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University Emergency Procedures by vev19514

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									 Experimental Notebook
 (Official record for all experiments/ trials/ activities
                    and their associated risk assessments)
Issued to:
Division/Area:
Project:

Book Number:
Used from      /           /     to        /     /
Phone contact:




        Curtin University of Technology
        GPO Box U 1987, Perth WA 6845
SAFETY IN LABORATORIES ......................................................................................................... III
  UNIVERSITY EMERGENCY PROCEDURES .............................................................................................. III
  LABORATORY SAFETY RULES .............................................................................................................. III
  RISK ASSESSMENTS ..............................................................................................................................IV
  HAZARD CONTROL ................................................................................................................................V
  CHEMICAL SAFETY................................................................................................................................V
    Familiarise yourself with the risks ................................................................................................... v
    Assess the risks ................................................................................................................................. v
    Spills ................................................................................................................................................ vi
  BIOLOGICAL SAFETY ............................................................................................................................VI
  RADIATION SAFETY............................................................................................................................ VII
  MANUAL HANDLING .......................................................................................................................... VII
PLAGIARISM .................................................................................................................................. VIII
INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY ..................................................................................................... VIII
COPYRIGHT ................................................................................................................................... VIII
INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGY FACILITIES ............................ IX
ETHICS, EQUITY AND SOCIAL JUSTICE ................................................................................... IX
RECORD KEEPING ............................................................................................................................ X
TABLE OF CONTENTS .................................................................................................................... XI




This notebook forms part of the official University record of experiments (including their
associated risk assessments) conducted by Curtin University of Technology staff and
students.

Use the following pages and their associated web addresses to gain additional information. If
you still have concerns contact EduSafe x4900.


                                 IMPORTANT CONTACTS AND NUMBERS

All Emergencies from an internal phone                                                                                                 5

Security or Emergencies from a mobile phone                                                                                            9266 4444

EduSafe                                                                                                                                9266 4900

General maintenance                                                                                                                    9266 2020

Medical Centre/ Health services                                                                                                        9266 7345




                                                                                                                                                            ii
Safety in Laboratories
University Emergency Procedures

IN AN EMERGENCY DIAL 5* FROM AN INTERNAL PHONE OR 9266 4444 FROM A
MOBILE

FOR YOUR SAFETY MAKE SURE YOU KNOW THE LOCATION OF YOUR NEAREST
EMERGENCY EXIT AND ASSEMBLY AREA.

ENSURE THAT YOUR EXIT ROUTES ARE ALWAYS CLEAR.

During an evacuation:
     Alert other occupants in your area then commence evacuating the building by nearest
        emergency exit unless this is compromised by the incident.
     Remain calm
     If time permits turn off any experiments that could contribute to the incident
     Do not use lifts
     Follow instructions from Wardens (white and yellow hats)
     Only take small personal belongings with you (eg keys, purse)
     Move directly to your assembly area
     Do not re-enter the building until advised safe to do so

* Dialling 5 will ensure assistance arrives in the shortest possible time as it activates the
University emergency response team and state emergency services.

Laboratory Safety Rules

    1. Always act responsibly. Horseplay, running, unauthorised experiments etc are
        strictly forbidden.
    2. Appropriate clothing must always be worn. This includes as a minimum:
         Safety glasses. Personnel wearing contact lenses must inform the laboratory
             supervisor as special precautions may be required. Neither sunglasses nor
             common prescription glasses are acceptable
         A laboratory coat
         Closed-in shoes
         Disposable gloves are available and must be worn as required. Consult the
             Material Safety Data Sheet to ensure the appropriate gloves are being used
    3. No food or drink is to be handled or consumed in a laboratory
    4. Do not smoke within the laboratory area or within 3 metres of an inlet to any building
    5. Never undertake any work unless the hazards of the operation are known and the
        safety precautions adopted (refer to the following section on Risk Assessments)
    6. Always use protective devices appropriate to the type of operation being carried out,
        giving consideration to personnel operating in your vicinity
    7. Regard all substances as hazardous unless there is definite information to the
        contrary
    8. Report all accidents, no matter how trivial, to your supervisor
    9. Do not work in isolation unless the requirements of the University’s “Working Alone
        or in Isolation” minimum standards are adhered to
        (www.edusafe.edu.au/curtin/policies/)
    10. Always use safety carriers for transporting chemicals in glass or plastic containers
        with a capacity of 2L or greater. Never carry incompatible substances together
    11. Immediately wash skin areas which come into contact with chemicals, irrespective of
        concentration, and report this to your supervisor
    12. Immediately report all spills to your supervisor and ensure they are cleaned up
        immediately (www.edusafe.edu.au/curtin/hazard_Spills.htm)
    13. Never store incompatible substances in the same area
        (www.edusafe.edu.au/curtin/hazard_Storage_and_Handling_000.htm)
    14. Maintain the minimum required quantities of hazardous substances in the laboratory
        work area

