Authors Study Unit Plan by sorosabella

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									                                    Created by: Susie Rosabella

Introduction: I chose to do my Author Study Unit Plan on Leo Lionni because his books are

distinguished by their enduring moral themes and graphic simplicity. Lionni also uses very

colorful collages which engage the intended audience. After researching Leo Lionni and his

children’s books, my main reason for picking his books is that his collection of books teaches life

lessons and attitudes toward different life experiences. I would use this author study plan in a

second grade classroom over a one week period.


About the author:




                             “From time to time, from the endless flow of our mental imagery,

                             there emerges unexpectedly something that, vague though it may

                             be, seems to carry the promise of a form, a meaning, and, more

                             important, an irresistible poetic charge.”—Leo Lionni


       Leo Lionni was born in Holland in 1910. He was the only child of Louis Lionni, a diamond

cutter who later turned his sights to being an accountant, and Elisabeth Grussouw Lionni, an

opera singer. Lionni began his own art career when his Uncle Piet, an architect, gave him an art

table for his ninth birthday. As a child, he spent most of his free time in Amsterdam’s museums

teaching himself how to draw.
       Growing up, Lionni and his family moved a lot because of his father’s career. Louis

Lionni’s career as an accountant was failing so when Leo was twelve years old, his parents

moved to the United States in hopes of a promising future. Leo stayed back in Amsterdam with

his grandparents and two years later, he met with his parents in the United States. After three

years of working for the Atlantic Refining Company in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, Louis Lionni

was asked to manage the company’s Italian branch in Genoa.


       Because his family moved so often, Lionni attended a number of different schools in the

various countries in which he lived. He had fond memories of most of them. Upon moving to

Genoa, Lionni found himself with his greatest academic challenge. He spent ten months with a

tutor preparing for the entrance exams to attend an Italian high school. He was finally admitted

to a four-year program at the Intituto Tecnico Superiore Vittorio Emanule Terzo. This school

would train him to become a licensed businessman. While he usually did very well with his

studies, Lionni struggled at the new school. The only good thing he remembers about the

school is that it was where he met his future wife, Nora Maffi.


       While struggling to find a career after college, Lionni attended the University of Genoa

to earn a Ph.D. After graduating with a doctrine in Economics, his business degree quickly faded

into the background when his interest in art and design grew. In 1931, Lionni married and

settled in Milan. They eventually had two sons together, Mannie and Paolo. He started off

writing about European architecture for a local magazine. At this magezine, he met people who

moved him into the career of graphic designing which he stayed with for a number of years.

Lionni eventually moved back to America in 1939 and was hired by a Philadelphia agency as an
art director. From that agency, his reputation as an artist launched. He began to exhibit his

paintings and drawings in galleries from New York to Japan.


       In the late 1990's, Lionni announced that he had developed Parkinson's Disease, a

progressive neurological disorder that affects the nerves that carry electrical signals within the

brain. In his final years, he suffered from some of the common symptoms of the disease,

including shaky hands and difficulty walking. While it was not easy, Lionni attempted to live his

final years to the fullest. He died on October 11, 1999 at the age of 89 at his home in Italy.


       The year of 1959 was when Lionni career started as an author/illustrator. His first story

was developed for his grandchildren during a train ride, little blue and little yellow. This book,

along with a list of wonderful children’s books, has led to Leo Lionni’s remarkable reputation

and career as an author. He has gained international renown for his paintings, graphic designs,

illustrations, and sculpture in his stories. Throughout his career Leo Lionni wrote and illustrated

more than forty highly acclaimed children’s books. He received the 1984 American Institute of

Graphic Arts Gold Medal and was a four-time Caldecott Honor Winner for: Inch by Inch,

Frederick, Swimmy, and Alexander and the Wind-Up Mouse.


