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					Job Search Best Practice Guide
Cisco Partner Talent Portal
                                                       Best Practice Job Search




Table of Contents

Take Advantage of the Three Step Process of Getting a Job                 3

Resume Guide                                                              3

Example of Resume                                                         9

Cover Letter Guide                                                       10

Example of Cover Letter                                                  10

Frequently Asked Interview Questions                                     11

Networking is Key                                                        13

Extend Your Resume                                                       14

Use a Search Firm or Head Hunter                                         15

Business Etiquette                                                       15

Take Advantage of New Technologies                                       15

References                                                               16




                                                                              
                                                                        Best Practice Job Search




Take Advantage of the Three Step Process of
Getting a Job

There are three essential steps in successfully obtaining a job.
Step 1: Have a strong resume and cover letter to get an interview.
Hire a resume writing service to help review your resume and provide constructive
criticism. ResumeWriters.com, ResumeEdge.com, or CareerPerfect.com are great
resources where you can submit your resume online and be assigned a personal
assigned writer who will contact you with a first draft within 7 hours. You can continue
to work with the writer until you are happy with a final copy.



Resume Guide

What is a resume?
Stated simply, a resume is a piece of e-paper that represents you when you are not there.
The main intent of the resume is to get you into an interview with an employer. People
are usually not hired by a resume alone; it is the interview that makes hiring possible. The
resume simply leads the way into the interview. Make sure that you send your resume to
multiple employers at once.

Are there different kinds of resumes? Are there different ways to use a resume?
There are different kinds of resumes and there are different ways in which resumes may
be used. Following are five different kinds of resumes and the ways to properly use them:

1. The Personal Resume is, as it suggests, a resume for your own use. This resume is a
   comprehensive autobiographical listing of all of your education, employment, honors,
   activities, interests, affiliations, travel, languages, skills, licenses, publications, etc. that
   you have ever done. This resume may be several pages in length and is not intended
   to be seen by other people. This document becomes your source for writing other,
   specialized resumes.

. A General Use Resume is used to circulate your name and qualifications to unfamiliar
   employers who have not made a specific employment need known to you. You use
   a general resume because you do not know enough about this company to write a
   “focused” or “targeted” resume for them. This use of a resume is generally the least
   efficient way to “find” a job. This style of resume has often been nicknamed the
   “shotgun approach” because of the similarity to the distribution of shots from a
   shotgun used for bird hunting. “Shotgunning” dozens or hundreds or even thousands
   of resumes may get your name spread around to many different employers, but you
   are not likely to get much positive response from such a campaign.

3. A Targeted or Focused Resume is used to respond in a specific way to a specific job
   listing. Targeting means that you will customize your resume to conform to the stated
   needs of the employer. This resume is made only after you have secured a job listing
   and you know what the employer is looking for. Then, with the employer’s needs in
   mind, you write your resume to correspond to the employer’s needs. This is the best
   method if you are truly qualified for the job and if the resume is well written.




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   If you are applying for a technical position it is important to arrange your resume to
   best highlight your technical skills. Typically, technical resumes tend not to include too
   much focus and extraneous information. The format to minimize this is as such:

   A. Summary of qualifications (SOQ)

      • One to three sentences of certifications, experience, degrees,
        and area of expertise.

   B. Technical Skills section

      • Prioritize your technical skills

      • Use this section to show your proficiency in each category

   C. List of experiences

      • Details of where you have worked.

      • Employers are worried about what you have accomplished not where
        you have been.

   Some other helpful tips are:

   D. Use numbers to quantify experiences

      • Be specific

      • Demonstrate that you saved or managed money for an organization

   E. If you have less than five years of work experience, put your education first;
      five or more years of work, put work experiences first.

   F. Consider key words when creating your resume

      • For example: Technical support, call center

   G. Use an easy-to-read font

4. Two variations of the General Use Resume and the Targeted Resume are the
   Chronological Style and the Functional Style.