                                                                                                iii
Risk Assessments

Risk assessment involves careful examination of the hazards identified with consideration
given to:
     The likelihood of the hazard leading to an incident that results in the injury or harm to
        an employee or student
     The likely consequences should the hazard lead to an incident
Using these criteria will assist in assessing the hazards identified and will help to prioritise the
controls required.

Typical areas of concern are:
     Chemicals or Biological materials (handling, processing, storage and disposal)
     Ergonomics (repetitive tasks, manual handling, lifting, confined spaces)
     Radiation (lasers, EMF, X rays, radioactive isotopes)
     High Voltages (>110V DC or >50V AC)
     Extreme Temperatures (Cryogenics, furnaces), and
     Field work (off road travel, working in isolation).
These headings are not exclusive and other unforseen risks may need to be assessed.

The first step is to determine the level of consequence should the hazard or hazardous work
practice lead to an accident. This will involve consideration of the potential for injury/ill health
and/or damage to property. Secondly consider the likelihood of the accident occurring. Use
the risk matrix below to determine the need for hazard controls and obtain the level of risk.

                                                  Consequences
Likelihood
                  Insignificant        Minor        Moderate             Major         Catastrophic
Almost certain         H                H              E                  E                 E
Likely                 M                H              H                  E                 E
Moderate               L                M              H                  E                 E
Unlikely               L                 L             M                  H                 E
Rare                   L                 L             M                  H                 H

Legend:
E extreme risk; immediate action required
H high risk; senior management attention required
M moderate risk; management responsibility must be specified
L low risk; manage by routine procedures.

Likelihood descriptions:
     Almost certain – can expect more than one event annually. Occurs frequently in this
        Division/work area/industry.
     Likely – can expect event to occur annually.
     Moderate - Can expect event to occur once every three years.
     Unlikely - Can expect event to occur once every ten years. Has happened in the
        industry/work area in Australia.
     Rare - Can expect event to occur only in exceptional circumstances. Not known to
        have happened in this industry/work area.

Consequence descriptions:
    Catastrophic – Multiple deaths; Substantial property damage; eg. Loss of building(s);
      facilities and/or critical services; Catastrophic, long term environmental harm; Total
      cessation of all services for more than one week and disruption over subsequent
      months. Major facility is involved.
    Major – Single death and/or multiple serious injuries (ie. Lost time from work > 1 day);
      Significant/extensive property damage; Significant long term environmental harm;
      Total cessation of services for up to seven days and subsequent disruption for
      two/three months.




                                                                                                       iv
         Moderate – Individual serious injury; (eg Lost time from work > 1 day) Moderate
          property damage; Significant release of pollutants with mid-term recovery; Total
          cessation of services for up to one day and subsequent disruption for one/two
          months.
         Minor – First Aid; Minor property damage; Minor/transient environmental harm; Minor
          disruption to services for up to one month.
         Insignificant – No injuries; No property damage; Brief pollution but no environmental
          harm; No disruption to operations.

Hazard Control

Controls should be determined according to the “Hierarchy of Control”. The following control
elements should be utilised in the order presented and where appropriate used in
combination.

                                          1. Elimination
                                                ↓
                                         2. Substitution
                                                ↓
                                           3. Isolation
                             (Barriers/ Relocation by space or time)
                                                ↓
                                       4. Engineering
                  (Equipment and workplace design/ Automation/ Containment)
                                                ↓
                                       5. Administration
        (Standard Operating Procedures/ Maintenance schedule/ Training and information)
                                                ↓
                            6. Personal Protective Equipment (PPE)

Chemical Safety

Detailed information on the University’s program for managing chemical safety is available
from the EduSafe website http://www.edusafe.edu.au/curtin/hazardous.html

Familiarise yourself with the risks
It is essential that you familiarise yourself with the hazards you (and bystanders) are facing
when using chemical products, as well as the controls that are recommended. This
information is primarily available from:
       The label on the container (refer to www.edusafe.edu.au/curtin/hazard_Labelling.htm
         for information on how to read and interpret chemical labels)
       The Material Safety Data Sheet (MSDS) is a document that provides detailed health
         and safety information in relation to the chemical being used. MSDSs are available
         from your supervisor or www.edusafe.edu.au/curtin/hazard_Chem_Alert.htm

Assess the risks
The information available from the above sources should be used to assess the level of risk
presented by the product. The risk assessment principles described in the preceding pages
should be used to determine whether the existing controls provide adequate protection for
yourself, as well as any bystanders.

