43rd CDCGoes to the Bahamas as IEEE CSS Celebrates by ntz11397

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									CONFERENCE REPORTS



   43rd CDC Goes to the Bahamas as IEEE CSS Celebrates 50 Years




    I
       n this issue, we present four conference reports. We con-
       tinue the tradition of reporting on the IEEE Conference on
       Decision and Control (CDC), which took place in
    December 2004 in The Bahamas. We also report on REDIS-
    COVER 2004, IS 2004, and a workshop in honor of the
    retirement of one of our distinguished colleagues.
        REDISCOVER 2004, a Southeastern Europe, United
    States, Japan, and European Community workshop on edu-
    cation in control and signal processing, was held in Cavtat,
    Croatia, in June 2004 and was aimed at rebuilding links
    between the international community of researchers and
    educators and their colleagues in Southeastern Europe. The
    Second IEEE International Conference on Intelligent Systems
    (IS 2004) was held in Varna, Bulgaria, in June 2004. This
    event, which was jointly organized by the several IEEE Soci-                s
                                                                      Tamer Ba¸ ar delivering the 2005 Bode lecture. His talk was
    eties, the Cybernetics Society Joint Chapter in Bulgaria, and     titled “Games, Decisions, and Control: Fifty Years Back, Fifty
                                                                      Years Forward.”
    other Bulgarian professional societies, attracted attendees
    from all over the world.
        Finally, the Workshop on Recent Advances in Algebraic
    Systems and Control Theory was held at Georgia Tech in Jan-
    uary 2004 to honor Prof. Edward Kamen, who recently retired
    from Georgia Tech, for his seminal contributions to algebraic
    systems theory and hierarchical control for manufacturing.
        In future issues, we plan to report on control conferences
    and control events from a wide range of venues throughout
    the world. I look forward to receiving your reports as well as
    announcements of upcoming events. Please contact me at
        Zongli Lin
        Charles L. Brown Dept. of Electrical
          and Computer Engineering
        University of Virginia
        P.O. Box 400743                                               Plenary speaker Timothy Buchman (right) with CDC Pro-
        Charlottesville, VA 22904-4743 USA                            gram Chair Weibo Gong. Timothy Buchman presented a ple-
        zl5y@virginia.edu                                             nary talk titled “Control Theories in Critical Illness and
                                                                      Critical Care.”




   T
         he IEEE Conference on Decision and Control (CDC)             nity to celebrate the 50th anniversary of the CSS by invit-
         is the premier meeting sponsored annually by the             ing all past presidents of the Society to attend and by
         IEEE Control Systems Society (CSS), with the tech-           including a number of special technical and social events.
   nical cooperation of the Society for Industrial and                   The 43rd CDC was held on 14–17 December 2004 at the
   Applied Mathematics (SIAM), the Institute for Operations           Atlantis, an internationally acclaimed resort located on
   Research and the Management Sciences (INFORMS), the                Paradise Island in the Bahamas. Aside from providing
   Japanese Society for Instrument and Control Engineers              excellent conference facilities in a relaxed Caribbean
   (SICE), and the European Union Control Association                 atmosphere, the Atlantis boasts one of the largest marine
   (EUCA). The 43rd edition of the CDC was also an opportu-           habitats in the world. The resort is set amidst 34 acres of


   104                                                IEEE Control Systems Magazine                                          June 2005
              14                                                                          Computers/Networks
                                                                                          Coop. Control/UAV
              12
                                                                                          Hybrid/Switched Systems
              10                                                                          Nonlinear
                                                                                          Stochastic/Filtering
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Figure 1. The number of sessions associated with each of 16 general areas in the control field (areas that had fewer than
three sessions associated with them are not included). It is interesting to note that the top four areas in this chart accounted
for about 1/3 of the entire technical program.


