  situation  that 
represents  something  very  different  from  what  has  been  faced  in  the  past.    While  there  have 
certainly  been  periods  of  negative  per  capita  GDP  growth  in  many  LAC  countries  at  the  same 
time  (mainly  during  the  first  half  of  the  1980s),  this  has  not  ever  happened  after  a  period  of 
universal  good  growth  and  fast  poverty  reduction.    Whereas  previous  periods  of  negative 
growth  in  per  capita  GDP  over  the  last  25  years  have  usually  been  triggered  by  changes  in 
developing  countries,  the  current  period  has  been  triggered  by  events  in  industrialized 
countries.   While many  countries had entered into previous periods of negative growth  in per 
capita GDP with public sector deficits,  macroeconomic balances in most –not all‐ LAC countries 
around  the  end  of  2008  had  been  strong,  which  gives  some  countries  room  to  implement 
countercyclical  policies.    Finally,  some  of  the  factors  that  appear  to  have  contributed  to  the 
recent  significant  gains  in  poverty  between  2002  and  2008  (expansion  of  conditional  cash 
transfers, greater effectiveness of some public  transfer programs,  and rising remittances) were 
either not present or at much lower levels during periods of previous downturns. 
 
Changes in Poverty During Previous Downturns 
Unfortunately,  it  is  not  possible  to  analyze  what  happened  to  poverty  during  all  periods  of 
negative  growth  in  per  capita  GDP  because  poverty  data  are  not  collected  annually  in  many 
countries  in  the  region.  Moreover,  there  is  far  less  poverty  data  available  during  the  1980s, 
when there were many periods of crises. 
The analysis presented in this section makes use of all available data on poverty, taken from the 
SEDLAC data bank of comparable LAC household surveys.101  The SEDLAC database contains data 
on  poverty  reported  by  national  statistical  agencies  and  calculated    on  the  basis  of  national 
poverty  lines.    These  data  are  used  in  this  exercise  instead  of  the  POVCALNET  World  Bank 
poverty data (where poverty is measured using international poverty lines) because the SEDLAC 
data have more observations on poverty over consecutive years.  This ensures that periods of 
changes in poverty can be matched to periods of negative growth in per capita GDP.   
Figure  9  presents  information  on  how poverty  has changed  for  all  the  periods  of  negative  per 
capita  GDP  growth  ‐  for  which  poverty  data  are  available  (34  in  total).  Note  that 




101
    See www.depeco.econo.unlp.edu.ar/cedlas/sedlac/  SEDLAC is a joint initiative between the Centro de Estudios 
Distributivos , Laborales y Sociales ‐  Universidad de la Plata and the LAC region of the World Bank. 


                                                         63
64
there  were  no  periods  of negative  per  capita  GDP  growth  in  the  countries  for  which  poverty  data  are 
available after 2003.  Figure 9 captures multiple dimensions of the poverty response.   The figure shows 
the beginning and end year for all periods of negative per capita GDP growth. The size of the bar shows 
the magnitude of the decline in per capita GDP and the color shows the change in poverty that occurred 
during the period of negative growth.  Finally, the number under the bar indicates the number of years 
between  the  time  when  poverty  stopped  falling  to  when  the  poverty  level  recovered  to  the  level  of 
poverty that prevailed before the onset of the decline in per capita GDP.  If poverty did not rise over the 
period of decline in per capita GDP, the recovery period is denoted as zero years. 
Table  3  summarizes  some  of  the  information  from  the  observations  in  Figure  9.102    In  this  table,  we 
divided the size of the GDP declines into ones that could be characterized as large, medium or small103.  
For  each  category  of  decline  in  per  capita  GDP,  the  table  presents  information  on  the  average 
cumulative loss in per capita GDP and the average cumulative change in poverty over the period when 
per capita GDP fell.  The table also presents the average number of years it took to recover to the level 
of poverty that prevailed before the crisis. 
 
                                  Table 3.  Effects on Poverty of GDP Shocks 
                          (Using data from 19 LAC countries over period 1981‐2006) 
                                                      Cumulative Loss in Per Capita GDP 
                                           Large                Medium                      Small 
                                        (> 3 % loss)      (Between 1.5 and 3  (Less than 1.5 percent 
                                                              percent loss)                 loss) 
      Average cumulative loss in            ‐7.2                   ‐1.8                      ‐0.6 
      per capita GDP 
      Average cumulative                     4.4                 0.64104                    ‐0.08 
      change in poverty rate 
      Average years it takes to               3                     3                          1 
      recover poverty loss  
      Countries with projected       Ecuador (‐3.34%) Guatemala (‐1.62%)            Colombia (‐.37 %) 
      losses in per capita GDP       Mexico (‐3.83%)       Argentina (‐1.63%)         Panama (‐0.8 %) 
      for 2009 (Consensus                                  Paraguay (1.82%)        El Salvador (‐0.93 %) 
      forecasts as of March,                                                           Chile (‐0.97 %) 
      2009)                                                                         Nicaragua (‐1.09%) 
                                                                                    Honduras (‐1.14%) 
                                                                                       Brazil (‐1.25%) 
                                                                                    Dom. Rep. (‐1.42) 

102
     The data on poverty change and GDP per capita that underpin figure 9 are reported in Annex 4. 
103
     This classification is based on the size of the cumulative loss in GDP and is not based on the length of the period 
of negative per capita GDP growth. The exact divisions are somewhat arbitrary, but were made in such a way as to 
correspond to some of the projected declines in per capita GDP that are forecast for 2009.   
104
     This average does not include Jamaica, which appears to be an outlier.  The Jamaican experience has been a 
puzzle and is discussed in The Road to Sustained Growth in Jamaica, World Bank (2004) and Osei, P.  (2002) , “A 
Critical Assessment of Jamaica’s National Poverty Eradication Programme”, Journal of International Development, 
Vol. 14, pp. 773‐88. 


                                                           65 
 
The  average  years  to  recover  from  a  poverty  loss  are  measured  from  the  time  when  poverty  stops 
increasing to the time when it recovers to the level that prevailed before the onset of the crisis.  As a 
crisis  itself  lasts  typically  for  one  or  two  years,  a  country  may  actually  suffer  through  a  period  of  4‐5 
years before it is able to get back to its position before the fall.   
The  last  row  presents  the  March  2009  projections  for  per  capita  GDP  for  2009.    The  GDP  growth 
forecasts  are  taken  from  the  Consensus  Forecasts  and  these  were  converted  to  GDP  per  capita 
projections using population data from the World Development Indicators.  As is evident from the table, 
the projected losses of GDP per capita in 2009 for Mexico and Ecuador could already be considered large 
by historical standards.  In these cases,  it may take three years to recover the losses in poverty.    
 
Estimating the Impact of the Economic Crisis on Poverty 
The previous section simply presented the information on past relations between declines in per capita 
GDP and past changes in poverty.  This information can help frame the expectations for the likely change 
in poverty.   An alternative approach to considering what might be the effect of a given change in per 
capita GDP is to estimate the elasticity of changes in poverty to changes in per capita GDP and then use 
the estimated elasticities  to predict  the change in  poverty for a specific projected growth rate for per 
capita GDP.    Poverty elasticities were estimated using a specification similar to Ravallion (1995)105 and 
Adams (2004)106. 
It should be noted that these elasticities make use of the periods of positive increase in per capita GDP 
growth and declines of poverty. We did estimate the elasticities with a spline to allow the coefficient on 
GDP  growth  to  take  on  a  different  value  depending  on  whether  growth  was  positive  or  negative.  
However, the difference  was not statistically significant.  These  results are presented in Annex 3.  We 
also  estimated  elasticities  using  the  POVCALNET  data  instead  of  the  SEDLAC  data  and  the  differences 
were not very great.  Table 4 reports the different elasticities and the significance level of the estimated 
elasticities using the SEDLAC data. 
 
                                                    Table 4 
                 Elasticities of Changes in Poverty Measure with changes in per capita GDP 
                           Poverty Line                       Elasticity                P value 
                         National Extreme*                      ‐2.63                    0.00 
                        National Moderate*                      ‐1.62                    0.00 
 
Note:  (*)  SEDLAC  data;  std  errors  clustered  at  country  level;  population  weighted  point  estimates; 
controls: Log(Gini) and time trend. 
The estimated elasticities presented in Table 4 can be used to simulate the impact of the economic crisis 
on poverty in LAC.  This is done by taking forecasted rates of growth of GDP, converting them into rates 
of growth of GDP per capita and using the elasticities to generate an estimated effect on poverty.  The 
forecast economic growth rates are taken from the March 16th LAC Consensus Forecasts, which compile 

105
     Ravallion (1995) used the private consumption component from national accounts. Since our main objective 
here was to use these elasticities to simulate the impact of changes on GDP per capita, we chose to follow the 
approach of Adams (2004) and others, who have used per capita GDP as one the regressors. 
106
     The specification is of first difference on the LOG, in order to take into account for country specific fixed effects, 
and also includes the Gini coefficient and a time trend. 


                                                             66
data from several sources and report the mean, minimum and maximum expected growth rate for the 
period.107      The  baseline  values  for  poverty  rates  and  numbers  are  calculated  by  taking  the  2006  and 
2007 poverty rates in SEDLAC and projecting them forward to 2008, using the estimated elasticities and 
the preliminary estimates of 2008 growth rates.   
Table 5 reports the estimated impact of the economic crisis on moderate poverty and extreme poverty, 
using poverty defined by national poverty lines and reported in SEDLAC.108  Using the mean consensus 
forecast,  aggregate  poverty  rates  for  LAC  are  estimated  to  rise  1.14  points.    That  would  result  in  8.3 
million  more  poor  people  than  in  2008.  About  half  of  those  people  that  will  fall  into  poverty  are  in 
Mexico,    about  a  fifth  in  Brasil,    and  the  rest    are  distributed    in  Argentina,  Colombia,  Ecuador, 
Guatemala and Venezuela. The aggregate extreme poverty rate for LAC is estimated to rise 0.53 points 
to, which would generate an increase of approximately 3.6 million in the number of extreme poor. 
As today’s pessimistic forecast seems to be turning rapidly into tomorrow’s mean forecast, it is worth 
noting the estimated poverty rates and numbers associated with the pessimistic forecast.  In this case, 
aggregate  poverty  rates  are  estimated  to  rise  by  2.05  points  generating  13.5  million  additional  poor 
people  in  2009.    Aggregate  extreme  poverty  rates,  under  the  pessimistic  forecast,  are  estimated  to 
increase almost one point, generating an increase of 6 million in the number of extreme poor.  In the 
region,  the  final  performance  both  of  growth  and  poverty  will  depend  on  the  magnitude  of  the 
downturn  in  industrialized  countries  and  on    the  speed  and  effectiveness  of anticyclical  packages  that 
most  countries  are  already  implementing.  Figures  10  illustrate  that  the  number  of  poor  projected  for 
LAC in 2009 is beginning to rise to the levels that prevailed back in 2006. 
If  one  compares  the  projected  number  of  poor  people  in  2009  to  a  prediction  based  on  what  was 
expected to be 2009 GDP growth back in January 2008, the increase in the number of people would be 
13 million (Table 6).   As there was a more optimistic outlook for growth in 2009 when forecasts were 
made  back  in  January  2008  (see  figure  6),  the  estimated  poverty  impact  is  greater  for  this 
counterfactual. In other words,  now we expect, by the end of 2009 , 13 million more poor people than 
what  would  have  been  observed  had  past  growth  been  maintained.    In  the  case  of  extreme  poverty, 
comparing the change to what had been expected back in January 2008 yields an increase of  6.1 million 
more extreme poor than what had been expected. 
 




107
      The GDP growth rates used in the analysis are provided in Annex 5.  The estimated poverty impacts for the 
individual countries are also presented in Annex 5.   If a particular country only reported data for the mean, the 
same number was used on the minimum and maximum scenario. Moreover, a few countries (St Lucia, Haiti and 
Jamaica) were not covered by the LAC Consensus Forecast, in those cases the World Bank GEP 2009 forecast was 
used, also on the three scenarios. 
108
       Similar tables of results are presented  in Annex 4, using  data from POVCALNET and elasticities estimated from 
POVCALNET data. 


                                                           67
    Table 5: Poverty Impact of Slowdown in 2009 (changes with respect to observed levels in 2008) 
                                                             Consensus Forecast for Latin America and the 
                                                                                 Caribbean* 
                                                             Mean            Pessimist          Optimistic 
     Moderate Poverty                                                                                   
            Absolute change in incidence (pp)                 1.14              2.05                0.58 
            Percentage change in incidence (%)              12.64%            22.79%               6.39% 
            Absolute change in number of poor (,000)         8,325            13,491               5,144 
            Percentage change number of poor (%)             5.37%             8.70%               3.32% 
                                                                                                        
     Extreme Poverty                                                                                    
            Absolute change in incidence (pp)                 0.53              0.94                0.28 
            Percentage change in incidence (%)               5.87%            10.40%               3.06% 
            Absolute change in number of poor (,000)         3,603             5,909               2,169 
            Percentage change number of poor (%)             7.16%            11.75%               4.31% 
     Note: (*) Consensus Forecast as of May/2009 for Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Mexico, Peru, 
     and Venezuela.; For the countries in which theres was no Consensus Forecast esimates, the World 
     Bank Forecast as of March 2009 was used; For the countries which Consensus Forecast did not report 
     a minimum or a maximum value, the average reported value was used for both the optimistic and 
     the pessimistic scenario. Countries: Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, El Salvador, 
     Honduras, Mexico, Paraguay, Peru, Uruguay, and Venezuela (90% of the region population covered 
     by Povcalnet). Elasticities estimated using Sedlac data (17/nov/2008). 
 




                                                           68
                             Table 6: Poverty Impact of Slowdown in 2009 
               (as compared to expected poverty levels had past growth rates continued) 
                                                              Consensus Forecast for Latin America and the 
                                                                                Caribbean* 
                                                             Mean            Pessimist            Optimistic 
     Moderate Poverty                                                                                     
            Absolute change in incidence (pp)                 2.30             3.22                  1.74 
            Percentage change in incidence (%)               8.66%            12.09%                6.54% 
            Absolute change in number of poor (,000)         13,015           18,181                 9,834 
            Percentage change number of poor (%)             8.66%            12.09%                6.54% 
     Extreme Poverty                                                                                      
            Absolute change in incidence (pp)                 1.07             1.48                  0.82 
            Percentage change in incidence (%)              12.70%            17.52%                9.70% 
            Absolute change in number of poor (,000)         6,075             8,381                 4,641 
            Percentage change number of poor (%)            12.70%            17.52%                9.70% 
                                                                                                          
     Note: (*) Consensus Forecast as of May/2009 for Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Mexico, Peru, and 
     Venezuela.; For the countries in which theres was no Consensus Forecast esimates, the World Bank 
     Forecast as of March 2009 was used; For the countries which Consensus Forecast did not report a 
     minimum or a maximum value, the average reported value was used for both the optimistic and the 
     pessimistic scenario. Countries: Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, El Salvador, 
     Honduras, Mexico, Paraguay, Peru, Uruguay, and Venezuela (90% of the region population covered by 
     Povcalnet). Elasticities estimated using Sedlac data (17/nov/2008). 
                                                                                            
 
 
            Figure 10.  Trends in the Number and Projected Number of Poor in Latin America 




                                                                                            
The aggregate data include actual and forecasted values for Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, 
Costa  Rica,  Ecuador,  El  Salvador,  Guatemala,  Honduras,  Mexico,  Nicaragua,  Paraguay,  Peru,  Uruguay, 
and Venezuela.  
 




                                                            69
 

Conclusions 
For almost all of the 1980s and 1990s, the number of poor and extreme poor in Latin America and the 
Caribbean  rose.  Despite  the  growth  episodes  observed  in  the  nineties      poverty  rates  stagnated.    The 
number of poor climbed from 160.5 million in 1981 to 240.6 million by 2002,  and of extreme poor from 
90 to 114 million.  Since 2002 the number of poor has decreased at unprecedented speed – so much so 
that in 2008 the number of poor is estimated to have fallen to 181.3 million and the number of extreme 
poor to 73 million. Hence,  during the strong growth period 2002‐2008,  almost 60 million people were 
lifted out of poverty,  and 41 million left the ranks of extreme poverty. It should be noted that towards 
2007 and 2008 there seems to be already a deceleration on the rate of poverty reduction. 
Unfortunately, the recent worldwide recession has put an end to that progress and the number of poor 
are  now  projected  to  increase.  However,  compared  to  past  periods  of  negative  growth,  in  most  cases 
the  current  projected  declines  in  GDP  have  not  yet  approached  the  largenegative  shocks  that  Latin 
America experienced throughout the eighties and late nineties.  The large shocks of the past averaged a 
loss in per capita GDP of 7.2 percent and generated increases in poverty rates that were, on average, 4 
percentage points.  And, historically, it has proved difficult for countries to recover quickly and get back 
to the poverty level that prevailed before the shock.  On average it has taken 3 years to get back to the 
poverty  level  prior  to  the  shock,  for  all  but  the  smallest  negative  shocks.As  of  March  2009,  only  in 
Mexico and Ecuador are the projected declines in GDP for 2009 expected to be relatively large. Given 
the consequente larger increases in poverty rates it might take about three years to recovre from the 
povrety losses.  More countries could be in similar situations as the worldwide recession deepens. 
If  the  projected  growth  rates  are  not  yet  at  the  level  that  has  prevailed  in  individual  countries  in  the 
past, what is noteworthy in this crisis is how it has hit all countries and how rapidly the projected growth 
rates  are  trending  downwards.    Whereas  in  2007  and  2008,  no  country  in  Latin  America  was 
experiencing negative growth in per capita GDP, today 15 countries are projected to have negative per 
capita  GDP  growth  in  2009.    The  downward  trend  in  projections  for  Latin  America  are  following  the 
pattern  observed  in  industrialized  countries.  Using  elasticity  estimates  and  the  mean  LAC  Consensus 
Forecast for GDP growth , aggregate poverty rates are estimated to rise 1.14 points.  That would result 
in 8.3 million more poor people than in 2008 in Latin America and the Caribbean. About half of those 
people that will fall into poverty are in Mexico,  about a fifth in Brasil,  and the rest  are distributed  in 
Argentina,  Colombia,  Ecuador,  Guatemala  and  Venezuela.  Aggregate  extreme  poverty  rates  are 
estimated  to  rise  0.53  points,  increase  that  would  generate    a  rise  of  approximately  3.6  million  in  the 
number of extreme poor. Using a pessimistic forecast – which,  if the recent trend continues will turn 
rapidly  into  tomorrow’s  mean  forecast‐  aggregate  poverty  rates  are  estimated  to  rise  by  two  points 
generating  13  million  additional  poor  people  in  2009.    Aggregate  extreme  poverty  rates,  under  the 
pessimistic forecast, are estimated to increase 0.94 points, generating an increase of almost  6 million in 
the number of extreme poor.  
 
 Annex 1.  Construction of regional poverty estimates for Latin America 
The World Bank has created estimates of regional poverty estimates for Latin America and other regions 
of  the  world  using  PPP  $1.25  and  $2  a  day  international  poverty  lines,  corresponding  to  extreme  and 
moderate  poverty.    Based  on  an  analysis  of  the  PPP  equivalents  of  national  poverty  lines,  this  note 
argues that using PPP $2 a day for extreme poverty and PPP $4 a day for moderate poverty would be 
more appropriate for Latin America. 



                                                            70
The  following  table  presents  information  on  the  PPP  $  a  day  equivalent  of  national  extreme  poverty 
lines  across  countries  and  over  time.    These  values  were  obtained  by  converting  the  reported  local 
currency poverty lines into PPP equivalents using  the PPP Exchange  Rates for household  consumption 
from the 2005 International Comparison Program, adjusted for inflation using the national CPI. 




                                                                                                              
 
    Source:  SEDLAC data base, PPP conversion factors from World Bank POVCALNET 
 
 
It is worth noting that the values of the national extreme poverty lines in PPP terms are quite consistent 
over time for each country.  The average coefficient of variation is 0.07 and there is not a great range in 
the  coefficient  of  variation  across  countries.    The  range  extends  from  0.01  (Chile)  to  0.15  (Honduras).  
There is more of a variation looking across countries, with the lowest value at 1.04 for Nicaragua and the 
highest at 2.73 for Mexico.  The coefficient of variation across countries is 0.35. 
The following table presents equivalent values of the PPP $ a day equivalent of national  poverty lines, 
calculated in a similar fashion. 
 
 




                                                          71
                                                                                                           
Source:  SEDLAC data base, PPP conversion factors from World Bank POVCALNET 
 
The  values  are  still  relatively  consistent  across  time  within  a  country.    The  average  coefficient  of 
variation is 0.06 and the range extends from 0.002 (Panama) to 0.15 (Honduras).  However, in terms of 
the variation across countries, there is considerably greater variation in the national poverty lines in PPP 
terms across countries in moderate poverty than in extreme poverty.  This is because all countries use 
some variation of a food or caloric based extreme poverty line.  After accounting for differences in prices 
with the PPP adjustment, the remaining differences are due to differences in the combination of food 
that  would  yield  the  minimum  requirements.    The  moderate  poverty  lines  are  typically  defined  by 
multiplying  the  extreme  poverty  line  by  the  inverse  Engel  coefficient  and  this  varies  somewhat  more 
across countries. 
The observation that there is a considerable range in the national moderate poverty lines in PPP terms 
implies  that  comparisons  of  estimated  national  poverty  rates  are  potentially  misleading.    All 
comparisons of poverty should be made using the same international PPP line. 
We choose to consider extreme poverty as PPP $2 a day, because that is the round figure that minimizes 
the  distance  from  the  observed  national  extreme  poverty  lines.    Similarly,  we  choose  to  consider 
moderate poverty as PPP $4 a day for the dame reason.  However, this does not mean that all countries 
should necessarily use the $2 a day or $4 a day PPP lines.  Nicaragua may want to compare their poverty 
situation  to  that  of  other  countries  using  a  PPP  $1.25  a  day  line  that  more  closely  approximates  their 



                                                           72
own particular national poverty line.  Mexico may choose a different one.  The important point is to use 
the same PPP $ a day international poverty line consistently across all comparisons. 
The following three graphs illustrate the relation between GDP per capita in PPP terms and the PPP $ a 
day equivalent to the national poverty line, national extreme poverty line and the ratio of the moderate 
to extreme poverty line.  The graphs show that there is more variation across countries in the PPP $ a 
day equivalent of the national poverty lines than there is of the extreme poverty lines. 
 




                                                                                         
 




                                                   73
      
 
 
 




74
                                                                                               Annex 2.  Trends in Regional Poverty and Growth in GDP per Capita 
 
    Figure A.2: Evolution of poverty and GDP 
    East Asia ‐ 2USD a day                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                       East Asia ‐ 4USD a day 
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    100.0                                                                                                                                                                                             5000
                                                 100.0                                                                                                                                                                      5000


                                                  90.0
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                      4000
                                                                                                                                                                                                                            4000
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    90.0




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 constant 2005 international $
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                      Headcount Poverty Rate
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                      constant 2005 international $
                                                  80.0
        Headcount Poverty Rate




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                      3000
                                                                                                                                                                                                                            3000
                                                  70.0
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    80.0


                                                  60.0                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                2000
                                                                                                                                                                                                                            2000


                                                  50.0                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              70.0
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                      1000
                                                                                                                                                                                                                            1000
                                                  40.0

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    60.0                                                                                                                                                                              0
                                                  30.0                                                                                                                                                                      0                                                                                                                                                  1980          1982    1984     1986         1988      1990         1992        1994     1996     1998      2000    2002        2004
                                                          1980      1982       1984      1986      1988       1990      1992       1994     1996        1998     2000     2002     2004
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    4 USD a day             GDP per capita, PPP (constant 2005 international $)

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                               
                                                               2 USD a day             GDP per capita, PPP (constant 2005 international $)
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                         
    ECA‐ 2USD a day                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              ECA‐ 4USD a day 
                                                20.0                                                                                                                                                                    10000                                                                                                                                              50.0                                                                                                                                                                       10000



                                                18.0

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                           45.0                                                                                                                                                                       9000
                                                16.0                                                                                                                                                                    9000


                                                14.0




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              constant 2005 international $
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    constant 2005 international $




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                               Headcount Poverty Rate
                       Headcount Poverty Rate




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                           40.0                                                                                                                                                                       8000
                                                12.0                                                                                                                                                                    8000


                                                10.0

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                           35.0                                                                                                                                                                       7000
                                                 8.0                                                                                                                                                                    7000


                                                 6.0

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                           30.0                                                                                                                                                                       6000
                                                 4.0                                                                                                                                                                    6000


                                                 2.0

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                           25.0                                                                                                                                                                       5000
                                                 0.0                                                                                                                                                                    5000                                                                                                                                                          1989           1991           1993            1995               1997            1999        2001           2003           2005
                                                        1989            1991            1993           1995              1997             1999           2001            2003        2005

                                                                                                2 USD a day          GDP per capita, PPP (constant 2005 international $)
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                      4 USD a day               GDP per capita, PPP (constant 2005 international $)
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                      
    Middle East and North Africa‐ 2USD a day                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     Middle East and North Africa‐ 4USD a day 
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                               70.0
                                                 29.0
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                               68.0


                                                 27.0                                                                                                                                                                           6000                                                                                                                           66.0                                                                                                                                                                                       6000


                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                               64.0




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              constant 2005 international $
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    Headcount Poverty Rate
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    constant 2005 international $




                                                 25.0
       Headcount Poverty Rate




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                               62.0


                                                 23.0                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                          60.0


                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                               58.0                                                                                                                                                                                       5000
                                                 21.0                                                                                                                                                                           5000
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                               56.0


                                                 19.0                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                          54.0


                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                               52.0
                                                 17.0
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                               50.0                                                                                                                                                                                       4000
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                               1980          1982    1984     1986         1988          1990       1992       1994     1996     1998      2000        2002     2004


                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                               
                                                 15.0                                                                                                                                                                           4000
                                                         1980     1982         1984     1986       1988       1990      1992       1994      1996        1998     2000      2002    2004                                                                                                                                                                                                               4 USD a day            GDP per capita, PPP (constant 2005 international $)


                                                                                      2 USD a day          GDP per capita, PPP (constant 2005 international $)
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                         
    Sub‐Saharan Africa‐ 2USD a day                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                               Sub‐Saharan Africa‐ 4USD a day 
                                                80.0                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     100.0


                                                79.0                                                                                                                                 1900                                                                                                                                                                               99.0                                                                                                                                   1900


                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                        98.0
                                                78.0

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                        97.0
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                      constant 2005 international $




                                                77.0
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 Headcount Poverty Rate
                                                                                                                                                                                            constant 2005 international $
    Headcount Poverty Rate




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                        96.0                                                                                                                                   1600
                                                76.0                                                                                                                                 1600
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                        95.0
                                                75.0
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                        94.0
                                                74.0
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                        93.0                                                                                                                                   1300
                                                73.0                                                                                                                                 1300
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                        92.0

                                                72.0
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                        91.0

                                                71.0
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                        90.0                                                                                                                                   1000
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                               1980      1982       1984    1986     1988         1990      1992       1994     1996     1998    2000      2002       2004


                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                       
                                                70.0                                                                                                                                 1000
                                                        1980     1982     1984        1986     1988    1990      1992       1994     1996        1998     2000    2002      2004                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   4 USD a day           GDP per capita, PPP (constant 2005 international $)

                                                                                             2 USD a day       GDP per capita, PPP (constant 2005 international $)
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 
    Source:  World Bank, World Development Indicators and POVCALNET 
 


                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                            75
Annex 3.  Alternative Specifications of Poverty Elasticities 
Table A3.1 presents the coefficients of the Poverty‐GDP pc elasticity using a linear spline transformation. 
This  exercise  allows  the  estimation  the  relationship  between  y  and  x  as  a  piecewise  linear  function, 
which  is  a  function  composed  of  linear  segments.  In  this  particular  case,  the  first  linear  segment 
represents  the  Poverty‐per  capita  GDP  elasticity  for  periods  of  economics  crises  (negative  per  capita 
GDP  change),  while  the  second  linear  segment  represents  the  Poverty‐per  capita  GDP  elasticity  for 
periods  of  economic  growth  (positive  per  capita  GDP  change).  Two  models  were  estimated,  with  two 
different specifications. The first model looked at the extreme poverty elasticity, and the second looked 
at the moderate poverty elasticity. The two alternative specifications considered the full dataset and all 
observations  but  Argentina,  given  the  very  particular  magnitudes  of  the  changes  in  this  country.  All 
models were estimated using ordinary least squares (OLS) algorithm, with standard errors clustered at 
the country level. 
These  models  allow  us  to  test  the  equality  of  the  elasticities  during  periods  of  economics  crisis  and 
growth.  As  it  can  be  seen  in  the  last  two  lines  of  Table  A5.1  none  of  the  specifications  allowed  the 
rejection of the hypothesis that the coefficients are identical. 
 