   A. Chronological Style is the most popular style. This means that as you detail your
      employment, you list your former jobs in descending chronological order. You start
      with your latest job and work back to your earliest.

   B. Functional Style is usually used by people who have been in the workforce for
      a number of years and have a varied background. Instead of listing jobs in
      chronological order, the jobs are listed by function (i.e., management, sales.)

5. The Professional Vitae is used only by professional people. This resume is several
   pages, and includes all of the educational, professional, research, and publishing
   background of the person. This is most used by university faculty and administrators.

What is contained in a resume?
A resume contains any information about you that will help you “sell” yourself to an
employer. Some things are always included, some things are sometimes included,
and some things should not be included. Knowing these differences will help you build
a better resume.




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Is more better?
Not necessarily. If you are just starting your career search and you do not have a continuing
record of long-term employment, you should confine your resume to one page. If you
have been in the work force for several years there may be a reason for a functional style
resume, which is a longer resume, but consider the following generalizations:

1. No one wants to read a resume (they would much rather be playing golf).

. The average reading time of a resume is 18 seconds. Lengthy resumes are not
   appreciated by busy people.

3. Bulky or wordy resumes that don’t make every word count are seen by readers as
   representations of people who haven’t learned the value of brevity and efficiency.



Content and Organization of a Resume
Items that should always be included in a resume:
Identifying Data—Your name, address(es), phone number(s) and e-mail address should
be at the top of the page. Typically it is a bad practice to use your current corporate e-mail
address. Instead, you should use a free e-mail service such as, yahoo, Gmail, or hotmail
etc. The name is usually centered and capitalized. A single address is usually centered
under the name. If you use a “present” and “permanent” address, the “present” address is
usually placed on the left and the “permanent” address is usually on the right.

Education—Your graduating school (or school of your latest degree) is listed first with
previous schools following. If your degree is in progress, you can state when you are
expected to receive a degree. For example, “Degree Expected May 008.” Also, never
claim a degree if you do not possess it. A company will find out when they are doing
the background check. State major fields of study or areas of special emphasis. Special
assignments or projects are valuable if they relate to the employer’s needs. Stating your
GPA is optional; it is probably not advised if your GPA is under 3.. Sometimes stating
your “GPA in major” will provide a better picture of your academic skills. Graduation dates
are typically included in the education section. However, if your graduation was many
years ago it is acceptable to not include your graduation date to avoid any potential age
discrimination. If you are a college graduate looking for a career position, eliminate your
high school history.

Employment or Work Experience or Experience—This section may include full-time
jobs, summer employment, part-time work, internships, volunteer work, research or
study projects, college work study, graduate assistantships, or field placement. For a
chronological resume these descriptions are usually placed in reverse chronological
order starting with the latest job first; dates of employment should be included. Within
each job description you will need to list the tasks you performed. Be concise and factual,
and be sure to highlight your accomplishments. It is important to include measurable
accomplishments whenever possible.

Optional items:
Objective Statement—An objective statement is often used. If you choose to send the
same resume to many employers (general resume), your objective will be general in
nature. This is not the most efficient use of your resume. If you focus on a specific job
listing, you will be able to make your objective direct and will probably have a better
chance of having your resume read and being considered for an interview. Remember,
an objective statement is for the benefit of the reader. Plainly state what you are wanting.
Do not use this statement to tell the reader how good you are.
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Activities—Include appointments that will demonstrate your leadership skills
and experiences.

Interests—You may not be deeply involved in some things but may still have an interest
in them. Such things might include art, woodworking, sports, travel, etc. Adding these
things to your resume may help the interviewer see that you are well rounded. Often
Interests and Activities are listed together.

Affiliations—Perhaps you belong to the Student Teachers Association or the Entrepreneurs
Club. Sometimes included in this section are political or ethnic affiliations. Be cautious
in the use of these two categories. Their inclusion in a resume can be very good or very
bad, depending on the reader’s view.