More information on completing a chemical risk assessment and a tool to guide you through
the task is available from www.edusafe.edu.au/curtin/hazard_Risk_Assessment.htm.




                                                                                               v
Spills
All spills must be dealt with immediately. Below is information to assist in dealing with spills of
common laboratory chemicals. Refer to the MSDS for more detailed information.

Major Spills
   1. Alert those in the area and evacuate;
   2. Dial 5;
   3. Inform the warden and follow the areas emergency procedure;
   4. Keep personnel away from the area;
   5. Report the incident on the on-line reporting system
       http://www.edusafe.edu.au/curtin/incident.html

Minor Spills of corrosive materials (Acids and Caustics)
   1. Do not take unnecessary risks;
   2. Alert those in the area;
   3. Wear the appropriate personal protective equipment as detailed on the MSDS;
   4. Contain the spill by covering drains and/ or surrounding the spill with earth or sand;
   5. Carefully neutralize:
        Acids with soda ash or sodium bicarbonate
        Caustics with dilute or weak acid;
   6. Scoop the material into a sealable plastic container;
   7. Repeat steps 5 & 6 to ensure residues are removed;
   8. Wash the area with excess water;
   9. Clean up and leave area dry;
   10. Report the incident on the on-line reporting system
       http://www.edusafe.edu.au/curtin/incident.html

Minor Spills of Organic Solvents
   1. Do not attempt to clean up if there is an ignition source present;
   2. Do not take unnecessary risks;
   3. Alert those in the area;
   4. Wear the appropriate personal protective equipment;
   5. Absorb the spill using a solvent absorbent moving from the perimeter inward;
   6. Mix thoroughly with plastic scoops and transfer to an appropriate disposal container
       (check with the MSDS);
   7. Repeat steps 5 & 6 to ensure residues are removed;
   8. Clean up and leave area dry;
   9. Report the incident on the on-line reporting system
       http://www.edusafe.edu.au/curtin/incident.html

Biological Safety

A biological hazard or biohazard is an organism, or substance derived from an organism, that
poses a threat to (primarily) human health. This can include medical waste, samples of a
micro-organism, virus or toxin (from a biological source) that can impact human health.

Detailed information on the University’s program for managing Biosafety is available from the
following EduSafe website http://www.edusafe.edu.au/curtin/biosafety/index.html

The biohazards posed by this type of work can include, but are not limited to:
    Sharps and needle stick injuries
    Greater risk posed from exposed open wounds especially when dealing with infected
       biological samples (e.g. blood, saliva)
    Infection can result from inhalation, skin penetration, ingestion or infection of orifices
       such as eyes

In highly infectious situations, extra precautions are required:
      Disposable gloves must be worn
      Hands must be disinfected after removing gloves in case any perforation of the
         gloves has permitted the entry of micro-organisms


                                                                                                 vi
       Work with highly infectious substances must only be performed in areas provided with
        wash basins equipped with elbow or foot operated taps
       An emergency shower must be readily accessible
       All work should be carried out in biosafety cabinets. Where the work poses an
        extreme risk, use of biosafety cabinets is mandatory
       Correct disposal of infectious waste, radioactive waste, sharps, drugs and cytotoxins
        in containers reserved for the particular type of waste
       Protective clothing should be worn in microbiological laboratories and gowns or coats
        removed before leaving the laboratory for common rooms, office areas or home

It is the responsibility of all staff and students to ensure the Biological Risk Assessment
available from the following site is completed:
http://test.edusafe.edu.au/curtin/biosafety/documents/biologicalagentsriskassessment.doc

Radiation Safety

All work involving radiation must be done under the supervision of a licensee holding the
correct licence for the type of radiation being handled. This includes sealed and unsealed
ionising radiation as well as sources of ultraviolet light such as transilluminators.

