GREATER KOKSTAD MUNICIPALITY INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN EXECUTIVE by qdk21196

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									              GREATER KOKSTAD MUNICIPALITY
              INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN
                   EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

1.   Introduction

     The Municipal Systems Act (No.32) of 2000 and other relevant
     legislative mechanisms require that local government structures
     prepare Integrated Development Plans (IDPs) in line with the Act. The
     IDPs serve as tools of transforming local governments towards
     facilitation and management of development within their areas of
     jurisdiction. The Act also requires that all spheres of Government work
     together in a spirit of co-operative governance, in order to facilitate the
     creation of viable and sustainable municipalities. The Act identifies the
     IDPs as the vehicle to be used in the attainment of these goals. In
     conforming with the Act’s requirements Greater Kokstad Municipality
     tasked the IDP Manager to facilitate the whole IDP process.

2.   The Study Area

     Greater Kokstad Local Municipality is located to the Southwestern tip
     of KwaZulu-Natal Province, bordered by Matatiele Local Municipality
     on the West, Lesotho and parts of Eastern Cape on the North West,
     KwaSani Local Municipality on the North, Umzimkhulu and Eastern
     Cape (former Transkei) on the south. The municipality is traversed by
     N2 linking Kwazulu- Natal and Eastern Cape province; it is further
     traversed by R617 linking the municipality with Southern Drakensberg
     Areas.

     Greater Kokstad Local Municipality used to be part of the then Indlovu
     Sub-region 5 together with Matatiele Municipality (KZ5a3) within the
     then Indlovu Regional council. Presently it is one of the local
     municipalities that fall under the Sisonke District municipality, located
     within the KwaZulu Natal province. The Sisonke District Municipality is
     comprised of Ingwe; KwaSani; Matatiele; KZ5a5; KZDMA43 and
     Greater Kokstad Local Municipalities. Greater Kokstad Local
     Municipality shares its borders with KwaSani; Matatiele; uMziwabantu
     Local Municipalities and the KwaZulu Natal enclosed portion of the
     Eastern Cape Province.
     .




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3.   Phases of the IDP Process

     The full IDP process is divided into five (5) phases:

     •      Phase 1              Analysis

          This phase focuses on the determination of development status
          quo and establishment of key development challenges within the
          municipality.

     •      Phase 2       Strategies

          This phase focuses on the formulation of strategies that will
          provide the basis for a Development Framework.

     •      Phase 3       Projects

          This phase focuses on the identification of specific sectoral
          development projects. The projects are identified in line with
          development strategies.

     •      Phase 4       Integration

          This phase focuses on ensuring vertical and horizontal linkages
          with various adjoining areas and municipalities within the vicinity.

     •      Phase 5       Approval

          This phase ensure that all organs of the municipality including
          stakeholders and councillors must adopt a completed plan and
          thereafter forward it to the MEC.

     This report however presents Analysis Phase, Strategies Phase and
     the Projects Phase.

4.   Consultation Process

     The preparation of this IDP was largely driven through the joint effort of
     the various internal departments of the municipality. However input and
     participation was sought from:

     •   Local representative structures, interest groups
     •   Sisonke District council
     •   Adjoining local municipalities
     •   Various provincial and national government departments
     •   Service providers

     What distinguishes the new IDP from the previous municipal plans is,
     amongst other things, the role of stakeholders in the preparation of the

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         plan. Prior to the commencement of the analysis phase a process plan
         was developed by the council. What the process plan had sought to
         achieve included:
         • Providing a framework for various specialist input in the preparation
             of the IDP
         • Suggesting a progamme that would ensure vertical and horizontal
             linkages
         • Identifying in broad terms interest groups and stakeholders who
             should be involved in the IDP process as well as their roles and
             responsibilities.
         • Suggesting process time frames

         In particular the process plan further introduced options of
         management of IDP at a municipal level. To this end the following
         structures were introduced:
     •   IDP steering committee
     •   IDP representative Forum
     •   Project Task teams

         Consultation at Residential Level

         This has been used as principal and more reliable source of
         information contained in this report. This was equally a useful
         interactive process which was not simply limited to the identification of
         needs but the following benefits were realized:
         • This process provided meaningful opportunity for the council to
              clarify competencies and responsibilities. To this end it was
              clarified where the service providers fit in, in relation to the
              municipality.
         • The councilors were able to provide feedback on current initiative
         • The communities got a clearer picture about this council’s term of
              office and what it has identified as its preliminary vision

         The key findings from this process are outlined on the following
         sections below.