                            Table A3.1: Poverty Elasticities using Splines (OLS) 
                       Extreme Poverty                            Moderate Poverty 

                     Full                 Without Argentina  Full                    Without Argentina 
d_lngdppc: (.,0)     ‐2.481               ‐1.494               ‐1.332                ‐0.732 
                     (1.221)              (0.822)              (0.684)               (0.392) 
d_lngdppc: (0,.)     ‐3.767**             ‐3.965*              ‐2.423*               ‐2.547* 
                     (1.178)              (1.315)              (0.929)               (1.037) 
d_lngini3            ‐0.015               ‐0.011               ‐0.010                ‐0.008 
                     (0.008)              (0.008)              (0.006)               (0.006) 
Year                 ‐0.001               ‐0.002*              ‐0.000                ‐0.001 
                     (0.001)              (0.001)              (0.001)               (0.001) 
Constant             2.534                4.426*               0.698                 1.806 
                     (1.862)              (1.646)              (1.148)               (1.053) 
Adj.R‐squared        0.335                0.301                0.348                 0.310 
Obs. (unweighted)  107                    102                  96                    91 
Test: d_lngdppc_a1 ‐ d_lngdppc_a2 = 0 
         F‐stat      0.323                1.346                0.529                 1.632 
         P‐val       0.580                0.271                0.480                 0.226   
Note: clustered standard errors; population weighted. Inference: * p<0.05, ** p<0.01, *** p<0.001 
 
 




                                                           76
Table  A3.2  presents  the  same  models  presented  in  Table  A3.1,  estimated  as  median  regression.  The 
advantage of this model over the OLS is the fact that it is much more robust to the presence of outliers. 
As it can be seen the moderate poverty elasticities for periods of economics crisis [d_lngdppc: (.,0)] are 
not very different, however the same is not true in the case of extreme poverty.  
 
 
Table A3.2: Poverty Elasticities using Splines (median regression) 
                   Extreme Poverty                               Moderate Poverty 

                   Full                  Without Argentina  Full                    Without Argentina 
d_lngdppc: (.,0)  ‐3.721***              ‐1.794***            ‐1.671***             ‐0.932*** 
                   (0.000)               (0.011)              (0.026)               (0.000)    
d_lngdppc: (0,.)  ‐2.559***              ‐3.578***            ‐1.916***             ‐2.020*** 
                   (0.000)               (0.008)              (0.021)               (0.000)    
d_lngini3          ‐0.019***             ‐0.013***            ‐0.008***             ‐0.006*** 
                   (0.000)               (0.000)              (0.000)               (0.000)    
Year               ‐0.002***             ‐0.002***            0.002***              0.002*** 
                   (0.000)               (0.000)              (0.000)               (0.000)    
Constant           3.346***              4.306***             ‐3.775***             ‐3.152*** 
                   (0.000)               (0.054)              (0.140)               (0.000)    
Obs. (unweighted)  107                    102                  96                    91 
Note: clustered standard errors; population weighted. Inference: * p<0.05, ** p<0.01, *** p<0.001 
 
 
Annex 4.  Estimates of Poverty Impact Using POVCALNET data and Elasticities calculated using 
POVCALNET data 
This  annex  presents  tables  similar  to  tables  5  and  6  in  the  text,  but  using  POVCALNET  data  and 
elasticities calculated from POVCALNET data instead of the SEDLAC data and elasticities calculated from 
the SEDLAC data (Table A6.1).  For this case moderate poverty corresponds to PPP $4 a day and extreme 
poverty corresponds to PPP $2 a day. The estimated impacts are lower than in the case of the estimates 
based  on  the  SEDLAC  data.    This  is  due  to  lower  estimated  elasticities.    It  is  probably  the  case  that 
calculating poverty changes over a longer period results in less sensitivity to changes in per capita GDP. 
 
Table A4.1  Elasticities of Changes in Poverty Measure with changes in per capita GDP 

            Poverty Line            Region                   GDP per capita           P value 
                                                                                       
            $ 2 a day PPP          LAC                    ‐1.37                  0.044 
                                   World                  ‐1.37                  0.000 
            $ 4 a day PPP          LAC                    ‐0.96                  0.001 
                                   World                  ‐0.14                  0.708 
Note:  (*)  SEDLAC  data;  std  errors  clustered  at  country  level;  population  weighted  point  estimates; 
controls: Log(Gini) and time trend. 
 



                                                           77
           Table A4.2.  Poverty Impact of Slowdown in 2009 (4 US dollars a day PPP) 
                                               Consensus Forecast for Latin America and the Caribbean*
                                               Mean        Pessimistic            Optimistic 
    (4 US dollars a day PPP) 
    Absolute change in incidence (pp)              0.31            0.58                   ‐0.07 
    Percentage change in incidence (%)            2.40%           4.42%                  ‐0.55% 
    Absolute change in number of poor (,000) 3,990.02            5,489.36               1,801.88 
    Percentage change number of poor (%)          2.20%           3.03%                   0.99% 
    (2 US dollars a day PPP) 
    Absolute change in incidence (pp)              0.13            0.26                   ‐0.08 
    Percentage change in incidence (%)            0.99%           1.99%                  ‐0.59% 
    Absolute change in number of poor (,000) 1,631.77            2,370.05                453.30 
    Percentage change number of poor (%)          2.23%           3.23%                   0.62% 
                                                                                    
 
 
 




                                                    78
     Annex 5.  GDP Growth Forecasts used in estimating the Poverty Impact of the Worldwide Recession 
      
                                                Table A5.1 GDP Growth 
                                             WB  GDP  WB  GDP                        LAC Consensus Forecasts*** 
                                             Growth      Growth 
                                             Forecast  Forecasts 
                   2007 *       2008 *       2009**      2009 ** 
                                             (from       (from  WB  IMF 
                                             WB  GEP  GEP           Forecasts 
                                             2008)       2009)      2009                    Mean  Pessimistic  Opptimistic 
Argentina               8.70%         6.60%  4.70%       1.50%      0.00%                   ‐0.69%  ‐3.80%            2.10% 
Bolivia                 4.60%         4.10%  4.20%       3.58%      4.00%                   1.80%  1.80%              1.80% 
Brazil                  5.40%         5.20%  4.50%       2.83%      1.80%                   ‐0.05%  0.00%             1.80% 
Chile                   5.10%         4.20%  5.00%       3.45%      2.20%                   0.01%  ‐1.45%             1.60% 
Colombia                8.20%         3.70%  4.80%       2.64%      2.00%                   0.85%  ‐1.00%             2.70% 
Costa Rica              6.77%         4.00%  4.90%       3.92%      1.00%                   0.00%  0.00%              0.00% 
Dominican  
Republic                8.50%         5.20%        4.80%      2.57%          1.80%          0.00%  0.00%              0.00% 
Ecuador                 1.90%         2.50%        2.70%      0.80%          1.00%          ‐2.30%  ‐2.30%            ‐2.30% 
El Salvador             4.20%         2.00%        4.00%      2.65%          2.50%          0.40%  0.40%              0.40% 
Guatemala               5.70%         2.80%        5.00%      3.13%          3.00%          0.80%  0.80%              0.80% 
Guyana                  5.50%         4.80%        3.50%      4.00%          4.50%          4.00%  4.00%              4.00% 
Haiti                   3.50%         3.00%        4.00%      3.80%          2.50%          3.80%  3.80%              3.80% 
Honduras                6.30%         3.10%        4.75%      3.96%          2.00%          0.60%  0.60%              0.60% 
Jamaica                 1.20%         0.90%        3.10%      0.80%          ‐1.00%         0.80%  0.80%              0.80% 
Mexico                  3.20%         2.00%        3.60%      1.12%          ‐0.30%         ‐2.82%  ‐5.00%            ‐1.50% 
Nicaragua               3.50%         2.20%        4.50%      1.51%          1.50%          0.20%  0.20%              0.20% 
Panama                  11.50%        7.80%        7.10%      3.27%          7.80%          0.80%  0.80%              0.80% 
Paraguay                6.80%         4.20%        3.80%      3.01%          2.00%          ‐0.10%  ‐0.10%            ‐0.10% 
Peru                    9.00%         8.50%        6.10%      5.19%          6.00%          4.01%  1.80%              6.20% 
Trinidad and  
Tobago                  5.50%         6.20%        7.10%      6.60%          4.50%          6.60%  6.60%              6.60% 
Uruguay                 7.40%         4.67%        3.80%      2.81%          2.50%          1.40%  1.40%              1.40% 
Venezuela, RB  8.40%                  5.30%        4.24%      0.98%          ‐2.00%         ‐0.24%  ‐4.10%            3.80% 
LAC                     5.79%         4.48%        4.38%      2.18%          0.98%          ‐0.63%  ‐2.10%            1.19% 
     Notes: (*) Source World Bank, World Development Indicators;   
                 (**)  Source:    World  Bank  Global  Economic  Forecasts,  2008  and  2009.    The  GEP  2009  forecasts 
     were made in November 2008; 
                (***)  Consensus  Forecast  as  of March  16th;  For  the  countries  in  which  there  was  no  Consensus 
     Forecast  estimate,  the  World  Bank  Forecast  as  of  March  2009  was  used;  For  the  countries  which 
     Consensus  Forecast  did  not  report  a  minimum  or  a  maximum  value,  the  average  reported  value  was 
     used for both the optimistic and the pessimistic scenario. 
      
      



                                                            79
                                                Table A5.2 Per Capita GDP Growth 
                                                  WB  GDP  WB  GDP                               LAC Consensus Forecasts*** 
                                                  Growth     Growth 
                                                  Forecast  Forecasts 
                     2007*          2008*         2009**     2009 ** 
                                                  (from      (from  WB  IMF 
                                                  WB  GEP  GEP           Forecasts 
                                                  2008)      2009)       2009                    Mean         Pessimistic      Opptimistic 
Argentina            7.64%          5.60%         3.72%      0.55%       ‐0.93%                  ‐1.62%       ‐4.70%           1.15% 
Bolivia              2.77%          2.31%         2.41%      1.80%       2.21%                   0.05%        0.05%            0.05% 
Brazil               4.16%          3.95%         3.26%      1.61%       0.59%                   ‐1.24%       ‐1.19%           0.59% 
Chile                4.07%          3.18%         3.98%      2.44%       1.20%                   ‐0.96%       ‐2.41%           0.61% 
Colombia             6.21%          2.44%         3.53%      1.40%       0.76%                   ‐0.37%       ‐2.20%           1.46% 
Costa Rica           4.79%          2.52%         3.41%      2.44%       ‐0.44%                  ‐1.42%       ‐1.42%           ‐1.42% 
Dominican  
Republic             6.97%          3.72%          3.32%          1.13%           0.36%          ‐1.41%       ‐1.41%           ‐1.41% 
Ecuador              0.85%          1.44%          1.64%          ‐0.24%          ‐0.04%         ‐3.31%       ‐3.31%           ‐3.31% 
El Salvador          2.82%          0.65%          2.62%          1.29%           1.14%          ‐0.93%       ‐0.93%           ‐0.93% 
Guatemala            3.15%          0.34%          2.49%          0.66%           0.53%          ‐1.61%       ‐1.61%           ‐1.61% 
Guyana               5.47%          4.87%          3.57%          4.07%           4.57%          4.07%        4.07%            4.07% 
Haiti                1.42%          1.23%          2.21%          2.02%           0.73%          2.02%        2.02%            2.02% 
Honduras             4.46%          1.31%          2.94%          2.16%           0.23%          ‐1.14%       ‐1.14%           ‐1.14% 
Jamaica              1.67%          0.53%          2.72%          0.43%           ‐1.36%         0.43%        0.43%            0.43% 
Mexico               2.25%          0.97%          2.56%          0.10%           ‐1.30%         ‐3.79%       ‐5.96%           ‐2.49% 
Nicaragua            2.86%          0.88%          3.15%          0.21%           0.19%          ‐1.09%       ‐1.09%           ‐1.09% 
Panama               9.44%          6.09%          5.40%          1.63%           6.09%          ‐0.80%       ‐0.80%           ‐0.80% 
Paraguay             4.60%          2.42%          2.03%          1.25%           0.26%          ‐1.81%       ‐1.81%           ‐1.81% 
Peru                 7.78%          7.30%          4.92%          4.02%           4.82%          2.85%        0.67%            5.02% 
Trinidad and  
Tobago               5.63%          5.83%          6.73%          6.23%           4.14%          6.23%        6.23%            6.23% 
Uruguay              7.29%          4.54%          3.67%          2.69%           2.37%          1.27%        1.27%            1.27% 
Venezuela, RB        6.64%          3.59%          2.55%          ‐0.66%          ‐3.59%         ‐1.86%       ‐5.66%           2.11% 
LAC                  4.58%          3.30%          3.20%          1.03%           ‐0.16%         ‐1.75%       ‐3.21%           0.05% 
Notes: (*) Source World Bank, World Development Indicators;   
            (**) Source: World Bank Global Economic Forecasts, 2008 and 2009.  The GEP 2009 forecasts were made in November 
2008; 
           (***)  Consensus  Forecast  as  of  March  16th;  For  the  countries  in which  there  was  no  Consensus  Forecast  estimate,  the 
World Bank Forecast as of March 2009 was used; For the countries which Consensus Forecast did not report a minimum or a 
maximum value, the average reported value was used for both the optimistic and the pessimistic scenario. 
           

 
 




                                                                      80
                4. LABOR MARKETS AND THE CRISIS IN LATIN AMERICA AND THE CARIBBEAN 
                          (A PRELIMINARY REVIEW FOR SELECTED COUNTRIES)109 
                                  Samuel Freije‐Rodríguez and Edmundo Murrugarra 
                                                     June 2009* 
 
                                                             Abstract 
Countries in Latin America and the Caribbean are experiencing the impact of the international financial 
crisis on labor markets across different dimensions, such as employment, wages and the quality of labor 
market arrangements.  This note reviews a selected group of countries to assess the speed and severity 
of labor market impacts. It identifies patterns in the changing labor market conditions, such as specific 
sectors  or  types  of  workers  being  affected.    It  also  describes  countries’  preparedness  and  capacity  to 
respond  to  the  crisis  and  the  specific  policy  responses  being  implemented.    The  review  finds  a  large 
variation in impacts and responses in the context of increases in  unemployment rates that  range from 
0.4  to  2.1  percentage  points.    The  impacts  of  the  crisis  are  evolving  rapidly  but  seem  to  have  a  more 
noticeable negative effect among salaried workers in Brazil and Chile whereas in Colombia non‐salaried 
workers have been affected the most. Mexico shows both types of workers as being seriously hit by the 
recession. 
 

LAC Responses on Labor Markets: Information and Capacity

Countries in Latin America and the Caribbean are experiencing the impact of the international financial 
crisis on labor markets across different dimensions, such as employment, wages and the quality of labor 
market arrangements.  The policy response to these impacts is reflecting both Governments’ ability to 
monitor the actual impacts of the crisis, as well as their capacity to consistently (and effectively) respond 
with programs and interventions. 
This  note  reviews  a  selected  group  of  countries  to  assess  the  speed  and  severity  of  labor  markets 
impacts. It identifies patterns in the changing labor market conditions, such as specific sectors or types 
of workers being affected.  It also describes the policies announced or adopted to respond to the crisis. 
At  this  stage,  the  note  provides  only  a  systematic  description  of  labor  market  facts  and  policies.  This 
groundwork stock‐taking is necessary for future analytical work. In this regard, the evidence presented 
below highlights the importance of further studies to understand two main questions: i) why different 
countries in the region show different labor market adjustments to the crisis and ii) what explains the 
adoption and effectiveness of the wide range of policy responses adopted by governments. 

*LCR CRISIS BRIEFS SERIES. 
109
      This  is  the  first  of  a  series  of  notes  to  monitor  the  status  of  the  labor  market  during  this  crisis  period. 
Forthcoming  issues  will  extend  the  study  to  other  countries  of  the  area,  and  complement  the  analysis  of  the 
countries included with further data. It will also report advances in labor market policies adopted by governments 
as the crisis evolves. This note was produced by a joint team from the Social Protection and Poverty and Gender 
Units  including  Georgina  Pizzolitto,  Diana  Hincapie,  Pablo  Acosta  and,  Rodolfo  Beazley,  under  the  guidance  of 
Helena Ribe and Jaime Saavedra.


                                                                 81 
Understanding  the  size  and  speed  of  the  impacts  of  the  crisis  on  labor  markets  depends  on  the 
availability of high frequency data. Countries included in this review fall into two categories: those with 
higher frequency data (i.e., monthly or quarterly labor statistics) and those with low frequency data (i.e., 
annual or bi‐annual statistics). For the latter group, however, leading indicators such as Social Security 
records provide some indicative information on the nature of the labor market response to the crisis.  
Current Labor Market Impacts of the Global Crisis  

Regarding  the  impact  of  the  crisis,  all  countries  with  timely  data  show  an  increase  in  unemployment 
rates.  Chile  registers  an  increase  in  the  unemployment  rate  of  2.1  percentage  points  for  the  latest 
month in record with respect to the same month one year ago. Colombia and Mexico register near one 
percentage  point  changes.    Brazil  shows  an  even    smaller  increase  (0.4  percentage  points)  but  a  very 
rapid rise in recent months.  These rises in unemployment are accompanied by important falls in net job 
creation  since  mid  2008.  Countries  differ  on  the  main  force  that  explains  this  fall  in  net  employment 
creation. On one hand, Brazil, Chile and Mexico, register a deep fall in salaried net job creation since mid 
2008.  In  Colombia,  on  the  other  hand,  it  is  net  job  creation  of  non‐salaried  jobs  (i.e.  employers,  self‐
employed  and  unpaid  workers)  what  is  driving  the  fall  in  total  employment.  All  countries  show  a  net 
destruction  of  non‐salaried  jobs  towards  the  end  of  2008  or  the  beginning  of  2009,  although  the 
Mexican  is  the  largest  fall  in  both  relative  and  absolute  terms.  In  general,  non‐salaried  workers 
represent a large portion of total informal employment. Hence, it can be argued that the crisis is having 
a  more  noticeable  negative  effect  on  the  formal  sector  in  Brazil  and  Chile  whereas  in  Colombia  the 
informal  sector  has  been  the  most  affected.  Mexico  shows  both  sectors  been  seriously  hit  by  the 
recession.  
A  preliminary  distributive  analysis  of  the  Mexican  case  shows  that  the  poorest  households  and  the 
households in the North of the country (where tradable activities concentrate) are the most affected by 
the  crisis.    The  evolution  of  the  impacts  over  time  is  also  important.  In  Brazil,  the  early  labor  market 
impacts of the crisis were clearly observed in industrial states like Sao Paulo, but are now larger in the 
urban areas of poorer Northeast states like Recife and Salvador.  
The  impact  of  the  crisis  on  earnings  and  wages  is  mixed.  While  Brazil  and  Chile  show  growing  real 
earnings,  Colombia  registers  falling  real  wages  both  in  retail  commerce  and  blue‐collar  manufacturing 
(two  of  the  most  common  occupations).  Mexico  shows  a  dual  pattern  whereby  blue‐collar 
manufacturing  workers  have  steady  real  wages  whereas  workers  in  retail  commerce  have  falling  real 
earnings. A pattern emerges whereby the more open economies like Chile, Colombia and Mexico have 
all endured an important shock due to the international crisis, but Chile has been able to prevent a fall in 
real  wages,  whereas  Colombia  and  Mexico  have  endured  declines  in  real  wages,  for  at  least  some 
sectors. On the other hand, in a less open economy like Brazil the impact in the labor markets appears 
limited to losses of employment in the export oriented activities with no significant impact on earnings. 
For  other  countries  (e.g.  El  Salvador,  the  Dominican  Republic),  timely  data  is  lacking  but  leading 
indicators  from  Social  Security  data  suggest  major  job  losses  in  recent  months.  However,  given  the 
limited size of formal employment, the full impact of the crisis cannot be fully ascertained.  
Current Policy Responses 

In relation to the policies actions adopted in response to the crisis, countries like Brazil, Chile or Mexico 
are  taking  advantage  of  labor  market  policy  instruments  already  in  place,  such  as  unemployment 
insurance, or wage subsidies to keep or hire workers,.  In these countries, the duration of unemployment 
insurance  has  been  extended  either  in  specific  sectors  or  across  sectors  aiming  at  protecting  formal 
workers  from  longer  unemployment  spells.    Wage  subsidies  are  being  utilized  for  targeted  and 


                                                            82
vulnerable  groups.    In  Chile,  the  wage  subsidy  is  targeted  at  the  youth  with  earnings  below  a  certain 
threshold, and with formal employment.  In Colombia, the (implicit wage) subsidy is broader since the 
Government  established  general  payroll  tax  holidays  for  new  small  and  medium  size  firms.    Still,  the 
actual  coverage  of  these  policy  changes  (unemployment  insurance,  wage  subsidies)  is  limited  to  the 
formal sector, and it is unclear how much the take up for these measures will be. There is also renewed 
attention amongst policy makers to finding ways to protect or create jobs, and several are considering 
temporary employment programs (TEP), although countries are still dealing with implementation issues 
(Mexico).  Minimum wages, a traditional labor market policy variable, have not been a key instrument in 
managing  the  current  global  crisis.    Minimum  wage  increases  have  responded  instead  to  the  planned 
periodic adjustment, although in some cases (like in El Salvador), the adjustment took place earlier than 
planned  to  protect  workers’  purchasing  power  due  to  high  inflation  during  2008.    Finally,  firms  are 
receiving special subsidies and loans or benefiting from corporate tax reductions in Chile and Mexico in 
order  to  protect  employment.    While  some  of  these  interventions  are  aimed  at  providing  a  finance 
cushion to small and medium enterprises, their coverage, take up and impact cannot be fully assessed 
still.  
 
                         Table 1: LAC Labor Market Interventions (Changes to policies since Oct. 2008) 

                                                                              Unemp.             Wage 
                                   MinimumWage          Training                                                    Public Works 
                                                                              Insurance          subsidies* 
      Argentina                                                                                         x                     
      Bolivia                              x                    x                    x                                        
      Brazil                               x                                         x                                        
      Chile                                                    x(1)                  x                  x                     
      Colombia                                                  x                                                             
      Guatemala                                                                                                              x 
      El Salvador                          x                                                                                  
      Honduras                             x                    x                                                             
      Jamaica                              x                    x                                                            x 
      Mexico                                                    x                                       x                    x 
      *  This  includes  wage  subsidies  and  other  labor  cost  reductions.  (1)  Tax  credit  and  leave  for  training  activities. 
      Source: Crisis Policy Response ‐ LAC Social Protection Unit. 
 

Latin America in International Perspective 

When compared to other countries in the world with available data, Latin American countries are not 
among the worst hit by the crisis. Table 2 includes year‐to‐year changes in open unemployment rates as 
an indicator of the impact of the crisis on the labor market for a selection of countries. Spain, The United 
States  and  small  open  economies/cities  in  Asia  (Singapore,  Hong‐Kong  and  Taiwan‐China)  show  an 
increase of more than 50 percent in their open unemployment rates in the past year. On the other hand, 
most  Latin  American  countries  register  changes  in  their  unemployment  rates  of  less  than  30  percent 
(Chile and Mexico) and even at or below the 10 percent mark (Brazil, Colombia, Peru and Uruguay).  

Absolute changes are also a good indicator of the severity of the impact. In this regard, Chile is the only 
country with a rise in the open unemployment rate of more than 2 percentage points, so far. This mark 
is similar to the increases observed in Hong‐Kong and Taiwan, but still well below the record marks of 




                                                                       83
Spain (7.9 percentage points), the U.S. (3.9 percentage points), Turkey (3.9 percentage points), Canada 
(2.6 percentage points) and Sweeden (2.3 percentage points). 
 
                 Table 2: Change in Open Unemployment Rates in selected countries 

                                        initial                  final                    annual change
                                                                                   in percentage  in percentage 
                                  rate        period      rate           period        points         change
             Spain                    9.6      Q1 2008       17.5        Q1 2009              7.9            82%
             USA                      5.2       May‐08         9.1        May‐09              3.9            75%
             Singapore                2.6      Q1 2008         4.4       Q1 2009              1.8            69%
             Hong‐Kong                3.3       Mar‐08         5.3        Mar‐09              2.0            61%
             Taiwan (China)           3.8       Apr‐08         5.8        Apr‐09              2.0            51%
             Canada                   6.2       May‐08         8.8        May‐09              2.6            42%
             Sweden                   6.0       Apr‐08         8.3        Apr‐09              2.3            38%
             UK                       5.2      Q1 2008         7.1       Q1 2009              1.9            37%
             Turkey                  11.6       Feb‐08       15.5         Feb‐09              3.9            34%
             Australia                4.3       Apr‐08         5.6        Apr‐09              1.3            30%
             Mexico                   4.0      Q1 2008         5.1       Q1 2009              1.1            28%
             Chile                    7.7       Mar‐08         9.8        Mar‐09              2.1            28%
             Thailand                 1.7      Q1 2008         2.1       Q1 2009              0.4            27%
             Norway                   2.5      Q1 2008         3.1       Q1 2009              0.6            24%
             Hungary                  8.0      Q1 2008         9.7       Q1 2009              1.7            21%
             Portugal                 7.6      Q1 2008         8.9       Q1 2009              1.3            17%
             Peru                     7.1       Mar‐08         7.8        Mar‐09              0.7            10%
             Uruguay                  7.6       Apr‐08         8.3        Apr‐09              0.7            10%
             Morocco                  9.5      Q4 2007       10.4        Q4 2008              0.9             9%
             Colombia                12.1       Feb‐08       12.9         Feb‐09              0.8             6%
                      (1)
             Germany                   7.8       May‐08         8.2    May‐09                0.4             5%
             Brazil                    8.6       Mar‐08         9.0    Mar‐09                0.4             5%
             Philippines               7.4      Q1 2008         7.7 Q1 2009                  0.3             4%
             Poland                    8.1      Q1 2008         8.3 Q1 2009                  0.2             2%
             South Africa             23.5      Q1 2008        23.3 Q1 2009                 ‐0.2            ‐1%
             Egypt                     9.1      Q4 2007         8.8 Q4 2008                 ‐0.3            ‐3%
                       Source:  International Labor Office, LABORSTA‐Internet




                                                            84
ANNEX: Summary of recent country experiences 

BRAZIL 

Labor market facts 

The  global  economic  slowdown  is  having  a  sharp  impact  on  Brazilian  labor  markets  but  recovery  may 
occur  soon.  After  years  of  sustained  employment  creation  and  falling  unemployment,  the 
unemployment rate in Metropolitan Areas experienced its largest increase ever from 6.8 in December 
2008 to 9.0 in March 2009 (Figure 2).  Most of the net job losses so far seem to be among non‐salaried 
workers, but there is an important decline in net job creation among salaried workers since mid 2008 
(see  Figure  3)  which  is  consistent  with  previous  findings  that  “…the  countercyclical  rise  in 
unemployment  and  informality  is  driven  primarily  by  a  reduction  in  hiring  in  the  formal  sector,  rather 
than increased labor shedding…” (see LCR Crisis Brief by Bill Maloney).110  Wages in the informal sector, 
which  are  less  likely  to  be  affected  by  minimum  wage  regulations,  seem  to  be  adjusting  downwards 
during recent months, partly due to the high food inflation during 2008. 
•     Unemployment  rates  had  a  large  increase  in  January  2009,  in  a  period  of  historically  low  levels. 
      While January is a month with seasonal increases in unemployment, 2009 showed the largest jump 
      (21  percent)  in  the  number  of  unemployed,  compared  to  the  increases  in  January  2007  (10.7 
      percent) or January 2006 (10.6 percent).111  Still, this sudden increase in the number of unemployed 
      in urban Brazil is taking place when the unemployment rate is at historical low levels: the average 
      unemployment rate between October and December 2008 was 7.5 percent, the lowest since 2002.  
      This  recent  increase  in  unemployment  has  been  particularly  acute  in  Sao  Paulo  where  the 
      unemployment  rate  reached  9.4  percent  (compared  to  December’s  7.1%).  By  February  the 
      unemployment  rate  stayed  around  8.4  percent  and  in  March  the  number  of  unemployment 
      insurance requests actually declined, suggesting a gradual improvement in labor market outcomes. 
•         The  sharp  impact  on  labor  markets  is  primarily  driven  by  the  employment  reduction  in  the 
      informal labor market.  Labor market informality in Brazil has been traditionally countercyclical, and 
      was  declining  during  the  recent  fast  growth  period.    Since  the  onset  of  the  crisis,  the  number  of 
      informal  workers112  in  Metropolitan  Areas  was  reduced  by  3.2  percent  (90  thousand  workers) 
      between  January  2008  and  January  2009,  compared  to  an  increase  in  the  number  of  formal 
      workers113 by 4.5 percent (about 400 thousand workers) in the same period. 
•         After an early ‐‐ and substantial – net employment reduction in the formal sector, labor demand 
      shows  signs  of  stability  by  March  2009.    According  to  the  roster  of  formal  workers  in  the  private 
      sector (Caged),114 close to 800 thousand formal jobs were lost between November 2008 and January 
      2009  ‐‐  with  a  peak  of  654  thousand  in  December  2008.    Most  of  the  decline  in  formal  jobs  took 
      place because of the sudden reduction in hiring rather than firing, especially in States like Sao Paulo 


110
      The  number  of  underemployed  workers  ‐‐  as  measured  by  those  working  an  insufficient  number  of  hours  – 
increased by 11 percent between January 2008 and January 2009, or an additional 60,000 underemployed workers, 
suggesting other margins of adjustment to the crisis. This rising underemployment is better observed in Sao Paulo, 
Rio  de  Janeiro  and  Belo  Horizonte.  Still,  underemployment  as  measured  here,  represent  only  700,000  workers 
compared to more than 21 million workers in the PME population. 
111
     Data from Pesquisa Mensual de Emprego (PME).  
112
     Informal workers are defined as those without Employment Card (sem Carteira de Trabalho assinada).  Other 
analyses could include those self‐employed (conta propia). 
113
     Formal workers are defined as those with Employment Card (com Carteira de Trabalho assinada). 
114
     Caged stands for Cadastro Geral de Empregados e Desempregados and excludes informal sector workers. 