Travel—If you have extensive travel outside the U.S., it is good to include this in your
resume. Travel in the U.S., and just across the Canadian or Mexican border is not usually
included on a resume.

Languages—Sometimes Travel and Languages are listed together. In describing
language ability, use the word “fluent” if you can speak, read and write in the language.
Use the term “conversant” if you can understand the language and can speak enough
to survive in that country.

Computer Skills—If you are comfortable with computers and know data entry and retrieval,
programming or are a master of software, you should include this in your resume. List the
various hardware, software, languages and applications with which you are familiar.

Skills—Sometimes Computer Skills are included under Skills. Other skills that might
be listed are art, music, computer maintenance, public speaking, writing, counseling,
decorating, etc. While such skills may not be directly related to your desired job, they
may make you a more appealing candidate.

Licenses and Certifications—Any licenses or certifications that set you apart from the
common crowd should be listed. Your possession of a pilot’s license or a teaching certificate
may make you a more desirable candidate. Do not include a driver’s license unless you
have a permit that lets you drive a specialty vehicle and that license is a requirement for
the position.

Publications—If you have been published in a known journal or periodical, or if you
have a noteworthy book published, you should include this in your resume. Pamphlets,
booklets, or advertising materials are not usually listed.

References—References are not included on the resume, but as a separate page. The
phrase “References furnished upon request” is usually used as the last statement on
the bottom of the resume.

What you should not put in a resume
Current U.S. legislation restricts employers from asking questions that do not directly
relate to your employability. Following is a list of items that you do not need to put on
your resume:

1. You are not required to list your place of birth.

. You are not required to state your age or birth date.

3. You are not required to reveal your marital status.

4. You are not required to offer any ethnic or racial information.


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5. You are not required to give your religious affiliation (except where it relates
   directly to a job with a church or religious movement).

6. You are not required to state you political affiliation or interest.

7. You are not required to state your gender (although first names tend to reveal
   that information).

8. You are not required to enclose a picture with your resume or cover letter.

Even though you may not be asked for this information, you have the right to offer it if
you choose. But, be careful: sometimes too much information can be “deadly.”

Creating the Targeted Resume
A properly written targeted resume should nearly always evoke an invitation to an interview.
First of all, a targeted resume is aimed directly and intensely at one pre-defined job.
Because the employer has put on paper what he or she wants, it is really not too difficult
to write a good targeted resume. The procedures for writing such a resume are as follows:

1. Search current job listings for which you are fully qualified and have experience, training
   and background. If you are not fully trained and experienced in all tasks required, you
   will likely not have an invitation to interview. There will be others who have that back-
   ground and they will be selected over you. Be aware that in a week’s search you might
   find only two or three job listings for which you are fully qualified that suit your needs.
   Your pursuit is not for quantity, but for an accurate match of your skills and abilities to
   the employer’s needs.

. With a highlighter, mark everything on the job listing that the employer requires you
   to be (qualifications) and everything he/she expects you to do (tasks).

3. Place your personal resume on the left hand side of your desk. Place your fully
   marked job listing on the right hand side of your desk. Now, place a blank piece of
   paper in the middle of your desk (any arrangement is fine—make it work for you).

4. On your blank piece of paper list the first requirement that the employer makes on the
   job listing. Now, using your personal resume, find how your experience or education
   qualifies you to meet the first requirement. List that first requirement and your
   qualifications on the blank piece of paper. Now do the same with the other requirements
   of the job. When you have reached the bottom of the job listing page you should have
   written all the things that qualify you for that job.

5. Now, from your (formerly) blank piece of paper you will begin to build your targeted
   resume. Carefully choose the right wording, adding to and taking from just the right
   amount of information. Your new resume will be nearly a mirror image of the job listing,
   and you will have responded to all of the employer’s needs and expectations.