5.       Development Vision

         Interaction with various stakeholders during the consultation process
         emerged with the following development for the Greater Kokstad
         Municipality:

         "GREATER KOKSTAD MUNICIPALITY WILL BE A VIBRANT,
         ECONOMICALLY SOUND AREA WHERE RESIDENTS ENJOY A
         SAFE ENVIRONMENT IN WHICH INDIVIDUALS’ DEMOCRATIC
         RIGHTS ARE PROTECTED. BY 2020 ALL RESIDENTS OF THIS
         MUNICIPALITY WILL ENJOY ACCESS TO SAFER SERVICES,
         EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES AND THEY WILL IN TURN MEET
         THEIR OBLIGATIONS FOR THE PAYMENT OF SUCH SERVICES."


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6.   Analysis Phase

     This phase focused on the establishment of the development status
     quo within Greater Kokstad Municipality. The following outlines the
     key development challenges identified during the analysis phase:
     Water

     •     The Kokstad Town area is well reticulated with potable water,
           although the reticulation system needs upgrading.
     •     Water Purification Plant is operating on its maximum limit
     •     There is a need for additional raw water supply
     •     Investigations for an alternative dam sites were conducted
     •     Franklin is supplied by a borehole system.
     •     Swartberg obtains water from a privatised dam, which is
           reticulated untreated.
     •     Pakkies 1 & 2 has no formal water supply.
     •     KwaPakkies has a formal RDP level water supply with
           communal standpipes
     •     Kraansdraai has formal house connections.
     •     Maraiskop has communal standpipes
     •     Wansbeck has a protected spring

     Sanitation

     •    Kokstad formal ervens are reticulated with full waterborne
          sewerage.
     •    Kokstad Sewerage Treatment Works is operating at its
          maximum level.
     •    New Housing Developments and DWAF effluent quality
          requirements for Mzintlava River, would require urgent
          upgrading of the treatment plant.
     •    Other areas are serviced by pit latrines (informal areas) and
          septic tanks (farms)
     •    Farming areas have no formal sanitation
     Roads & Stormwater

     •     The GKM has a reasonable access to a network of National and
           Provincial routes.
     •     The N2 (linking EC & KZN) and R617 (connecting Underberg
           with Swartberg, Franklin & Kokstad) are better maintained.
     •     R56 (joining Kokstad to Matatiele via Cedarville & links to the
           EC) is in a worse state of disrepair and maintenance.
     •     Community access roads are privately owned on farmlands
     •     80% of tarred roads are in need of urgent reconstruction due to
           increase of heavy traffic and lack of stormwater reticulation.
     •     Gravel roads within Kokstad Town area also lack stormwater
           control, and need to be tarred to reduce maintenance costs due
           to lack of suitable heavy plant & equipment
     •     Gravel roads in outlying areas are maintained by DoT.
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    •     A bridge over Mzintlanga and up to Railway St. needs to be
          widened to accommodate 4 lanes of traffic. The Department of
          Transport provided funding for the construction of pedestrian
          walkways on the either sides of the bridge. There are other
          bridges that also need to be widened.

    Education

    •     There are 43 schools within GKM area.
    •     Primary & secondary schools within Kokstad experience
          overcrowding with 12% of student population coming from small
          towns and rural areas.
    •     Schools outside of Kokstad are mainly farm schools lacking
          basic infrastructure and teachers.
    •     Most schools lack sanitation and water facilities, and a general
          lack of access to telephones, proper roads
    •     Backlog of 4 primary & 2 high schools (Kokstad)
    •     Department of Education identified a need for a technical
          training facility within Kokstad
    •     (9) registered creches and (6) child-minder facilities and most
          are privately owned
    •     Dept. of Welfare is responsible for registration in close
          relationship with the Dept. of Health
    •     (2) libraries exist in Kokstad and Bhongweni, two @) other
          libraries are under construction
    •     Increase in settlements necessitates more library services
          including mobile and satellite library services
    Health

    •     Health services are provided at Provincial and TLC levels and
          privately.
    •     Provincial Health Services provided by KZN-Dept. of Health,
          responsible for District Health System
    •     (2) Primary Health Care Services, responsible for health
          services including:
              3 Mobile Clinic Teams for rural areas
              School Health Services (Sanitation & Hygiene)
              1 Family Planning Clinic (Kokstad)
              HIV/ AIDS Worker (Testing & Counselling)
              1 Psychiatric Clinic
              Community Health Workers
    •     Environmental Health Office
    •     Ambulance and Emergency Medical Services operating from
          Port Shepstone, however located in depots and hospitals
    •     Kokstad Clinic and East Griqualand and Usher Memorial
          Hospital both over-utilised
    •     11 medical practitioners with surgeries within GKM, some serve
          as District Surgeons
    •     (2) Dentists
    •     (3) Opticians and

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    •      Traditional healers play a role in remote areas
    Electricity

    •      Farm areas supplied by Eskom
    •      GKM purchases power from Eskom
    •      Municipal Sub-station needs upgrading
    •      Eskom substation has limited power supply
    •      GKM is responsible for reticulation and cost recovery
    •      New development projects demand increase of power supply
    •   Telecommunications

