Wellness Policy by sammyc2007

VIEWS: 152 PAGES: 28

									Wellness Policy


      A guide to
  understanding and
developing a Wellness
 Policy in your school
        district.


                     1
    Section 204 of Public Law
             108-265
•   Became Law – June 30, 2004
•   Section 204 of the Child Nutrition and
    WIC Reauthorization Act of 2004
•   Components of a Wellness Policy
    1. Goals for nutrition education, physical
       activity, and other school-based
       activities.
    2. Nutrition guidelines for all foods sold
       on campus
    3. Assurance that school meals meet
       USDA regulations
    4. Establish plan for measuring
       implementation of wellness policy
    5. Involve parents, students, and
       representatives of school food
       authority and others.

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3
4
    Steps to Creating Policy


•    Create the guest list – who will you
     invite to create policy writing team?

•    Plan the menu – how far reaching do
     you want your policy to be?




                                             5
           Plan The Menu

•   Policy must include the following:
    1a. Nutrition education goals
    1b. Physical activity goals
    1c. Other school-based activities
    2. Nutrition guidelines/standards
    3. Assurances that USDA school meals
       guidelines are being met
    4. Plan for measuring implementation
        – Designation of 1 or more people to
          ensure wellness policy is being met
          at all school buildings
•   We recommend having a specific
    workgroup designated to work on each
    of the above sections.

                                            6
1a. Nutrition Education Goals

• The primary goal of nutrition education is
  to influence students' eating behaviors.
  The following should be considered when
  establishing nutrition education policy
  language:
    Students in grades pre-K -12 receive
      nutrition education that is interactive
      and teaches the skills they need to
      adopt healthy eating behaviors.
    Nutrition education is offered in the
      school dining room as well as in the
      classroom, with coordination between
      the foodservice staff and teachers.
    Students receive consistent nutrition
      messages throughout the school,
      classroom, cafeteria, home,
      community and media.

   http://www.fns.usda.gov/tn/Healthy/policy_component1.html   7
1a. Nutrition Education Goals

  – State and district health education
    curriculum standards and guidelines
    include both nutrition and physical
    education.
  – Nutrition is integrated into the health
    education curricula or core curriculum
    (e.g., math, science, language arts).
  – Schools link nutrition education
    activities with the coordinated school
    health program.
  – Staff who provide nutrition education
    have appropriate training.
  – Schools are Team Nutrition Schools
    and they conduct nutrition education
    activities and promotions that involve
    parents, students, and the community.
                                          8
  1b. Physical Activity Goals

• The primary goal for a school's physical
  activity component is to provide
  opportunities for every student to develop
  the knowledge and skills for specific
  physical activities, maintain physical
  fitness, regularly participate in physical
  activity, and understand the short- and
  long-term benefits of a physically active
  and healthful lifestyle.

• The following examples of policy
  language should be considered when
  setting goals for physical activity.

      At a minimum, students should have 60
       minutes of physical activity on most, preferably
       all, days of the week.


                                                      9
1b. Physical Activity Goals
– Students should be given
  opportunities for physical activity
  during the school day through daily
  recess periods, elective physical
  education (PE) classes, walking
  programs, and the integration of
  physical activity into the academic
  curriculum.
– Students should be given
  opportunities for physical activity
  through a range of after-school
  programs including intramurals,
  interscholastic athletics, and physical
  activity clubs.
– Schools should work with the
  community to create an environment
  that is safe and supportive of students'
  physically active commute to and from
  school.                                 10
     1c. Other School Based
            Activities
• Policies established under this category create a
  school environment that provides consistent
  wellness messages and is conducive to healthy
  eating and being physically active. Examples of
  policy language include:
   – Provide a clean, safe, enjoyable meal
      environment for students.
   – Provide adequate time for students to enjoy
      eating healthy foods with friends, scheduled
      as near the middle of the school day as
      possible.
   – Prohibit use of food as a reward or
      punishment.
   – Provide enough space and serving areas to
      ensure student access to school meals with a
      minimum of wait time.
   – Prohibit denial of student participation in
      recess or other physical activity as a form of
      discipline, or cancellation of recess or other
      physical activity time for instructional make-up
      time.
                                                     11
 1c. Other School Based
        Activities
– Ensure fundraising efforts are supportive of
  healthy eating.
– Provide on-going professional training and
  development for foodservice staff and
  teachers in the areas of nutrition and
  physical education.
– Provide student access to physical activity
  facilities outside school hours.
– Schedule recess for elementary grades
  before lunch so that children will come to
  lunch less distracted and ready to eat.
– Develop strategies for parents, teachers,
  school administrators, students,
  foodservice professionals, and community
  members to serve as role models in
  practicing healthy eating and being
  physically active, both in school and at
  home.