For Lionni’s biography, a complete list of works, and a complete list of awards please visit:

http://www.randomhouse.com/teachers/authors/results.pperl?authorid=17763

http://www.aiga.org/content.cfm/medalist-leolionni

http://www.yourlibrary.ws/childrens_webpage/e-author52000.htm

http://www.randomhouse.com/kids/catalog/author.pperl?authorid=17763
Annotated Bibliography: Ten of Leo Lionni’s Most Popular Books!
Frederick (Random House, 1973)

                     Winter is near and all the field mice are busy preparing and gathering
                     food for the cold months ahead, all except for Frederick. Always the
                     daydreamer, Frederick is preparing a small surprise that will warm the
                     hearts and feed the spirits of his fellow mice when they need it most. This
                     book is very humorous and just fun to read and Lionni’s illustrations are
                     portrayed among all the pages. Teachers can use this as a transitional
                     book to another subject or activity. Students will laugh at Frederick’s wit.




Inch by Inch (HarperCollins, 1995)

                    Inch by Inch is about a tiny green inchworm who can measure anything,
                    from a robin’s tail to a toucan’s beak. When a nightingale demands that
                    the inchworm measure its song, the clever worm calls on its skill to
                    creatively save his life. This is another humorous book from Lionni that
                    portrays his colorful and lively illustrations. Students will be left feeling
                    motivated to measure things and that is why I would lead them into a
                    measurement activity using a cutout of a green inchworm.




Alexander and the Wind-Up Mouse (Random House, 1974)

                      Everyone loves Willy the wind-up mouse, while Alexander the real mouse
                      is chased away with brooms and mousetraps. Wouldn't it be wonderful
                      to be loved and cuddled, thinks Alexander, and he wishes he could be a
                      wind-up mouse too. This book is filled with the honestly of friendship.
                      Lionni illustrates this book with bold and sumptuous collages that will
                      keep students engaged in the reading
Swimmy (Random House, 1973)

                      Swimmy is a happy black fish that lives in a school of red fish until a big
                      tuna eats all of his brothers and sisters. Lonely and sad, Swimmy
                      searches the sea and finally finds another school of red fish. These fish
                      are too frightened to swim in the ocean, so Swimmy comes up with a
                      plan. All the red fish swim close together in the shape of one giant fish,
                      and black Swimmy is the eye! Lionni’s colorful and carefully brushed
                      illustrations are shown on each page. His moral theme of friendship is
                      shown by the end and is a great book for teaching children teamwork.




A Color of his Own (Random House, 1997)

                       The charming story of a chameleon searching for his own color, who
                       ends up finding a true friend. This book is adorable and age appropriate
                       to teach students about making friends. It shows that no matter the
                       differences, there is always a common similarity. Lionni’s colorful
                       illustrations are displayed throughout each page.




Little Blue and Little Yellow (HarperCollins, 1995)

                       Little Blue and Little Yellow are best friends, but one day they can’t find
                       each other. When they finally do, they give each other such a big hug
                       that they turn green! How they find their true colors again concludes a
                       wonderfully satisfying story told with colorful pieces of torn paper and
                       very few words. Lionni’s moral theme of friendship is shown throughout
                       the text. This book would be very helpful for teachers wanting to show
                       students how colors mix to make other colors.
Mr. McMouse (Random House, 1992)

                Timothy is just a regular city mouse until the day he looks in the mirror and
                sees a little man reflected back at him. Timothy flees to the country, trying to
                figure out what's happened and what to do. A group of country mice
                recognize his true mousy essence and take Timothy under their wing. This
                story captures the essence of self discovery. Timothy is confused and is guided
                with the help of other mice to find himself again.




It’s Mine! (Random House, 1996)

                   Three selfish frogs quarrel over who owns their pond and island, until a
                   storm makes them value the benefits of sharing. This book really made me
                   laugh. The three frogs all think that they are “in charge,” but in reality there
                   is a bigger obstacle ahead. The frogs learn that through hardships friends
                   are more important than being “in charge.” This is another book where
                   Lionni’s moral theme is displayed for children to learn.




Fish Is Fish (Random House, 1974)

                   A tadpole and a minnow are underwater friends, but the tadpole grows
                   legs and explores the world beyond the pond and then returns to tell his
                   fish friend about the new creatures he sees. The fish imagines these
                   creatures as bird-fish and people-fish and cow-fish and is eager to join
                   them. This book is all about imagination. It allows the students to explore
                   different possibilities through humorous illustrations.
An Extraordinary Egg (Random House, 1998)

                    Jessica is an adventuresome frog who is full of wonder and always brings
                    back treasures to share with her frog buddies, Marilyn and August. One day
                    she brings home an extraordinary egg and Marilyn tells her it's a chicken
                    egg. The frogs hold firm to this belief, even when an alligator hatches out,
                    and eventually finds its way home and is called alligator by its mother. This
                    is another humorous book by Lionni. Even the cover of the book will grab
                    students attention and draw them into reading the story.




