PARENTS' GUIDE TO EMERGENCY PROCEDURES

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PARENTS' GUIDE TO EMERGENCY PROCEDURES Powered By Docstoc
					             Pacific Grove
         Unified School District

     PARENTS’ GUIDE
TO EMERGENCY PROCEDURES

                   Emergency: 911
         Pacific Grove Police Dept: 648-5700
          Pacific Grove Fire Dept: 648-3110
   Pacific Grove Unified School District: 646-6517

    My Child’s School Main Office: ____________
              (see page 2 for numbers)




                                                     Revised: 08/29/06
      Forest Grove 646-6560
     PG Adult School 646-6580
PG Community High School 646-6597
     PG High School 646-6590
    PG Middle School 646-6568
     Robert H. Down 646-6540




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I. Introduction.
In the event of an emergency, the Pacific Grove Unified School District shall respond in
a way to protect students and staff in as comprehensive manner as possible. Safety
committees at all district schools work diligently on planning, preparing, and practicing
emergency procedures.

This document is a parents’ guide to emergency procedures. Preparedness is the key to
safety. Any questions? Please contact the
District Office at 646-6517.

Preparedness begins at home:
DEVELOP and practice a family disaster plan (see Section VI: Personal
Preparedness)
TEACH your child how to recognize danger signals such as smoke
detectors, fire alarms and local community warning systems.
EXPLAIN how and when to call for help.
HELP your child memorize important family information: name, address,
phone number, and where to meet in case of an emergency.


After a natural or man-made emergency:
DO NOT call the school. Turn your radio to local stations and listen for
                        damage reports. The school phone lines must be
                        kept open for emergency communications.
                        Check the ALERT notice on the PGUSD website:
                        www.pgusd.org
DO NOT drive to the     Parent cars could impede the ability of
school immediately.     emergency vehicles to get to school. Listen for
                        emergency procedures and possible evacuation
                        site info.
WHEN IT IS SAFE to      DO NOT remove any student from campus
travel to the school:   unless you are listed on the child's Student
                        Release Form. ALWAYS sign students out before
                        removing them from the school.




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If an earthquake or other disaster occurs while your
child is:
Walking to    your child continue to school.
school:       should
Walking       your child continue home.
home:         should
In the        your child return home or go to a designated alternate home.
neighborhood: should
Waiting for a   your child return home or go to a designated alternate home.
bus:            should
En route to     the bus     continue to school when it is safe to drive.
school on       driver will
bus:
En route        the bus     return your child to school where he/she will either
home on bus:    driver will remain until released or be transported when safe.




II. Picking Up Students at School During an
Emergency/Student Release.
Certain situations may involve releasing students from school OR relocating them at a
time when parents expect their children to be at the school site. Such actions are
authorized by the superintendent or principal only in times of extreme emergency. It is
preferred that students remain at school during the academic day.

THREE STEPS TO STUDENT RELEASE

PARENTS
1.    Report to the designated REQUEST AREA.
   a)        Fill out Student Request Form.
   b)        Show photo ID.
2.    Move to RELEASE AREA to wait for student.
3.    Leave campus immediately after student is released to your custody.

SCHOOL STAFF will assist you as follows:
1. At REQUEST AREA:
   a) Verify parent ID and authorization.
   b) Direct parent to RELEASE AREA.
   c) Radio or send runner for student.
2. At RELEASE AREA:
   a) Verify Student Request Form is signed.
   b) Release student to custody of authorized adult.


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III. Student Release Advice for Parents.
1. PREPARE YOUR CHILD. Children who are prepared experience less fear. Let
   your child know who can make the pickup at school if you are unable to do so.
   Reassure your child that he/she will be cared for until you arrive.

2. KEEP YOUR CHILD’S EMERGENCY CONTACT CARD UP-TO-DATE.
   Only those people listed on the Emergency Contact Card will be allowed to pick up
   your child. No student will be allowed to leave with another person, even a relative,
   unless the school has prior written permission from the parent/guardian. The district
   will use the contact information on this card to reach you in an emergency.
   Remember to update your cell numbers and email addresses.

3. REMAIN CALM. Your child is probably safer at school in the event of a disaster.
   Many school personnel are certified in CPR, First Aid, and Emergency Preparedness.
   In the event of a disaster, school staffs are designated as Disaster Service Workers
   and must remain with your children at all times for up to 72 hours after the
   emergency.

4. DO NOT CALL THE SCHOOL AND TIE UP THE SCHOOL PHONE. Check
   alert message on PGUSD website, (www.pgusd.org), listen to local radio and
   television stations. Phone lines will be needed for emergency communications. If
   possible, the district will call primary phone numbers listed on emergency cards.

5. WALK FROM YOUR HOME, IF POSSIBLE. Leave the streets free for
   emergency vehicles. You may get to school faster by foot or bicycle.

6. PARK ONLY IN AREAS DESIGNATED FOR PARENTS. Leave adequate room
   for emergency vehicles to park and turn around.

7. DO NOT ATTEMPT TO PICK UP YOUR CHILD DIRECTLY FROM THE
   RELEASE AREA. Parents and authorized adults must first report to the Request
   Area.

8. BRING A PHOTO ID WITH YOU TO THE REQUEST AREA. Students will
   only be released to their parents or to an adult designated on the Student’s Emergency
   Contact Card.

9. PICK UP ALL STUDENTS FOR WHOM YOU ARE AUTHORIZED.

10. SIGN OUT AT THE RELEASE AREA. The staff will locate and bring your child
    to you. No student will be released without a parent signature, noting time of release,
    destination and phone number.


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11. LEAVE THE CAMPUS IMMEDIATELY AFTER BEING REUNITED WITH
    THE STUDENT.