                                                             85
                                                and Minas Gerais.115  In 2008, the average monthly number of workers hired and fired in Sao Paulo 
                                                was  around  425  and  358  thousand  respectively,  but  in  December  the  number  of  hired  workers 
                                                dropped to only 271 thousand, causing a major drop in formal jobs.  By March 2009, the formal job 
                                                losses seem to have halted overall, and in fact may have reverted in some states, but not including 
                                                the industrial sector in Sao Paulo.  In April 2009, unemployment figures in Sao Paulo finally dropped, 
                                                representing 38 thousand less unemployed in urban Sao Paulo.  
                                                 
                                                                            Brazil Labor Market Indicators (2006‐2009) 
                                                                                         Figure 1                                                                                                                                                                                     Figure 2 

                                                                                          Activity rate                                                                                                                                                                          Unemployment rate
                                              58                                                                                                                                                                                               (Recife, Salvador, Belo Horizonte, Rio de Janeiro, Sao Paulo, Porto Alegre)
                                                                                                                                                                                                                           12
  Percentage of the working age population




                                              58

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                       10.40




                                                                                                                                                                     Percentage of the acitve
                                              57                                                                                                                                                                                                                                      10.10

                                                                                                                                                                                                                           10




                                                                                                                                                                           population
                                              57                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                      9.00

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                       8.60


                                              56
                                                                                                                                                                                                                            8



                                              56



                                              55
                                                    2006




                                                                                  2007




                                                                                                                   2008




                                                                                                                                                  2009
                                                            Jul




                                                                                                 Jul




                                                                                                                                   Jul




                                                                                                                                                                                                                            6
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                2006




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                        2007




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                2008




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                               2009
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     Jul




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              Jul




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                               Jul
                                                                                              Months
                                                                  Activity rate                        12 per. Mov. Avg. (Activity rate)                                                                                                                                                      months                                                          

                                                                                         Figure 3                                                                                                                                                                                     Figure 4 

                                                                            Net job creation/destruction                                                                                                                                                         Real income of private sector workers
                                             900                                                                                                                                                                          1,400
                                                                                                                                                              Real income for private sector workers (R$ of March 2009)




                                             800
                                                                                                                                                                                                                          1,300
                                             700
                                                                                                                                                                                                                          1,200
                                             600
 Thousand of workerse




                                             500                                                                                                                                                                          1,100

                                             400
                                                                                                                                                                                                                          1,000
                                             300
                                                                                                                                                                                                                           900
                                             200

                                             100                                                                                                                                                                           800

                                               0
                                                                                                                                                                                                                           700
                                             -100
                                                                                                                                                                                                                           600
                                             -200
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                           Jul




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                               Jul




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                               Jul
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                       2006




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                               2007




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                2008




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                             2009
                                                            Jul




                                                                                                Jul




                                                                                                                                 Jul
                                                     2006




                                                                                  2007




                                                                                                                 2008




                                                                                                                                           2009




                                                                                                Months                                                                                                                                                                                        Months
                                                            salaried workers                                 non-salaried workers                                                                                               Private sector workers with social security                          Private sector workers without social security
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              

•                                                   In  addition,  informal  workers  are  facing  declining  real  wages  in  recent  months.    Average  real 
                                                wages  in  urban  areas  have  increased  during  2008,  and  real  wages  in  January  2009  were  almost  6 
                                                percent higher than those in 2008.  These higher real wages hide important differences across types 
                                                of employees, since those informal workers (sem Carteira) saw their wages decline during the 2008 
                                                year and in January 2009 by 8 and 3 percent, respectively. 



115
                                              This pattern is also identified as a stylized fact by Bosch and Maloney (2009). 


                                                                                                                                                         86
 

Recent Labor Market Policies 

The rapid increase in unemployment at the beginning of the 2009  and the lower real due to the 2008 
inflation made the Government take two actions related to labor markets: 
•        First,  to  address  the  sharp  increase  in  unemployment  the  Government  extended  the 
    unemployment  compensation  period  (Seguro  Desemprego,  SD)  for  two  additional  months  for  the 
    “most affected sectors and states.” Originally the SD covered from three to five months and it was 
    extended  to  three  to  seven  installments.  Every  month,  around  600  thousand  people  receive  the 
    benefit, and in 2008, the total cost was R$13.8 billion. The additional payment is expected to cost 
    R$2.2  billion  and  only  those  laid  off  after  December  2008  are  eligible.  Funding  for  these  benefits 
    come  from  the  FAT  (Fundo  de  Amparo  ao  Trabalhador)  which  might  use  up  to  10  percent  of  its 
    technical reserves. 
•        Second,  the  Government  increased  in  February  the  minimum  salary  from  R$415  to  R$465 
    (about 6.4 percent) following its periodic adjustment pattern.  The minimum salary not only applied 
    to  working  individual  but  it  also  defines  the  benefit  amount  for  several  social  security  and  social 
    assistance transfers.  This increase is expected to represent R$24.3 billion in additional salaries. The 
    R$50  increase  will  impact  the  Federal  Government’s  in  R$8.5  billion  (about  0.3  percent  of  GDP), 
    mostly affecting the social security accounts with additional R$7.8 billion.  Other benefits also linked 
    to the minimum wage, like salary bonus (abono salarial) and unemployment compensation will also 
    be  readjusted.    Overall,  the  labor  markets  policy  response  in  Brazil  is  addressing  the  vulnerable 
    population  affected  by  the  decline  in  external  demand  and  facing  unemployment.    Other 
    interventions  like  housing  construction  and  increase  social  assistance  transfers  (Bolsa  Familia)  are 
    part of the measures of the Government. 
 

CHILE 

Labor market facts 

Unemployment rates have been increasing, quarter‐to‐quarter, since the first quarter of 2008, changing 
the downward trend that these rates showed during the previous two years (see Figure 6). During the 
quarter ending in April 2009, unemployment rate was at 9.8 percent, higher than in the same period of 
2008  (7.6  percent)  and  of  2007  (6.8  percent).  On  the  other  hand,  the  activity  rate,  has  stayed  at  the 
same level than in April last year (i.e., around 56.2 percent of the working age population) (Figure 5) 
Employment  creation  came  to  a  halt  in  February  2009.  After  three  years  of  annual  growth  of 
employment  between  1  and  4  percent  every  month,  the  quarter  ending  in  February  2009  showed  an 
employment growth rate of 0.1 percent. Since March 2009 there has been net job destruction of around 
30  thousand  jobs  per  month.  Salaried  jobs  have  declined  steeply  going  from  an  annual  creation  of 
around 200 thousand up until November 2008 to only 41 thousand in February 2009 and net job losses 
of nearly 40 thousand in the quarter ending in April 2009.. The number of non‐salaried workers has had 
an annual decline of around 40 thousand during the end of 2008, but this figure does not differ much 
from  what  had  been  seen  in  previous  years  and  have  actually  had  a  small  rise  in  recent  months  (see 
Figure  7  ).  Hence,  most  of  the  deceleration  in  employment  creation  is  due  to  an  abrupt  reduction  in 
salaried employment creation. 




                                                           87
                                         Interestingly, real wages have, during the last three months, reverted the downward trend observed for 
                                         most of year 2008 (see Figure 8) although some occupations (mostly in the service sector) have lower 
                                         real wages than in January 2007.  
                                          
                                                                                                                            Chile Labor Market Indicators (2006‐2009) 
                                                                                                        Figure 5                                                                                                                                                                        Figure 6 

                                       57.0%                                                                                                                                                                                                                                           Unemployment Rate
                                                                                                                                                                                            10.0

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     9.8
percentage of the working population




                                                                                                                                                                                                                               8.6




                                                                                                                                                                           percentage of the labor force
                                       55.0%
                                                                                                                                                                                                           8.0


                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  7.6



                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                       6.8

                                       53.0%
                                                                                                                                                                                                           6.0



                                                            activity rate


                                                            12 per. Mov. Avg. (activity rate)

                                       51.0%                                                                                                                                                               4.0
                                                           Jul




                                                                                    Jul




                                                                                                            Jul




                                                                                                                                      Jul




                                                                                                                                                       Jul
                                                 2004




                                                                       2005




                                                                                                 2006




                                                                                                                     2007




                                                                                                                                              2008




                                                                                                                                                                    2009




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                             Jul




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     Jul




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                            Jul
                                                                                                                                                                                                                 2006




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                         2007




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    2008




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              2009
                                                                                                             month                                                                                                                                                                                         month


                                                                                                        Figure 7                                                                                                                                                                        Figure 8 
                                                                                                                                                                                                           108.00
                                                                       Net job creation/destruction (year-to-year)
                                       400.00                                                                                                                                                                                                             real earnings per hour

                                                                                                                                                                                                           106.00

                                       300.00



                                                                                                                                                                                                           104.00

                                       200.00
                                                                                                                                                                           index ( 2006=100)
thosuands of workers




                                                                                                                                                                                                           102.00
                                       100.00




                                                                                                                                                                                                           100.00
                                          0.00
                                                  2006




                                                                 Jul




                                                                                          2007




                                                                                                           Jul




                                                                                                                             2008




                                                                                                                                                 Jul




                                                                                                                                                             2009




                                       -100.00                                                                                                                                                              98.00




                                       -200.00
                                                                                                                                                                                                            96.00
                                                                              non-salaried workers                                  salaried workers
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                               Octobre




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                          Octobre




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    Octobre
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     April




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                             April




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    April
                                                                                                                                                                                                                        2006




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                2007




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                           2008




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              2009
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   July




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                           July




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                             July




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                      Abril




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  month




                                         Recent Labor Market Policies 

                                         •               Chile launched one of the most ambitious fiscal stimulus plans to buffer the impacts of the global 
                                                         economic crisis. In addition to a public investment plan for US$ 1.485 billion (1 percent of GDP) and 
                                                         tax  reductions  or  holidays  accounting  for  up  to  US$    1.455  billion  (another  1  percent  of  GDP), 
                                                         president Bachelet announced in early January 2009 several measures related to labor markets: 
                                         •               First, a new Youth Employment Subsidy Law (30 Jan 09) provides a 30 percent subsidy of the annual 
                                                         income  for  those  individuals  aged  between  18  and  24,  with  finished  secondary  education  and 
                                                         working  in  a  formal  position.    It  only  covers  workers  with  monthly  (annual)  incomes  below 



                                                                                                                                                                           88
    Ch$360,000  (aprox.  US$  600).    This  Law  also  includes  extensions  to  maternity  benefits  and 
    additional leave associated to training activities.   
•   Second,  in  January  2009  a  Law  was  approved  providing  for  temporary  income  tax  reductions  for 
    individuals and tax credits for firms that carry out training activities with their workers.  Also, the law 
    includes an extraordinary benefit of Ch $ 40,000 (aprox. US$ 67).   For families and individuals that 
    are  beneficiaries  of  certain  social  programs  (Subsidio  Familiar.  Asignación  Familiar,  Chile  Solidario, 
    Asignación Maternal).  More recently, the Government has passed legislation to facilitate the access 
    to credit for medium and small enterprises. 
•   In  early  2008,  and  not  related  to  the  current  international  crisis,  the  Chilean  Government  had 
    adopted important wage measures. In May it approved a bonus of 20.000 pesos (approximately 14% 
    of the minimum wage) for workers with low incomes. Then, in July, it increased the minimum wage 
    from 144000 to 159000 pesos (that is from US$ 291 to US$ 321, approximately). 

 

COLOMBIA 

Labor market facts 

Recent unemployment rates in Colombia show a deterioration with respect to similar periods in years 
before  (see  Figure  10).  Unemployment  rate  in  March  2009  was  12.0  percent,  0.8  percentage  points 
above the year before and 0.1 percentage points above the mark for 2007. The January rate, usually the 
highest in the year, reached a level not seen since 2005. Participation rates have been on the rise. Active 
labor  force  represents  60.7  percent  of  the  percentage  of  working  age  population  for  the  month  of 
March 2009. This is one of the highest rates recorded in the country in the last three years.  
Net job creation was in decline most of year 2008 because of a net destruction of salaried workers and a 
by  declining  net  job  creation  of  non‐salaried  workers.  However,  since  the  last  quarter  of  2008,  the 
growth of non‐salaried workers has declined while salaried jobs have been on the rise (see Figure 11).  
On  the  other  hand,  real  wages  show  an  important  deceleration  since  the  middle  of  2007  for  retail 
commerce and since early 2007 for blue‐collar workers in manufacturing (see Figure 12). This fall in real 
wages is associated to consumer inflation being above 7% since June 2008, while nominal wages have 
grown at a rate below 5% in both retail and manufacturing. 
Recent Labor Market Policies 
 
In a recent intervention during a meeting of the Inter‐American Development Bank, President Alvaro 
Uribe announced that Colombia will approach employment protection with a focus on investment, firm 
activity, and good quality jobs. In particular, President Uribe mentioned three main policy interventions 
to protect employment during the crisis: 
•   Temporary  reductions  in  para‐fiscal  contributions  for  small  and  medium  size  enterprises,  during 
    their first three years of operation, in an effort to revitalize the creation of small and medium firms. 




                                                          89
                                                                                                         Colombia Labor Market Indicators (2006‐2009) 
                                                                                        Figure 9                                                                                                                                                     Figure 10 

                                                                                          Activity Rate                                                                                                                                                     Unemployment Rate
                                               62                                                                                                                                                  15
    Percentage of working age population




                                               61
                                                                                                                                                                                                   14

                                               60

                                                                                                                                                                                                   13




                                                                                                                                                           Percentage of active labor population
                                               59


                                               58                                                                                                                                                  12
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   11.9                                                              12.
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                               11.2
                                               57                                                                                                                                                                 11.3
                                                                                                                                                                                                   11

                                               56
                                                                                                                                                                                                   10
                                               55

                                                                                                                                                                                                   9
                                               54
                                                       2006




                                                                                 2007




                                                                                                                          2008




                                                                                                                                               2009
                                                              Jul




                                                                                                   Jul




                                                                                                                                   Jul

                                                                                                Months                                                                                             8




                                                                                                                                                                                                        2006




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                            2007




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 2008




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              2009
                                                                                                                                                                                                                         Jul




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    Jul




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                      Jul
                                                               Activity Rate                             12 per. Mov. Avg. (Activity Rate)




                                                                                    Figure 11                                                                                                                                                        Figure 12 

                                                                                   Net Job creation/destruction
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                       Change in real wages
1500
                                                                                                                                                                                                    8.0%


                                                                                                                                                                                                    6.0%
1000


                                                                                                                                                                                                    4.0%

             500
                                                                                                                                                                                                    2.0%
                                                                                                                                                             Annual percentage change




                                           0                                                                                                                                                        0.0%
                                                2006




                                                                          2007




                                                                                                                   2008




                                                                                                                                             2009




                                                                                                                                                                                                    -2.0%
     -500

                                                                                                                                                                                                    -4.0%

-1000
                                                                                                                                                                                                    -6.0%
                                                                                                                                                                                                                               Jul.




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                          Jul.




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                       Jul.
                                                                                                                                                                                                               2006




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     2007




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                        2008




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              2009
-1500                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              Months
                                                                    salaried workers                non-salaried workers                                                                                                       change in real wages f or blue collar workers in manufacturing (YoY)
                                                                                                                                                                                                                               change in real wages f or workers in retail commerce (YoY)




•                                                 To enhance the employability of vulnerable individuals, an additional 250,000 vacancies in SENA (a 
                                                  technical training institution) will be made available for individuals between 18 and 30 years.  The 
                                                  estimated  cost  of  this  training  effort  is  C$250  billion  (0.7  percent  of  GDP).    An  important  stated 
                                                  element  in  the  Colombian  strategy  is  the  need  to  maintain  workers  within  the  formal  sector 
                                                  (affiliated to Social Security). 
•                                                 In addition to the large public investment program included in the budget, the Government, through 
                                                  the  Export  Bank  of  Colombia  (Bancoldex),  will  launch  C$5  billion  facility  for  funding  small  and 
                                                  medium enterprises. 




                                                                                                                                                      90
 

EL SALVADOR 

Labor market facts 

Unemployment  and  Informal  employment  rates  in  El  Salvador  are  produced  annually  and  the  most 
recent figures corresponds to year 2007, making impossible a short term inspection of the labor market. 
Unemployment  has  been  quite  stable  around  the  7%  for  the  last  5  years,  with  a  peak  for  youth 
unemployment  in  2005  (see Figure 13).  Informal  employment,  on  the  other  hand,  has  declined  since 
2004, although it is still very high (see Figure 14). 
                                                                                      El Salvador Labor Market Indicators (2006‐2009) 
                                                                           Figure 13                                                                                                                                                            Figure 14 

                                                                   Unemployment rates
                         16
                                                                                                                                                                                                               Workers without formal labor contracts 
                                                                                                                                                                           100
                         14


                         12                                                                                                                                                80

                         10
Percentage




                                                                                                                                                            Percentage

                                                                                                                                                                           60
                                   8


                                   6                                                                                                                                       40

                                   4

                                                                                                                                                                           20
                                   2


                                   0
                                                                                                                                                                             0
                                            2001       2002        2003      2004         2005       2006          2007
                                                                                                                                                                                          2001                 2002                 2003                  2004                  2005                     2006                 2007
                                                         15-22 years old                         23-30 years old
                                                         31-64 years old                         15-64 years old
                                                                                                                                                                                                                     15‐30 years old                           31‐64 years old


                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                           Figure 15                                                                                                                                                            Figure 16 

                                             Employment rates and social security contributors                                                                                                                 Annual change in Social Security contributors
                                       62                                                                            700000                                                10%
    % employed for 10+ years old




                                                                                                                                                                            8%
                                                                                                                     670000

                                       61                                                                                                                                   6%
                                                                                                                                                         Annual % change
                                                                                                                              SS Contributors




                                                                                                                     640000
                                                                                                                                                                            4%

                                                                                                                     610000
                                       60                                                                                                                                   2%


                                                                                                                     580000                                                 0%



                                       59                                                                            550000                                                -2%
                                                                                                                                                                                 Jan 01



                                                                                                                                                                                                      Jan 02



                                                                                                                                                                                                                           Jan 03



                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                Jan 04



                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     Jan 05



                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                          Jan 06



                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                               Jan 07



                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    Jan 08
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                             May
                                                                                                                                                                                                Sep



                                                                                                                                                                                                                     Sep



                                                                                                                                                                                                                                          Sep



                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                               Sep



                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    Sep



                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                         Sep



                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              Sep



                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   Sep
                                                                                                                                                                                          May



                                                                                                                                                                                                               May



                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    May



                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                         May



                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              May



                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   May



                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                        May




                                               2001      2002      2003     2004       2005      2006       2007

                                                   Employment Rate                 Contributors to Social Security
                                                                                                                                                 

 
There  is,  however,  monthly  data  on  number  of  contributors  to  the  Social  Security  System.  Figure  15 
shows that social security contributions are associated to the growth of economic activity and that they 
have  declined  noticeably  since  January  2007.  Recent  numbers  are  the  lowest  in  more  than  five  years, 
indicating a serious blow to the formal employment in the economy. 


                                                                                                                                                        91
 

Recent Labor Market Policies 

The attention in El Salvador has been focused on the electoral process for the last months, and it is now 
when  the  future  and  current  administration  are  discussing  broad  policy  actions  in  a  joint  Crisis  Team. 
The main messages in the public policy dialogue include the revision of the 2009 budget which should be 
revised to reflect the slower growth and more limited fiscal resources.   
On labor markets, the main discussion is about urban employment programs especially focused on the 
youth.    This  discussion  is  expected  to  be  evolving  rapidly  as  the  administration  changes  in  June  2009.  
Since employment and other interventions will require additional fiscal resources, the Government has 
been studying the rationalization of some subsidies with a regressive pattern (water, electricity). 
 

THE DOMINICAN REPUBLIC 

Labor market facts 

Unemployment  rates  in  the  Dominican  Republic  have  been  declining  since  year  2005.  However,  there 
seems to be a reversion of this trend during the second semester of 2008. In fact, the unemployment 
rate  (broad  definition)  grew  to  14.2  percent  in  October  2008,  a  0.2  percentage  point  increase  with 
respect  to  April  2008.  The  conventional  unemployment  rate  leveled  off  at  4.2  percent,  after  five 
consecutive  semesters  in  decline.  Meanwhile,  the  inactivity  rate  increased  for  a  second  consecutive 
semester to 44.6 percent: the highest since April 2004. 
The former rates can be interpreted as early indicators of worsening labor market conditions (see Figure 
17).  Another indicator is the deceleration in the number of workers affiliated to the Dominican Republic 
pension  system.  During  most  of  years  2007  and  2008,  the  annual  increase  of  affiliated  workers  was 
above 8%. In the last quarter of 2008, the rates of growth declined noticeably (see Figure 19) 
Annual data for real wages have recorded a slight increase in 2008, although still remain well below the 
levels before the financial crisis of 2004 (see Figure 18). Monthly data from the Pension System shows 
that the increase in real wages among affiliated workers occurred during the second part of year 2008 
(see Figure 20). 




                                                          92
                                                                                                              Dominican Republic Labor Market Indicators (2006‐2009) 
                                                                                                         Figure 17                                                                                                                                                                                                                                             Figure 18 

                                                                                             Unemployment and Inactive population                                                                                                                                                                                                               Earnings in the formal and informal sector
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                        40
                                                   25.0                                                                                                                  50.0


                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                        35


                                                   20.0                                                                                                                  45.0




                                                                                                                                                                                Inactives - Percentage of working age population
    Unemployment - Percentage of the Labor force




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                       Real DR $ per hour (base 2000)
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                        30



                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                        25
                                                   15.0                                                                                                                  40.0


                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                        20


                                                   10.0                                                                                                                  35.0
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                        15



                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                        10
                                                    5.0                                                                                                                  30.0

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                         5


                                                    0.0                                                                                                                  25.0
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                         0
                                                          Oct-00




                                                          Oct-01




                                                          Oct-02




                                                          Oct-03




                                                          Oct-04




                                                          Oct-05




                                                          Oct-06




                                                          Oct-07




                                                          Oct-08
                                                          Jan-01




                                                          Jan-02




                                                          Jan-03




                                                          Jan-04




                                                          Jan-05




                                                          Jan-06




                                                          Jan-07




                                                          Jan-08
                                                          Apr-00
                                                           Jul-00



                                                          Apr-01
                                                           Jul-01



                                                          Apr-02
                                                           Jul-02



                                                          Apr-03
                                                           Jul-03



                                                          Apr-04
                                                           Jul-04



                                                          Apr-05
                                                           Jul-05



                                                          Apr-06
                                                           Jul-06



                                                          Apr-07
                                                           Jul-07



                                                          Apr-08
                                                           Jul-08




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    2000




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  2001




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                2002




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  2003




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    2004




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 2005




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                               2006




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              2007




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                      2008
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                Year
                                                                     unemployment (conventional definition)       unemployment (broad definition)          inactive
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  informal employment earnings                                    f ormal employment wages




                                                                                                         Figure 19                                                                                                                                                                                                                                             Figure 20 

                                                   1000000                                                                                                            75.0%                                                                                                                                                                                   Change in real wages
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  15%




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  10%

                                                    750000                                                                                                            50.0%
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   Change in Real Wages (percentage)




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   5%
Nomber of workers




                                                                                                                                                                                           Percent change




                                                    500000                                                                                                            25.0%                                                                                                                        0%




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                        -5%



                                                    250000                                                                                                            0.0%
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                        -10%




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                        -15%
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                           July




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                             July




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                       July
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                             2006




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                       2007




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                        2008




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     2009
                                                              0                                                                                                       -25.0%
                                                                  2006




                                                                                                  2007




                                                                                                                             2008




                                                                                                                                                            2009




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                             Months
                                                                                                              months
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                         Real wages f or workers with social security
                                                                         change in social security af filiates (YoY)                    social security af filiates


                                                           

                                                          Recent Labor Market Policies 

                                                          The Government of the Dominican Republic initially responded to the crisis by creating a social dialogue 
                                                          mechanism called “National Unity Summit to confront the International Crisis”. The Summit deals with a 
                                                          wide  range  of  issues,  among  them  employment  and  social  policy.  As  a  result  of  this  dialogue,  many 
                                                          specific proposals have been suggested in relation  to (i) employment generation, (ii) support to micro 
                                                          and medium enterprises, (iii) temporary employment programs, (iv) boosting housing construction, and 
                                                          (v) supporting business incubation centers 

                                                          More recently, the government has announced a one year extension of health coverage for unemployed 
                                                          workers who earned less than DR$10.000 (around US$285) and their families. Furthermore, a US$ 400 
                                                          million  (1%  of  GDP)  public  works  plan  will  be  adopted  in  2009  to  promote  both  employment  and 
                                                          economic growth. 

                                                          On  a  related  matter,  the  government  has  responded  to  the  crisis  with  measures  that  reduce  costs  of 
                                                          transportation, trying to maintain exports and tourism, two major drivers of employment.  The impact of 
                                                          these measures has not been assessed yet. 