Leo Lionni Unit Plan
Unit Standards:

      LA.2.1.7.3 The student will summarize information in text, including but not limited to
       main idea, supporting details, and connections between texts
      LA.2.1.7.6 The student will identify themes or topics across a variety of fiction and
       nonfiction selections.
      LA.2.3.1.1 The student will prewrite by generating ideas from multiple sources (e.g.,
       text, brainstorming, webbing, drawing, writer's notebook, group discussion, other
       activities).

Unit Objectives:

      The student will be able to identify the theme that the author portrays across his
       collection of books.
      The student will be able to develop an understanding of the author by performing
       activities related to his works.
      The student will be able to justify how the author was motivated to write his collection
       of books.

Guided Questions:

      What theme does the author portray across his collection of books?
      What information should be shared with my audience to give them a flavor or my
       author?
      What motivated the author to write his collection of books?
Overview of Unit

Students will be taking a trip through Leo Lionni Land. I have provided three of my favorite

books from Lionni and some fun activities that I think the students will really enjoy. Student will

be creating their own poems just as Frederick did in the story Frederick. They will be using

inchworm cutouts as a unit of measurement to measure items in the classroom. This will allow

children to make a connection to the story Inch by Inch. Using the book An Extraordinary Egg,

students will find out information on eggs using a KWL chart. This will lead students in making

their own extraordinary egg that will be displayed on a bulletin board in the classroom. I will

have Lionni’s books at a center in my classroom for this unit. Students will be able to read his

stories and gather ideas that will come into play for our culminating activity. For our

culminating activity, students will be working in groups to retell one of Lionni’s stories. This

video will be shared with the class and students will reflect by writing a paragraph answering

questions related to Lionni’s books.


Unit Introduction

              (What theme does the author portray across his collection of books?)

      Standard: LA.2.3.1.1 The student will prewrite by generating ideas from multiple sources
       (e.g., text, brainstorming, webbing, drawing, writer's notebook, group discussion, other
       activities).
      Objective: The student will be able to identify the theme that the author portrays across
       his collection of books.

As an introduction to this unit, I would introduce students to the author Leo Lionni by telling

students, “Who knows what an author is? What does an author do? Do any of you have a

favorite author? Well I have many favorite authors and one that I have grown to love is Leo

Lionni. Do you know what I like his books so much? It’s because all of his book are about
animals and you all know how much Miss. Rosabella loves animals! Over the next week, we will

be studying Leo Lionni and his passion for writing books. Write now, we are going to watch a

short video with Leo Lionni explaining why he writes and creates book that involve animals.

Let’s watch!” ( http://www.randomhouse.com/kids/lionni/gallery.php).


“What did you all think about the video? Was Leo Lionni what you pictured he would look like?

What else would you like to learn about Leo Lionni?” I would have student write one paragraph

answering these questions. I would go on to say, “Leo Lionni has written many books and I

would love to share them all with you, but I am just going to share three of my favorites with

you this week. Then we are going to do some fun activities that reflect each book that you hear!

Are you ready to have some fun?”


Lesson 1: Creating a Poem

  (What information should be shared with my audience to give them a flavor or my author?)

Sunshine State Standards:                             Goal 3 Standards

Language Arts                                         Standard 1: Information Managers

LA.2.3.1.1The student will prewrite by generating     Standard 4: Creative and Critical Thinkers
ideas from multiple sources (e.g., text,
brainstorming, webbing, drawing, writer's
notebook, group discussion, other activities).

