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					Weather Unit Math – Grades 1-3
Duration: 1 week (based on 210 minutes of math instruction)

Grade One Objectives: 1. Students will read measuring devices to measure length/distances in centimeters. 2. Students will compare temperatures using terms such as "hotter", "colder", "warmer", "cooler" Grade Two Objectives: 1. Students will recognize and use the appropriate unit to measure length or distance given a real world measurement situation 2. Students will compare temperatures using terms such as "hotter", "colder", "warmer", "cooler" 3. Students will compare and estimate, then read a thermometer and record in degrees Celsius Grade Three Objectives: 1. Students will recognize and use the appropriate unit to measure length or distance given a real world measurement situation 2. Students will compare and estimate, then read a thermometer and record in degrees Celsius 3. Students will use environmental signs to estimate temperature

Teacher Materials: Chart Worksheet 8 small jars or beakers Water Rain Gauge Thermometer Temperature Graph made on chart paper Magazine pictures of scenes showing varying types of weather. Student Materials: ruler Activity: (Grades 1-3) * If you have not already covered measurement, this concept must be taught first. Day One (45 minutes) - Reinforce the concept of measurement in centimeters. Practice measuring items such as pencils, erasers, pinky fingers, crayons, etc. - Discuss the idea that weather is measured. How might it be measured? Why would we need to measure weather? What might we measure weather with? Where are the best locations to take weather measurements? (i.e.: temperature in direct sun, rain gauge in a shaded spot, etc.) Lead the children to the conclusion that rain can be measured in cm & temperature in degrees Celsius using a thermometer. Pose the question “How might you measure water in cm?” - Have the eight jars filled to the following depths of water:

 Jar 1 – 3 cm  Jar 2 – 1 cm  Jar 3 – 5 cm  Jar 4 – 8 cm  Jar 5 – 2 cm  Jar 6 – 7 cm  Jar 7 – 4 cm  Jar 8 – 6 cm - Distribute one of the worksheets provided to each student. Using a Learning Center Approach, have the students measure the amounts of water in each jar and record their findings on their worksheet. - Once everyone has completed the center circuit then collect the sheets and introduce the rain gauge. Discuss “Who has seen one of these items before? How do they work?” - Then as a class go outside and decide which spot would be the best and safest place to put the rain gauge. Install the rain gauge. Assessment: collect and mark the charts that the students filled in. Day Two (45 minutes) - Discuss “What is temperature? What is the instrument used to measure temperature called? Can we guess what the temperature might be in any other way? If rain is measured in cm, what is temperature measured in? Where is the best place to put a thermometer if you want an accurate reading of the temperature? - Use the worksheet provided to have students practice reading a thermometer. Correct orally. - Take the students outside and have them each take a turn reading the thermometer in different locations around the school yard. - As a class discuss the best location to put the thermometer up. Then install the thermometer. Assessment: Collect and correct worksheets Anecdotal records  Was the student able to make an accurate reading of the thermometer? Day Three (30 minutes) - Distribute and explain the charts provided for keeping track of the weather. Have the grade ones pick the appropriate pictures to describe the weather and put them into the chart. Have one of the students use his/her pictures to describe the weather to the class. - Have the older students discuss what the weather “looks like” outside. Have them make an estimate of the temperature and rainfall (again if there has been any) - Have one of the students run out and measure the amount in the rain gauge (if there’s been rain!) and another student run out and measure the temperature on the thermometer. - Once this data is collected then have the students record it in their charts. - Introduce the temperature graph for the class. Fill in the graph as required.

As a group do a role-play activity where the students stand beside their desks and you call out a temperature and they act out what it would feel like if it were that temperature outside. ( you say: -25, they all shiver and act freezing cold) Assessment: Check their charts for accurate recordings and make anecdotal notes on the performance of the Grade one student who described the weather and of the two students who went to take readings from the rain gauge and the thermometer. Day Four (30 minutes) - Once again carry out the procedure as was outlined yesterday for collecting data for the student charts. Use different students to present and collect the information. - Fill in the class temperature graph with today’s temperature. - Brainstorm, “What are some words you might use to compare the weather from one day to the next?” Brainstorm a list of words on the board. Then have the students in grade one fold a sheet of paper in half (the short way) and draw a picture of yesterday’s weather on one side and today’s weather on the other side. Then go from student to student and write down what they say about the weather comparison for yesterday and today. - The grade 2 & 3 classes can write in their math journals (if they have them) or just in their math notebooks, four or five sentences comparing yesterday’s weather to today’s weather. Encourage them to use some of the words that were brainstormed to help their comparison. Assessment: Collect and mark their pictures and journal entries. Once again, make anecdotal notes on the performance of the Grade one student who described the weather and of the two students who went to take readings from the rain gauge and the thermometer. Day Five(45 minutes) - Again collect data from the instruments and fill in charts. Have some students describe the weather and other students compare the weather to yesterday. (This project can continue on an ongoing basis if you wish, especially advisable if you’ve had no rain during the unit!) - For the day’s activity then show the student’s pictures of various types of weather. Have the students describe in detail each picture. Then show two pictures and have the students collectively compare the pictures. Assessment: Anecdotal records documenting the students’ ability to describe weather and compare pictures. Paying close attention to the older students use of the correct units of measurement where applicable.

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