                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                        93
MEXICO 

Labor market facts 

Recessions  have  been  accompanied  by  a  rapid  deterioration  of  labor  markets  in  Mexico.  The  Tequila 
crisis of 1995 and the deceleration of economic growth of 2001‐2002 both brought about increases in 
unemployment  and  in  informal  employment  rates.    The  current  developments  show  that  Mexico  is 
heading  to  a  severe  fall  in  output  growth  (GDP  fell  ‐8.2  percentage  points  y‐o‐y  in  the  first  quarter  of 
2009) which will be accompanied with rising unemployment and informality. 
Monthly data on unemployment records 5.3 percent for the month of February 2009. This is the highest 
mark since the third quarter of 1996, when the Mexican economy was getting out of the Tequila crisis. 
The rate for April was 5.26, still higher than the rate for any month during the last five years (see Figure 
22).  
                                                                                                                       Mexico Labor Market Indicators (2006‐2009) 
                                                                                                    Figure 21                                                                                                                                       Figure 22 
                                           62
                                                                                                   activity rate
                                                                                                                                                                                                            6.00
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                            unemployment rate

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                         5.25



                                                                                                                                                                                                            5.00
    percentage of working age population




                                           60
                                                                                                                                                                         percentage of active labor force




                                                                                                                                                                                                            4.00




                                           58                                                                                                                                                               3.00




                                                                                                                                            57.77                                                           2.00


                                           56
                                                                                                                                                                                                                               unemployment rate
                                                                                                                                                                                                            1.00
                                                             activity rate    12 per. Mov. Avg. (activity rate)
                                                                                                                                                                                                                               12 per. Mov. Avg. (unemployment rate)

                                                                                                                                                                                                            0.00
                                           54
                                                                                                                                                                                                                      2006




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     2007




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                       2008




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                           2009
                                                   2006




                                                                                         2007




                                                                                                                       2008




                                                                                                                                     2009




                                                                                                          month                                                                                                                                                        month




                                                                                                    Figure 23                                                                                                                                       Figure 24 
                                                                             Net Job Creation/Destruction (year-to-year)
                                                                                                                                                                          110
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                Earnings


                                           1600

                                                                                                                                                                          105

                                           1200


                                                                                                                                                                          100
                                                                                                                                                      index (2003=100)




                                            800
    thousands of workers




                                            400                                                                                                                                            95



                                                0
                                                                                                                                                                                           90
                                                          2005




                                                                                  2006




                                                                                                               2007




                                                                                                                              2008




                                                                                                                                               2009




                                            -400
                                                                                                                                                                                           85

                                            -800

                                                                   salaried workers             non-salaried workers                                                                       80
                                                                                                                                                                                                               2006




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     2007




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              2008




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  2009
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  Jul




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                      Jul




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                             Jul




                                           -1200

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                      Months
                                           -1600                                                                                                                                                            earnings in retail commerce (seasonally adjusted)    wages f or blue collar workers in manufacturing (seasonally adjusted)
                                                                                                             quarter




 
As  another  indicator  of  the  dearth  of  jobs,  the  activity  rate  has  also  been  declining  and  reached  57.3 
percent of the working age population in March 2007. This is the lowest activity rate in three years. By 
the fourth quarter of 2008, Mexico’s total employment fell by nearly 750,000 workers with respect to 
the fourth quarter of 2007. Interestingly, salaried employment grew by 530,000 workers for the same 



                                                                                                                                                      94
period, whereas self‐employment, employers and non‐salaried workers declined by 1.28 million. Figure 
23 shows that year 2008 recorded the highest destruction of self‐employment of the last five years. 
The impact of the crisis is felt not only in loss of employment, but in falling wages as well. On the one 
hand,  wages  are  declining  in  sectors  such  as  commerce.    On  the  other  hand,  wages  have  remained 
stable in the sectors that showed a sharp reduction in employment, such as manufacturing (see Figure 
24) 
 

Recent Labor Market Policies 

The Mexican economy has had both active and passive labor market programs in place for several years. 
However,  the  country  is  the  member  of  the  OECD  with  the  lowest  expenditure  in  labor  policies  as  a 
percentage of GDP. 
As  a  response  to  the  crisis,  President  Felipe  Calderón  announced  in  early  January  2009  a  National 
Agreement for the Economy and Employment (Acuerdo Nacional en Favor de la Economía Familiar y el 
Empleo). The agreement includes 25 activities grouped into five pillars. The activities directly related to 
labor markets are the following:  
•   an  expansion  of  2.2  billion  pesos  (a  0.02%  of  GDP)  of  the  Temporary  Employment  Program 
    (Programa de Empleo Temporal, PET);  
•   2 billion pesos (a 0.02% of GDP) for employment subsidies for exporting firms;  
•   extended ability to withdraw funds from retirement accounts for unemployed individuals;  
•   extension of coverage of health insurance up to six months after dismissal for unemployed workers 
    and their families; and  
•   1.25  billion  pesos  (a  0.01%  of  GDP)  for  enhancing  the  employment  intermediation  services  of  the 
    Labor Secretary. In addition, the “Acuerdo” announced a national infrastructure program for 2009 of 
    570 billion pesos (a 5.87% of GDP) in combined investment between the public and private sectors. 
 

Some Distribution aspects 

A preliminary analysis of the Mexican Labor Force Survey (ENOE) allows for a first look at the distributive 
impact  of  the  recent  labor  market  performance.  Sorting  employment  changes  by  position  of 
employment and type of economic activity reveals if the patterns in net job creation/destruction are the 
same  across  different  industries.  Manufacturing  is  the  only  economic  activity  that  has  recorded  a  net 
destruction  of  salaried  jobs.  It  also  registers  net  destruction  of  all  types  of  non‐salaried  jobs.  Actually, 
manufacturing represents more than 60 percent of all the job losses between the fourth quarter of 2007 
and 2008 (seeTable 3). All the other activities, with small exceptions, have a different pattern: net job 
creation of salaried positions and net job destruction of non‐salaried jobs. Very few activities, however, 
have net employment creation. Even non‐tradable activities as construction register net job destruction. 
The severity of the impact on the manufacturing sector highlights the international channel of diffusion 
of  the  crisis  in  Mexico.  Another  piece  of  the  evidence  in  this  regard  is  the  distribution  of  household 
income by geographic region. The regions in the north of Mexico (where tradable activities concentrate) 
have experienced the most severe fall in nominal household incomes. Income losses are registered for 
households  in  all  quintiles  of  the  distribution  in  Northern  Mexico,  whereas  in  the  rest  of  the  country 
household income losses are mostly concentrated in the bottom quintiles. (see Table 4)  



                                                             95
          Table 3: Distribution of Net job creation by employment position: Fourth quarter 2008 
                                               (year‐to‐year) 
                                          Salaried         Employer        Self-employed   Non-paid        Total
Non specified                                   (2,834)          (1,859)            77       (14,713)       (19,329)
Agriculture                                    142,157          (62,270)       (59,752)     (122,918)      (102,783)
Power generation and mining                     21,009              591           (852)          224         20,972
Manufacturing                                 (246,251)         (78,733)      (107,208)      (28,247)      (460,439)
Construction                                   129,022          (92,764)      (113,050)         (100)       (76,892)
Trade and Commerce                             108,647         (114,572)      (185,711)      (83,832)      (275,468)
Restaurants and Hotels                          42,061           11,544         (5,445)      (12,454)        35,706
Transport and communications                   108,765           (3,055)       (19,909)        3,533         89,334
Financial and private services                  50,425          (29,623)       (42,864)       10,531        (11,531)
Social services                                121,898          (19,534)       (11,119)       (6,854)        84,391
Other services                                  45,553          (46,332)       (41,115)       (4,719)       (46,613)
Government and diplomatic services              11,103                0              0         1,562         12,665
Total                                          531,555         (436,607)      (586,948)     (257,987)      (749,987)


    Table 4: Changes in household income per capita by region and initial family labor income quintile: 
                      Fourth quarter 2008 (year‐to‐year) (in nominal Mexican pesos) 
                Region                                      Quintile
                                      1            2           3                4           5           Total
         Northwest                   -13.7%        -4.3%       -2.8%            -4.5%       -6.8%         -5.6%
         North                       -34.9%        -7.4%       -3.2%            -1.7%       -6.3%         -5.4%
         Northeast                   -39.4%        -9.6%       -6.0%            -4.7%       -5.6%         -6.6%
         Midwest                     -38.8%        -6.4%       -3.3%            -2.6%        1.4%         -1.5%
         Mideast                     -20.9%        -2.9%       -0.8%             1.9%        0.4%          0.0%
         South                       -16.2%        -3.7%       -1.2%             0.1%       -0.1%         -0.4%
         Eastern                     -32.0%         0.3%        1.9%             0.9%        2.5%          1.5%
         Yucatan                      -5.6%         2.3%        4.1%             2.0%       -4.5%         -1.6%
 




                                                          96
     5. HOW MUCH ROOM DOES LATIN AMERICA AND THE CARIBBEAN HAVE FOR IMPLEMENTING 
                           COUNTER‐CYCLICAL FISCAL POLICIES?* 

                                       Cesar Calderón and Pablo Fajnzylber 
                                                    April 2009** 
 
                                                       Abstract 
Latin America’s government debt has exhibited a clear downward trend since 2003. While this has been 
partly  due  to  rapidly  increasing  commodity  prices,  more  sustainable  fiscal  policies  have  also  been  a 
contributing  factor.  In  effect,  in  a  significant  break  with  the  past,  cyclically  adjusted  government 
balances  have  risen  (fallen)  in  response  to  increases  (reductions)  in  debt  levels.  However,  Latin 
governments have continued to under‐save in good times and therefore fiscal policy has remained pro‐
cyclical, thus weakening the ability to protect the poor and maintain infrastructure investments during 
bad  times.  Financing  and  institutional  constraints  to  more  counter‐cyclical  fiscal  policies  still  remain  in 
most  countries.  They  are  lowest  in  Chile,  followed  by  Brazil  and  Colombia,  and  highest  in  Ecuador  and 
Venezuela. Looking forward, long‐term sustainability considerations cannot be ignored as decisions are 
made regarding the size, composition and targeting of fiscal stimulus packages.  
 
Financing and institutional barriers to counter‐cyclical fiscal policies remain 

Counter‐cyclical  fiscal  policies  have  recently  been  the  focus  of  increasing  attention  by  Latin  American 
policy‐makers.  As  suggested  by  the  stimulus  packages  recently  announced  by  various  G20  countries 
(Figure  1),  such  policies  are  being  considered  a  potentially  important  tool  for  mitigating  the  negative 
impacts of the current global economic slowdown. In the case of LAC, both the size and the composition 
of  the  fiscal  stimulus  packages  that  have  been  announced  vary  considerably  across  countries.  While 
some  countries  have  focused  predominantly  on  tax  cuts  (Brazil),  others  have  planned  to  raise 
infrastructure spending (Mexico, Chile and Peru). Moreover, some countries are reinforcing their social 
protection networks (Argentina and Chile) whereas others are focusing on providing incentives to non‐
traditional exports (Peru). As for the size of the packages that have been announced, it ranges from 0.6 
percent  of  GDP  in  Brazil  to  2.2  percent  for  Chile.  Overall,  the  stimulus  measures  that  have  been 
announced by Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Mexico and Peru are equivalent to 1 percent of their combined 
GDP. Still, it is difficult to ascertain the extent to which the announced fiscal stimulus measures add to 
already existing plans or reallocate expenditures that had already been budgeted.  
One  important  concern,  in  this  context,  is  that  Governments  may  be  placing  excessively  high 
expectations  on  their  ability  to  implement  discretionary  counter‐cyclical  fiscal  policies  in  an  effective 
manner.  After  all,  as  documented  in  an  extensive  empirical  literature,  few  developing  countries  have 
been  able  to  implement  such  fiscal  programs  in  the  past.116  The  great  majority  of  emerging  market 


*The views in this note are entirely those of the authors and do not necessarily represent the views of the World 
Bank, its executive directors and the countries they represent. 
**LCR Crisis Briefs Series. 
116
     See Lane (2003), Kaminsky et al. (2005), Talvi and Végh (2005) and, Ilzetzki and Végh (2008). 


                                                          97 
economies have systematically cut taxes and raised expenditures during booms, while being forced to 
adopt  contractionary  policies  during  busts,  when  domestic  and  external  credit  constraints  become 
binding.117 True, access to domestic and  international financial markets has increased considerably for 
many Latin American governments during the present decade. This, in principle, could have reduced the 
financing constraints which in the past limited their ability to implement counter‐cyclical fiscal policies. 
However,  as  is  well  known,  this  situation  has  changed  drastically  with  the  drying  of  private  credit 
markets  after  the  onset  of  the  current  global  financial  crisis.  Many  LAC  countries  are  now  facing 
considerable  challenges  just  to  roll‐over  their  current  stock  of  private  and  public  debt.  As  a  result,  in 
order to finance possible fiscal expansions, or at least to avoid a fiscal contraction, most governments 
would probably have to rely solely on their own resources, complemented by multilateral financing. The 
risk  is  that  many  of  the  countries  in  the  region  could  not  have  the  necessary  resources  to  finance 
substantial stimulus packages without compromising their hard‐gained macroeconomic stability. 
A related concern is that some of the political incentives and weaknesses in budgetary institutions which 
in the past have contributed to the pro‐cyclicality of the region’s fiscal policies may be hard to alter in 
the short run. This could limit the scope for shifting, at least in a sustainable manner, to a more counter‐
cyclical  approach.  In  particular,  governments  have  been  traditionally  unable  to  deal  effectively  with 
political  pressures  during  expansions,  which  have  limited  their  ability  to  generate  significant  surpluses 
during good times.118 To the extent that these political and institutional constraints remain unchanged, 
it could be difficult to scale back expansionary programs once the region’s economies start their cyclical 
recovery. This could in turn negatively affect their future creditworthiness and further limit the potential 
for shifting, in the  medium term and  on a sustainable basis, from pro‐cyclical to counter‐cyclical fiscal 
policies. 
 
Although LAC has traditionally had a poor fiscal policy track record … 

Latin  America’s  pro‐cyclical  approach  to  fiscal  policy  has  negatively  affected  its  long  term  growth 
through at least two channels. First, pro‐cyclicality has helped amplify economic fluctuations.119 Second, 
governments have tended to penalize public investment in the fiscal adjustment programs implemented 
during downturns.120 Besides hurting growth, this anti‐investment bias has arguably also had unintended 
negative consequences on long term government solvency.121 This effect has been reinforced by the fact 
that  most  Latin  American  countries  have  failed  to  systematically  adjust  their  fiscal  policies  to  the 
requirements of long term debt sustainability, at least until the 1990s.122 In particular, during this period, 
countries  experiencing  increasing  ratios  of  debt  to  GDP  were  not  able  to  systematically  tighten  their 
discretionary revenue and expenditure policies. Finally, the pro‐cyclicality of the region’s fiscal policies 
has made it difficult to expand social safety nets. In this sense, the behavior of fiscal policies has been 



117
     See Gavin, Hausmann, Perotti and Talvi (1996) and Caballero and Krishnamurthy (2004). 
118
     See Tornell and Lane (1999), Braun (2001), Talvi and Végh (2005), Perry (2007), Alesina, Campante and Tabellini 
(2008), Ilzetzky (2008). 
119
     See Fatás and Milhov (2007) and Perry (2007). On the pro‐cyclicality of the region’s fiscal policies, see Gavin and 
Perotti (1997), Suescún (2005), Perry (2007), Perry , Servén, Suescún and Irwin (2007) and the references therein. 
120
      The  “perversity”  of  fiscal  adjustments  biased  against  public  investments  is  related  to  the  fact  that  the  latter 
have the potential to increase future government revenues, for instance through tolls, tariffs and growth‐related 
increases in general tax collection. See Easterly and Servén (2003) and Calderón and Servén (2004). 
121
     See Servén (2007). 
122
     See Suescún (2005) and Perry , Servén, Suescún and Irwin (2007).   


                                                                 98
especially  harmful  for  the  poor,  given  their  fewer  assets,  limited  access  to  credit  and  lower  ability  to 
smooth consumption during downturns.123  
…this record has improved during the present decade  

Have these stylized facts been altered during recent years? Increasing concerns with debt sustainability, 
for example, have been apparent in many LAC countries during the last decade. In fact, the region has 
reduced  its  net  dependency  on  external  capital  inflows.  As  shown  in  Figure  2,  Latin  America’s  general 
government debt as a share of GDP has exhibited a clear downward trend after 2003. This has been the 
result  of  sound  macroeconomic  and  financial  policy  frameworks  as  well  as  better  debt  management 
practices involving improvements in currency and term composition. Moreover, countries have adopted 
more flexible and credible monetary policy frameworks; they have increased substantially their level of 
reserves, shifted to current account surpluses (or lower deficits) and deepened their local currency debt 
markets. 
Figure  2  also  presents  the  region’s  actual  and  cyclically‐adjusted  structural  primary  balances,  both 
measured  as  shares  of  GDP.124  During  most  of  the  past  two  decades  differences  between  these  two 
variables have been very small, which is consistent with previous evidence on the relative weakness of 
Latin  American  automatic  stabilizers  –  which  can  be  approximated  as  the  difference  between  actual 
fiscal outcomes and their structural counterparts.125 The main exceptions are the years 2000 and 2003, 
in which automatic stabilizers appear to have contributed to reducing the volatility of the region’s fiscal 
policy: operating in an expansionary fashion when cyclically‐adjusted balances were being increased (in 
2000) and in a contractionary way when structural balances were being reduced (in 2003). 
In addition, Figure 2 shows that after a decline during the second half of the 1990s, structural primary 
balances rose by about 3 percentage points between 1998 and 2008. This fiscal improvement was not 
driven, however, by an increased ability of governments to resist political pressures to increase primary 
expenditures. Instead, it can attributed largely to improvements in debt management and the fact that 
rising fiscal revenues, associated to a large extent to rapidly increasing commodity prices, were able to 
outgrow  primary  expenditures  (Figure  3).  Still,  higher  structural  balances  allowed  governments  to 
increase their emphasis on social spending, including on education, health and targeted transfers. 
 
And fiscal policies have become more sustainable, even while remaining pro‐cyclical 

In  order  to  assess  the  extent  to  which  the  above  policy  changes  altered  the  cyclical  properties  of  the 
region’s fiscal policies, we use data for 17 LAC countries for the period 1990‐2008. We summarize the 
behavior  of  fiscal  policy  by  estimating  a  fiscal  policy  rule  in  which  primary  balances  –  or  alternatively 
government  revenues  or  expenditures  –  depend  on  a  measure  of  the  state  of  the  cycle,  measured 
through the output gap, and the lagged value of the economy’s total debt as a share of GDP.126 We allow 

123
     See Perry (2007). 
124
      The  construction  of  the  structural  balance  follows  the  OECD  methodology  as  outlined  by  Fatas  and  Mihov 
(2009). 
125
     See Suescun (2007) for evidence on the weakness of the region’s automatic tax stabilizers, in comparison with 
industrial countries, which the author attributes to the relatively smaller size of LAC governments and the smaller 
share of income taxes found in this region.  
126
      We  closely  follow  the  methodology  proposed  by  Fatas  and  Mihov  (2009)  and  correct  for  the  possibility  of 
reverse causality from fiscal policy to the level of economic activity using instrumental variables. We instrument for 
the lagged dependent variable and the output gap with actual and lagged values of the foreign output gap, lagged 
domestic output gap, actual and lagged values of international oil prices.  


                                                             99
for the cyclical behavior and the responsiveness of fiscal policies to debt levels to vary from the 1990‐
2002 to the 2003‐2008 period. As dependent variables we first use cyclically adjusted fiscal outcomes, so 
as to capture the behavior of the discretionary component of fiscal policy which responds endogenously 
to the economic cycle. Alternatively, we use the component of fiscal policy that is linked to automatic 
stabilizers.  Moreover,  to  capture  the  joint  effect  of  endogenous  discretionary  policies  and  automatic 
stabilizers, we repeat our analysis with actual values of fiscal outcomes as dependent variables.  
Our  main  findings  are,  first,  that  after  2002  fiscal  policies  have  become  sensitive  to  long  term 
sustainability considerations, even when controlling for the effect of increasing commodity prices. Thus, 
observed  fiscal  balances  and  their  discretionary  component  have  tended  to  significantly  rise  (fall)  in 
response to increases (reductions) in the level of Government debt (Table 1).127 Our second main finding 
is  that  during  the  present  decade  Latin  America’s  fiscal  policies  have  continued  to  behave  in  a  pro‐
cyclical  way,  being  expansionary  in  countries  experiencing  booms  and  contractionary  in  those  going 
through  downturns.128  Policy  reactions  to  the  state  of  the  business  cycle,  however,  are  statistically 
significant  only  for  observed  government  expenditures  –  not  for  primary  balances  or  for  government 
revenues.  
Third,  looking  in  more  detail  at  the  region’s  endogenous  discretionary  policies,  we  find  that  the 
cyclically‐adjusted  component  of  government  revenues  tends  to  behave  in  a  counter‐cyclical  manner, 
while that of government expenditures is significantly pro‐cyclical. Not surprisingly, the behavior of the 
structural  primary  balance  is  a‐cyclical.  Fourth,  with  regard  to  the  automatic  stabilizer  component  of 
fiscal  policies,  we  find  that  it  is  significantly  pro‐cyclical  for  government  revenues  and  the  primary 
balance but counter‐cyclical in the case of government expenditures. Fifth, the behavior of government 
expenditures is dominated by their pro‐cyclical discretionary component, which more than compensates 
for  their  counter‐cyclical  automatic  stabilizer  element.  And  sixth,  government  revenues  appear  to  be 
dominated  by  their  pro‐cyclical  automatic  component,  which  more  than  compensates  for  counter‐
cyclical discretionary policy changes.  
There are, however, some notable differences between the behavior of fiscal policies across the group 
of  7  largest  LAC  countries  and  the  rest  of  the  region.  129  As  illustrated  in  Figure  4,  the  discretionary 
component  of  government  expenditures  is  relatively  more  pro‐cyclical  in  LAC7,  while  that  of 
government revenues and primary balances is relatively more counter‐cyclical in this group of countries. 
In  contrast,  LAC  7  countries  exhibit  weaker  counter‐cyclical  automatic  stabilizers  in  the  area  of 
government expenditures, but stronger and more pro‐cyclical automatic revenue and primary balance 
stabilizers. Overall, considering both discretionary and automatic changes in primary balances (jointly), 
LAC7 countries exhibit a less pro‐cyclical behavior.  
 




127
      The  results  in  Table  1  do  not  change  significantly  when  we  also  control  for  changes  in  export‐weighted 
commodity prices. 
128
     In our framework, booms (downturns) are defined as periods in which the growth of observed output is above 
(below) that of its cyclically‐adjusted structural component. 
129 
     LAC  7  countries  include  Argentina,  Brazil,  Chile,  Colombia,  Mexico,  Peru  and  Venezuela.  Rest  of  LAC  includes 
Bolivia, Costa Rica, Ecuador, Guatemala, Honduras, El Salvador, Nicaragua Panama, Paraguay, and Uruguay. 


                                                              100
Fiscal space for financing stimulus packages varies considerably across LAC9 countries 

We  assess  the  extent  to  which  LAC  countries  are  in  a  position  to  implement  fiscal  stimulus  packages 
without jeopardizing their fiscal sustainability and macroeconomic stability.130 To that end, we construct 
a composite index of “lack of space for fiscal stimulus” which depends on the following six factors: levels 
of  public  debt,  primary  deficits,  commodity  dependence,  expenditure  rigidity,  access  to  finance  and 
borrowing costs.131 We combine these six dimensions into an aggregate index.132 Higher scores indicate 
higher  constraints  for  the  financing  of  fiscal  stimulus  packages.  As  shown  in  Figure  5,  Ecuador  and 
Venezuela display the largest constraints for financing fiscal stimulus packages, while Chile displays by 
far the lowest constraints. Among the rest of the countries in our sample, Brazil and Colombia appear to 
be  slightly  better  positioned  than  Peru,  Mexico  and  Argentina.  In  most  countries,  the  most  important 
barrier to countries’ ability to implement stimulus packages is related to their limited access to domestic 
and  external  financing.  The  main  exceptions  are  Chile,  for  which  commodity  dependence  is  the  main 
factor, Brazil, for which the existing debt burden is the dominant factor, and Mexico, where high primary 
deficits are the main constraint, at least relative to other countries in the region. 
 
Some desirable traits of counter‐cyclical stimulus packages 
As  shown  above,  the  room  for  implementing  counter‐cyclical  fiscal  policies  varies  considerably  across 
the  region.  However,  some  key  characteristics  of  fiscal  stimulus  measures  are  likely  to  be  considered 
desirable by all countries.133 First, given the hard‐gained achievements of the region in the area of debt‐
management,  most  countries  are  likely  to  place  a  large  value  on  sustainability  considerations.  In 
practice, given the various constraints described above, this calls for exercising caution in terms of the 
size of potential stimulus packages. In terms of their composition, it calls for an emphasis on measures 
that  could  easily  be  scaled  down  once  countries  start  recovering,  or  which  could  generate  future 
increases  in  fiscal  revenues  –  e.g.  as  in  the  case  of  growth‐enhancing  investments  in  infrastructure. 
Second,  when  designing  their  fiscal  responses  to  the  crisis,  most  countries  are  likely  to  give  a  large 
weight to targeting issues, so as to try and protect the region’s achievements in the social front and help 
the most vulnerable cope with the downturn. In this respect, social safety nets based on means‐tested 
transfers and workfare programs may be preferable to general increases in public sector wages. Finally, 
all  countries  are  likely  to  seriously  consider  the  possible  trade‐off  between  the  timeliness  of  fiscal 
interventions  and  their  potential  effectiveness  and  efficiency.  This  may  imply,  for  example,  giving 
priority to avoiding the suspension of ongoing or pre‐appraised projects instead of starting new and un‐
tested public investment projects.  
 




130
     We focus on a group of nine countries comprising Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, Mexico, 
Peru and Venezuela. 
131
      Appendix  1  describes  the  motivations  for focusing  on  these  factors,  as  well  as  the  specific  indicators  used  to 
measure them, and country rankings for each of them. 
132
      We  normalize  the  six  components  of  the  index  to  scores  in  the  unit  interval  [0,1].  We  do  not  cover  Bolivia 
because of lack of data on borrowing costs. 
133
     See Spilimbergo, Symansky, Blanchard and Cotarelli (2008) and Kraay and Serven (2008). 


