GDA September Newsletter by tqr19314

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									                                                             September 2006


              OFFICE OF GLOBAL DEVELOPMENT ALLIANCES

              UPDATE TO THE FIELD
COFFEE CONSERVATION ALLIANCES EXPANDING IN MEXICO
USAID’s    Global   Development     Alliance    (GDA) between Starbucks and
                                                  Conservation International (CI)
                                                  has expanded to include a new
                                                  Mexican partner. One of Mexico’s
                                                  largest coffee exporters, and a
                                                  key supplier of Starbucks -
                                                  AgroIndustrias Unidas de Mexico
                                                  (AMSA), signed an agreement
                                                  with CI. This agreement will
                                                  further     expand        technical
                                                  assistance and key market
                                                  linkages to help coffee farmers in
                                                  areas of high biodiversity produce
                                                  and market high quality coffee
and provide financial incentives to farmers to protect the forests providing shade
for their coffee. This new partnership applies the GDA model at a national level. It
also represents a key step in making the original program sustainable for the
long term.

USAID AND KRAFT FOODS ANNOUNCE A NEW INITITATIVE TO
ENCOURAGE PRODUCTION OF CERTIFIED SUSTAINABLE
COCOA IN CÔTE D’IVOIRE

The Côte d’Ivoire supplies about 40% of global cocoa production. The majority of
African cocoa farmers are smallholders facing constraints (impoverished soils,
low productivity, inefficient management practices, and low quality due to
inadequate processing). Their returns from cocoa are low and the traditional
option has been to plant new cocoa on fertile virgin forestland.

At a meeting in Abidjan on August 30, representatives of the U. S. Agency for
International Development (USAID), Kraft Foods, Armajaro Trading and the
German Agency for Technical Cooperation (GTZ) announced the start-up of a
new public-private alliance designed to demonstrate the potential for producing
certified sustainably produced cocoa in West Africa. The project has been
designed to work with small cocoa farmers and producer cooperatives in the
forest regions of the country to assist them qualify their cocoa farms for
certification. Farmers producing certified cocoa will be paid a price premium over
regular cocoa for their efforts in incorporating sustainable agriculture practices.

USAID has committed $600,000 to support this three year project and Kraft,
along with the other project partners, is providing more than $1.3 million
additional dollars, bringing the project funding to nearly $2 million.

NovoBanco GRADGUATES FROM USAID ASSISTANCE ROLLS

NovoBanco, which was, in part, created with support from a USAID-Chevron
partnership, is the only commercial bank in Angola that has an exclusive focus
on micro and small lending. One of the most indisputable success stories, the
bank, which opened the doors of its headquarters office in August 2004, now has
two branches, in addition to the headquarters office. Its client base is growing
rapidly. At the end of 2005, it had a business loan portfolio of $4.6 million and
1,300 loans outstanding. By August 31, 2006, it had grown its loan portfolio to
$7.1 million, and had nearly 2000 loans outstanding. The average loan size is
around $5000. Most of the loans are to traders. Loans to start schools and loans
to buy fishing boats and mini-taxi buses are also popular. Many of the banks best
clients are women. A number of women who began importing clothes from
Namibia and South Africa are now importing from as far away as Brazil and
China. USAID support to NovoBanco ended on September 30, 2006. USAID is
confident, thought, that the bank’s expansion will, nevertheless, continue and that
its contributions to the Angolan economy will go far in helping to boost the
prospects of many who might otherwise be left behind.

USAID AND THE PERUVIAN GOVERNMENT HAVE RENEWED A
PUBLIC-PRIVATE PARTNERSHIP THAT SUPPORTS POVERTY
ALLEVIATION EFFORTS IN PERU'S SIERRA.
On September 19, in the town of Hunancavelica, the American Ambassador to
Peru signed an agreement with the government of Peru’s “Sierra Exportadora”
Director Gaston Benza Pflucker and Roque Benavides, Director the
“Buenventura” mining company, to jointly finance operation of the Poverty
Reduction and Alleviation (PRA) economic service center in the region for an
additional two years. Poverty reduction through trade-led growth is a government
of Peru priority while mining companies are under pressure to do more for
communities and regions in which they are operating. This unique “triple alliance”
is seen as a model, especially where mining companies face community
criticism.

Since PRA began in Peru in 1999, the combined project have yielded sales of
$135 Million and crated 53,000 jobs in ninve economic corridors with hight rates
of poverty. Many of the products from PRA projects have found a ready market in
the US and Europe, a trend which will benefit from increased stability once the
FTA is in effect. Benza Pflucker cited PRA as the only activiy in Peru’s Sierra that
is effectively creating sustainable jobs sand income by expanding the operation
of the private sector. Pflucker promised to promote the PRA model within the
new government’s development plan.


News & Notes

   USAID is seeking applications for the position of a Regional Alliance Builder
    for USAID Regional Mission, Kiev, Ukraine. Detailed position description,
    salary level, and the application procedures for this position can be found at:
    http://www.fbo.gov/spg/AID/OP/WashingtonDC/M%2DOAA%2DGRO%2DEG
    AS%2D07%2D004/listing.html

								
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