waterscape, with 11 exhibit lagoons and more than 50,000               On Monday, 13 December, the day before the CDC
sea animals. Through panoramic windows and underwater              began, eight full-day and two half-day workshops were
viewing tunnels, CDC attendees and their guests were able          held covering topics that reflect the systems and control
to explore “The Dig,” which reveals Atlantean life as it may       community’s current interests, such as hybrid systems,
have been 11,000 years ago.                                        quantum systems, cooperative control, system complexi-
                                                                   ty, and nanotechnology. The workshops were selected fol-
The CDC Program                                                    lowing a review process coordinated by George Pappas,
Program Chair Weibo Gong, along with Vice Chairs                   the workshop chair of CDC’04.
Edwin Chong and Jim Spall, headed an international pro-
gram committee consisting of 44 experts in all facets of
system theory, decision-making, control, automation,
and related areas and applications. These individuals
faced the daunting task of selecting papers from 1,891
submissions (an all-time high) to fill the 936 slots avail-
able in the four-day program (13 daily parallel sessions
were held each morning, early afternoon, and late after-
noon, with six papers per session). The 1,891 submis-
sions consisted of 1,569 regular papers, 138 short
papers, 173 invited papers, and 11 SIAM papers. The
large number of submissions resulted in a lower-than-
usual acceptance rate of 49%.
   It is worth mentioning that this was the first time CDC
submissions were subject to a strict page limit and a rigid
format. The latter was necessitated by IEEE requirements
to facilitate publishing the conference proceedings in IEEE
Xplore. I would like to thank the chair of the CSS Confer-         Plenary speaker Jessy Grizzle (left) with CDC General Chair
ence Editorial Board, Thomas Parisini, as well as Pradeep          Christos Cassandras. Jessy Grizzle presented the plenary talk
Misra, for their invaluable help in the overall paper sub-         “Walking and Running in Bipedal Robots: Control Theory
mission and reviewing processes.                                   and Experiments.”


June 2005                                          IEEE Control Systems Magazine                                                   105
                                                                and Control: Fifty Years Back, Fifty Years Forward.” There
                                                                were two additional plenary addresses: one by Timothy
                                                                Buchman from Washington University titled “Control The-
                                                                ories in Critical Illness and Critical Care” and one by Jessy
                                                                W. Grizzle from the University of Michigan titled “Walking
                                                                and Running in Bipedal Robots: Control Theory and Exper-
                                                                iments.” The former highlighted the recent trend in which
                                                                control theory is expanding its horizons toward new areas
                                                                such as biology and medicine, while the latter provided an
                                                                opportunity for all to reflect on the contributions that non-
                                                                linear control techniques have made in robotics.
                                                                    On Thursday, 16 December, a plenary panel session
                                                                took place to debate “Challenges and Opportunities for
Members of the “Challenges and Opportunities for the Future     the Future of Control,” a most appropriate theme for the
of Control” panel (from left): Hideo Mabuchi, Christos Cas-     50th anniversary of the CSS. The discussion was moderat-
sandras, Naomi Leonard, John Doyle, and P.R. Kumar.             ed by John Doyle from CalTech, with panelists Christos
                                                                Cassandras (Boston University), P.R. Kumar (University of
   The contributed and invited sessions that made up the        Illinois), Naomi Leonard (Princeton University), and Hideo
core of the four-day technical program indicate the direction   Mabuchi (CalTech). Each panelist gave a short presenta-
in which the research community in systems and control is       tion on topics and issues on the cutting edge of systems
headed. The topics that attracted the most workshop partic-     and control theory, and this was followed by a question-
ipants reflected the most popular technical session themes.     and-answer period with audience participation. The
Figure 1 shows the number of sessions associated with each      theme of understanding and managing complexity, in
of 16 general areas in our field (areas that had fewer than     both natural and synthetic systems, was the common
three sessions associated with them are not included). It is    denominator of the panelists’ presentations. This theme
interesting to note that the top four areas in this chart       captures one of the strongest motivating forces for the
account for about 1/3 of the entire technical program.          next generation of systems and control researchers.
   The traditional Bode Lecture, delivered by Tamer Ba¸ ars         The CDC program traditionally includes industrial and
of the University of Illinois, was titled “Games, Decisions,    government organization exhibits, including several pub-
                                                                lishers. This year, thanks to the efforts of Exhibits Chair
                                                                L.K. Mestha, we arranged for ten exhibitor booths, which
                                                                remained active during the entire course of the confer-
                                                                ence. The technical program also included a number of
                                                                lunchtime sessions, some of which were sponsored by
                                                                industrial organizations.




Award recipients at CDC’04. Top (from left): Stephen Prajna,
Guy Dumont, George Vachtsevanos, Dimitry Gorinevsky, Mrd-
jan Jankovic, Munther Dahleh, William Dunbar, and Masao
Ikeda. Middle (from left): Henrik Sandberg, Minyue Fu, Er-
Wei Bai, Kevin Passino, Alexander Fradkov, Edwin Chong,
Bassam Bamieh, and John Doyle. Bottom (from left): Peter
                       s
Kootsookos, Tamer Ba¸ ar, Yuko Hatano, Jing Sun, Bonnie         Outgoing CSS President Doug Birdwell (right) passes the
Heck, Banavar Sridhar, and Arie Feuer.                          gavel to 2005 President Mark Spong.