                                                                101
References 

Alesina, A., F. Campante, and G. Tabellini (2008) “Why is fiscal policy often pro‐cyclical?” Journal of the 
        European Economic Association 6(5): 1006‐1036 
Braun, M. (2001) “Why is fiscal policy pro‐cyclical in developing countries?” CIPPEC, manuscript 
Caballero,  R.,  and  A.  Krishnamurthy  (2004)  “Fiscal  policy  and  financial  depth.”  NBER  Working  Paper 
        10532, May 
Calderón,  C.  and  L.  Servén,  eds.  (2004)  “Trends  in  Infrastructure  in  Latin  America,  1980‐2001,”  Policy 
       Research Working Paper No. WPS 3401, World Bank, Washington, DC. 
Debrun, X., J. Pisany‐Ferri, and A. Sapir (2008) “Government size and output volatility: Should we forsake 
       automatic stabilization?” 
Easterly,  W.  and  L.  Servén,  eds.  (2003)  The  Limits  of  Stabilization:  Infrastructure,  Public  Deficits,  and 
        Growth in Latin America, Palo Alto: Stanford University Press and World Bank. 
Fatas,  A.,  and  I.  Mihov  (2001)  “Government  size  and  automatic  stabilizers.”  Journal  of  International 
         Economics  
Fatas,  A.,  and  I.  Mihov  (2003)  “The  case  for  restricting  fiscal  policy  discretion.”  Quarterly  Journal  of 
         Economics 118(4): 1419‐1447 
Fatás, Antonio and Ilian Mihov (2007).  “Fiscal Discipline, Volatility and Growth”, in Guillermo Perry, Luis 
        Servén  and  Rodrigo  Suescún  (eds.),  Fiscal  Policy  Stabilization  and  Growth:  Prudence  or 
        Abstinence? Washington D.C.: The World Bank. 
Fatas, A., and I. Mihov (2009) “The Euro and fiscal policy.” NBER Working Paper 14722, February 
Galí, J. (2004)”Government size and macroeconomic stability.” European Economic Review 38:  
Gavin, M., R. Hausmann, R. Perotti, and E. Talvi (1996) “Managing fiscal policy in Latin America and the 
       Caribbean: Volatility, pro‐cyclicality, and limited creditworthiness.” Inter‐American Development 
       Bank, Office and the Chief Economist, Working Paper 326 
Gavin,  Michael  and  Roberto  Perotti  (1997).    "Fiscal  Policy  in  Latin  America".    NBER  Macroeconomics 
        Annual.  Cambridge and London:  MIT Press.  pp. 11‐61. 
Ilzetzki,  E.  (2008)  “Rent‐seeking  distortions  and  fiscal  pro‐cyclicality.”  University  of  Maryland, 
          manuscript, December 
Ilzetzki, E., and C.A. Végh (2008) Pro‐cyclical fiscal policy in developing countries: Truth or fiction? NBER 
          Working Paper 14191, July 
Kaminsky,  G.L.,  C.M.  Reinhart,  and  C.A.  Végh  (2005)  “When  it  rains,  it  pours:  Pro‐cyclical  capital  flows 
       and macroeconomic policies.” In: Gertler, M., and K. Rogoff, eds., NBER Macroeconomics Annual 
       2004. Cambridge, MA: The MIT Press 
Kraay,  A  and  L.  Servén  (2008)  “Fiscal  Policy  Responses  to  the  Current  Financial  Crisis:  Issues  for 
        Developing Countries,” Manuscript, World Bank, Washington, DC. 
Lane,  P.R.,  2003.  “Business  cycles  and  macroeconomic  policy  in  emerging  market  economies.” 
        International Finance 6: 89‐108 
Perotti, R., 2007. “Fiscal policy in developing countries: A framework and some questions.” The World 
         Bank Policy Research Working Paper 4365, September 


                                                         102
Perry, G. (2007): “Fiscal Rules and Pro‐Cyclicality”, in Guillermo Perry, Luis Servén and Rodrigo Suescún 
        (eds.),  Fiscal  Policy  Stabilization  and  Growth:  Prudence  or  Abstinence?  Washington  D.C.:  The 
        World Bank. 
Perry, G., L. Servén, R. Suescún and T. Irwin (2007): “Overview: Fiscal Policy, Economic Fluctuations and 
        Growth”, in  Guillermo Perry, Luis Servén and Rodrigo Suescún  (eds.), Fiscal  Policy Stabilization 
        and Growth: Prudence or Abstinence? Washington D.C.: The World Bank. 
Servén, L. (2007): “Fiscal Discipline, Public Investment and Growth”, in Guillermo Perry, Luis Servén and 
        Rodrigo  Suescún  (eds.),  Fiscal  Policy  Stabilization  and  Growth:  Prudence  or  Abstinence? 
        Washington D.C.: The World Bank. 
Spilimbergo, A., S. Kaminsky, O. Blanchard, and C. Cotarelli (2008): “Fiscal Policy for the Crisis”, IMF Staff 
       Position Note, SPN/08/01, International Monetary Fund, Washington DC. 
Suescún, R. (2005): “Pro‐Cyclical Fiscal Policy in Latin America: Where do we Stand?”  World Bank LAC 
       Regional Study, World Bank, Washington, DC. 
Suescún,  R.  (2007):  “The  Size  and  Effectiveness  of  Automatic  Fiscal  Stabilizers  in  Latin  America”,  in 
       Guillermo Perry, Luis Servén and Rodrigo Suescún (eds.), Fiscal Policy Stabilization and Growth: 
       Prudence or Abstinence? Washington D.C.: The World Bank. 
Talvi, E. and C.A. Végh (2005) “Tax base variability and pro‐cyclical fiscal policy in developing countries.” 
         Journal of Development Economics 78, 156‐190 
Tornell, A., and P.R. Lane (1999) “The voracity effect.” American Economic Review 89: 22‐46 
 




                                                       103
Annex 1: Index Components  

Public  Debt.  Lower  levels  of  public  debt  may  signal  successful  efforts  of  fiscal  consolidation  as  well  as 
better debt management practices. As an indicator of debt levels we use the general government debt 
as a percentage of GDP over 2005‐2008. As shown in Figure 6, Chile is by far the best positioned country 
in  this  respect,  while  Brazil  exhibits  the  largest  level  of  public  debt  in  our  sample,  and  is  followed  by 
Argentina, Bolivia and Mexico. 
Primary  deficits.  During  periods  of  liquidity  constraints  —either  in  domestic  or  international  capital 
markets— governments may need to rely on liquidity buffers to finance stimulus programs. We focus on 
the  average  primary  balances  between  2005  and  2008.  Figure  7  shows  that  between  2005  and  2008 
Chile had the largest primary surplus whereas Venezuela had the lowest – despite the sharp increase in 
this country’s fiscal revenues thanks to rising oil prices. 
Commodity dependence. Our indicator of choice is the response of central government revenues (as a 
percentage of GDP) to a 10% increase in the Reuters/Jefferies CRB index of commodity prices. Figure 8 
shows  that  the  LAC  countries  that  are  exporters  of  oil  and  natural  gas  (Bolivia,  Ecuador,  Mexico  and 
Venezuela) appear to be the most vulnerable, in terms of reductions in fiscal revenues, to the ongoing 
declines  in  commodity  prices.  At  least  in  the  LAC9  group,  the  countries  with  the  lowest  sensitivity  of 
fiscal revenues to fluctuations in commodity prices are Brazil and Colombia.  
Expenditure rigidity. Countries with a higher share of earmarked spending arguably have a smaller room 
to undertake discretionary fiscal policies.134 We measure this through the share of mandatory spending 
in  total  spending,  where  mandatory  spending  is  the  sum  of  public  wages,  interest  payments,  social 
security payments and transfers to regions (or provinces). Figure 9 shows that mandatory spending was 
lowest in Colombia and largest in Brazil, Mexico and Venezuela. In Argentina and Venezuela, about three 
quarters of mandatory spending come from social security and transfers. Ecuador and Bolivia display the 
largest  contribution  of  public  wages  while  Colombia  shows  the  largest  contribution  of  interest 
payments. 
Access  to  finance.  Countries  with  deeper  local  currency  debt  markets  and  those  with  less  restrictive 
access to world capital markets are expected to face lower financing constraints. Our composite index 
uses  the  following  variables  to  measure  this  factor:  (a)  capital  raisings  by  the  private  sector  in  the 
domestic market (as % of GDP) as a measure of depth of local currency debt markets, (b) gross capital 
inflows  (i.e.  FDI,  portfolio  equity,  portfolio  debt,  and  other  investment)  as  %  of  GDP  as  a  measure  of 
access to funds abroad, and (c) an indicator variable that accounts for the fact that some countries have 
swap lines with foreign central banks and some LAC governments pre‐qualify for the flexible credit line 
(FCL) with the IMF.  Figures 10 and 11 show the size of capital raisings by LAC9 countries and the gross 
capital  inflows  to  those  countries  during  2005‐2008.  Overall,  Chile  and  Brazil  appear  to  be  the  least 
constrained in terms of access to domestic and external financing.  
Borrowing costs. The financial burden of financing stimulus packages would be lower for countries with 
lower  sovereign  spreads.  We  focus  on  the  average  EMBI  sovereign  spread  of  LAC  countries  between 
2007  and  2008.  Figure  12  shows  that  Argentina,  Venezuela  and  Ecuador  display  the  largest  sovereign 
spreads while investment grade countries such as Chile, Brazil and Mexico have smaller spreads.135 

134
   Fatas and Mihov (2003). 
135
    We  do  not  include  measures  of  local  borrowing  costs  as  the  papers  issued  by  different  countries  vary 
considerably in terms of their maturity. However, thanks to extensive arbitrage between local and external bond 
markets, cross‐country differences in local borrowing costs are likely to be similar to those in external borrowing 
costs. 


                                                           104
Annex 2: Figures and Tables 

 
             Figure 1. Estimated Cost of Fiscal Discretionary Measures in 2009                                       Figure 2. Gross general government debt and primary balance in 
                                       (as % of GDP)                                                                                LAC region, 1990‐2008 (% of GDP )
                                                                                                         80                                                                                                            4.0
    4.5
                                                                                                         70                                                                                                            3.5
    4.0
                                                                                                         60                                                                                                            3.0
    3.5
    3.0                                                                                                  50                                                                                                            2.5
    2.5
                                                                                                         40                                                                                                            2.0
    2.0
                                                                                                         30                                                                                                            1.5
    1.5
    1.0                                                                                                  20                                                                                                            1.0
    0.5                                                                                                  10                                                                                                            0.5
    0.0
                                                                                                          0                                                                                                            0.0
                                                            str S
                                  ge K




                                                                    a
        do e




                                       da
                                Ge ico
                                  M a
                 il




                                  Ca y




                                                                   n
                                                                    a
         Fr a




                                                                ain
               ly




                                                         S. ina
              sia




                                                                   a
                                                                  ia
                                                                                                              1990      1992      1994        1996     1998          2000      2002        2004       2006     2008
                                                                 U
              az




                                                                bi
                                     an
                                Ar U
     I n nc




                                      in
              di




                                                               pa




                                                                re
                                                                ali
            Ita




                                                               ss
                                    na
          ne




                                                              ra
                                    ex




                                                             Sp
           In




                                                             Ch
                                    nt
          Br




                                                            Ko
            a




                                   rm




                                                             Ja




                                                            Ru
                                                            A
                                                          Au




                                                                                                                        Government Debt               Actual balance (rhs)                Structural balance (rhs)
                                                                                                                                                                                                                              
                         Figure 3: LAC Revenues and Primary Spending                                              Figure 4: Sensitivity of Fiscal Policies to the Economic Cycle in Latin
    32.0                                    (Percent of GDP)                                                                            America and the Caribbean

    30.0                                                                                                 0.30
                                                                                                         0.20
    28.0                                                                                                               0.26                                                                    0.24
                                                                                                         0.10                         0.19               0.15
    26.0                                                                                                 0.00                                                               0.03
                                                                                                                      -0.05           -0.08
                                                                                                                                                                                                               -0.13
    24.0                                                                                                 ‐0.10                                           -0.27              -0.22             -0.21

                                                                                                         ‐0.20                                                                                                 -0.15
    22.0
                                                                                                         ‐0.30
    20.0
                                                                                                         ‐0.40
           1990   1992        1994   1996       1998     2000      2002      2004      2006       2008           Expenditures :   Expenditures :     Revenues :           Revenues :         Primary        Primary
                                                                                                                     LAC7          Res t of LAC         LAC7              Res t of LAC    Balance: LAC7 Balance: Res t of
                  Revenues                                      Ciclycally Adjusted Revenues                                                                                                                  LAC
                  Primary Spending                              Ciclycally Adjusted Primary Spending                                 Endogenous discretionary policy          Automatic Stabilizers


 




                                                                                                         105
     1.0
                       Figure 5. Aggregate index of lack of space for fiscal stimulus                                                                                              Figure 6. Public Debt as % of GDP 
                                                                                                                                   70                                                     (2005‐2008 Average)

     0.8                                                                                                                           60


                                                                                                                                   50
     0.6

                                                                                                                                   40
     0.4
                                                                                                                                   30

     0.2
                                                                                                                                   20

     0.0                                                                                                                           10
              Chile       Brazil       Colombia             Peru         Mexico      Argentina        Ecuador       Venezuela
                                                                                                                                       0
                        Debt burden                    Primary deficits                  Commodity dependence
                                                                                                                                               Argentina      Bolivia       Brazil        Chile     Colombia     Ecuador     Mexico     Peru     Venezuela
                        Expenditure rigidity           Financing constraints             Financing costs


                                       Figure 7: Primary Balance as % of GDP                                                                         Figure 8. Reduction of Central Government Revenues as a result of a 10% 
      9                                                                                                                            3.0                                decline in commodity prices (% of GDP )
                                                    (2005‐2008 Average)
      8
                                                                                                                                   2.5
      7

      6                                                                                                                            2.0

      5
                                                                                                                                   1.5
      4

      3                                                                                                                            1.0

      2
                                                                                                                                   0.5
      1

      0                                                                                                                            0.0
           Argentina   Bolivia        Brazil        Chile          Colombia    Ecuador     Mexico          Peru      Venezuela                  Brazil      Colombia      Argentina       Peru       Chile       Mexico     Bolivia   Ecuador   Venezuela



                                 Figure 9. Central Government: Mandatory Spending                                                                                          Figure 10. Capital raisings ‐ Private issues 
 90%                                    (% of total spending, average 2005‐2008 )                                                  6                                                 (% of GDP, 2005‐2008 Average )
 80%
                                                                                                                                   5
 70%

 60%                                                                                                                               4
 50%

 40%                                                                                                                               3

 30%
                                                                                                                                   2
 20%

 10%                                                                                                                               1
     0%
            Colombia    Bolivia        Chile       Ecuador         Argentina      Peru       Mexico        Brazil     Venezuela    0
                                                                                                                                           Argentina        Bolivia       Brazil         Chile     Colombia     Ecuador     Mexico     Peru     Venezuela
                           Public wages         Interest payments         Social security and transfers


                                               Figure 11. Gross Capital Flows                                                                                         Figure 12. Borrowing Costs: EMBI Sovereign spreads 
 12                                            (% of GDP, 2005‐2008 Average )                                                      3000                                            (in basis points, 2007‐2008 Average )
 10
                                                                                                                                   2500
     8

     6
                                                                                                                                   2000
     4

     2                                                                                                                             1500
     0
                                                                                                                                   1000
     ‐2

     ‐4
                                                                                                                                       500
     ‐6

     ‐8                                                                                                                                    0
           Argentina   Bolivia       Brazil        Chile       Colombia        Ecuador     Mexico         Peru      Venezuela                   Argentina      Bolivia       Brazil        Chile     Colombia     Ecuador    Mexico     Peru     Venezuela

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              
  




                                                                                                                                  106
Table 1
Fiscal Policy Reaction Function:  Model with 2003 break in output gap and government debt
Dependent variable:  Fiscal indicator as % of GDP (FI)
Method: Instrumental Variables

                                                                     Actual                                                   Cyclically‐adjusted                                 Automatic stabilizers
                                                   Primary         Government          Primary                Primary            Government           Primary         Primary         Government            Primary
                                                   Balance          Revenues         Expenditure              Balance              Revenues         Expenditure       Balance          Revenues           Expenditure

I. All LAC Countries
       Output gap, 1990‐2002                         ‐0.109486          ‐0.066482        0.209820**              0.001678             0.081457         0.249023**    ‐0.181486***      ‐0.246536***       ‐0.060828***
                                                 [0.100086]         [0.103084]        [0.106947]            [0.104136]           [0.101633]         [0.104293]          [0.016243]        [0.016112]         [0.009430]
     Output gap, 2003‐2008                            ‐0.10535          ‐0.060685         0.211770*              0.004452             0.088687         0.251989**    ‐0.180441***      ‐0.246137***       ‐0.061561***
                                                 [0.101527]         [0.104511]        [0.108066]            [0.105610]           [0.103208]         [0.105446]          [0.016472]        [0.016332]         [0.009560]
     Govt Debt, 1990‐2002                             0.006994          ‐0.005468        ‐0.009512*              0.007275            ‐0.005738          ‐0.008646          0.00038          0.000447             ‐0.0004
                                                 [0.004982]         [0.005668]        [0.005663]            [0.004824]           [0.005672]         [0.005607]          [0.001364]        [0.001351]         [0.000771]
     Govt Debt, 2003‐2008                         0.020370***            0.002222         ‐0.012584          0.024904***              0.006603          ‐0.012623        ‐0.002169         ‐0.000937           0.000735
                                                 [0.007432]         [0.008076]        [0.008248]            [0.007043]           [0.007985]         [0.008156]          [0.002142]        [0.002115]         [0.001222]
     Lagged fiscal indicator                      0.444984***        0.682914***       0.845723***           0.437704***          0.565476***        0.844531***      0.161839***       0.113259***        0.244445***
                                                 [0.106828]         [0.092082]        [0.082748]            [0.107885]           [0.084132]         [0.079674]          [0.048194]        [0.043339]         [0.052917]
     No. Countries                                          17                 17                17                    17                   17                 17               17                17                  17
     No. Observations                                      272                272               272                   272                  272                272              306               306                 306

II. LAC 7 Countries (a)
      Output gap, 1990‐2002                          ‐0.037676          ‐0.041078          0.196103                  0.2348           0.142881           0.254821     ‐0.208988***     ‐0.267301***       ‐0.053806***
                                                 [0.164666]         [0.121295]        [0.164085]             [0.192193]          [0.126647]         [0.158613]           [0.025564]       [0.024641]         [0.016643]
     Output gap, 2003‐2008                           ‐0.023594          ‐0.029414          0.200864               0.250227            0.156735           0.261228     ‐0.207845***     ‐0.267365***       ‐0.055178***
                                                 [0.168506]         [0.123204]        [0.166281]             [0.196760]          [0.128824]         [0.160861]           [0.026051]       [0.025102]         [0.016962]
     Govt Debt, 1990‐2002                            ‐0.000763           ‐0.00989         ‐0.001902               0.001669           ‐0.014657           0.002041         ‐0.004023        ‐0.005303          ‐0.001944
                                                 [0.014259]         [0.013865]        [0.018588]             [0.014380]          [0.014638]         [0.018524]           [0.003888]       [0.003745]         [0.002521]
     Govt Debt, 2003‐2008                             0.008195          ‐0.002954         ‐0.005339               0.012009            0.000133           ‐0.00554         ‐0.005435        ‐0.003938           0.001002
                                                 [0.014810]         [0.012530]        [0.016004]             [0.014901]          [0.013349]         [0.016018]           [0.004300]       [0.004132]         [0.002783]
     Lagged fiscal indicator                          0.134514       0.630896***       0.749189***                0.006668        0.502029***        0.788488***         0.138092*          0.084851       0.282845***
                                                 [0.198628]         [0.106361]        [0.165117]         [0.235915]              [0.103950]         [0.160556]       [0.071242]           [0.063592]         [0.084087]
     No. Countries                                           7                  7                 7                       7                  7                  7                 7                7                  7
     No. Observations                                      112                112               112                     112                112                112               126              126                126

III. Rest of LAC (b)
      Output gap, 1990‐2002                          ‐0.144559          ‐0.069438           0.145708             ‐0.133101            0.027987            0.188266    ‐0.145566***     ‐0.224928***       ‐0.079714***
                                                 [0.129731]         [0.161922]        [0.135007]             [0.128318]          [0.155761]         [0.132233]           [0.021507]       [0.022241]         [0.009787]
     Output gap, 2003‐2008                           ‐0.144969          ‐0.068222            0.14432             ‐0.135258            0.029068            0.187705    ‐0.144717***     ‐0.224477***       ‐0.080097***
                                                 [0.131105]         [0.163918]        [0.136214]             [0.129618]          [0.158015]         [0.133485]           [0.021755]       [0.022488]         [0.009890]
     Govt Debt, 1990‐2002                            0.008552*          ‐0.005486       ‐0.013607**              0.009440*           ‐0.004229        ‐0.012773**          0.001114          0.00126          ‐0.000046
                                                 [0.005088]         [0.006830]        [0.005454]             [0.004989]          [0.006899]         [0.005393]           [0.001291]       [0.001329]         [0.000548]
     Govt Debt, 2003‐2008                         0.026800***            0.005217          ‐0.013895          0.031569***             0.011017           ‐0.013397        ‐0.001317         ‐0.00063           0.000448
                                                 [0.008710]         [0.011281]        [0.009458]             [0.008181]          [0.011159]         [0.009359]           [0.002264]       [0.002324]         [0.000985]
     Lagged fiscal indicator                      0.547577***        0.731633***       0.894010***       0.608808***              0.665810***        0.880947***       0.207247***      0.168877***          0.126472*
                                                 [0.120285]         [0.175971]        [0.097688]         [0.114474]              [0.166286]         [0.094710]       [0.069091]           [0.062152]         [0.065995]
     No. Countries                                          10                 10                 10                    10                  10                  10               10               10                 10
     No. Observations                                      160                160                160                   160                 160                 160              180              180                180

Standard errors in brackets        *** p<0.01, ** p<0.05, * p<0.1
(a) LAC 7 countries include Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Mexico, Peru and Venezuela. 
(b) Rest of LAC includes Bolivia, Costa Rica, Ecuador, Guatemala, Honduras, El Salvador, Nicaragua Panama, Paraguay, and Uruguay.                                                                                           




                                                                                                         107
                 6. CRISIS IN LAC:  INFRASTRUCTURE INVESTMENT AND THE POTENTIAL FOR  
                                         EMPLOYMENT GENERATION 
                                    Laura Tuck, Jordan Schwartz and Luis Andres 
                                                    May 2009* 
 
                                                          Abstract 
Infrastructure  investment  is  a  central  part  of  the  stimulus  plans  of  the  LAC  region  as  it  confronts  the 
growing  financial  crisis.      This  paper  estimates  the  potential  effects  on  direct,  indirect,  and  induced 
employment for different types of infrastructure projects with LAC‐specific variables.  The analysis finds 
that  the  direct  and  indirect  short‐term  employment  generation  potential  of  infrastructure  capital 
investment projects may be considerable—averaging around 40,000 annual jobs per US$1billion in LAC, 
depending  upon  such  variables  as  the  mix  of  subsectors  in  the  investment  program;  the  technologies 
deployed;  local  wages  for  skilled  and  unskilled  labor;  and  the  degrees  of  leakages  to  imported  inputs.  
While these numbers do not account for substitution effect, they are built around an assumed “basket” 
of investments that crosses infrastructure sectors most of which are not employment‐maximizing.  Albeit 
limited in scope, rural road maintenance projects may employ 200,000 to 500,000 annualized direct jobs 
for  every  US$1billion  spent.    The  paper  also  describes  the  potential  risks  to  effective  infrastructure 
investment  in  an  environment  of  crisis  including  sorting  and  planning  contradictions,  delayed 
implementation and impact, affordability, and corruption. 
 
Introduction:  Latin America and the Caribbean’s Stimulus Packages 

As of February 2009, the largest economies in Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC) have announced 
                                                                                         136
stimulus  packages  that  commit  governments  to  increase  spending  on  public  works.     The  programs 
range  in  size  from  0.4  percent  to  1.6  percent  of  each  country’s  Gross  Domestic  Product  (GDP).  
Extrapolating these commitments to the region as a whole suggests that governments in the region plan 
to invest approximately an additional US$25 billion in 2009 in public works—which is about 20 percent 
                                                     137
beyond the originally planned budget allocations.   This represents an additional 0.5 to 1.0 percent of 




*LCR Crisis Briefs Series. 
136
      Public  Works,  in  this  case,  mainly  refers  to  infrastructure  investments  in  transport,  energy,  and  water  and 
sanitation but may also include public housing and public edifices such as schools and hospitals.  The division of 
expenditure expected among categories and sub‐sectors is still unclear in many of the pronouncements. 
137 
     While the authors have used UNECLAC, IMF and country‐level public expenditure data to attempt to verify the 
additionality of the stimulus announcements over originally budgeted expenditures, it remains to be seen whether 
fiscal, political and disbursement constraints will allow for these resources to be mobilized in the months to come.  
Also, the stated stimulus plans vary in degree of specificity and clarity as to timing, resourcing and additionality.  
The extrapolation to the region is based on the average levels of stated public works stimulus for 9 countries in LAC 
including the region’s 5 largest economies covering 80% of LAC’s GDP. 


                                                             108 
GDP in commitments in public works, raising public capital spending levels to somewhere between 3.0 
                                                138
to 4.0 percent of GDP for the region as a whole.  (See Annex 1 for details.) 
The  stimulus  packages  are  comprised  mainly  of  public  works.    Although  some  of  the  programs  may 
include  investments  in  public  housing  and  edifices,  to  date  the  majority  of  the  projects  and  programs 
announced  focus  on  the  core  infrastructure  sectors  of  transport,  water  and  sanitation,  and  energy.  
While discussions continue about the effects of these investments on short‐term aggregate demand, the 
                                                                                              139
employment generation potential of these investments remains a central feature . This is particularly 
important  as  LAC’s  unemployment  levels  rise  in  the  face  of  the  growing  crisis.    This  note  provides  a 
                                                            140
preliminary  estimate  of  the  employment  generation   potential  for  different  types  of  infrastructure 
investments as per the LAC stimulus packages. 
 
The Impact of Infrastructure Investment on Short‐Term Employment Generation  

The  most  comprehensive  way  to  calculate  the  labor  impacts  of  a  single  infrastructure  investment  or 
                                                                                                     141
program is to consider three levels of employment generation stemming from the investment : 
         •    Primary Impact:  Those directly employed on site to undertake the task at hand; 
         •    Secondary  Impact:  Those  indirectly  employed  in  the  manufacture  of  materials  and 
              equipment that are supplied to the initial investment; and 
         •    Tertiary  Impact:    The  induced  employment  generated  by  the  direct  and  indirect  jobs 
              created.    This  includes  all  of  the  jobs  supported  by  consumer  expenditures  resulting  from 
              wages in the two previous levels. 
Using an Input‐Output Model that considers all levels of inputs to construction, the US Federal Highway 
                                                                                                                142
Administration  has  estimated  employment  generated  or  supported  from  investments  in  highways.   
Keeping  in  mind  the  shortcomings  of  these  calculations—and  adjusting  for  them  with  available  data 
                                                143
from LAC on wages, leakages by sub‐sector   and skilled and unskilled labor divisions—the approach to 
calculating direct and indirect jobs provides a basis for estimating the employment generation potential 
of  investments  in  all  areas  of  infrastructure  in  countries  outside  of  the  US.    A  review  of  project 
documents,  IEG  reports,  and  sectoral  ESW  provides  a  sufficient  starting  point  for  this  analysis  with 
information  about  construction  costs  and  direct  employment  levels  for  a  variety  of  infrastructure 
projects  across  Latin  America.    By  assigning  wage  assumptions  to  workers  according  to  skill  sets, 
138
    In recent years, the LAC Region has seen additional investments in infrastructure from private sector sources 
totaling between 1 and 2 percent of GDP per year.  This range includes telecommunications investments which are 
mostly private throughout the region but does not include private housing stock.  Calderon and Serven (2004a,b). 
139 
     For  a  summary  of  other  related  issues  such  as  risks  to  effective  infrastructure  investment,  impact  of  public 
expenditure stimulus on short‐ and long‐term growth, the balance between new investments vs. maintenances see 
Schwartz, Andres, Dragoiu  (2009). 
140 
     This note uses the term “employment generation” to refer to annualized short‐term jobs mobilized directly or 
indirectly as the result of an investment.  It does not consider substitution effects or imply change in the long‐term 
labor stock. 
141 
    See, for example, Heintz and Pollin (2009) and Romer and Bernstein (2009),. 
142 
      JOBMOD2.1:  A  Comprehensive  Model  for  Estimating  Employment  Generation  from  Federal‐Aid  Highway 
Projects  (2006).  Boston  University  Center  for  Transportation  Studies  under  subcontract  to  Battelle  Memorial 
Institute  for  U.S.  Department  of  Transportation  Federal  Highway  Administration  Office  of  Transportation  Policy 
Studies  See also Weels (2008) for more  recent results of this model.  
143 
     In  calculating  secondary  labor  generation,  a  portion  of  machinery  and  equipment  inputs  are  assumed  to  be 
imported depending upon the technology deployed in the sub‐sector providing a very basic discount for leakage. 