It is essential that you understand the type of hazards posed by the material you are working
with and how to protect yourself from these hazards, for example unsealed sources of
ionising radiation may present an internal or external hazard.

There are three main methods of intake to be aware of when assessing the risk of internal
radiation hazard are:
     Ingestion: Swallowing radioactive material.
     Inhalation: Breathing air contaminated with radioactive material.
     Absorption: Absorption of radioactive material through breaks in the skin or directly
         through intact skin.

There are three main concepts of control to remember in protecting yourself from an external
radiation source. They are:
     Time: The amount of radiation exposure received is proportional to time. So minimise
         the time spent handling radioactive substances or with radiation producing
         equipment.
     Distance: The intensity of radiation drops rapidly the further you are from the source.
         So maximise your distance from sources of radiation at all times. This includes for
         example, using tongs instead of bare hands to handle radioactive samples.
     Shielding: Increasing shielding around a radiation source will reduce exposure.

Follow the correct procedures for monitoring yourself and your work area and ensure you
abide by the correct procedures for any irradiating equipment.

Any concerns you have should be discussed with your supervisor, or refer to EduSafe’s
website for more information www.edusafe.edu.au/curtin/radiation/index.html

Manual Handling

Manual Handling includes any activity that involves the use of force to lift, push, pull, carry,
move, hold or restrain an object. One in three injuries to Australian workers are caused by
manual handling, hence it is very important to assess the risk and ensure adequate controls
are in place.

Ask yourself if the manual handling activity is necessary or can the risk be removed (eg by
using machinery or lifting devices). If not, can the work be changed to eliminate, reduce or
control the risk of injury? You can reduce risk factors by:
     Modifying workplace layout and equipment so that awkward postures can be avoided
         (eg by working at waist height benches rather than bent over at a lower level)
     Modifying the load (eg repackaging larger loads into smaller loads)



                                                                                                   vii
       Redesigning work patterns (eg by alternating tasks to avoid repetition and prolonged
        awkward postures, such as alternating between seated written work and standing at a
        bench)
       Warming up and stretching prior to manual handling

Aim for an upright spine in a neutral relaxed posture as often as possible and avoid twisting,
particularly with a load. Incorporate regular breaks, particularly from repetitive work or
awkward postures. Consider the need for training if frequent or heavy manual handling is a
regular requirement.

Set up your work area so that you can avoid or reduce awkward postures - seek assistance
from EduSafe (x4900) if you need ergonomic or safe manual handling advice or advice on
assistive equipment. Seek assistance from your doctor if you feel any pain or discomfort.

Plagiarism
Plagiarism means presenting the work or property of another person as one’s own, without
appropriate acknowledgement or referencing. Plagiarism includes, but is not limited to
    (i)     copying of sentences, paragraphs or creative products which are the work of
            other persons (including books, articles, theses, unpublished works, working
            papers, seminar and conference papers, internal reports, lecture notes or tapes)
            without due acknowledgment;
    (ii)    too closely paraphrasing sentences, paragraphs or themes without due
            acknowledgment;
    (iii)   using another person’s work/s (including words, music, computer source code,
            creative or visual artefacts, designs or ideas) or research data without due
            acknowledgment;
    (iv)    submitting work which has been produced by someone else (e.g. allowing or
            contracting another person to do the work for which you claim authorship);
    (v)     copying or submitting computer files, code or website content in whole or in part
            without indicating the origin of these;
    (vi)    submitting one’s own previously assessed or published work for assessment or
            publication elsewhere, without appropriate acknowledgement (self-plagiarism);
    (vii)   in the case of collaborative projects, falsely representing the individual
            contributions of the collaborating partners.

All cases of plagiarism will be dealt with in accordance with the University’s Plagiarism Policy
available from www.policies.curtin.edu.au

Intellectual Property
The University has ownership of course materials, computer programs and other Intellectual
Property created by staff in the course of their duties. Where the University decides to
commercialise such intellectual property the net revenue received by the University will be
shared between the University and the originator. Staff normally retains the copyright in other
scholarly works that they create, but the University claims a royalty-free, non-exclusive
licence to use them.

As a general rule the University does not claim ownership of intellectual property created by
students.

View the University’s Ownership of Intellectual Property policy available from
www.policies.curtin.edu.au for more information.

Copyright
Every Curtin University student and staff member is subject to obligations under the Copyright
Act 1968. Staff and students who flagrantly disregard University policy and copyright
requirements will be liable to disciplinary action under their contract of employment or the
Student Disciplinary Statute as appropriate.