LA.2.4.1.2 The student will compose simple stories,
poems, riddles, rhymes, or song lyrics.
Objectives

After reading the book Frederick, the student will explain the patterns of Frederick’s poem
correctly. (Comprehension)

During a group discussion, the student will brainstorm and list rhyming words on the topic of
summer with 90% accuracy. (Application)

During independent practice, the student will produce create their own poem on the topic of
summer using the words listed during group discussion with 90% accuracy. (Synthesis)

Assessment & Evaluation

Initial: While reading the story, I will check for understanding when students answer
comprehension questions. While discussing Frederick’s poem, I will observe that students are
explaining the patterns throughout the poem correctly.



Informal: As a class, we will discuss Frederick’s poem and will come up with a list of rhyming
words that students can use to create their own poems. I will observe if students are
brainstorming words on the topic of summer time with 90% accuracy.



Formal: Students will turn in their poems for a grade. Students will be graded on accuracy and
content of the topic with 90% accuracy. Students should have used words that we
brainstormed together in their poems. I will be looking for the following characteristics in each
poem:

    1.   Rhyme
    2.   Rhythm
    3.   Content topic
    4.   At least four lines

Introduction to Lesson:                                    Materials

I will read Frederick to the class during circle time. I         The book Frederick by Leo Lionni
will tell students, “Just like Frederick, now you are            Pencil
going to be a poet, but you don’t even know it!”                 Paper
Technology Integration:

When student’s poems are checked and graded, they may publish their poems using a
computer.

Teacher Presentation or Facilitation:

1. I will read the story Frederick to the class during circle time.

2. As I am reading, I will ask questions to check for comprehension:

      Why does Frederick not want to work with the other mice?
      Why does Frederick need to gather sun rays for the winter days?
      Why does Frederick need to gather colors for the winter days?
      Why does Frederick need to gather words for the winter days?
      What happens to Frederick and the mice when the winter days come?

3. At the end of the story, the other mice celebrate Frederick's poetry. I will use this poem to
describe rhyme and rhyme patterns to the class. As a class, we will brainstorm rhyming words
on the topic of summer (I will write these words on the board and students will also write them
down on a piece of paper). Using these rhyming words, the students will create a four line
poem that fits rhyming pattern of Frederick’s poem. This poem will reflect how summer time
makes them feel.

      What do you notice about the ending words of each row in Frederick’s poem?
      What are some rhyming words that describe the summer time?
      How does summer time make you feel?

4. Students will work independently and I will assist them if needed.

5. When students are finished, they will share their poems with the class.


Differentiated Instruction

Student with special needs will work with a partner and/or assisted by the teacher as needed.
Student will have a copy of the book to use a reference.

English Language Learners will work with a partner and/or be assisted by the teacher as
needed. Student will have a copy of the book to use as a reference. Visuals throughout the
book will help the student’s comprehension. Student may use a bilingual dictionary if
necessary.
Lesson 2: Inchworm Measurements

  (What information should be shared with my audience to give them a flavor or my author?)

Sunshine State Standards:                     Goal 3 Standards

MA.2.G.3.1 Estimate and use standard          Standard 3: Numeric Problem Solvers
units, including inches and centimeters, to
                                              Standard 5: Responsible Workers
partition and measure lengths of objects.

Objectives

While reading the book Inch by Inch the student will show understanding of the story by
answering and explaining comprehension questions correctly. (Knowledge, Comprehension)

Given an inchworm cutout the student will estimate and measure various items in the
classroom with 90% accuracy. (Synthesis, Evaluation)

Assessment & Evaluation

Initial: I will observe student participation during the story and during the measurement
activity.



Informal: I will observe student’s correct understanding of comprehension questions
throughout the story.



Formal: I will collect student’s estimations and measurements worksheet done with 90%
accuracy. Student work will be graded on the following characteristics:

   1. Participation
   2. Completion of worksheet

Introduction to Lesson:                       Materials

After reading the story, show a green               Pencil
inchworm cutout to the class. Ask                   Paper
students, “How many inchworms would
                                                    Inchworm cutout
be needed to go the length of your desk?
What about the length of the classroom?
Let’s find out!”
Technology Integration

Student may use a computer to create bar graphs and compare their results.

Teacher Presentation or Facilitation:

   1. I will read the book, Inch by Inch to the class during circle time.

   2. As I am reading, I will ask questions to check for comprehension:
           Are the animals soft or prickly?
           What do they smell like?
           Does the inchworm get hungry or tired along the way?
           What would the inchworm like to do if he or she was not measuring?