                                                              109 
estimating domestic and foreign content for both materials and equipment, a levelized set of results in 
terms  of  direct  and  indirect  annualized  employment  can  be  calculated  for  a  given  sum  of  money 
expended—in this case US$1billion.  These estimates do not account for substitution effect and are thus 
most applicable to economies with slack labor conditions and high unemployment among day laborers 
and construction workers. 
The most important result of this summary analysis is that the range of direct employment impacts is 
tremendous:    from  750  direct  short‐term  positions  per  US$1billion  spent  on  coal‐fired  generation 
projects  to  100,000  short‐term  positions  for  water  supply  and  sanitation  network  expansion.    In 
addition, the results are highly sensitive to assumptions about wages and the division between skilled 
and  unskilled  workers.    The  direct  employment  generation  potential  of  a  public  works  project  is  thus 
highly sensitive to:  the sectoral allocation of the proposed program; the technology to be employed in 
each project, and the local labor market traits of the country in question.  Indirect job estimates are also 
highly sensitive to the division between locally produced versus imported inputs. 
                                                                                                    144
With  those  sensitivities  in  mind,  a  “prototypical  mix”  of  infrastructure  investment   implemented  in 
LAC would generate about 40,000 direct and indirect short‐term positions per US$1billion spent.  Even 
with an assumed multiplier of 2.0 for further induced employment and no crowding out or substitution 
effect,  this  would  mean  employment  generation  of  about  2  million  jobs  for  the  incremental  US$25 
billion so far proposed as stimulus in 2009 in the LAC region.  This would represent about 7 percent of 
LAC’s  estimated  unemployed  in  2009.    The  estimates  correspond  to  capital  investment  projects  in 
various countries across the region.  [See Annex 2 for details.]   
There  is  a  sub‐set  of  infrastructure  interventions,  which,  however  limited  in  scope,  may  provide  the 
opportunity  for  even  greater  direct  employment  benefits:    rural  road  maintenance.    Such  programs 
          145
typically  invest up to 90 percent of the total project costs in labor activities.  Regional data suggest 
that  between  200  and  500  annualized  positions  are  generated  for  every  million  dollar  spent  on  these 
initiatives by employing unskilled workers in rural areas paid at the minimum wage.  The jobs generated 
from labor intensive maintenance projects would, in turn, generate very few indirect jobs because of the 
lack  of  material  and  equipment  inputs.    Nevertheless,  labor  intensive  projects  coupled  with  well‐
targeted social programs may be considered a highly progressive intervention for reducing the impact of 
the  crisis  on  poor  communities.    Again,  the  primary  employment  generation  numbers  assume  no 
substitution effect. 
In advising governments on the design of stimulus plans, it becomes clear that the employment story is 
complex  and  the  investment  decision  should  be  made  in  the  context  of  the  explicit  objectives  of  the 
government  in  the  medium  to  long  term.    Beyond  the  varying  labor  results,  fast  and  significant 
expansion  of  infrastructure  investments  presents  important  practical  challenges  to  the  efficiency  and 
the efficacy of the stimulus program.  A shortlist of these challenges might include:  sorting and planning 
contradictions,  delayed  disbursement  and  impact,  the  affordability  of  these  packages,  and  corruption 
risks. 



144 
     Based on country experience with infrastructure investment we assumed a composition of these stimulus as: 
50%  in  Transport  (25%  in  highways,  20%  in  urban  roads,  and  5%  in  rural  roads),  30%  in  Electricity  (25%  in 
generation  of  electricity  and  5%  in  rural  electrification),  and  20%  in  Water  and  Sanitation  (15%  in  coverage 
expansion and 5% in treatment plants). We simulated different composition and the estimations were significantly 
robust. 
145 
     Peru  ‐  Second  Rural  Roads  Project  (P044601);  data  from  Mexico  Subsecretario  de  Transporte,  MTC,  and 
Guatemala ‐ Second Rural and Main Roads Project (P055085). 


                                                           110 
Sorting and Planning Contradictions:  Infrastructure investments often contain complementarities (e.g., 
modes  of  transport  assets  along  a  supply  chain)  or  substitution  effects  (e.g.,  rail  versus  road  for 
transport or gas versus electricity supply for heating).  They might also contain contradictory character 
traits  intended  to  meet  different  objectives.    For  example,  a  road  investment  component  might  meet 
employment  goals,  but  could  contribute  to  automobilization  and  higher  carbon  emissions  in  the  long‐
term.  A renewable energy component might meet environmental objectives but may not demonstrate 
significant employment benefits given the high import components.  Governments will need to call upon 
the  capacity  for  ex  ante  project  evaluation;  cross‐sectoral  convening  ability;  and  the  authority  to 
                                                                          146
prioritize, scale and permit projects according to impact analysis.   This will enable the development of 
investment packages that converge short‐term goals of stimulus with the long‐term goals of sustainable 
growth. 
Delayed  Implementation  and  Impact:    The  lifecycle  of  project  preparation  for  medium  or  large‐scale 
projects is generally 1 to 3 years, although projects that are simply awaiting financing may be “shovel 
ready.”  However, it is possible that projects that have been sitting in pipeline will require new demand 
studies, updated cost projections or even recalibrated willingness and ability to pay analyses given the 
shifting resources of consumers and the changing prices of inputs in the crisis environment.  Moreover, 
several countries in LAC habitually disburse less than their annually expected disbursements—typically 
around 75 percent of plan.  Given the importance of timeliness in generating stimulus effect, delays and 
slow  disbursements  would  have  a  significant  and  perhaps  irreversible  effect  on  the  impact  of  the 
project. 
Affordability  of  the  Stimuli  Packages:    The  potential  scope,  size  and  timing  of  LAC’s  proposed  stimuli 
packages  will  be  determined  by  fiscal  space—the  room  in  a  government’s  budget  that  allows  it  to 
provide resources for additional projects without jeopardizing the sustainability of its financial position 
or the stability of the economy.  In other words, fiscal space must exist or be created if extra resources 
                                                                          147
are  to  be  made  available  for  worthwhile  government  spending .    LAC’s  proposed  stimuli  packages 
present  enormous  demand  on  the  limited  fiscal  space  in  the  region  and  the  room  for  aggressive 
                                                    148
responses is heterogeneous across the region.    
Corruption Risks:  Emergency environments often create the impetus for shortcuts, particularly as they 
relate  to  time‐consuming  safeguard  practices.    In  a  crisis  situation,  governments  may  feel  justified  in 
seeking  to  bypass  lengthy  procurement  policies  such  as  international  competitive  bidding,  pre‐
                                                                                                          149
qualification,  and  re‐bidding  in  the  case  of  insufficient  competition  or  non‐responsive  bids .    The 
temptation to trade time for competition raises the risk of corruption, collusion, and public skepticism.  
Rushed procurement processes run the risk of being self‐defeating and costly elements of stimulus.  
 




146
     The Global Experts Team for Public Sector Management, in conjunction with LCSPS, is undertaking a study of 
best practices in the management of stimulus programs that includes a review of US and other OECD institutional 
arrangements. 
147
     Heller (2005). 
148
     Calderon and Fajnzylber (2009)
149
     Kenny (2007). 


                                                        111 
 

Conclusions 

Infrastructure investment is already a central part of the stimulus plans of LAC as the region confronts 
the  growing  financial  crisis.    The  employment  generation  potential  of  the  infrastructure  investment 
component of stimulus may be considerable—averaging around 40,000 jobs per US$1billion in LCR for a 
basket of investment.  This excludes the tertiary effects of induced employment from direct and indirect 
                           150
employee  consumption.     Albeit  limited  in  scope,  rural  road  maintenance  projects  initiated  through 
micro‐enterprises may produce 200,000 to 500,000 direct jobs per US$1billion of disbursements.  Levels 
of  employment  generation  per  package  of  investments  is  highly  sensitive  to  local  wages,  the  division 
among skilled and unskilled workers, the sector under consideration (i.e., the component pieces in the 
“basket”),  the  technology  being  deployed  in  each  project  investment,  the  degree  of  importation  of 
inputs, and— in areas without slack labor conditions—substitution effect. 
To understand the impact of investments in times of crisis, policy makers will benefit from sector‐level 
analysis, comparative technology analysis, and data on the sourcing of inputs.  In addition, in order to 
assure the effectiveness of infrastructure investments in a crisis environment, governments may wish to 
consider  the  strengthening  of  planning  processes  which  weigh  the  trade‐offs  associated  with  multiple 
investments; procurement processes which are robust in the face of time pressures; and disbursement 
plans  which  keep  up  with  the  levels  of  expected  investment  activity.    Finally,  short‐term  plans  for 
infrastructure investment are most effective when viewed in the context of the long‐term objectives of 
growth  and  poverty  alleviation  which  remain  infrastructure’s  fundamental  contribution  to  economic 
activity. 




150 
     Although  US  estimates  from  highway  construction  more  than  double  the  employment  generation  estimates 
when  induced  jobs  are  added,  it  should  be  remembered  that  other  forms  of  transfers  from  government—tax 
credits, CCTs, food stamps—would also generate induced employment 



                                                        112 
Bibliography 

Calderon, C. and P. Fajnzylber (2009) “How much room does Latin America and the Caribbean have for 
       implementing counter‐cyclical fiscal policies?”  LCR Crisis Briefs Series, The World Bank. 
Calderon, C. and L. Servén (2004a) “The Effects of Infrastructure Development on Growth and income.” 
       Policy Research Working Paper Series 3400, The World Bank. 
Calderon, C. and L. Servén (2004b) "Trends in infrastructure in Latin America, 1980‐2001," Policy 
       Research Working Paper Series 3401, The World Bank. 
Coenen, G. and R. Straub (2005), “Does Government Spending Crowd in Private Consumption? Theory 
      and Empirical Evidence for the Euro Area,” International Finance, 8(3): 435‐470. 
Consensus Economics (2009) “Latin America Consensus Forecast,” February 16, 2009. 
Heintz, J. and R. Pollin (2009) “How Infrastructure Investment Supports the U.S. Economy: Employment, 
        Productivity and Growth,” Political Economy Research Institute (PERI), University of 
        Massachussetts Amberst, January 2009. 
Heller, P. (2005) “Understanding Fiscal Space,“ IMF Policy Discussion Paper PDP/05/4, Fiscal Affairs 
         Department. March 2005. 
Kenny, C. (2007) “Infrastructure governance and corruption: where next?,” Policy Research Working 
       Paper, WPS4331. The World Bank. 
Romer, C. and J. Bernstein (2009), “The Job Impact of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Plan.” 
       January 8, 2009. 
RDEL (2009) “Job and Economic Development Impact Models” National Renewable Energy Laboratory. 
Schwartz, J., L. Andres, and G. Dragoiu (2009) “Crisis in LAC:  Infrastructure Investment, Employment and 
       the Expectations of Stimulus,” The World Bank. 
UNECLAC (2009) “The reactions of Latin American and Caribbean governments to the international 
      crisis: an overview of policy measures up to 30 January 2009.” 
UNEP (2008) “Green Jobs: Towards decent work in a sustainable, low‐carbon world,” United Nations 
       Environment Programme (UNEP). 
Wells, J. (2008) “Transportation Spending, An Inefficient Way to Create Short‐Term Jobs,” The official 
         blog of the U.S. Secretary of Transportation, http://fastlane.dot.gov/2008/09/chief‐
         economist.html (Accessed March 12, 2009) 
 
Acknowledgements: 

The  authors  would  like  to  acknowledge  the  research  assistance  of  Georgeta  Dragoiu,  María  Claudia  Pachón  and 
Darwin Marcelo Gordillo and to thank the following colleagues for their inputs and suggestions:  Daniel Benítez, 
Philippe  Benoit,  Cesar  Calderón,  Rodrigo  Chaves,  Cecilia  Corvalán,  Augusto  de  la  Torre,  Marianne  Fay,  Jose  Luis 
Guasch,  Ada  Karina  Izaguirre,  Emmanuel  A.  James,  William  Maloney,  Nick  Manning,  Marisela  Montoliu  Muñóz, 
Nicolas  Peltier‐Thiberge,  Jaime  Saavedra,  Tomas  Serebrisky,  María  Angélica  Sotomayor,  Aiga  Stokenberga,  Theo 
David Thomas, Maria Vagliasindi, and Ariel Yepes.  The findings, interpretations, and conclusions expressed in this 
paper are entirely those of the authors, and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Board of Executive Directors 
of the World Bank or the governments they represent.  The authors are also solely responsible for any incomplete 
or inaccurate data.  



                                                            113 
Annex 1: Stimulus Pans for LAC 

The  Table  below  summarizes  the  region’s  major  commitments  to  economic  stimulus  that  have  been 
announced  in  recent  weeks  and  the  estimation  of  region‐wide  investment  levels.    The  five  countries 
included in the table represent over 75 percent of the region’s population and GDP. 
 
                                                       Table A1: Stimulus Plans for LAC, 2009
                                      2009 Stimulus Pkg                                       Total Public Works                            Ratio Stimulus vs
                                  Investment in Public Works                                        (2009)                                  Total Investment
                                      $B          % GDP                                        $B          % GDP
          Argentina                   4.4           1.6%                                      17.1          6.1%                                      25.7%
          Brazil                      6.7           0.5%                                      23.3          1.7%                                      28.8%
          Chile                       0.7           0.4%                                       4.7          2.7%                                      15.0%
          Mexico                      6.9           0.8%                                      43.6          4.8%                                      15.8%
          Peru                        1.6           1.3%                                       5.8          4.6%                                      27.6%
          LAC (*)             25       0.5% to 1.0%           125        3% to 4%                20%
          (*) For the LAC estimates, we extrapolated the figures to those countries without information.
          Source: UNECLAC (2009), IMF, National Legislation Data, Consensus Economics (2009), and Authors’ calculations.
          Note: Many countries have proposed multiyear packages. These estimates capture the additional investments in public work
          to be implemented in 2009 in addition to the budget proposed previously for the year 2009. (*) For LAC’s estimates, we
          extrapolated the figures to those countries without information.

 
Annex 2: Annual Direct Employment 

The  table  below  provides  the  results  for  an  estimate  of  Annual  Direct  Employment  per  US$1Billion 
spent. 

       Table A2: Employment Levels for Representative Infrastructure Capital Investment Projects in
                                   LAC, by Country and Sub-sector
                                                                                                Domestic         Foreign                                Annual Direct
                                                                Qualified    Non-qualified        inputs          inputs                                Employment
                                                                                                                               Others        Total
                                                                workers        workers           (mainly         (mainly                               (per US$1B/yr)
                                                                                                material)      equipment)                                    [*]
     Transport
          Colombia - Access to neigborhoods (streets)             15%              6%               49%               16%          14%         100%       22,500
          Colombia - Feeder routes for Transmilenio                        43%                      27%               23%           6%          99%       35,833
          Brazil - Roads                                           3%              9%               22%               63%           3%         100%       16,577
          Argentina- Rosario - highways                           1.3%            0.3%              60%               38%           0%         100%        1,650
     Water and Sanitation
          Honduras - Improvement on water captation               28%             12%               40%               20%                      100%       43,333
          Honduras - Rehabilatation of water networks             30%             20%               40%               10%                      100%       58,333
          Honduras - Expansion of water networks                  20%             30%               40%               10%                      100%       66,667
          Honduras - New treatment plant                          10%             10%               80%                0%                      100%       25,000
          Colombia - Expansion of WSS networks                     8%             56%               32%                4%                      100%       100,000
          Brazil - Rain Drainage networks                          8%             16%               48%               28%           0%         100%       34,001
          Brazil - Sewerage                                        4%             11%               68%               17%           0%         100%       21,746
     Energy
          US - Solar PV                                          3%-5%                                    95%-97%                              100%        2,700
          US - Wind Power                                        4%-6%                                    94%-96%                              100%        3,400
          US - Biomass                                           1%-2%                                    98%-99%                              100%         700
          US - Coal-fired                                        1%-2%                                    98%-99%                              100%         750
          US - Natural gas-fired                                 2%-4%                                    96%-98%                              100%        1,700
          Brazil - Hydropower                                    5%-10%                                   90%-95%                              100%        4,500
          Peru - Rural Electrification                            14%              7%               26%               53%           0%         100%       23,000
     [*] These estimates were based on an hourly wage of $3 for non qualified workers and $6/hr for qualified one for 2,000 working hours a year.
     Source:  World Bank project documents: Honduras ‐ Water and Sanitation Program (P103881), Colombia ‐ Bogota Urban Services Project (P074726), 
     Brazil ‐ Bahia Poor Urban Areas Integrated Dev (P081436), and Argentina ‐ Santa Fe Road Infrastructure (P099051). Energy estimates are from the 
     UNEP (2008), Peru ‐ Rural Electrification (P090116), and Brazil ‐ Cana Brava hydropower plant. Authors’ calculations. 




                                                                                      114 
              7. HOW WILL LABOR MARKETS ADJUST TO THE CRISIS? A DYNAMIC VIEW 
                                               William Maloney 
                                                March 2009* 
                                                        
                                                   Abstract 
 
 
Tracking flows of workers among different sectors of employment during economic downturns can 
shed  light  on  the  mechanism  of  labor  market  adjustment  and  inform  the  design  of  safety  net 
programs.  Though patterns may differ across recessions, we find that the generally countercyclical 
rise  in  unemployment  and  informality  is  driven  primarily  by  a  reduction  in  hiring  in  the  formal 
sector,  rather  than  increased  labor  shedding.    Further,  changes  in  the  rate  of  separations  from 
informality  are  the  largest  determinant  of  changes  in  unemployment.    Both  suggest  that  safety 
nets  should  focus  less  on  formal  job  loss  per  se  and  more  generally  on  movements  in  family 
incomes, perhaps revealed through self targeting mechanisms. 
Past crises suggest that as GDP falls unemployment and informality will rise. For Brazil and Mexico 
the  elasticity  of  the  unemployment  rate  with  respect  to  output  averages  roughly  ‐4.5;  for 
unemployment and the elasticity of the share of the labor force in informal employment averages 
about .2. 
Understanding the flows of workers among sectors that generate these movements in aggregates 
can help understanding the mechanisms of adjustment of labor markets during crisis, and inform 
the design of safety net programs. At any moment in time, changes in any labor market indicator, 
such as the unemployment rate, or the share of formal employment, is driven by changes in flows 
into and out of those employment states from and to other states. A change in the unemployment 
rate, for example, could be supported with a variety of combinations of flows.  In the US literature, 
for  example,  Shimer  (2007)  and  Hall  (2005)  among  others  have  argued  that  most  new 
unemployment is caused by employers ceasing hiring, rather than firing workers.  The reason for 
this is an active subject of debate.  
Following  workers  as  they  move  among  sector  across  several  periods  of  economic  downturn  in 
Brazil and Mexico suggests several stylized facts about how Latin America’s labor markets adjust 
to macro economic shocks.151 
• Consistent  with  the  US  literature,  the  share  of  formal  employment  is  procyclical  with  an 
elasticity of approximately .2‐.3. That is, while not always the case, formal employment generally 
falls during recessions.  This occurs primarily because of a reduction in hiring and hence greater 
difficulty  of  finding  formal  jobs  from  inactivity,  unemployment  and  informal  jobs  rather  than 
because of increased separation from formal jobs.  




*LCR Crisis Briefs Series. 
151
      See Bosch and Maloney (2008) for details.  


                                                     115 
• Transitions  between  informality  and  formal  employment,  in  fact,  slow  down  during  downturns. 
Conversely, in recoveries, flows increase in both directions suggesting increased matching across both 
the  informal  and  formal  sectors  of  the  economy.    The  symmetry  of  flows,  as  opposed  one  where 
workers transit unidirectionally from unemployment to informality to formality to retirement suggests 
that  job  matches  in  the  informal  sector  are  not  overall,  considered  inferior.    The  queuing  view  of 
informality as disguised informality is true for some, but not the majority of those holding informal jobs. 
• The  unemployment  rate  is  countercyclical,  rising  as  output  falls,  with  an  elasticity  with  respect  to 
output of roughly ‐4.5. It is driven primarily by increased job separations of informal workers. Shedding 
of workers from the formal sector, while important, has not been the dominant driver.   
• Informality  is  also  countercyclical,  not  primarily  because  of  increased  shedding  from  the  formal 
sector,  but  because  unemployed  workers  cannot  find  jobs  in  the  formal  sector.152  Fundamentally, 
informal job finding rates show much less cyclical volatility than formal ones and hence the sector winds 
up hiring a disproportionate number of job seekers in downturns. 
• Together,  these  stylized  facts  offer  an  updated  mechanism  of  the  informal  sector  as  a  safety  net, 
although without the connotation of a general inferiority of informal employment. The sector absorbs 
the majority of the newly unemployed, and contributes most to changes in unemployment.  However, it 
is not primarily a direct safety net for those losing formal sector jobs. 
 
Why does this matter? 

Downturns  differ  from  one  another.  At  the  most  basic  level,    the  elasticities  of  unemployment  and 
formality vary across episodes within these two countries and we could expect the underlying dynamics 
to  change  as  well.    Hence,  extrapolating  the  lessons  from  history  to  the  present  global  crisis  is  not 
without risks.  However, several implications emerge from the stylized facts presented above: 
• Job  loss  in  the  formal  sector  is  not  sufficient  as  a  targeting  criterion.    New  entrants  to  the  labor 
force, or family members seeking to augment falling real incomes will find themselves unable to access 
formal employment and will recur to the informal sector. Because no one in the family has lost a job, 
their declining prospects will not show up on official job registers. 
• To the degree that job loss is a criterion, the fact that most is from the informal sector suggests that 
tracking formal employment rolls, or targeting formal workers will miss a critical part of the story. 
• The increased absorption of labor in the informal sector implies a fall in average earnings there. For 
instance, small business owners will see more competition from new entrants in the midst of a decline 
in overall spending.   Again, average family incomes, rather than job loss per se, needs to be a central 
focus of targeting efforts.  
• The  increased  rate  of  job  separations  from  the  informal  sector  suggests  that,  while  the  informal 
sector is absorbing more workers, it is doing so in a dynamically frenetic way, shedding labor at a very 
high rate as well.  This may arise because many of the new entrants to the sectors soon find their micro 
enterprise to be unviable.  Informality is thus something of an unstable safety net.  

152
     More  generally,  the  cyclical  patterns  can  be  more  complex  depending  on  the  nature  of  the  economic  shock.  
From 1988‐91 in Mexico, the informal sector expanded during the boom in non‐tradables‐construction, services, 
transport, a pattern also found in Brazil and Colombia at various times (Fiess et al 2008).  However, the present 
shock is originating from the exterior largely through demand for exports which tend to be more formal sectors.  
The more straightforward interpretation as a negative shock to the formal sector is appropriate.


                                                            116
• That said, informality cannot be considered a criterion in itself for social protection expenditures.  In 
good  times,  opinion  surveys  in  both  countries  confirm  the  view  gleaned  from  the  transition  patterns 
above  that  a  substantial  majority  consider  self‐employment  an  attractive  sector  to  enter.    In  times  of 
crisis,  the  relative  share  of  involuntary  entrants  rises,  but  a  sizable  share  remains  voluntarily  informal 
(see annex II).  The informal salaried in both good and bad times are substantially less voluntary than the 
self employed (see Perry et. al 2008). 
 
Policy 

• Policies seeking to preserve jobs by raising the costs of firing are unlikely to have first order effects 
since formal sector separations are not the primary drivers of unemployment and informality growth.  In 
fact, they may further depress hiring in the formal sector by increasing the long run labor cost. 
• Targeting  should  be  based  more  on  family  income  than  on  registered  job  loss.    Unfortunately, 
because  of  the  CCT’s  reliance  on  means  testing  for  targeting,  sudden  falls  in  family  income  with 
moderate duration may be missed by infrequent periodicity of means testing.  That said, the fact that in 
Mexico,  children  do  drop  out  of  school  when  a  parent  loses  a  job  suggests  a  need  for  the  kinds  of 
incentives that CCTs offer. 
• A  self  targeting  system  such  as  envisaged  in  workfare  programs  such  as  Trabajar  or  the  PET  can 
obviate the need for means testing. For instance, setting the program wage sufficiently low means that 
only those truly in need will apply for the program.  
• The  choice  of  types  of  works  programs,  whether  simple  with  low  materials  content  or  more 
sophisticated  infrastructure  projects  with  a  lower  budget  share  transferred  to  workers  depends 
substantially on the local context and bjectives of the government.153  
 
Annex 1: Details on adjustment mechanisms 

Fujita and Ramey (2007) offer a means of decomposing movements of labor market aggregates, such as 
the unemployment rate, or the share of formal employment into the principle contributions of flows to 
and from different sectors. Table 1 reports this breakdown for Brazil and Mexico, across a long period, 
and during times of crisis.  In general, between 85 and 80% of movements in the unemployment rate are 
driven  by  inflows  from  informality  (I).    Outflows  reductions  in  outflows  to  formal  jobs  (F)  contribute 
roughly 20%; to informal salaried work, relatively little, and to self employment (S), essentially zero.  
 




153
       See Ravallion (1999) and Maloney (2000) 


                                                          117
 

                       Table 1: Relative Contribution of Flows to Aggregate Movements 
                            in Unemployment and Formal Employment (In percent) 
                                                         Unemployment Rate 
                               I‐Inflows               Outflows‐F  Outflows‐I            Outflows‐S        Error 
        Whole Sample                                                                                    
        Mexico                   0.82                     0.20             0.02              ‐0.03         ‐0.01 
        Brazil                   0.69                     0.22             0.11              ‐0.03          0.01 
                                                                                                              
        Recession                                                                                             
        Mexico                   0.76                     0.24        0.04        ‐0.01                    ‐0.02 
        Brazil                   0.65                     0.26        0.09         0.00                     0.00 
                                                          Formal Employment 
                                I‐flows                 Outflows‐I  Outflows‐S  Outflows‐U                 Error 
         Whole Sample                                                                     
        Mexico                   0.69                      0.08             0.01              0.19          0.04 
        Brazil                   1.22                     ‐0.21            ‐0.16              0.18         ‐0.02 
                                                                                                              
        Recession                                                                                             
        Mexico                   0.84                     ‐0.05            ‐0.01              0.17          0.05 
        Brazil                   1.31                     ‐0.15            ‐0.22              0.08         ‐0.02 
    Notes: The table presents the contribution of   the cyclical component of each flow to cyclical volatility of the 
    unemployment rate and the share of formal employment for Mexico and Brazil following Fujita and Ramey, 
    2007.  We  define  recession  as  output  below  trend.  O=Out  of  the  Labor  Force,  U=Unemployment, 
    E=Employment,  S=Informal  Self‐Employed,  I=Informal  Salaried,  and  F=Formal  Sector,  all  as  proportions  of 
    working age population. Data for Mexico (left panels) is drawn from the quarterly National Urban Labor Survey 
    (ENEU) from 1987:Q1 to 2004:Q4. Data for Brazil (right panels) is drawn from the Monthly Employment Survey 
    (PME), quarterly averaged from 1983:Q1 to 2001:Q2.  
 
Underlying these results are differing responses of flows among particular sectors to downturns.  Figure 
1 presents the raw and detrended job finding probabilities across time in Brazil and Mexico.  The former 
are somewhat clearer, however Brazil experienced a steady rise in informality across the sample period 
and  this  evolution  muddies  somewhat  the  cyclical  patterns.    What  is  clear  is  that  flows  from 
unemployment into formal employment show the greatest volatility across the cycle, decreasing more 
than any other sector of employment during downturns. 
Figure  2  shows  the  analogous  series  for  job  separations.    In  this  case,  transitions  from  formality  to 
unemployment vary far less than either flows from informal salaried work or informal self employment.  
In  the  simulations  underlying  table  1,  the  contribution  of  each  possible  flow  to  the  evolution  of 
unemployment  and  formal  employment  is  undertaken  by  modeling  how  all  flows  interact  to  generate 
these aggregates, and then sequentially holding one flow or another fixed and measuring the resulting 
impact on the evolution of the aggregate.  