Honesty versus skillful selection of pertinent data
Never lie or stretch the truth on your resume! First, it is morally wrong to misrepresent
yourself to another person. Second, employers do check up on their hires and if you do
misrepresent yourself you will be found out. Misrepresentation on a resume is considered
grounds for dismissal by most employers.

On the other hand, you should present yourself in the best possible light. This may mean
accentuating one portion of your resume while downplaying another portion. It may also
mean that you will leave out some work or school experience that will not represent you in
the best way. Since you cannot get your entire life’s story on a single page, leave out those

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things that will benefit you least or that will work against you. Remember, never lie, but
likewise, never make yourself look just average or commonplace. You are neither!

How do I write a career objective?
The “career objective” should be one concise sentence telling the reader what you want.
This may be the hardest sentence that you will have to write, because how you write it will
determine the limits you do or don’t place on yourself. Your career objective should not
contain any of your qualifications.

Following are samples of effective career objectives. Do not copy these word-for-word.
Use them as samples and devise wording that is “you”.

• To utilize my computer science and art background to develop advanced-user
  software for commercial graphic workstations.

• A career in sales that allows for professional development in the areas of
  management and marketing.

• An entry level sales/marketing position.

• A position in marketing where I can use my public relations, finance and
  marketing skills.

• A position in a management training program emphasizing communication,
  motivation and public relations.

• To apply management experience and French language skills in an
  international corporation.

• A management training position which will utilize my computer/math skills.

• A position in a multinational firm utilizing my economics and language background.

• To secure a dynamic sales/management position with a real estate firm.

• A position in public relations with a nationally known insurance corporation.

• An entry level staff position for a nationwide accounting firm.

How to use references
References are usually selected from your professors, employers, personal friends (who
hold some status in the community), or church or community leaders. You should always
ask permission to use a person’s name as a reference. Usually three to five references are
expected. You should supply the names, addresses, phone and fax numbers, and e-mail
address for each reference.

Remember: References are not sent with resumes unless the employer specifically asks
for them. Instead, references are sent after the employer has reviewed your resume and
asks for them.

General tips
• Use 10 to 1 point font

• Bold for emphasis, but use sparingly

• One page is the norm, unless a Ph.D. or have extensive relevant experience

• Graduate students should include publications and presentations

• If work experience is limited, emphasize educational experience and skills

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• Have resume reviewed before circulating

• Use action verbs

• Match the needs of the hiring company



Technical Resume Example




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Cover Letter Guide
Your cover letter is meant to augment and not restate your resume. It includes three parts:
opening, sales pitch, and closing

1. Opening

   A. Address, salutation, and opening paragraph

    • Try to address the letter to a trusted person. You should find the contact online,
      through a friend, or from a contact that you have already made.

    • State why you are writing and refer to the specific position for which you are
      applying, and where you found out about the job.

    • Link your skills to the mission of the company. Use their vocabulary.

. Sales Pitch

   A. This is the meat of the cover letter.

   B. State why you are interested in the position, use the same language as the
      company. You can brag a little bit and explain why you should be a good fit
      for the job. Use your background work: specific achievements, unique talents,
      and experiences.

3. Closing

   A. Restate your interest and ask for a time to meet.

Cover Letter Example




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Step 2: Convert the interview into an offer, or get a referral or contact
of someone else to get in touch with.
Once you have impressed a company with your resume and have made it to the
interview process. It is very important to be prepared for the interview. This includes
doing research on the company you are interviewing with and practicing different types
of interview questions. Remember to be confident and shake everyones’ hands during
the interview. Once you have finished ask for the business cards of the people interview-
ing you and remember to send them a thank you note.



Frequently Asked Interview Questions
Toughest questions
• Tell me about yourself.

• What three words would you use to describe yourself?

• What three words would your friends use to describe you?

• What is your greatest weakness?

• Where do you see yourself in 5 years?

• Where else are you interviewing?

• Tell me about a conflict you’ve had with a boss or co-worker.

Behavioral interview questions
• Describe a situation in which you were able to use persuasion to successfully
  convince someone to see things your way.