    •     Telkom acts main service provider within GKM.
    •     Automatic telephones limited to mostly formal settlements and
          limited access in farming areas.
    •     Local shops provide access to telephones for farm communities
          at a cost.
    •     Common Copper theft also prevalent within GKM.
    •     Plans reportedly underway to expand infrastructure and/or
          change to to wireless technology
    •     Cell phone signal coverage tends to be weaker in some
          sections of farming areas
    Postal Services

    •    Postal office located in Kokstad with agencies in Swartberg and
         Franklin.
    •    Formal areas serviced by post boxes.
    •    Informal areas generally utilise addresses of people from formal
         settlements, shops, schools and people acting as agents for the
         post office.
    •    New housing projects necessitate reliable postal addresses for
         municipal and general correspondence.
    •    At least cluster boxes be provided including farming areas.
    •    Extend agency outlets to farming areas.
    Waste Disposal

    •    Formal settlements have a regular refuse collection system.
    •    Informal and rural settlements bury or burn their own waste.
    •    Kokstad and Bhongweni receive refuse services twice weekly
    •    Waste disposal site permit has expired and no new site has
         been identified.
    •    Plans are underway to utilizes services outside of the municipal
         area or identify other alternative technology..
    •    Commercial waste collected everyday.
    •    Recycling facility for glass.
    •    Plans to improve the recovery system by using conveyor belts.
    Cemeteries

    •      Two cemeteries exist within town area, although one close to its
           capacity

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    •     New housing developments and HIV/AIDS related deaths exert
          pressure in the identification of new or extension of existing
          cemeteries
    •     Farming tenants at times utilize informal land allocated by farm
          owners.
    Sports and Recreation

    The following outlines some of the sports and recreational facilities
    within the municipality:

    •     Country Club (Cricket And Squash)
    •     Bowling Clubs
    •     2 Riverview Fields (Soccer)
    •     Murray Park (Soccer)
    •     Sports Field (Soccer, Cricket)
    •     Rugby Field
    •     Gold Club
    •     Tennis Courts
    •     3 Halls
    •     Multi Purpose Center
    •     Youth Centre
    •     Tennis Courts
    Tourism

    •      Limited tourism development compared to Southern
           Drakensberg areas.
    •      Existing ‘transit tourism’ covering tourists travelling to EC and
           KZN.
    •      Need for diversification of tourism activities to include getaway,
           eco-and adventure tourism.
    •      Potential exists in terms accommodation facilities and tourism
           assets.
    •      Potential also exists in the form of tourism facilities including fly
           fishing dams and sports facilities.

    Land And Housing

    •     The greater part of GKM is comprised of privately owned
          agricultural farms.
    •     Various Land Claims (±36) have been lodged with the
          Restitution of Land Claims Commission.
    •     Pakkies I & II and Franklin (Redistribution Projects)
    •     Makhoba Resettlement (Restitution Project).
    •     Kokstad Town with a concentration of formal and informal
          housing (characterised by lack of proper social and
          infrastructural services).
    •     A number of housing development initiatives on the pipeline,
          including densification of existing settlements
    Agriculture

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    •      Dominance of livestock farming including, sheep, beef cattle
           and dairy farming.
    •      Livestock products include milk, cheese and yoghurt, though the
           latter two at a small scale. 2 Abattoirs within GKM as
           agro-industries.
    •      Dominant crop farming – maize, potatoes and cabbages as
           cash crop for selling not for exporting.
    •      Community gardens located in rural areas assisted by a
           technician from Agricultural Research Station – Hilton (PMB).
           One Agricultural Research Station within Kokstad.

    Municipal Local Economy

     The municipal economy is dominated by the following sectors:
    •     Industry
    •     Trade
    •     Agriculture and
    •     Government




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7 Strategies and Projects Phases

     This phase provides strategic interventions, which respond to the
     problems identified during the Analysis Phase. This phase includes
     the formulation of development objectives and strategies that best
     respond to the identified problems while at the same time working
     towards the achievement of the development vision.

     These phases also provide the specific projects that were identified
     during the Projects Phase after due consultation with various
     stakeholders. These projects are in line with the identified
     development objectives and strategies mentioned above.

     The development strategies and projects covered the following
     sectors:

     (a) Land reform
     (b) Environmental management.
     (c) Water
     (d) Sanitation
     (e) Roads and storm water
     (f) Electricity
     (g) Telecommunications
     (h) Waste management
     (i) Cemeteries
     (j) Agriculture
     (k) Tourism
     (l) Economic Development & Poverty Alleviation
     (m)         Health
     (n) Education
     (o) Social facilities
     (p) Housing
     (q) Safety and security
     (r) Institutional




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