                                           12
           2. Nutrition
       Guidelines/Standards
• Students' lifelong eating habits are greatly
  influenced by the types of foods and
  beverages available to them.
• Standards must be established to address all
  foods and beverages sold or served to
  students, including those available outside of
  the school meal programs.
• The following items should be considered
  when setting nutrition standards for all
  available foods during the school day. These
  standards should focus on increasing nutrient
  density, decreasing fat and added sugars,
  and moderating portion size.
    Set guidelines for foods and beverages in
      a la carte sales in the food service
      program on school campuses.
    Set guidelines for foods and beverages
      sold in vending machines, snack bars,
      school stores, and concession stands on
      school campuses.
    Set guidelines for foods and beverages
      sold as part of school-sponsored
      fundraising activities.
    Set guidelines for refreshments served at
      parties, celebrations, and meetings during
                                               13
      the school day.
   3. Assurance that School
        Meals Meet USDA
            Standards
• Schools must ensure that reimbursable
  school meals meet the program
  requirements and nutrition standards set
  forth under the 7 CFR Part 210 and Part
  220.




                                         14
      4. Plan for Measuring
         Implementation

– Establish a plan for measuring
  implementation of the local wellness
  policy
   – Including designation of 1 or more
     persons within the local educational
     agency or at each school, as
     appropriate, charged with operational
     responsibility for ensuring that the
     school meets the local wellness policy.
   – Recommendation - periodically assess
     how well the policy is being managed
     and enforced, and evaluate any
     financial impact to vending policies.
     Evaluation and feedback are very
     important in maintaining a sound,
     school wellness policy.


                                          15
       Sample Local School
        Wellness Policies
• http://www.asfsa.org/childnutrition/wellnesspolicie
  s/districtsamples.asp
•   California
      Hemet Unified School District
      Los Angeles USD (in Adobe Acrobat format)
      Oakland USD (in Adobe Acrobat format)
      San Francisco USD (in Adobe Acrobat format)
•   Georgia
      DeKalb County Schools
•   Maine
      Maine School Administrative District 22
•   Minnesota
      Wilmar Public Schools
•   New York
      New York Public Schools (in Adobe Acrobat format)
•   Pennsylvania
      School District of Philadelphia
•   Texas
      Austin ISD
      Eanes ISD (in Adobe Acrobat format)
•   South Carolina
      Richland One SD
•   Wisconsin
      Appleton Area School District
                                                      16
Example Wellness Policy




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Example Policy #2




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    Nutrition Resources

– Team Nutrition Changing the Scene:
  Improving the School Nutrition
  Environment. Developed by U.S. Department
  of Agriculture (USDA) Team Nutrition, this
  guide is designed to assist parents, school
  administrators, teachers, school foodservice
  employees, and other concerned members of
  the community to examine their school's
  nutrition environment, develop a plan for
  improvement, and put the plan into action.

– Michigan’s State Board of Education
  Nutrition Policy and toolkit

– A Call to Action

– Team Nutrition: Getting it Started and
  Keeping it Going

– HealthierUS Schools Challenge


                                            24
        Nutrition Resources
• Other Federal Agencies
   – Guidelines for School Health Programs to
     Promote Lifelong Healthy Eating [PDF 490K].
     These guidelines identify school-based strategies
     most likely to be effective in promoting lifelong
     healthy eating among young people.

   – Resource Guide for Nutrition and Physical
     Activity Interventions to Prevent Obesity and
     Other Chronic Diseases. This document provides
     selected references and resources for developing or
     updating community nutrition and physical activity
     programs. Topics include obesity prevention and
     control, increased physical activity, improved
     nutrition, and reduced television time.

   – Healthy School Action Tool at
     www.mihealthtools.org/schools This tool enables
     schools to identify the strengths and weaknesses of
     nutrition and physical activity environments and
     develop an action plan for improvement.