• Describe a time when you were faced with a stressful situation that demonstrated
  your coping skills.

• Give me a specific example of a time when you used good judgment and logic in
  solving a problem.

• Give me an example of a time when you set a goal and were able to meet or achieve it.

• Tell me about a time when you had to use your presentation skills to influence
  someone’s opinion.

• Give me a specific example of a time when you had to conform to a policy with
  which you did not agree.

• Please discuss an important written document you were required to complete.

• Tell me about a time when you had to go above and beyond the call of duty in
  order to get a job done.

Other common questions
• What experience or individual has had the greatest influence on you?

• Tell me about a supervisor, professor or other individual that has made a significant
  impact on your life.

• Tell me about an event that has had a great impact on your life.

• What is the most useful criticism you received and who was it from?
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• What would you change about yourself?

• Which decisions are easiest for you to make and which are the most difficult?

• What is the most important decision you've made in the past year? What were your
  other options? How did you go about making the decision?

• What is the greatest obstacle you've overcome in the past year? How did it affect
  what you were doing at the time? How did you go about overcoming it?

• Describe your work ethic.

• What are your long-term goals? What are your short-term goals?

• How do you set goals? Do you meet them?

• Tell me about a time when you showed initiative or that demonstrates your abilities
  as a self-starter.

• What is important to you in a job?

• Tell me about your "dream job."

• Do you prefer working with others or by yourself?

• What percent of your day would you like to spend doing "peoplework" vs. "paperwork"?

• What percent of your day would you like to spend working with people on the
  phone vs. in person?

• What percent of your day would you like to spend working with people vs.
  information vs. things?

Three step process to answering any question
• Identify what’s really being asked

• Present solid facts that highlight your positive qualities

• Provide clear examples to support your claim



Step 3: Once you have an offer, negotiate what you’re worth.
Now that you have proven yourself and have obtained the right job for you it is now
important that you get what you deserve. One of the first steps you should take is
checking out the at recent salary survey in your field. http://www.salary.com

Choosing the best offer
There are many things to weigh when considering an offer. Type of work, opportunity
for advancement, salary, location and the company culture are the primary areas for
consideration and concern.

Whether you are choosing from multiple offers or one, it is wise to accept a position
only when it is of high interest to you and fits your needs. One that provides you with the
opportunity to acquire and expand the kinds of skills and experience that is of value in
your field. Salary and location are important, but ultimately, job satisfaction comes from
being challenged and happy with the work.

Factors such as company stability, company growth potential and market share are
also important considerations in choosing an offer. Reading business publications,
visiting Vault.com for insider information, etc. will help you get a handle on an employer.
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Do not accept a position unless you are fully committed to working for the employer
and once you have accepted an offer, you should cease all other efforts towards
seeking employment.

Ask yourself the following questions when contemplating an offer:

• Is the position stimulating and challenging?

• Will I acquire the kinds of experiences that will make me more employable?

• Is the employer well respected?

• Do the values of the company and employees reflect my own?

• Would I enjoy working with the people in the office?

• Is the salary competitive?

• Cost of living. Will the salary be sufficient?

• Will the overall benefits package meet my needs?

• Are the requirements and demands of the job compatible with my lifestyle?

• Will I be successful in meeting the challenges of the job?

• Can I build a good rapport with my immediate supervisor?

• Does the company support and provide opportunities for additional education
  and upgrading my skills?

• How much travel is required? Is it too much? Not enough?

• Is the job located in a community that offers the lifestyle I desire?

• The best job is one that is fun, exciting, challenging and interesting.



Networking is Key
Network with friends to get a referral
• Referrals were the number one source of filling jobs at 5.6 percent

• Always ask for business cards

• Carry around personal business cards to hand out

Research and contact employers
• Personal e-mail or phone call

Attend a networking party
• You can look up online in your specific city under city events and most cities have
  a professional group that meets for networking purposes.