106                                             IEEE Control Systems Magazine                                        June 2005
Industrial Sponsorship
Similar to last year’s CDC, we were delighted to have
industrial support in the form of US$5,000 contributed by
each of five companies: Honeywell Laboratories, The
MathWorks, National Instruments, United Technologies
Research Center, and Xerox. One aspect of industrial par-
ticipation at the CDC’04 was the organization of lunchtime
sessions and panel discussions. On Tuesday, 14 Decem-
ber, The MathWorks sponsored the session “Challenges
and Solution Techniques for Hybrid Simulation.” On
Wednesday, 15 December, Xerox organized a panel discus-
sion titled “Industry-University Interactions.” Two addi-
tional sessions were held on Thursday, 16 December: one
sponsored by the United Technologies Research Center             Incoming CSS President Mark Spong learns a new skill.
titled “UTRC Perspective on Controls for Critical Infra-
structure,” and the other by National Instruments called         general chair of the 2005 joint CDC-ECC, issued the official
“Graphical Programming Integration with Graphical Con-           invitation for the next CDC-ECC to be held in Seville, Spain.
trol Design and Simulation.” Despite the obvious tempta-         Photographs taken at the banquet, as well as other techni-
tion of a pool- or seaside lunch, it is noteworthy that all of   cal and social events, are available at http://www.photore-
these lunchtime sessions were well attended.                     flect.com/scripts/prsm.dll?EventFrame?event=08C6000F
                                                                 (also easily accessed through the CDC’04 Web site at
Special Events                                                   http://control.bu.edu/ieee/cdc04/).
In addition to the lunchtime sessions, the CDC program              The social program of CDC’04 included a welcome
included a special session titled “Pathways to Success in        reception on Monday, 13 December, a companion orienta-
Industry and Government for Women in Control: Chal-              tion meeting, and a farewell reception on Friday, 17
lenges, Opportunities, and Rewards.” This session, which         December, which coincided with the celebration of the
was organized by Molly Shor from Oregon State Universi-          CSS 50th anniversary.
ty and Dawn Tilbury from the University of Michigan, was
held over lunch on Wednesday, 15 December, with a                Celebrating the 50th CSS Anniversary
panel chaired by CSS Past President Cheryl Schrader              Aside from a special farewell reception, the CSS 50th
from Boise State University. The panelists shared their          anniversary was also the motivation for the plenary panel
experiences and insights on opportunities and barriers           session on Thursday, 16 December, already mentioned as
encountered as women in control pursue careers in both           part of the CDC program. All registered attendees were
industry and government.                                         offered a commemorative bag sponsored by The Math-
   Another special session titled “Early Career Develop-         Works, as well as commemorative luggage tags. Moreover,
ment: The Role of NSF and CSS” was organized by Kishan           custom-made polo shirts celebrating the anniversary were
Baheti of the National Science Foundation (NSF). This ses-       sold, an effort orchestrated by CSS Secretary-Administra-
sion was held in the evening on Wednesday, 15 December,          tor Linda Bushnell. Throughout the conference, a slide
with the purpose of informing students about NSF-support-        show was continuously available with pictures taken at
ed activities such as the CAREER and GOALI programs and          past CDCs, courtesy of 2004 CSS President Doug Birdwell.
highlighting the many opportunities offered by the CSS for          Perhaps the most special of all activities associated
networking and career enhancement, wonderful options             with the 50th anniversary was the gathering of many of
that students can take advantage of in their pursuit of a        the Society’s past presidents. A lunch in their honor was
career in control systems engineering.                           held on Friday, 17 December, and all present were recog-
   The annual CSS awards ceremony took place on                  nized at the start of the Bode lecture plenary session the
Thursday, 16 December, followed by a reception and the           same day.
traditional CDC banquet, which was held outdoors at the
Royal Deck of the Atlantis between one of its many pools         Student Participation
and the Paradise Lagoon. During the banquet, CDC partici-        The 2004 CDC Organizing Committee recognized the
pants and their guests were thoroughly entertained by            importance of student participation in the CDC. We were
Caribbean music, dancing, and a uniquely Bahamian                particularly pleased by the large number (well over 200) of
junkanoo parade. The annual passing of the gavel took            student attendees. Under the leadership of Student Affairs
place here between outgoing President Doug Birdwell to           Chair Panos Antsaklis, a travel grant from the NSF (we are
2005 President Mark Spong. Finally, Eduardo Camacho,             grateful to Kishan Baheti for his continuing support) was