                                                            118
 

 
              Figure 1: Job Finding Rates from Unemployment (Levels and Cycle): Mexico and Brazil 
                            Mexico                                            Brazil 
    .6




                                                                            .4
    .5




                                                                            .3
    .4




                                                                            .2
    .3




                                                                            .1
    .2




                                                                            0
    .1




                                                                             1983q1   1988q1        1993q1         1998q1   2003q1
     1987q1        1991q3        1996q1         2000q3   2005q1

                                U-S       U-I                                                      U-S       U-I
                                U-F                                                                U-F

                                                                                                                                      

                                                                            .4
    .2




                                                                            .2
    0




                                                                            0
    -.2




                                                                            -.2
                                                                            -.4
    -.4




                                                                             1983q1   1988q1        1993q1         1998q1   2003q1
     1987q1        1991q3        1996q1         2000q3   2005q1

                            U-S (HP)      U-I (HP)                                             U-S (HP)      U-I (HP)
                            U-F (HP)                                                           U-F (HP)

                                                                                                                                      
 




                                                                      119
          Figure 2: Job separation Rates towards Unemployment (Levels and Cycle): Mexico and Brazil 
                           Mexico                                           Brazil 
    .15




                                                                           .1
                                                                           .08
    .1




                                                                           .06
                                                                           .04
    .05




                                                                           .02
                                                                           0
    0




                                                                            1983q1   1988q1        1993q1         1998q1   2003q1
     1987q1       1991q3        1996q1         2000q3   2005q1

                               S-U       I-U                                                      S-U       I-U
                               F-U                                                                F-U

                                                                                                                                     




                                                                           .4
    .4




                                                                           .2
    .2




                                                                           0
    0




                                                                           -.2
    -.2




                                                                           -.4
    -.4




                                                                            1983q1   1988q1        1993q1         1998q1   2003q1
     1987q1       1991q3        1996q1         2000q3   2005q1

                           S-U (HP)      I-U (HP)                                             S-U (HP)      I-U (HP)
                           F-U (HP)                                                           F-U (HP)

                                                                                                                                     
Notes:  Figure  1  shows  the  transition  rates  from  unemployment  (U=Unemployment)  into  the  three  employment 
sectors (S=Informal Self‐employed, I=Informal Salaried, and F=Formal Sector). Figure 2 shows the transitions rates 
into unemployment (U) from all three sectors of employment. Transition rates are inferred from the continuous 
time transition matrix for each period obtained following the procedure by Geweke et al. (1986) outlined in Bosch 
and Maloney (2009) Section III. Computations are based on 10.000 Monte Carlo replications. The series have been 
smoothed using a 4 quarter moving average to remove high frequency fluctuations. The bottom panels shows the 
series logged and de‐trended using an HP filter with lambda 1600. Data for Mexico (left panels) is drawn from the 
quarterly  National  Urban  Labor  Survey  (ENEU)  from  1987:Q1  to  2004:Q4.  Data  for  Brazil  (right  panels)  is  drawn 
from the Monthly Employment Survey (PME), quarterly averaged from 1983:Q1 to 2001:Q2. Shaded areas indicate 
recessions. 
 




                                                                     120
 
Annex II: Cyclical changes in the level of disguised unemployment in the informal sector 

The Mexican employment survey suggests that there is a component of informality that correspond to 
disguised  unemployment  and  which  varies  as  expected  over  the  business  cycle..  Figure  3  plots  the 
proportion of workers who respond positively to the question “Have you been looking for a job over the 
last two months?” and who had not changed employment status from the quarter before as a possible 
proxy for the degree of dissatisfaction with the current job coupled with the availably of alternative jobs.  
Search intensity is generally higher in the informal salaried sector, perhaps, reflecting the relative youth 
of  that  group  although  the  magnitudes  (and  hence  differences)  are  not  large:  in  the  upturns  of  mid‐
1990s and 2000, search rates were equal across sectors at roughly 1‐2%. These very low levels suggest 
that  we  may  not  be  fully  capturing  the  degree  of  involuntariness  in  the  sector.    As  additional 
information, the National Microenterprise survey suggests that in 1992, roughly 65% of those entering 
informal self employment from formal salaried work replied doing so voluntarily.  The rate of search is 
equivalent  to  the  formal  sector  at  this  time,  and  somewhat  below  the  informal  salaried  sector 
suggesting a higher degree of involuntary entry there.  
The share searching is strongly countercyclical implying that as the labor market becomes slack and the 
access to the formal sector from all sectors decreases, dissatisfaction increases. In the informal sectors, 
the percentage searching for better jobs peaks at just under 7% during the 1995 crisis, a gap of slightly 
over 4% points over the formal sector  .   This suggests that in fact  the sector contained more workers 
who were forced into bad matches.   This makes sense if during the crisis only the informal sector was 
hiring and absorbing more unemployed as a share of the workforce than during booms. 
                                  Figure 3: Searching While Employed: Mexico  
                   .08
                   .06
                   .04
                   .02
                   0




                    1987q1              1991q3             1996q1             2000q3              2005q1

                                                 Searching(F)             Searching(S)
                                                 Searching(I)

                                                                                                            
            Note: Quarterly data from the National Urban Labor Survey (ENEU) 1987:Q1 to 2004:Q4. Searching 
            (j) refers to the proportion of employed workers in sector j who claim to be looking for a new job 
            and have not changed employment status in the previous quarter.   
 




                                                           121
References: 

      Bosch, M. and W. F. Maloney (2009) Cyclical Movements in Unemployment and Informality in 
         Developing Countries, mimeo, Office of the Chief Economist for Latin America, the World Bank 
Fiess, N. M. Fugazza, W. F. Maloney (2008) Informality and Macro economic Fluctuations” IBRD working 
         paper. 
Geweke  J.,  R.  Marshall  and  Gary  A.  Zarkin  (1986)  “Exact  Inference  for  Continuous  Time  Markov  Chain 
      Models,” Review of Economic Studies 53(4). Pp653‐69 
Hall, R. (2005); “Employment Efficiency and Sticky Wages: Evidence Flows in the Labor Market,” Review 
         of Economics and Statistics 87(3)397‐407. 
Maloney,  W.  (1990)  “Evaluating  Emergency  Programs:  Intertemporal  and  Financing  Considerations” 
      mimeo, Latin American and Caribbean Region. 
Shimer, R. (2007), “Reassessing the Ins and Outs of Unemployment” Mimeo, University of Chicago. 
Perry, G., W. F. Maloney, O.S. Arias, P Fajnzylber, A.D. Mason, J Saavedra‐Chanduvi (2007) Informality, 
        Exit and Exclusion, World Bank Latin American and Caribbean Studies. 
Ravallion, M (1999) “Appraising Workfare,” World Bank Research Observer 14(1): 31‐48. 
 
 




                                                      122
         8. WHAT IS THE LIKELY IMPACT OF THE 2009 CRISIS ON REMITTANCES AND POVERTY  
                               IN LATIN AMERICA AND THE CARIBBEAN? 

            Gabriel Demombynes, Hector Valdés Conroy, Ezequiel Molina and Amparo Ballivián 
                                            April 2009* 
 
Importance of Remittances for LAC’s Fight against Poverty and Inequality 

Remittances have long been known to be an important factor for development and poverty reduction 
                                              154
in Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC).  Just how important depends on what variable is chosen 
for the analysis, since there is wide variation in remittances’ importance by country, depending on the 
viewpoint: 
•   In total dollar terms, the largest remittance receivers in 2008 were: Mexico ($26bn), Colombia ($4.5 
    bn), Brazil ($4.5 bn), Guatemala ($4.4 bn), and El Salvador ($3.8 bn).  
•   As share of GDP the largest receivers in 2007 were: Honduras (24.5%), Guyana (23.5%), Haiti (20%), 
    and Jamaica (19.4%).  
•   In per capita terms, the largest receivers in 2008 were: Jamaica ($827), El Salvador ($555), Dominica 
    ($413), Honduras ($395), and Guyana ($377).  
•   By  fraction  of  households  receiving  remittances,  the  most  important  were:  Haiti  (49%),  Jamaica 
    (40%), Guyana (33%), El Salvador (27%), Nicaragua (22%), and Honduras (20%). 
Remittances are an important driver of income growth, but only for those fortunate enough to receive 
them.  The  distribution  of  remittances  across  income  quintiles  using  post‐transfer  income  can  be  very 
different  than  the  distribution  using  pre‐transfer  income.  Previous  analysis  for  11  LAC  countries  for 
which micro‐data is available, has shown that 30 percent of households in these countries are in the first 
quintile of the pre‐remittances income distribution, but only 10 percent of households are in the lowest 
quintile  of  the  post‐remittance  income  distribution.  The  different  conclusions  arrived  at  using  post‐ 
versus pre‐transfer income simply reflect the fact that transfers (including remittances) are an important 
driver of income growth among the households fortunate enough to have access to these transfers.155 In 
other  words,  if  remittances  were  to  exogenously  disappear,  or  substantially  decrease  as  a  result  of 
exogenous shocks, the incomes of the poorest in LAC would have a negative impact. 
The distribution of remittances across pre‐remittance income groups also shows significant variation 
among the 11 countries in LAC for which this data is available.156 Roughly speaking, three groups can 
be distinguished: 
•   In Mexico, 61 percent of the households receiving remittances fall in the bottom 20 percent of non‐
    remittances  income,  whereas  only  4  percent  of  them  are  in  the  top  20  percent.  Similarly,  in 
    Paraguay  42  percent  of  recipients  are  in  the  bottom  20  percent  of  the  distribution,  and  only  8 

*LCR Crisis Briefs Series. 
154
     For a complete analysis of the pros and cons of the subject see “Remittances and Development: Lessons from 
   Latin America,” P. Fajnzylber and J.H. López, editors. World Bank, 2008. 
155
     See P. Fajnzylber and J.H. López, op.cit., chapter 2, and “Mexico: Income Generation and Social Protection for 
the Poor,” World Bank 2005. 
156
     Data in this paragraph is taken from Fajnzylber and López, 2008, p.33. 

                                                       123 
       percent  are  in  the  top  20  percent.  Other  countries  where  at  least  30  percent  of  the  recipients  of 
       remittances are in the lowest 20 percent are Ecuador, El Salvador, and Guatemala. 
•      In contrast, in Peru and Nicaragua the distribution of remittances across households is completely 
       different.  For  example,  in  Peru  fewer  than  6  percent  of  the  households  that  receive  remittances 
       belong  to  the  bottom  20  percent,  while  40  percent  belong  to  the  top  20  percent.  In  the  case  of 
       Nicaragua, only 12 percent of the recipients are in the bottom 20 percent, while 33 percent belong 
       to the top 20 percent.  
•      In  between  these  extremes,  there  are  four  countries—Bolivia,  Honduras,  the  Dominican  Republic 
       and Haiti—where remittances recipients are found at similar rates among households in the bottom 
       and top quintiles.  
 
Evolution of Remittances flows to LAC and Impact of the 2009 Crisis   

After strong  growth in the 1990’s, since 2004, overall remittances to  the LAC region have stagnated 
(see figures 1 and 2). Following this stagnation period, the overall flow of remittances started to decline 
since the onset of the global financial crisis. Monthly remittance data from central banks for individual 
countries for which recent monthly data is available157  show declines in remittances for most countries. 
Rates  of  growth  in  these  countries  started  to  become  negative  in  the  last  quarter  of  2008.  The 
unweighted  average  change  in  remittances’  flows  to  these  countries  has  declined  by  7.3  percent  in 
recent months from levels one year earlier. Taking into account the weights of different countries in the 
overall remittance stream, the total level of remittances in November and December 2008 for these six 
countries  was  8.3  percent  below  the  level  for  the  same  two  months  in  2007.  In  Central  America,  the 
weighted average decline in the first quarter of 2009 was 4.4% lower than the same period of 2008. 
 
                                                                                                          Figure 2. Actual and Expected Growth of 
        Figure 1. Total Flow of Remittances to LAC                                                                   Remittances to LAC 
                    (percentage of GDP)                                                                            (year‐to‐year % change) 
    2.5%                                                                                           30%
                                                                                                   25%                   Base
    2.0%                                                                                                                 Low
                                                                                                   20%

    1.5%                                                                                           15%
                                                                                                   10%
    1.0%                                                                                            5%
                                                                                                    0%
    0.5%
                                                                                                   -5%

    0.0%                                                                                           -10%
                                                                                                                                                                                                 2009 f

                                                                                                                                                                                                          2010 f

                                                                                                                                                                                                                   2011 f
                                                                                                           1997

                                                                                                                  1998

                                                                                                                         1999

                                                                                                                                2000

                                                                                                                                       2001

                                                                                                                                              2002

                                                                                                                                                     2003

                                                                                                                                                            2004

                                                                                                                                                                   2005

                                                                                                                                                                          2006

                                                                                                                                                                                 2007

                                                                                                                                                                                        2008 e
           1997


                  1998


                         1999


                                2000


                                       2001


                                                  2002


                                                         2003


                                                                2004


                                                                       2005


                                                                              2006


                                                                                     2007




                                                                                                                                                                                                                             
Source: DECPG estimates. GDP figures are from World                                            Source: DECPG estimates.  
Development Indicators 2007. Does not                                                          Note: Does not include Chile, Suriname, and Uruguay. 
 
In Mexico rates of growth started to be negative for several consecutive months as early as January 
2008  in  nominal  terms,  but  remittances  have  increased  in  real  terms.  A  sharp  depreciation  of  the 
nominal exchange rate, coupled with lower inflation, has more than offset the decline in remittances in 
nominal dollars. IMF projections are that, in real terms, remittances to Mexico increased by 9.8 percent 
(annualized)  in  the  last  quarter  of  2008.  Yet,  for  the  region  as  a  whole,  the  gains  from  depreciation 



157
       Mexico, Dominican Republic, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras and Jamaica. 

                                                                                            124 
would  be  eroded  by  a  continued  decline  in  foreign  exchange  flows,  and  in  dollarized  economies  or 
countries with more inflexible exchange rates the depreciation cushion is either absent or small. 
World  Bank  projections  based  on  GDP  growth  projections  indicate  that  nominal  remittances  to  LAC 
will fall  by 4.4 percent in  the  base case and 7.7 percent in the low case scenario.158 Projections vary 
significantly  by  country.  These  projections  are  based  on  GDP  forecast  of  both  sending  and  receiving 
countries.  But,  if  remittance  senders  in  the  U.S.  are  disproportionately  affected  by  the  recession, 
remittances may decline more than GDP‐based forecasts imply. To examine this, we look at the three 
main  factors  that  determine  the  volume  of  remittances:  (a)  the  number  of  immigrants,  (b)  their 
employment status and (c) their earnings.  
The  number  of  potential  remittance  senders  from  the  United  States  is  very  unlikely  to  decline 
substantially. 159 There are 45 million Latinos in the country, of which about 13 million send remittances. 
Of  these,  8  million  send  remittances  on  a  regular  basis,  and  an  additional  5  million  are  occasional 
senders. The net positive flow of immigrants may drop from its recent levels of 1 million per year (from 
all countries of the world), but it is extremely unlikely that the net flow would turn negative. Research 
has shown that LAC migrant’s main motivation is to send money back home and, since they lack access 
to  social  security  or  other  sources  of  income,  they  typically  go  to  extraordinary  lengths  to  remain 
employed or find new employment. Only illegal migration could change quickly in response to economic 
cycles. However, illegal immigrants are quite resilient to worsening economic times because there are 
able  to  adjust  more  quickly  than  the  native‐born  competitors  for  the  same  jobs,  as  they  are  able  to 
change  residence  swiftly  for  work‐related  reasons.  In  addition,  earning  expectations  in  the  home 
countries  are  not  better  and  enhanced  border  controls  dissuade  migrants  from  temporarily  returning 
home to explore other opportunities. 
 
                            Figure 3: Average Weekly Wages of Hispanics in the 
                            Bottom Decile, by Quarter, Not Seasonally Adjusted, 
                                              Current Dollars 




                                                                                         
                            Source:  Bureau  of  Labor  Statistics,  Current 
                            Employment Statistics survey 
 
On the other hand, the U.S. labor market conditions of potential senders are deteriorating, and this is 
likely  to  decrease  the  average  amount  sent.  While  immigrants  comprise  a  varied  group,  remittance 
senders  to  LAC  are  typically  recently  arrived,  young,  married  men  with  little  education,  low  earnings, 

158
    For a description of the forecast methodology see the annex to Rahta, Mohapatra and Xu (2008).   
159
    About three quarters of the remittances flow to the LAC region originate in the United States. For this reason, 
the  impact  of  the  financial  crisis  on  remittances  to  Latin  America  depends  mainly  on  the  behavior  and 
circumstances of migration to the U.S. and remittance senders already in the U.S.  

                                                        125 
and little familiarity with formal banking systems. As they accumulate more time in the United States, 
immigrants become less likely to send remittances and the average amount sent drops. Therefore, we 
looked at the unemployment rate for Mexican immigrants who arrived in the last decade and found that 
it rose to 12.8 percent in January 2009 from 8.4 percent a year earlier (overall U.S. unemployment rose 
from 5.7 to 8.6 percent during the same period.). 
Despite these large changes in employment, for those who have jobs, wages have remained roughly 
the same or even increased. The median real weekly wages of Hispanics were at their highest level of all 
time  in  February  2009,  and  average  real  weekly  wages  of  construction  workers,  were  also  at  a 
historically high level. Furthermore, average wages of Hispanics in the bottom decile and quartile have 
been approximately flat since late 2008.  
Combining both effects, we find that the total earnings of likely remittance senders from the US have 
declined  by  about  4.4  percent.  Although  data  on  remittances  relative  to  the  income  of  individual 
migrants is not readily available, coupling median weekly earnings for recent Hispanic immigrants with 
average  amounts  of  remittances  suggests  that,  very  roughly,  remittances  may  constitute  between  15 
and  25  percent  of  a  typical  low‐income  migrant’s  earnings.  Unless  this  proportion  has  changed 
substantially as a result of the crisis, GDP‐based projections of remittances to the LAC region seem to be 
robust. 
Several factors explain why the impact of the crisis on remittances is not larger: (i) although migration 
is likely to decrease, remittances depend on the stock of migrants, not on their flows, and the stock of 
migrants  is  not  expected  to  change  significantly,  (ii)  the  latest  unemployment  and  salary  figures  for 
Hispanic  citizens  in  the  United  States  do  not  support  a  predicted  large  drop  on  remittances,  (iii) 
historically, remittance flows worldwide have shown less volatility than other financial flows, including 
foreign direct investment and official development assistance, and (iv) not all immigrants send money 
home,  so  immigrant  unemployment  among  those  who  do  not  send  remittances,  or  send  them  very 
occasionally, will not have a significant effect on overall remittance volumes. Overall, the evidence of a 
connection between U.S. macroeconomic conditions and remittance flows is mixed, but even if there is 
some  positive  correlation,  it  is  countered  by  deteriorating  macroeconomic  conditions  in  the  receiving 
country.160 Further, the depth and global nature of the current crisis sets it apart from recent economic 
downturns, so historical patterns may not hold. 
 
Implications for Poverty and Inequality in LAC 

The  relative  importance  of  remittances  in  the  receiving  country’s  economy  and  the  position  of 
remittance receivers in the income distribution —and thus the effect of remittances on poverty— also 
vary greatly by country. Estimates of the effect of the drop in remittances on poverty imply that a drop 
in remittances of 4.4 percent would increase poverty across the region ranging from a 0.3 percent point 
increase  in  the  headcount  in  Chile  (around  51,000  additional  poor)  to  a  1.6  percent  point  increase  in 
Haiti (around 152,000 additional poor).161 In Central America, Guatemala (125,000 additional poor) and 
Honduras (68,000 additional poor) would be most affected. 
The impact of projected remittances changes on inequality is also likely to show wide variations, but 
data shortcomings make it difficult to draw conclusions.  Unfortunately, not all household surveys have 

160
      Fajnzylber  and  López  find  that  remittances  are  pro‐cyclical  with  respect  to  US  economic  growth  and 
countercyclical with respect to recipient countries’ growth, with the former effect larger than the later. 
161
     We use elasticities of poverty to remittances calculated by Fajnzylber and López. The average elasticity for the 
region is ‐0.4. We use a $4/day poverty line, which is the average of the national poverty lines in the LAC region. 

                                                         126 
data on remittances and, for those who do, remittances questions have been added only recently. There 
is, however, some recent data for Guatemala and for Guyana, among the few countries where the last 
two household surveys included remittances data. In Guatemala, remittances as a share of expenditure 
have grown between 2000 and 2006 for all income groups, but they have almost tripled for the lowest 
quintile.  Hence,  any  fall  in  remittances  is  likely  to  hurt  a  significant  share  of  the  poorest  quintile, 
although not more than other income quintiles. Like the case of Guatemala, in Guyana remittances as a 
share of consumption for the lowest quintile have increased from 23 to 36 percent between 1992 and 
2006,  suggesting  that  the  poorest  quintile  would  be  particularly  hard  hit  from  any  decrease  in 
remittances.  
 
Conclusions 

Overall  poverty  and  inequality  impacts  from  the  recent  crisis  through  the  remittances  channel  are 
likely  to  be  limited,  but  may  be  of  some  significance  in  a  few  countries.  Although  there  is  large 
uncertainty about the depth and duration of the crisis, the effect it will have on remittance flows, and its 
impact on poverty via the remittances channel, available evidence points to a relatively small decline of 
remittance flows to LAC, resulting in relatively small increases in poverty rates. Yet, these declines would 
imply falling  into poverty  for about 3.4 million additional people. More data collection is needed to be 
able to ascertain the distributional and gender impacts of the current crisis on remittances.   
One  of  the  few  short  run  policy  options  available  to  LAC  governments  to  reduce  the  impact  of  the 
crisis on poverty is related to the cost of sending remittances. For remittances originating in the U.S. 
these vary from US$ 9.17 for a US$ 200 transfer to El Salvador to US$ 19.04, on average, for the same 
amount transferred to Dominican Republic. Now more than ever it becomes imperative to reduce these 
costs. Possible ways to reduce these costs include: (i) issuance of consular cards that allow migrants to 
open  bank  accounts,  (ii)  postal  agreements,  (iii)  promote  the  use  of  mobile  telephones  for  money 
transfers among private providers of telecommunication services, (iv) improve information on transfer 
costs  both  among  senders  and  recipients  and  (v)  promote  more  competition  in  the  market  for  these 
financial services, including lowering regulatory cost of opening bank branches. 
For the most vulnerable recipient families, short run compensation of losses through existing or new 
social protection programs is also a possibility. 
 
In the long run, governments can continue to enhance the development impact  of remittances. The 
impact  of  remittance  transfers  on  the  growth  rate  of  recipient  economies  depends  on  whether  this 
transfer  is  invested  or  consumed.  In  the  LAC  region,  remittances  are  used  mostly  for  consumption 
purposes.  Governments  can  continue  to  provide  incentives  to  increase  the  proportion  of  remittances 
devoted to investment, by raising education levels of remittance receivers (which increases the returns 
to  investment);  improving  the  functioning  of  financial  systems  so  that,  even  if  remittance  recipients 
themselves are not inclined to invest, the proportion of remittances that is not consumed is channeled 
to  investment  through  financial  intermediation;  and  reducing  macroeconomic  distortions  and 
institutional weaknesses that reduce incentives to invest. 




                                                         127 
 

 




    128 
                              9.   WILL FDI BE RESILIENT IN THIS CRISIS? 
                                   Cesar Calderon and Tatiana Didier 
                                            February 2009* 
 
Although FDI flows have tended to remain resilient during previous crises, they may not behave 
in a similar fashion during the current crisis. Why? In past crises, the stability of FDI flows was 
significantly associated with an increase in mergers and acquisitions (M&A), reflecting "fire‐sale 
FDI". In the present crisis, by contrast, M&A activity decreased significantly in the last quarter of 
2008, and this trend may continue as long as the global crisis constrain the purchasing ability of 
foreign  (acquiring)  firms.  These  developments  further  illustrate  that  the  nature  of  the  current 
crisis differs considerably from previous ones, suggesting that certain key lessons from past crisis 
lessons might not apply in the current context. 
 
Introduction 

The  outlook  for  private  capital  flows  to  emerging  market  economies,  and  especially  to  Latin 
America, has deteriorated substantially in recent months. Net flows to the region are expected 
to decline to US$ 43 billion in 2009, down from US$ 89 billion in 2008. This implies a decline of 
approximately 75% from the record net flows in 2007 —US$ 183.6 billion (IIF, 2009). While all 
components  of  net  capital  flows  are  projected  to  decline,  the  largest  drop  is  expected  on  net 
private debt flows —an estimated decline of US$ 40 billion in 2009.162 
Recent  studies  have  shown  that  the  various  types  of  financial  flows  have  different  dynamics 
along business cycles and in particular during crises.163 For example, using a panel dataset of 66 
countries during 1970‐2003, Levchenko and Mauro (2007) find that net equity flows, FDI flows, 
are not only less volatile than net debt flows (i.e., portfolio debt flows, bank lending, and trade 
credit) but also more resilient during episodes of sudden stops. In fact, the authors find that net 
debt  flows  explain  almost  entirely  the  reversal  in  the  financial  account  that  characterizes  a 
sudden stop. 
The resilience of FDI flows during crises episodes have been attributed to an increase in fire‐sale 
foreign  direct  investment.  The  tightening  of  liquidity  constraints  for  domestically  owned  firms 
during  these  episodes  has  been  associated  with  an  increase  in  foreign  acquisitions,  usually  at 
significantly  low  prices.  This  foreign  ownership  may  facilitate  the  access  of  financially‐
constrained  domestic  firms  to  world  capital  markets  by  bringing  transparency,  better 
management, and improved technology.  
In  this  note,  we  argue  that,  although  FDI  flows  remained  resilient  during  previous  crises,  they 
may  not  behave  in  a  similar  fashion  during  the  current  financial  crisis.  Why?  Recent  crises, 
including the Asian crisis for example, were circumscribed to the emerging market world. Firms 

*LCR Crisis Briefs Series. 
162
     The decline in net private debt flows is even larger, more than US$ 100 billion, if we compare the net 
private debt flows in 2009 relative to its record level in 2007. 
163
     See, for example, Sarno and Taylor (1999) and Levchenko and Mauro (2007). 


                                                    129 
buying out Asian firms were not affected by the liquidity crisis and had ample access to financial 
resources. In contrast, the current crisis has imposed severe liquidity constraints not only on the 
owners of (financially‐constrained) firms in emerging markets but also on the potential foreign 
buyers of these firms. 
We analyze the SDC mergers and acquisition database, which contains high frequency data on 
all  cross‐border  mergers  and  acquisitions  since  1985.  The  dataset  includes  all  corporate 
transactions (public and private ones) involving at least 5% of the ownership of a company, with 
a total of 607 thousands of transactions until November of 2008. Merger and acquisition deals 
usually take a long time to be completed. Thus, in order to capture the right incentives behind 
these transactions, we consider the announcement date as the date of a merger and acquisition. 
Lastly, all announced deals that have not been withdrawn are considered. 
 
Evidence from previous crises 

Although  East  Asian  countries  experienced  a  sharp  reversal  in  net  portfolio  equity  and  debt 
flows  during  the  1997‐98  financial  crises,  they  witnessed  a  significant  increase  in  FDI  inflows. 
Krugman  (2000)  and  Aguiar  and  Gopinath  (2005)  provide  evidence  that  this  increase  in  FDI 
inflows was driven by an increase in foreign acquisitions.164 This finding is confirmed by the data 
shown in Figure 1, which plots the number of cross‐border merger and acquisition (M&A) deals 
during this period for East Asian countries.  
The 1997‐98 crises also affected other emerging market countries, namely countries in LAC and 
Eastern  Europe.  Cross‐border  merger  and  acquisition  activity  for  these  two  regions  are  also 
plotted in Figure 1. The graph shows a clear upward trend in the number of cross‐border M&A 
deals over this period. For example, LAC‐7 countries had on average around 40 deals per quarter 
before the crises, whereas during the second half of 1998, this number increased around 50% to 
60  deals  per  quarter.  A  similar  pattern  is  observed  in  Eastern  European  countries  after  the 
Russian crisis in the third quarter of 1998. These countries went from an average of 26 deals per 
quarter before the crisis, to 52 deals per quarter six month after the onset of the crisis.  
In line with the existing evidence, Figure 1 suggests that during a crisis affecting only emerging 
economies, foreign investors from developed countries still have access to financial resources. 
They  are  thus  able  to  take  advantage  of  cheaper  investment  opportunities  in  crisis‐affected 
countries. Consequently, there is a significant increase in foreign ownership of domestic firms in 
financially‐constrained countries. 
 
The current financial crisis 

In contrast with the Asian/Russian crises, the current financial meltdown was originated in the 
United  States  and  has  then  spread  to  both  developed  and  emerging  countries.  Consequently, 
severe liquidity constraints are affecting not only the owners of (financially‐constrained) firms in 
emerging  markets  but  also  the  potential  foreign  buyers  of  these  firms.  In  other  words,  cross‐


164
    The evidence is explained not only by the elimination of policies unfavorable to foreign ownership in 
East  Asia  but  also  by  the  perception  of  multinational  firms  that  they  can  buy  Asian  companies  at 
significantly lower prices. 