Network online
LinkedIn is a business-oriented social networking site, mainly used for professional
networking. As of September 007, it had more than 14 million registered users, spanning
150 industries and more than 400 economic regions (as classified by the service).

The main purpose of the site is to allow registered users to maintain a list of contact
details of people they know and trust in business. The people in the list are called

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Connections. Users can invite anyone (whether a LinkedIn user or not) to become
a connection.

This list of connections can then be used in a number of ways:

• A contact network is built up consisting of their direct connections, each of their connections'
  connections (called nd degree connections) and also the connections of nd degree
  connections (called 3rd degree connections). This can be used, for example, to gain an
  introduction to someone you wish to know through a mutual, trusted contact.

• It can then be used to find jobs, people and business opportunities recommended
  by anyone in your contact network.

• Employers can list jobs and search for potential candidates.

• Job seekers can review the profile of hiring managers and discover which of their
  existing contacts can introduce them.



Extend Your Resume
It is important for you to post your resume or pass your resume along through different
avenues. Many alumni associations around the U.S. have portals or means for you to
extend your resume to be passed on to potential employers. Also, recruiters and head
hunters are always on the search to fill job positions online through search engines.
Some of the top search engines are:

• Monster.com

• Career Builder

• Hot Jobs

• Jobsonline.net

• Aftercollege.com

• Worktree.com


Proportion of the 1.3% External hires attributed to job boards.




         29.5%                   35.0%                        Monster
                                                              CareerBuilder
                                                              HotJobs
    6.5%
                                                              All Other

                     35.0%



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Use a Search Firm or Head Hunter
Another effective way to seek out employment is hiring someone else to seek it out for
you. Head hunters and recruiters are professionally trained to know how to learn your
strengths and be able to match you with a job that would be a good fit for you. For a
small fee, you can have a professional looking up job opportunities for you.
http://www.therecruiternetwork.com



Business Etiquette
Since first impressions greatly influence a hiring decision, the manner in which perspec-
tive employees present themselves can make a critical difference. Two really important
aspects of business etiquette are professional dress and dining. Dressing right and eating
with good manners are essential to the job interviewing process. It is always important to
freshen up on your business etiquette. You never know when a company will be judging
you during an interview if it is not in the typical business setting. For example, over lunch
or dinner. http://www.etiquetteexpert.com



Take Advantage of New Technologies
Find more creative ways to find jobs
YouTube: YouTube is a video sharing website where users can upload, view and share
video clips. Companies are putting together “commercial” like advertising to promote
positions they are recruiting for. Job searchers are now looking to YouTube to get job
descriptions through video. Also, some candidates are posting their own personal
creative resume testimony for recruiters to view. http://career-advisor.blogspot.
com/007/07/youtube-being-used-for-recruitment.html

SecondLife: SecondLife is an Internet based virtual world that was launched in 003.
60 percent of Europe has a membership in this second world and has opened up great
possibilities for recruiters to reach an international market. The first virtual career fair
on SecondLife was held on May 15-17, 007. This gave recruiters and candidates the
opportunity to cross over distance barriers and meet and greet in this virtual world.

Facebook: Is a social networking website that was launched February of 004. It’s
popularity has grown and the functionalities have expanded. Facebook now has a
Market Tab where individuals can post or seek out jobs.

Keep a clean image on Facebook and MySpace: It is important for candidates to
maintain an ethical and conservative Facebook profile. Recruiters and employers are
now pre-screening applicants by looking through candidates profile and pictures
posted for the public on their Facebook page.