11. KEEP EMERGENCY SUPPLIES IN YOUR CAR, including comfortable walking
    shoes, water and warm jackets.


IV. Methods of Communicating Information to Parents.
Pacific Grove Unified School District will attempt to disseminate announcements about
school closing, student pick up requirements, general emergency instructions in the
following primary methods:

1. Website: www.pgusd.org Alert Notice on homepage.
2. Phone Message: sent to primary phone number listed on emergency contact form.
3. Local radio and television stations: District office will communicate with media and
   provide Emergency Broadcast Information.




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V. Personal Preparedness.
1.       Your Family Disaster Plan
     Disaster can strike quickly and without warning. It can force you to evacuate your
     neighborhood or confine you to your home. What would you do if basic services
     water, gas, electricity or telephones were cut off? Local officials and relief workers
     will be on the scene after a disaster, but they cannot reach everyone right away.
     Families can and do cope with disaster by preparing in advance and working together
     as a team. Follow the steps listed in this brochure to create your family’s disaster
     plan. Knowing what to do is your best protection and your responsibility.

2.       Create a Disaster Plan
     Meet with your family and discuss why you need to prepare for disaster. Explain the
     dangers of fire, severe weather and earthquakes to children. Plan to share
     responsibilities and work together as a team.

     a)      Discuss the types of disasters that are most likely to happen. Explain what to do
          in each case.
     b)      Pick two places to meet:
           i) Right outside your home in case of a sudden emergency, like a fire.
          ii) Outside your neighborhood in case you can't return home.
     c)      Everyone must know the address and phone number of the second meeting
          place.
     d)      Ask an out-of-state friend to be your "family contact." After a disaster, it's often
          easier to call long distance. Other family members should call this person and tell
          them where they are. Everyone must know your contact's phone number.
     e)      Discuss what to do in an evacuation. Plan how to take care of your pets

3. Complete this Check List

_ Post emergency telephone numbers by phones (fire, police, ambulance, etc.).
_ Teach children how and when to call 911 or your local Emergency Medical Services
  number for emergency help.
_ Show each family member how and when to turn off the water, gas, and electricity at
  the main switches.
_ Check if you have adequate insurance coverage.
_ Teach each family member how to use the fire extinguisher (ABC type), and show
  them where it is located.
_ Install smoke detectors on each level of your home, especially near bedrooms.
_ Conduct a home hazard hunt.
_ Stock emergency supplies and assemble a Disaster Supplies Kit.
_ Take a Red Cross first aid and CPR class.
_ Determine the best escape routes from your home. Find two ways out of each room.
_ Find the safe spots in your home for each type of disaster.
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4. Emergency Supplies

   Keep enough supplies in your home to meet your needs for at least three days.
   Assemble a Disaster Supplies Kit with items you may need in an evacuation. Store
   these supplies in sturdy, easy-to-carry containers such as backpacks, duffle bags or
   covered trash containers:

_ A three-day supply of water (one gallon per person per day) and food that won't spoil.
_ One change of clothing and footwear per person, and one blanket or sleeping bag per
  person.
_ A first aid kit that includes your family's prescription medications.
_ Emergency tools including a battery-powered radio, flashlight and plenty of extra
  batteries.
_ An extra set of car keys and a credit card, cash or traveler's checks.
_ Sanitation supplies.
_ Special items for infant, elderly or disabled family members.
_ An extra pair of glasses.
_ Keep important family documents in a waterproof container. Keep a smaller kit in the
  trunk of your car.

5. Practice and Maintain Your Plan

   a)      Quiz your kids every six months so they remember what to do.
   b)      Conduct fire and emergency evacuation drills.
   c)      Replace stored water every three months and stored food every six months.
   d)      Test and recharge your fire extinguisher(s) according to manufacturer's
              instructions. Take it to fire department.
   e)      Test your smoke detectors monthly and charge the batteries at least once a
              year.




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VI. Activities to Calm Children.
A first step for parents is to understand the kinds of fear and anxiety a child experiences.
Recognize that a child who is afraid is afraid! A child may have distorted information and
may make false assumptions about the causes of major events. These distortions can
magnify the sense of fear and make the child more likely to have persisting emotional or
behavioral problems. Parental understanding and helpful intervention can reduce the
severity of fears and prevent more serious problems from developing. Listen to what your
child tells you about his/her fears. Explain as well as you can about the disaster and about
the known facts and encourage your child to ask questions or describe what they are
feeling.

Immediately following a quake, fire, flood, terrorist attack or other
disaster:

   〈   Keep children as quiet as possible.
   〈   Encourage deep breathing exercises.
   〈   Sing familiar songs, such as carols, nursery rhymes, etc.
   〈   Play word-guessing games.
   〈   Talk about happy memories that they can recall.
   〈   Make a plan for what they will do over the next 24 hours.
   〈   Whenever possible, give children tasks to perform as part of the response.
   〈   Reassure children that you will keep them safe. Provide extra emotional support.
   〈   Remind them that steps are being taken by state and federal government, the
          police, firemen, hospitals and others to make things safer.
   〈   Mostly, keep children in their area, quiet, seated, and breathing deeply and
          regularly.
   〈   Monitor and limit exposure to the media coverage of the events to decrease the
          traumatic power of explicit images.


                                Additional follow-up:
   〈   Create a comfort zone; do what brings you together as a family.
   〈   Make a deliberate effort to avoid inactivity and get back to routine.
   〈   Indicate to the child that you are maintaining control.
   〈   Be understanding but firm, be supportive, and make decisions for the child.
   〈   Maintain discipline, which sets boundaries that provide stability.
   〈   As much as possible, STAY TOGETHER.




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