                                                     130
border  mergers  and  acquisitions  in  emerging  economies  should  not  increase  as  it  has  during 
previous crises.  
The  data  shown  in  Figure  2  confirms  this  hypothesis.  If  LAC‐7  countries  are  considered,  the 
number  of  announced  deals  has  fallen  almost  60%,  from  around  105  deals  per  quarter  in  the 
second quarter of 2007 to only 44 in the last quarter of 2008. There is a similar decrease in the 
value of the cross‐border mergers and acquisitions. Foreign acquisitions amounted to about US$ 
11.6 billions in the second quarter of 2007 and have declined to only US$4.6 billions in the last 
quarter  of  2008.  It  should  be  noted  that  the  decrease  in  M&A  activity  is  not  an  issue  only  for 
Latin  American  countries.  Similar  patterns  can  be  observed  in  other  regions.  For  example,  the 
number of cross‐border M&A deals has decreased 25% in East Asia and almost 70% in Eastern 
Europe between the second quarter of 2007 and the last quarter of 2008.  
Furthermore, the main argument discussed in this note also implies a similar dynamics for the 
evolution of mergers and acquisitions in the United States. As the crisis has spread to the rest of 
the world, we should also observe a decrease in cross‐border M&A in the United States, which is 
confirmed in Figure 2. The number of cross‐border M&A deals starts to fall in the first quarter of 
2008 and has followed a downward trend since then, decreasing almost 70% in the last quarter 
of 2008 vis‐à‐vis the second quarter of 2007. 
 
Conclusion 

In sum, the evidence presented in this note suggests that FDI flows might not remain as resilient 
as they have been during previous financial crisis. A larger decrease in foreign direct investments 
should be expected.  These developments further illustrate that the nature of the current crisis 
differs  considerably  from  previous  ones,  suggesting  that  certain  key  lessons  from  past  crisis 
lessons might not apply in the current context. 
 




                                                     131
                                                                          Figure 1
                                                           Cross-Border M&A Activity: Number of Deals
    80

    70

    60

    50

    40

    30

    20

    10

     0
             1996.4



                               1997.1



                                                  1997.2



                                                                       1997.3



                                                                                 1997.4



                                                                                           1998.1



                                                                                                             1998.2



                                                                                                                               1998.3



                                                                                                                                                 1998.4



                                                                                                                                                          1999.1



                                                                                                                                                                   1999.2



                                                                                                                                                                                     1999.3
                                                           LAC-7                          East Asia                                     Eastern Europe
                                                                                                                                                                                                
                                                                                              
                                                                                              
                                                                          Figure 2
                                                           Cross-Border M&A Activity: Number of Deals
    120                                                                                                                                                                                  250


    100
                                                                                                                                                                                         200

     80
                                                                                                                                                                                         150

     60

                                                                                                                                                                                         100
     40

                                                                                                                                                                                         50
     20


         0                                                                                                                                                                               0
                      2006.4




                                         2007.1




                                                              2007.2




                                                                                 2007.3




                                                                                                    2007.4




                                                                                                                      2008.1




                                                                                                                                        2008.2




                                                                                                                                                          2008.3




                                                                                                                                                                            2008.4




                                        LAC-7                             East Asia                 Eastern Europe                               United States (RHS)
                                                                                                                                                                                                
 
 
 




                                                                                          132
References 

Aguiar,  M.,  Gopinath,  G.,  2005.  Fire‐sale  foreign  direct  investment  and  liquidity  crises.  The 
         Review of Economics and Statistics 87(3), 439‐452. 
Institute  of  International  Finance,  2009.  Capital  flows  to  emerging  market  economies. 
         Washington, DC: Institute of International Finance, January. 
Krugman,  P.,  2000.  Fire‐sale  FDI.  In:  Edwards,  S.  (Ed.),  Capital  Flows  and  the  Emerging 
      Economies:  Theory,  Evidence,  and  Controversies.  Chicago,  IL:  The  University  of  Chicago 
      Press for the NBER, pp. 43‐60. 
Levchenko, A., Mauro, P., 2007. Do some forms of financial flows help protect against “sudden 
       stops”? The World Bank Economic Review 21(3), 389‐411. 
Sarno, L., Taylor, M., 1999. Hot money, accounting labels, and the permanence of capital flows 
        to developing countries:  an empirical  investigation. Journal of Development  Economics 
        59, 337‐364. 




                                                  133
 

 
 




    134
                  10.  PATTERNS OF FINANCING DURING PERIODS OF HIGH RISK AVERSION: 
                            HOW HAVE LATIN FIRMS FARED IN THIS CRISIS SO FAR? 
                                                 Tatiana Didier 
                                                  May 2009* 
 
                                                    Abstract 
This note examines  the extent to  which firms in Latin America have been able to raise capital through 
debt and equity securities as well as syndicated loans, both abroad and domestically, since the onset of 
the 2008 global financial crisis. The public and the private sectors alike lost access to foreign sources of 
financing  during  the  height  of  the  turbulence.  Furthermore,  two  months  after  the  Lehman  Brothers’ 
collapse, only government‐owned firms and governments themselves were able to re‐enter international 
markets to some extent and raise capital. Thus, the evidence suggests an important role for government 
guarantees in attracting foreign investors in times of high risk aversion. In domestic and syndicated loan 
markets, there has been a marked decrease in the total amount raised, although they have remained a 
viable option for the private sector in Latin America. To the extent possible, non‐government borrowers 
have been able to raise capital in these markets and have generally met their rollover needs. In contrast, 
the  role  of  sovereign  guarantees  in  attracting  local  investors  seems  to  have  been  more  important  in 
Eastern Europe and Southeast Asia, where government entities have accounted for respectively 80 and 
44 percent of all new issues in local markets, compared to less than 15 percent in LAC. 
 
Introduction 

Governments  in  advanced  economies,  especially  in  the  U.S.,  have  announced  large  fiscal  stimulus  and 
financial rescue packages to help them recover from the current economic downturn. However, these 
packages will need financing. How will this affect the access of emerging economies to foreign capital 
markets?  These  packages  may  generate  a  global  crowding  out  by  mobilizing  savings  towards  richer 
countries and elevating the real interest rate which, in turn, may raise the cost of borrowing. In other 
words, firms and governments in developing countries might find it harder, and possibly more costly, to 
raise capital in international financial markets. In the same fashion, governments throughout emerging 
markets, including several Latin American countries, have also announced relatively large fiscal stimulus 
packages  to  help  their  economies  recover  from  their  current  slump.  Hence,  the  question  on  how  to 
finance  these  packages  also  arises.  Will  governments  rely  on  domestic  capital  markets,  thus  possibly 
affecting the  access of the private sector to local sources of financing? This  note aims to  describe the 
current evolution of access to capital markets, both domestically and abroad, with a focus on whether 
emerging markets are being crowded out of international capital markets, and if so, the role of domestic 
capital markets. 
Access  to  international  capital  markets  by  the  private  sector  in  emerging  market  economies  has 
deteriorated  substantially  since  the  start  of  the  current  financial  crisis.  This  is  evidenced  by  high 
frequency  data  on  domestic  and  cross‐border  issuance  of  securities  (equity  and  debt)  and  syndicated 
loans from 1990 to February 2009, which this notes analyzes. The dataset (SDC New Issues database)  
 
 
*LCR Crisis Briefs Series. 



                                                       135 
includes  all  transactions  by  the  private  sector  in  local  and  international  capital  and  syndicated  loan 
markets,  and  by  governments  in  foreign  capital  markets.  Government  issues  in  local  markets  are  not 
covered in this dataset and hence not addressed in this note. The local banking sector is only covered 
through  the  extent  of  local  banks’  participation  in  the  syndicated  loan  market.  This  type  of  evidence 
provides  a  clear,  although  incomplete,  assessment  of  access  (or  lack  thereof)  to  finance  in  local  and 
international capital markets by the private and public sectors, as well as their rollover needs. 
 
Volume of New Security Issues 

During 2006 and 2007, the seven largest countries of Latin America (LAC‐7 countries) raised a total of 
$167 and $184.8 billion, respectively, with an average $13.9 and $15.4 billion per month, either through 
domestic  or  foreign  capital  markets  in  equity,  bonds,  and  syndicated  loans.  These  numbers  are  even 
more striking if the first three quarters of 2008 are considered, in which an average of $22.4 billion per 
month was raised, amounting to a total of $201.7 billion. However, between October 2008 and February 
2009, firms and governments in Latin America were only able to obtain around $11 billion per month, 
58% less than the same period in 2007‐08. Figure 1  shows the substantial decrease in the issuance of 
new securities or syndicated loans. New corporate and sovereign issues abroad since September 2008 
have fallen 10% compared to the same period a year earlier, whereas in domestic markets and in the 
syndicated loan market, the amount raised by corporations in 2009 represents a striking decline, of 71% 
and 89%, respectively. Despite this marked decrease in the amount of new syndicated loans, they still 
accounted  for  most  of  the  new  issues  during  the  height  of  the  crisis,  from  September  to  November 
2008. New loans accounted for, on average, 78.2% of all new issues during this period. During the same 
period a year earlier, they accounted for only 30% of capital raisings, where both new security issues at 
home and abroad were significantly larger. 
 
Rollover Needs of the Private Sector 

Figure  2  allows  a  comparison  of  new  capital  raised  with  expiring  liabilities  (aka  rollover  needs)  of  the 
private sector. It suggest that LAC‐7 countries seem to have faced a credit crunch in October 2008, i.e., 
at the height of the crisis.165 Mexico and Chile were the most affected with a gap between rollover needs 
and new issues of around $300 million. The other LAC‐7 countries also faced a large gap. It should be 
noted though that $18 billion of the $21.3 expiring liabilities in October 2008 can be accounted for by a 
maturing syndicated loan of the Brazilian mining giant Companhia Vale do Rio Doce, which had raised 
$50 billion in January of 2008.  
The  aggregate  numbers  shown  in  Figure  2  also  suggest  that  the  private  sector  was  generally  able  to 
meet its rollover needs from November 2008 onwards, even though new issues have fallen significantly 
in all markets throughout Latin America. For instance, the private sector in LAC‐7 countries was able to 
raise  $13.3  billion  in  excess  of  its  expiring  liabilities  between  November  2008  and  February  2009. 
Furthermore, most of the new capital raised in this period by the private sector, over 97% of the total 
amount,  was  raised  locally  or  in  the  syndicated  loan  market.  In  other  words,  although  foreign  capital 
markets  have  remained  mostly  closed  since  September  2008,  firms  have  been  able  to  rely  on  local 
markets or on the syndicated loan market for both rollover and new issues. 

165
    It  is  possible  that  firms  raise  capital  in  anticipation  to  its  rollover  needs  in  the  near  future.  Hence,  the 
comparison on a monthly basis of these two figures might not be an accurate measure of the gap in firms’ rollover 
needs. A detailed firm‐level analysis of the timing of new issues is needed but it is beyond the scope of this short 
technical note. 


                                                              136
 
The Role of Governments and Government‐Owned Firms 

The data presented in Figures 1 and 2 and described above suggests a decline in access to new capital in 
all markets since September 2008 for the private sector. Furthermore, Figure 3 shows that governments 
or government‐owned firms have been responsible for a significant share of the total capital raised since 
then, and especially since December 2008. Hence, the date suggests an important role for government 
guarantees in attracting investors and syndicated lenders to Latin firms in times of high risk aversion.  
For  instance,  over  50%  of  the  total  amount  raised  can  be  accounted  by  governments  or  government‐
owned  firms  alone  in  December,  almost  66%  in  January,  and  more  than  30%  in  February.  However, 
between January and September 2008, the total capital raised by these two agents was on average only 
11.5% of the total amount being raised every month. As depicted in Figure 3, the private sector might 
have been hit harder than the public sector during this crisis. In Figure 4, domestic and foreign markets 
are analyzed separately to evaluate the role of sovereign guarantees in different markets. 
a.     Foreign Capital Markets 
Foreign capital markets were closed for two months after the Lehman/AIG episode as shown in the top 
panel  of  Figure  4.  However,  since  December  2008,  the  public  sector  (including  government‐owned 
firms)  has  been  able  raise  new  capital  abroad,  being  the  first  sector  to  tap  into  new  capital  in 
international  capital  markets.  Governments  from  Brazil,  Colombia,  Mexico,  and  Peru  issued  new  debt 
abroad.  Furthermore,  between  September  2008  and  February  2009,  only  the  public  sector  has  had 
access to foreign capital, with the only exceptions being InPar S.A. from Brazil and Mexoro Minerals Ltd. 
from Mexico. In other words, governments or government‐owned firms have been responsible for close 
to 100% of all foreign new issues since September 2008. While this prevented the total of new issues in 
foreign markets from declining too much, it also suggests a potentially important role for government 
guarantees  in  attracting  foreign  investors  in  times  where  access  to  markets  for  the  private  sector  is 
hindered by high risk aversion. 
b.     Syndicated Loan Markets 
Contrary to the patterns observed in foreign securities markets, the middle  panel in Figure 4 suggests 
that syndicated loans have been accessible to the private sector, including both government‐owned and 
non‐government‐owned  firms.  However,  lack  of  data  prevents  an  analysis  of  the  role  of  sovereign 
guarantees in loans given by the domestic banking sector. 
c.     Domestic Capital Markets 
The fall in new capital raising issues in local markets becomes evident in the bottom panel of Figure 4.166 
On average, the private sector was able to raise $5.5 and $5.6 billion per month from January 2007 to 
September 2008, whereas in the period October 2008 to February 2009 the monthly average decreased 
to $2.5 billion. Nevertheless, as opposed to the patterns observed in the foreign markets, there is little 
evidence  that  government  guarantees  are  important  for  attracting  capital  from  local  investors  during 
periods of high risk aversion. The amount raised by government‐owned firms represents less than 15% 
of the total amount raised through new equity or debt issues in domestic markets. If the same period in 
the previous year is considered, the percentage is similar, at around 10%. 



166
    Government  issues  in  local  markets  are  not  included  in  these  numbers.  The  local  banking  system  is  also  not 
analized. 


                                                             137
The  total  amount  raised  in  domestic  markets  has  not  been  concentrated  in  a  particular  country.  New 
issues throughout the region are still taking place. For instance, on average Brazil and Mexico accounted 
for a larger share of the amount raised locally, around 40% and 20% in the period from October 2008 to 
February  2009,  followed  by  Colombia  and  Chile,  which  represented  11%  and  10%,  respectively. 
However, if the same period a year earlier is considered, Brazil and Mexico accounted for 71% and 25%, 
respectively,  whereas  Chile  and  Colombia  represented  together  less  than  5%.  In  February  2009,  new 
issues  by  Colombian  and  Argentinean  firms  represented  33%  and  35%  of  the  total  amount  raised, 
respectively, suggesting that sizeable new issues across the region are taking place.  
Lastly, despite this fall in the amount of capital raised in local markets, the new capital raised has not 
been concentrated in few issues by large firms. The number of firms that have been issuing new capital 
has been comparable to historical averages. For example, in December 2008, 4 firms from Argentina, 9 
firms  from  Brazil,  and  7  from  Mexico  raised  new  capital  in  local  markets.  An  exception  though  is 
Colombia where a greater number of firms have gained access new capital in local markets recently – on 
average  only  1  firm  raised  new  capital  locally  in  the  2000s,  whereas  in  the  first  two  months  of  2009, 
almost 5 firms each month had access to new capital locally. 
 
Comparison with other Emerging Markets 

Firms  in  other  regions  of  the  world  are  facing  similar  problems  to  the  ones  faced  by  Latin  American 
companies. Figure 5 shows capital raising activity in Southeast Asia and Eastern Europe in both domestic 
and  foreign  markets.  Similarly  to  the  patterns  observed  for  LAC‐7  countries,  access  to  foreign  capital 
markets  has  been  almost  non‐existent  for  the  2‐month  period  after  the  spread  of  the  turmoil  in  U.S. 
financial markets to the rest of the world. Furthermore, only governments or government‐owned firms 
have been able to raise any new capital in foreign markets since then. Once more, close to 100% of all 
foreign issues can be traced back to the public sector. 
Similarly to what has been observed in Latin America, new issues in domestic markets have decreased in 
both  Eastern  Europe  and  Southeast  Asia,  as  shown  in  Figure  5.  However,  while  domestic  markets 
remained  a  viable  source  of  financing  for  the  private  sector  in  Latin  America,  government  guarantees 
might have played a more important role in domestic markets in these two regions over this period. For 
instance, government‐owned firms have been responsible for 44% of all new issues in domestic capital 
markets in Southeast Asia since October 2008, whereas previously in 2008, the share of new issues by 
government‐owned  firms  has  been  on  average  less  than  25%  every  month.  The  patterns  in  Eastern 
Europe are even more striking: capital raised by government‐owned firms represented 80% of all new 
issues in local markets after October 2008 versus 20% in the first nine months of 2008. 
 
Conclusion 

New security issues in international capital markets throughout emerging markets have dropped sharply 
since the onset of the 2008 global financial crisis. Both the public and the private sector lost access to 
foreign sources of financing during the height of the turbulence. However, since December 2008, only 
two‐months  after  the  Lehman  event,  only  governments  or  government‐owned  firms  from  for  Latin 
America  have  been  able  to  raise  capital  abroad.  Similar  patterns  are  observed  in  Eastern  Europe  and 
Southeast  Asia.  Therefore,  the  evidence  suggests  an  important  role  for  government  guarantees  in 
attracting foreign investors in times of high risk aversion. In domestic markets, the amount of new issues 
has  also  decreased  significantly  during  the  current  financial  crisis.  However,  while  domestic  and 
syndicated loan markets remained a viable source of financing for the private sector in Latin America, 



                                                         138
government guarantees seem to have played an important role in Eastern Europe and Southeast Asia. In 
sum,  the  private  sector  in  Latin  America,  and  in  emerging  markets  more  broadly,  has  been  living  in  a 
world  of  scarce  foreign  capital  and  have  been  relying,  to  the  extent  possible,  on  local  markets,  on 
domestic banking sources of finance, and on their own cash, to cover its financing needs. Without access 
to foreign markets and with lesser ability to raise capital domestically, the private sector has been facing 
stronger credit constraints than the public sector (including government‐owned firms) during these last 
turbulent months. 
 
 




                                                        139
 

Annex 1. Figures 

                                                                   Figure 1. Capital Raising Activity by LAC-7 Countries
                                                                                                                                              Capital Raised
                                                 60,000

                                                 50,000

                                                 40,000
                                  US$ Millioon




                                                 30,000

                                                 20,000

                                                 10,000

                                                          0
                                                                                                   Aug-07




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 Aug-08
                                                                   May-07


                                                                                        Jul-07




                                                                                                                                  Nov-07




                                                                                                                                                                                       Apr-08
                                                                                                                                                                                                 May-08


                                                                                                                                                                                                                       Jul-08




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 Nov-08
                                                                               Jun-07



                                                                                                               Sep-07
                                                                                                                        Oct-07


                                                                                                                                              Dec-07
                                                                                                                                                       Jan-08
                                                                                                                                                                 Feb-08
                                                                                                                                                                             Mar-08



                                                                                                                                                                                                              Jun-08



                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              Sep-08
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                       Oct-08


                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              Dec-08
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                       Jan-09
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 Feb-09
                                                                                                      Domestically*                                                                   Abroad                                                   Synd. Loans

                        * Does not include government bonds in domestic markets.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    
 
                  Figure 2. LAC-7: Capital Raising Activity and Rollover Needs of the Private Sector
                                                                                                                                              All Markets*
              70,000

              60,000

              50,000

              40,000

              30,000

              20,000

              10,000

                    0
                                                          May-07




                                                                                                            Nov-07




                                                                                                                                                        May-08




                                                                                                                                                                                                          Nov-08




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                        May-09




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                          Nov-09
                         Jan-07




                                                                                                                         Jan-08




                                                                                                                                                                                                                        Jan-09
                                                 Mar-07



                                                                            Jul-07

                                                                                          Sep-07




                                                                                                                                           Mar-08



                                                                                                                                                                          Jul-08

                                                                                                                                                                                        Sep-08




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                          Mar-09



                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                          Jul-09

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                        Sep-09




                                                                                                      Total Amount Raised                                                                                          Rollover Needs

            * Does not include government bonds in domestic markets.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    
                                                                                                                                                                  




                                                                                                                                                          140
                                     Figure 3. The Role of Governments
            Percentage of Capital Raised by Governments or Government-Owned
                                           Firms

  70%

  60%

  50%

  40%

  30%

  20%

  10%

   0%
          Nov-07

                   Dec-07



                                     Feb-08



                                                       Apr-08




                                                                                            Aug-08

                                                                                                     Sep-08



                                                                                                                       Nov-08

                                                                                                                                Dec-08



                                                                                                                                                  Feb-09
                            Jan-08




                                                                May-08

                                                                          Jun-08




                                                                                                              Oct-08




                                                                                                                                         Jan-09
                                              Mar-08




                                                                                   Jul-08
* Does not include government bonds in domestic markets.                                                                                                    




                                                                         141
                   Figure 4. The Role of Governments in Domestic and Foreign Markets

                                                                                 Total Amount Raised Abroad
                   14,000

                   12,000

   US$ Millioon    10,000

                    8,000

                    6,000

                    4,000

                    2,000

                        0
                                         Jun-07


                                                              Aug-07



                                                                                            Nov-07




                                                                                                                                                            Jun-08


                                                                                                                                                                              Aug-08



                                                                                                                                                                                                           Nov-08
                              May-07


                                                    Jul-07




                                                                                                                                                   May-08
                                                                        Sep-07




                                                                                                               Jan-08
                                                                                                                        Feb-08


                                                                                                                                          Apr-08



                                                                                                                                                                     Jul-08


                                                                                                                                                                                       Sep-08




                                                                                                                                                                                                                               Jan-09
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                          Feb-09
                                                                                  Oct-07


                                                                                                      Dec-07



                                                                                                                                 Mar-08




                                                                                                                                                                                                 Oct-08


                                                                                                                                                                                                                     Dec-08
                                                                Total                                          Government or Government-Owned Firms

                                                     Total Amount Raised through Syndicated Loans
                   20,000
                   18,000
                   16,000
                   14,000
   US$ Millioon




                   12,000
                   10,000
                    8,000
                    6,000
                    4,000
                    2,000
                        0
                                         Jun-07


                                                              Aug-07



                                                                                           Nov-07




                                                                                                                                                            Jun-08


                                                                                                                                                                              Aug-08



                                                                                                                                                                                                           Nov-08
                              May-07


                                                   Jul-07


                                                                        Sep-07




                                                                                                               Jan-08
                                                                                                                        Feb-08



                                                                                                                                                   May-08
                                                                                                                                          Apr-08



                                                                                                                                                                     Jul-08


                                                                                                                                                                                       Sep-08




                                                                                                                                                                                                                               Jan-09
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                          Feb-09
                                                                                  Oct-07


                                                                                                     Dec-07



                                                                                                                                 Mar-08




                                                                                                                                                                                                 Oct-08


                                                                                                                                                                                                                     Dec-08




                                                                           Total                                                           Government-Owned Firms

                                                                       Total Amount Raised Domestically*
                   14,000

                   12,000

                   10,000
    US$ Millioon




                    8,000

                    6,000

                    4,000

                    2,000

                       0
                                                             Aug-07




                                                                                                                                                                              Aug-08
                            May-07




                                                                                                                                          Apr-08
                                                                                                                                                   May-08
                                                                                                                                 Mar-08
                                       Jun-07




                                                                                 Oct-07
                                                                                           Nov-07


                                                                                                               Jan-08




                                                                                                                                                            Jun-08




                                                                                                                                                                                                  Oct-08
                                                                                                                                                                                                            Nov-08


                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 Jan-09
                                                  Jul-07


                                                                       Sep-07




                                                                                                     Dec-07


                                                                                                                        Feb-08




                                                                                                                                                                     Jul-08


                                                                                                                                                                                        Sep-08




                                                                                                                                                                                                                      Dec-08


                                                                                                                                                                                                                                            Feb-09




                                                                           Total                                                              Government-Owned Firms

* Does not include government bonds in domestic markets.                                                                                                                                                                                              


                                                                                                                    142
                                                                                                              143
                                                                                                                        
 
                                                                                                                       US$ Millioon                                                                                                                                          US$ Millioon
                                                                                                  0
                                                                                                      5,000
                                                                                                              10,000
                                                                                                                           15,000
                                                                                                                                    20,000
                                                                                                                                             25,000
                                                                                                                                                      30,000
                                                                                                                                                               35,000
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                             0
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 2,000
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                         4,000
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 6,000
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                         8,000
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 10,000
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                          12,000
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   14,000




                                                                                        May-07                                                                                                                                                     May-07
                                                                                        Jun-07                                                                                                                                                     Jun-07
                                                                                         Jul-07                                                                                                                                                     Jul-07
                                                                                        Aug-07                                                                                                                                                     Aug-07
                                                                                                                                                                                                            Total




                                                                                        Sep-07                                                                                                                                                     Sep-07
                                                               Total




                                                                                        Oct-07                                                                                                                                                     Oct-07
                                                                                        Nov-07                                                                                                                                                     Nov-07
                                                                                        Dec-07                                                                                                                                                     Dec-07
                                                                                        Jan-08                                                                                                                                                      Jan-08
                                                                                        Feb-08                                                                                                                                                     Feb-08
                                                                                        Mar-08                                                                                                                                                     Mar-08
                                                                                        Apr-08                                                                                                                                                     Apr-08
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                         Southeast Asia




                                                                                        May-08                                                                                                                                                     May-08
    * Does not include government bonds in domestic markets.
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                            Total Amount Raised Abroad




                                                                                        Jun-08                                                                                                                                                     Jun-08
                                                                                         Jul-08                                                                                                                                                     Jul-08
                                                                                                                                                                        Total Amount Raised Domestically*




                                                                                        Aug-08                                                                                                                                                     Aug-08
                                                                                        Sep-08                                                                                                                                                     Sep-08
                                                                                        Oct-08                                                                                                                                                     Oct-08
                                                                                        Nov-08                                                                                                                                                     Nov-08



                                                               Government-Owned Firms
                                                                                        Dec-08                                                                                                                                                     Dec-08
                                                                                                                                                                                                            Government or Government-Owned Firms




                                                                                        Jan-09                                                                                                                                                      Jan-09
                                                                                        Feb-09                                                                                                                                                     Feb-09
                                                                                                                       US$ Millioon                                                                                                                                          US$ Millioon




                                                                                                      0
                                                                                                    500
                                                                                                  1,000
                                                                                                  1,500
                                                                                                  2,000
                                                                                                  2,500
                                                                                                  3,000
                                                                                                  3,500
                                                                                                  4,000
                                                                                                  4,500
                                                                                                  5,000
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  0
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              2,000
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              4,000
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              6,000
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              8,000
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                             10,000
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                             12,000
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                             14,000
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                             16,000
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                             18,000
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                             20,000




                                                                                        May-07
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   May-07
                                                                                        Jun-07
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   Jun-07
                                                                                         Jul-07
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    Jul-07
                                                                                        Aug-07
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   Aug-07
                                                                                        Sep-07
                                                                                                                                                                                                            Total                                  Sep-07




                                                               Total
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                          Figure 5. Capital Raising Activity in the World




                                                                                        Oct-07
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   Oct-07
                                                                                        Nov-07
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   Nov-07
                                                                                        Dec-07
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   Dec-07
                                                                                        Jan-08
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    Jan-08
                                                                                        Feb-08                                                                                                                                                     Feb-08
                                                                                        Mar-08                                                                                                                                                     Mar-08
                                                                                        Apr-08                                                                                                                                                     Apr-08
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                         Eastern Europe




                                                                                        May-08                                                                                                                                                     May-08
                                                                                        Jun-08
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                            Total Amount Raised Abroad




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   Jun-08
                                                                                         Jul-08                                                                                                                                                     Jul-08




                                                                                                                                                                        Total Amount Raised Domestically*
                                                                                        Aug-08                                                                                                                                                     Aug-08
                                                                                        Sep-08                                                                                                                                                     Sep-08
                                                                                        Oct-08                                                                                                                                                     Oct-08
                                                                                        Nov-08                                                                                                                                                     Nov-08




                                                               Government-Owned Firms
                                                                                        Dec-08                                                                                                                                                     Dec-08




                                                                                                                                                                                                            Government or Government-Owned Firms
                                                                                        Jan-09                                                                                                                                                      Jan-09
                                                                                        Feb-09                                                                                                                                                     Feb-09