   – Ten Strategies for Promoting Physical Activity,
     Healthy Eating, and a Tobacco-Free Lifestyle
     Through School Health Programs [PDF 60K]. This
     publication identifies actions that schools can take to
     implement CDC's school health guidelines in these
     content areas.
                                                         25
          Nutrition Resources
•   Non-Governmental Organizations
    – Fit, Healthy, and Ready to Learn: A School Health Policy
      Guide Produced by the National Association of State Boards of
      Education (NASBE), this document provides direction to states,
      school districts, and individual schools on establishing an
      overall policy framework for school health programs and
      specific policies on promoting healthy eating among young
      people.

    – Healthy School Food Policies Checklist Distributed by the
      Center for Food and Justice's Urban and Environmental Policy
      Institute, this document contains many of the innovative policies
      that have been adopted or proposed to improve school food.

    – How You Can Take Action Developed by Action for Healthy
      Kids, these recommendations offer ways parents, school
      personnel, and others can take action to improve children's
      nutrition and physical activity in the education environment.

    – Keys to Excellence: Standard of Practice for Nutrition
      Integrity Published by the American Food Services Association
      (AFSA), this tool identifies the elements of a quality school
      nutrition program. It provides an easy-to-use evaluation form for
      assessing program quality and tracking progress in developing
      and implementing plans to achieve goals.

    – National Food Service Management Institute Resource
      Guide [PDF 1.8 Mb]. This resource guide includes information
      on educational materials, videotapes, reports applied research,
      and other resources for professional development that promote
      the improvement of child nutrition programs.

    – Preventing Obesity in Youth through School-Based Efforts
      [PDF 290K]. Developed by the National Governor's Association
      (NGA), this Issue Brief addresses childhood obesity and the
      role of schools in promoting healthy living and includes
      recommendations, examples, and resources for state leaders. 26
Physical Activity Resources
 – CDC Brochures for Parents, Teachers, and Principals to
   Increase Physical Activity Among Youth. These colorful
   brochures are designed to help parents, teachers, and
   principals increase physical activity among elementary and
   middle school-aged youth.

 – Guidelines for School and Community Programs to
   Promote Lifelong Physical Activity Among Young People.
   This document identifies strategies most likely to be effective
   in helping young people adopt and maintain a physically
   active lifestyle.

 – KidsWalk-to-School This community-based program aims to
   increase opportunities for daily physical activity by
   encouraging children to walk to and from school in groups
   accompanied by adults. It also encourages collaboration
   among partners to create an environment that is supportive of
   walking and bicycling to school safely.

 – Physical Activity Evaluation Handbook [PDF 590K]. This
   handbook outlines the six basic steps of program evaluation
   and illustrates each step with physical activity program
   examples.

 – Projects to Increase Physical Activity Among Youth This
   report provides descriptions of projects implemented by state
   and local education agencies and national organizations to
   increase physical activity among youth.

 – Promoting Better Health for Young People Through
   Physical Activity and Sports This 2000 report, written by the
   Secretary of Health and Human Services and the Secretary of
   Education and released by the White House, outlines 10
   strategies to promote health through lifelong participation in
   enjoyable and safe physical activity and sports.



                                                                27
   Physical Activity Resources

      – Promoting Physical Activity: A Guide for Community
        Action This guide uses a social marketing and behavioral
        science approach to intervention planning, guiding users
        through a step-by-step process to address the target
        population's understanding and skills, the social networks,
        the physical environments in which they live and work,
        and the policies that most influence their actions.

      – Resource Guide for Nutrition and Physical Activity
        Interventions to Prevent Obesity and Other Chronic
        Diseases [PDF 550K]. This document provides selected
        references and resources for developing or updating
        community nutrition and physical activity programs.
        Topics include obesity prevention and control, increased
        physical activity, improved nutrition, and reduced
        television time.

      – Ten Strategies for Promoting Physical Activity,
        Healthy Eating, and a Tobacco-Free Lifestyle Through
        School Health Programs [PDF 60K]. This publication
        identifies actions that schools can take to implement
        CDC's school health guidelines




Modified Version of the Michigan Dept. of Education Wellness Policy
Packet                                                                28

								
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