   3. After reading the book, I will show the students a green inchworm cutout. I will have
      students estimate how long their desk is. I will check their estimations and see whose
      estimation was the closest?

   4. I will then give each student an inchworm cutout to do their own measurements. I will
      give students a list of items to measure around the classroom. Students will estimate
      the length and then check with their inchworm cutouts.

   5. Students will record their findings on a worksheet labeled [Estimation] l [Measurement]

    6. Papers will be turned in for a grade.
Differentiated Instruction

Students with special needs will work with a partner and/or assisted by the teacher when
needed. While reading the story, student can sit close to the teacher.

English Language Learners will work with a partner and/or assisted by the teacher when
needed. Student can answer comprehension questions by using one word answers.
Lesson 3: Making an Extraordinary Egg

  (What information should be shared with my audience to give them a flavor or my author?)

Sunshine State Standards:                         Goal 3 Standards

LA.2.3.1.1 The student will prewrite             Standard 4: Creative and Critical Thinkers
by generating ideas from multiple sources
(e.g., text, brainstorming, webbing, drawing,
writer's notebook, group discussion, other
activities).

LA.2.4.3.1 The student will draw a picture and
use simple text to explain why this item
(food, pet, person) is important to them.

Objectives

Before reading the story An Extraordinary Egg the student will demonstrate their understanding
of an egg by constructing a KWL chart as a class with 90% accuracy (Comprehension).

After reading the story the student will create their own egg and illustrate an animal that will
come out of his/her own egg with 95% accuracy (Synthesis).


Assessment & Evaluation

Initial: I will observe student understanding of eggs by using the KWL chart. I will observe
student participation in the making of the eggs.



Informal: I will observe student understanding of an egg with 90% accuracy. This will be done
by creating a KWL chart as a class.



Formal: Student eggs will be turned in for a grade. After eggs are graded, they will be hung up
on a bulletin board to display. Student work will be graded on the following characteristics:

   1. Participation
   2. Illustration
   3. Color/writing (Did you describe your animal?)
Introduction to Lesson:                         Materials

Before reading the story An Extraordinary            The book, An Extraordinary Egg
Egg, we will fill out a KWL Chart as a class.        construction paper
Students will tell me what they know about           lined paper
eggs, and what they want to know about               scissors
eggs.                                                glue
                                                     crayons
                                                     markers
                                                     pre-made egg tracers
                                                     hole punch
                                                     yarn

Technology Integration

Students may use computers to find more research on an egg.
Teacher Presentation or Facilitation:

   1. I will fill in a KWL chart with students about eggs prior to reading the story.

   2. I will read the story An Extraordinary Egg during circle time with my students.

   3. After reading the story, I will complete KWL chart with what students learned about
      eggs from the story.
           What is the egg like it the story?
           What does the egg look like?
           What have you learned about eggs?

   4. I will pass out 2 sheets of construction paper, 1 sheet of lined paper and pre-made egg
      tracers. Students will trace and cut egg on each piece of paper (3 egg shapes total).

   5. Student will glue lined paper to one sheet of construction paper.

   6. I will hole punch and yarn eggs together to make a book.

   7. Each student will illustrate an animal that will come out of his/her egg and write about it
      (just a few lines).

   8. I will construct a bulletin board titled “Out Extraordinary Eggs.” We will hang the eggs on
      display.

Differentiated Instruction

Students with special needs can work with a partner and/or be assisted by the teacher when
needed. Student can have a copy of the KWL chart.

English Language Learners can work with a partner and/or be assisted by the teacher when
needed. Student can have a copy of the KWL chart.
Culminating Activity

                 (What motivated the author to write his collection of books?)

             (What theme does the author portray across his collection of books?)

For my culminating activity, I would have students work in groups to create a 3-5 minute video

on Leo Lionni and one of his books (Flip Video). I would show students how to use the video

and provide a sheet with detailed instructions. Throughout the week, each group (group of 5-6

students) will be assigned a book by Leo Lionni and they will go to the library to read the book.