                                                                                              viii
Under copyright fair dealing provisions, students are permitted to copy for the purpose of
research and study, criticism or review, but certain limits apply. For example:
     Books – you may copy up to 10 per cent of the pages or one chapter, whichever is
       the greater
     Periodicals/ journals/ newspapers – you may copy one article per issue (more than
       one if they are required for the same assignment or research project).
     Artwork, television, radio broadcasts and audio-visual material – specific
       requirements and limits apply.

You should normally only make a single copy, for your own individual use. Material (including
music, film, and unlicensed software) that does not support the educational purposes of the
University cannot be downloaded, copied or communicated using University or personally
owned equipment, or computer networks.

Refer to www.copyright.curtin.edu.au for more information.

Information and Communication Technology Facilities
and Services
While at the University you must not use either your own computer or Curtin's ICT facilities
and services to:
     Use another person’s identity or authorisation code
     Share accounts/passwords
     Store software and pre-purchased or rented videos, audio tapes, CD or DVD material
        on Curtin ICT facilities without the express permission of the copyright owner.
     Hack into, meddle with or damage any other computer or service or use any hacker
        tool without written permission from the University
     Harass or obstruct any person using ICT facilities and services
     Do anything dishonest or illegal, including viewing, sending or giving access to
        material defined as prohibited or objectionable, or giving a person under 18 access to
        restricted material.

Additionally, participation in the following practices should be demonstrably associated with
current study, research programs or business activities:
     Viewing and/or downloading of movie and video material
     Accessing and/or downloading of music, including MP3s
     Listening to music / radio through the internet
     Watching online news broadcasts
     Accessing and/or downloading adult material, including pornography.

Additionally, Curtin has a policy of zero tolerance to the accessing and downloading of
pornography, unless it can be clearly demonstrated that it is required for teaching, learning or
research purposes.

Refer to the Information Management – Information Security – Conditions of Use policy
available from www.policies.curtin.edu.au for more information.

Ethics
Ethics at Curtin takes many forms. The University has a set of Guiding Ethical Principles
which articulate ways in which the institution and its members may co-exist, co-operate and
collaborate to form a community in which everyone's rights are observed and protected. The
Guiding Ethical Principles can be accessed at:
http://www.policies.curtin.edu.au/documents/geps.doc

Research Ethics matters, including approval of research proposals, should be directed to the
Office of Research and Development which is responsible for the Human Research Ethics
Committee and the Animal Ethics Experimentation Committee. Full details are available at:
http://research.curtin.edu.au/

                                                                                                ix
Record Keeping
Inventors throughout the world are able to rely on evidence of their activities when proving
dates of their invention before the United States Patent Office. The following checklist is
provided by way of a guideline only to ensure all the requirements are met in your particular
circumstances, specific advice should be sought on a case by case basis.

       Record should be kept in a bound notebook with consecutively numbered pages.
        Records kept on computer are not currently acceptable as evidence of invention.
       Entries should be made in pen not pencil.
       The date should be entered on each page.
       Each experiment should be described in the past tense and in detail.
       The purpose of the experiment should be indicated.
       Entries should be made directly in the notebook as the experiment is carried out.
       Results should be entered immediately they are obtained.
       If some of the experimental work is carried out by another person, the data generated
        by that person should be entered in the bound notebook as soon as the researcher
        receives them.
       All non-standard terms and abbreviations should be defined in the notebook.
       Some results may be difficult to enter into the notebook. Photographs should be stuck
        in and signed and dated across the border to show that they have not been added
        later. Where possible gels should be sealed and taped in. Again a signature and date
        across the edge may be beneficial if this is possible. Bulky results such as large
        computer printouts may need to be kept separately. To accommodate this sort of data
        some laboratories are keeping a separate catalogue of signed and dated printouts
        numbered by consecutive catalogue numbers with a description of the results and a
        cross-reference to the catalogue number in the notebook.
       Incorrect entries should not be erased but rather struck through with a single line.
        Blank portions of pages should be drawn through with a single diagonal line.
       Each page of the notebook should be signed and dated by the person actually
        carrying out the experiment as soon as it is completed.
       Each page of the notebook should also be signed by at least one and preferably two
        people who have knowledge concerning the experiments actually conducted, ie.
        someone who has observed and understood the experiment. It may not be sufficient
        for the witness to be a person who understood the experiment to whom the
        experiment merely disclosed the experimental details.
       The witness should be someone who is not likely to be an inventor of any invention
        embodied in the experiment being witnessed. It is preferable where to have critical
        experiments conducted by someone who is not likely to be an inventor. A laboratory
        technician who is working under the direct instruction of the researcher, using
        standard manipulations and who is not engaged in any problem solving activity in
        order to perform the experiment is likely to satisfy this requirement.