According to a March survey by Ponemon Institute, a privacy think tank, 35 percent
of hiring managers use Google to do online background checks on job candidates,
and 3 percent look people up on social networking sites. About one-third of those
Web searches lead to rejections, according to the survey.
http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/00935/




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                                                                           References
                                                                           http://www.bestsearchers.com/best-websites/employment-jobs.html

                                                                           http://www.rileyguide.com

                                                                           http://www.how-to-write-a-resume.org/resume_writing.htm

                                                                           http://www.uwrf.edu/ccs/assets/documents/handouts/etiquette_tips.pdf

                                                                           http://web.princeton.edu/sites/career/Grad/Start/career_inventories.html

                                                                           http://www.cisco.com/web/learning/netacad/career_connection/promoteIT/VFT/index.html




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     Catalyst, CCDA, CCDP, CCIE, CCIP, CCNA, CCNP, CCSP, Cisco, the Cisco Certified Internetwork Expert logo, Cisco IOS, Cisco Press, Cisco Systems, Cisco Systems Capital, the Cisco Systems logo, Cisco Unity,
Enterprise/Solver, EtherChannel, EtherFast, EtherSwitch, Fast Step, Follow Me Browsing, FormShare, GigaDrive, HomeLink, Internet Quotient, IOS, iPhone, IP/TV, iQ Expertise, the iQ logo, iQ Net Readiness Scorecard, iQuick
Study, LightStream, Linksys, MeetingPlace, MGX, Networkers, Networking Academy, Network Registrar, PIX, ProConnect, ScriptShare, SMARTnet, StackWise, The Fastest Way to Increase Your Internet Quotient, and TransPath
are registered trademarks of Cisco Systems, Inc. and/or its affiliates in the United States and certain other countries.

All other trademarks mentioned in this document or Website are the property of their respective owners. The use of the word partner does not imply a partnership relationship between Cisco and any other company. (0711R)




                                                          Americas Headquarters                                  Asia Pacific Headquarters                               Europe Headquarters
                                                          Cisco Systems, Inc.                                    Cisco Systems (USA) Pte. Ltd.                           Cisco Systems International BV
                                                          170 West Tasman Drive                                  168 Robinson Road                                       Haarlerbergpark
                                                          San Jose, CA 95134-1706                                #28-01 Capital Tower                                    Haarlerbergweg 13-19
                                                          USA                                                    Singapore 068912                                        1101 CH Amsterdam
                                                          www.cisco.com                                          www.cisco.com                                           The Netherlands
                                                          Tel: 408 526-4000                                      Tel: +65 6317 7777                                      www-europe.cisco.com
                                                          800 553-NETS (6387)                                    Fax: +65 6317 7799                                      Tel: +31 0 800 020 0791
                                                          Fax: 408 527-0883                                                                                              Fax: +31 0 20 357 1100

   Cisco has more than 200 offices worldwide. Addresses, phone numbers, and fax numbers are listed on the Cisco Website at www.cisco.com/go/offices.

CCVP, the Cisco logo, and Welcome to the Human Network are trademarks of Cisco Systems, Inc.; Changing the Way We Work, Live, Play, and Learn is a service mark of Cisco Systems, Inc.; and Access Registrar, Aironet,
Catalyst, CCDA, CCDP, CCIE, CCIP, CCNA, CCNP, CCSP, Cisco, the Cisco Certified Internetwork Expert logo, Cisco IOS, Cisco Press, Cisco Systems, Cisco Systems Capital, the Cisco Systems logo, Cisco Unity,
Enterprise/Solver, EtherChannel, EtherFast, EtherSwitch, Fast Step, Follow Me Browsing, FormShare, GigaDrive, HomeLink, Internet Quotient, IOS, iPhone, IP/TV, iQ Expertise, the iQ logo, iQ Net Readiness Scorecard, iQuick
Study, LightStream, Linksys, MeetingPlace, MGX, Networkers, Networking Academy, Network Registrar, PIX, ProConnect, ScriptShare, SMARTnet, StackWise, The Fastest Way to Increase Your Internet Quotient, and TransPath
are registered trademarks of Cisco Systems, Inc. and/or its affiliates in the United States and certain other countries.

All other trademarks mentioned in this document or Website are the property of their respective owners. The use of the word partner does not imply a partnership relationship between Cisco and any other company. (0711R)
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