After reading the book, students will use the video to retell the story acting out specific

characters. Students will be provided the character roles they will act out. Roles will be

modified according to class size. When all groups are finished, videos will be shared with the

class. After videos are shared, students will write a paragraph explaining what the four books

have in common and why the author, Leo Lionni, wrote these books. Students will be graded on

creativity, participation, and accuracy of information shared.


       Group 1: Frederick                             Group 3: It’s Mine!
           Student 1: Director                           Student 1: Director
           Student 2: Frederick                          Student 2: Milton
           Student 3: Mice #1                            Student 3: Rupert
           Student 4: Mice #2                            Student 4: Lydia
           Student 5: Mice #3                            Student 5: Large Toad
           Student 6: Mice #4

       Group 2: A Flea Story                          Group 4: Swimmy
           Student 1: Director                           Student 1: Director
           Student 2: Dog                                Student 2: Swimmy
           Student 3: Chicken and the Duck               Student 3: School fish and Jelly
           Student 4: Porcupine and Bird                 Student 4: School fish and Lobster
           Student 5: Mole                               Student 5: School fish and Eel
           Student 6: Turtle                             Student 6: Tuna Fish
Florida Educator Accomplishment Practices Reflection


       While designing this unit, I wanted to keep in mind the grade level of my students while

also pushing students a little further to what I know they could achieve. This unit

unquestionably encourages students to use critical thinking skills. I want my students to make

connections to the author from personal experiences and I feel that they can do that because of

the author’s love of animal theme across his collection of books.

       According to the Florida Education Accomplishment Practices for communication, it

states, “The pre-professional teacher recognizes the need for effective communication in the

classroom and is in the process of acquiring techniques which she/he will use in the classroom”

Throughout my unit, I plan I keeping my students motivated by giving clear high expectations of

what is expected of them. My introductory activity will allow me to model how much I want

each one of them to know about an amazing author such as Leo Lionni. By allowing students to

see a video and write a short paragraph on what they would like to learn more about from this

author, they are creating a goal for themselves that I hope to fulfill for them. As children read

Leo Lionni’s books during centers, I would encourage them to ask one another questions to

develop further comprehension.

       According to the Florida Education Accomplishment Practices for assessment, it states,

“The pre-professional teacher collects and uses data gathered from a variety of sources. These

sources include both traditional and alternate assessment strategies. Furthermore, the teacher

can identify and match the students’ instructional plans with their cognitive, social, linguistic,

cultural, emotional, and physical needs” Throughout each lesson, I plan to assess students

informally. I will be checking that students are participating in the class discussions,
participating in group work, and also showing involvement in all activities. While assessing

formally, I will be checking student work based on involvement and completion. I want to know

that the students are having fun while participating in the lessons while also assessing their

strengths and weaknesses. Formally assessing my students work lets where students are

excelling but more importantly, where they are lacking. This assessment will allow me to work

with the student individually to ask questions an alternative solution.

       After making an author study plan on Leo Lionni, I have learned many new ideas that I

will carry with me through my career in education. Books give me, the teacher, an opportunity

to teach children values, morals, and many other wonderful life lessons that children may face.

There are so many marvelous and fun activities that I have learned that I could teach my

students to get a message across to them. Leo Lionni will teach children great morals through

beautiful illustrations, poetry, animals, and humor. Most children love books that they can

relate to and I hope to teach children that choosing these types of books, starts with choosing

an author.



Resources
The following resources are ones that I gathered to find information on my Author’s Study Plan.
These websites are also great for students to use in finding books and more information on the
author Leo Lionni:

   1. Barnes and Noble personal website retrieved June 2010 from
      http://www.barnesandnoble.com

   2. Kiddyhouse personal website retrieved May 2010 from
      http://www.kiddyhouse.com/Teachers/Literature/LeoL.html
3. Leo Lionni personal website: 100 Years of Leo Lionni retrieved May 2010 from
   http://www.randomhouse.com/kids/lionni/aboutlionni.php

4. ReadWriteThink personal website retrieved June 2010 from
   http://www.readwritethink.org

5. Florida Educator Accomplishment Practices. Bureau of Educator Recruitment,
   Development and Retention. Florida Department of Education, Tallahassee Florida
   retrieved June 2010 from
    http://www.fldoe.org/dpe/publications/preprofessional4-99.pdf

								
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