Used with permission Griffith Hack, Patent and Trade Mark Attorneys, Intellectual Property
Lawyers




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                                     1
 Title of Experiment./ Trial........................................................................ ...................     Page
 Name of Person Conducting Experiment .........................................                        / /                   Date
 Authorization/Witness as appropriate ...............................................
                                                                Signed
                                                                                                        /
                                                                                                          Dated
                                                                                                                  /              / /
OSH and Ethics assessment & declarationSe e pag es i to ix fo r guid elin es .                                               Continued
Does this activity have issues that would cause concern to you or Curtin University                                          from
If so then an authorizing signature is recommended and in some cases mandatory.                                              Page #...........
Tick/mark keywords that most nearly describes this experiment/trial/activity                                                 Book #............
[ ] Chemicals; Handling/processing [ ] Biological material [ ] Animal experiments
[ ] High voltages [ ] Ergonomics( lifting, repetitive tasks) [ ] Radiation [ ] Extreme t                                   emperatures
[ ]Other PLEASE specify:
Risk assessment:




                                                                                                                            2Continued
                                                                                                                             on
                                                                                                                             Page #...........
Page            Title of Experiment./ Trial........................................................................ ...................
Date            Name of Person Conducting Experiment .........................................                        / /
   / /          Authorization/Witness as appropriate ...............................................
                                                                               Signed
                                                                                                                       /
                                                                                                                         Dated
                                                                                                                                 /
Continued           OSH and Ethics assessment & declarationSe e pag es i to ix fo r guid elin es .
from               Does this activity have issues that would cause concern to you or Curtin University
Page #........... If so then an authorizing signature is recommended and in some cases mandatory.
Book #............ Tick/mark keywords that most nearly describes this experiment/trial/activity
              [ ] Chemicals; Handling/processing [ ] Biological material [ ] Animal experiments
              [ ] High voltages [ ] Ergonomics( lifting, repetitive tasks) [ ] Radiation [ ] Extreme t                                    emperatures
              [ ]Other PLEASE specify:
               Risk assessment:




                                                                                                                                          3
Continued
on
 Title of Experiment./ Trial........................................................................ ...................     Page
 Name of Person Conducting Experiment .........................................                        / /                   Date
 Authorization/Witness as appropriate ...............................................
                                                                Signed
                                                                                                        /
                                                                                                          Dated
                                                                                                                  /              / /
OSH and Ethics assessment & declarationSe e pag es i to ix fo r guid elin es .                                               Continued
Does this activity have issues that would cause concern to you or Curtin University                                          from
If so then an authorizing signature is recommended and in some cases mandatory.                                              Page #...........
Tick/mark keywords that most nearly describes this experiment/trial/activity                                                 Book #............
[ ] Chemicals; Handling/processing [ ] Biological material [ ] Animal experiments
[ ] High voltages [ ] Ergonomics( lifting, repetitive tasks) [ ] Radiation [ ] Extreme t                                   emperatures
[ ]Other PLEASE specify:
Risk assessment:




                                                                                                                            4Continued
                                                                                                                             on
                                                                                                                             Page #...........
Page            Title of Experiment./ Trial........................................................................ ...................
Date            Name of Person Conducting Experiment .........................................                        / /
   / /          Authorization/Witness as appropriate ...............................................
                                                                               Signed
                                                                                                                       /
                                                                                                                         Dated
                                                                                                                                 /
Continued           OSH and Ethics assessment & declarationSe e pag es i to ix fo r guid elin es .
from               Does this activity have issues that would cause concern to you or Curtin University
Page #........... If so then an authorizing signature is recommended and in some cases mandatory.
Book #............ Tick/mark keywords that most nearly describes this experiment/trial/activity
              [ ] Chemicals; Handling/processing [ ] Biological material [ ] Animal experiments
              [ ] High voltages [ ] Ergonomics( lifting, repetitive tasks) [ ] Radiation [ ] Extreme t                                    emperatures
              [ ]Other PLEASE specify:
               Risk assessment:




                                                                                                                                          5
Continued
on
6
etc




      7

								
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