June 2005                                        IEEE Control Systems Magazine                                             107
able to provide partial compensation for travel expenses          world-class working environment for the conference
incurred by students traveling from U.S. institutions to the      (including high-quality LCD projectors) for all technical
CDC. The special session “Early Career Development: The           sessions and wireless Internet access, as well as an abun-
Role of NSF and CSS,” organized by Kishan Baheti and men-         dance of social events, with a comfortable budget surplus
tioned earlier in this report, was specifically targeted to       at the conclusion of the CDC’04.
student participants. In addition, a newcomer and student
reception held on Tuesday, 14 December, provided the              Credit Is Due to Many…
opportunity for students from all over the world to meet          It is absolutely impossible for a member of the CDC com-
each other and interact in a pleasant, informal setting.          munity to appreciate the organizational complexity of this
Finally, as in past CDCs, a best student paper competition        event unless he or she has at some point been involved in
was held with a prize going to an outstanding paper whose         it. The members of a CDC Organizing Committee are volun-
principal author and presenter is a CSS student member.           teers who sacrifice a tremendous amount of time and ener-
                                                                  gy to ensure the success of the conference for everyone’s
Some Statistics                                                   benefit. Some of the functions these volunteers perform
The CDC’04 registration chair, Maria Elena Valcher, has com-      demand skills that go well beyond those of our “day job”
piled a comprehensive report that includes all vital data         as researchers and educators or as engineers and man-
associated with CDC registrants. Here are some highlights.        agers in industrial and government positions.
   There were 982 total registered participants. Most of them         I have already mentioned the contributions of the
came from the United States (462), with strong representa-        2004 CDC Program Chair Weibo Gong and those of sev-
tions from several other countries such as Italy (74), Japan      eral others, including Edwin Chong, Jim Spall, George
(71), Canada (42), Sweden (32), the United Kingdom (32),          Pappas, L.K. Mestha, Panos Antsaklis, Maria Elena
France (29), Australia (28), and The Netherlands (28). Overall,   Valcher, and Molly Shor. In addition, Publicity Chair
40 countries were represented, including one registrant each      Dave Pepyne was responsible for generating the call for
from Colombia, Iran, Uganda, and the United Arab Emirates.        papers and a conference poster. Over the past two
   CDC’04 Finance Chair Molly Shor was still finalizing her       years, he also created and tirelessly maintained the
report at the time this conference report was written.            CDC’04 Web site. Publications Chair Dawn Tilbury
Although full details are not yet available, the CDC Orga-        designed an outstanding preconference flier as well as
nizing Committee is pleased to have been able to provide a        the final program, while also coordinating the production




                                                                               s
Past CSS Presidents. Top (from left): Charlie Herget, Panos Antsaklis, Tamer Ba¸ ar, Stephen Kahne, Michael Athans, William
Levine, Derek Atherton, and Leonard Shaw. Bottom (from left ): Alex Levis, Harris McClamroch, Jose Cruz, Jack Rugh, Steve
Yurkovich, Cheryl Schrader, Doug Birdwell, Michael Masten, Alan Laub, William Perkins, and Edward Davison.


108                                               IEEE Control Systems Magazine                                     June 2005
of the proceedings CD that was made available to all reg-     Activities Ted Djaferis, who acted not only in that capacity
istered participants. Dawn had to deal with several unex-     but also repeatedly provided advice based on his experi-
pected problems due to difficulties faced by authors in       ence as a past CDC general chair.
properly formatting their paper files as well as last-            Frank Lewis, the 2003 CDC general chair, was of great
minute corrections. The last member of the Organizing         help in passing on the knowledge he acquired last year, as
Committee was the local arrangements chair, Yannis            were all of last year’s CDC Organizing Committee members,
Paschalidis. Superlatives fail to describe his contribu-      particularly Program Chair Chaouki Abdallah and Local
tions to the conference, both on site and prior to the        Arrangements Chair Jose Mireles.
event. Because of the location of the 2004 CDC, there             I also wish to thank once again our five industrial spon-
was no local arrangements chair to rely on, making his        sors, as well as Kishan Baheti of the NSF for helping us
duties all the more challenging.                              secure the student travel support grant and contributing
   A major part of the CDC is the processing of all submit-   to the CDC program as the organizer of a special session.
ted papers and invited session proposals, followed by             When the CDC is running, its brain center is the registra-
their review by members of the CSS Conference Editorial       tion desk, and those who worked there for a full week under
Board (CEB). This process is difficult and time critical. I   the leadership of Registration Chair Maria Elena Valcher
must express my gratitude to everyone who played a role       played a critical role in the conference’s success. I would
in it, starting with the CEB Chair Thomas Parisini, and       like to thank the registration desk assistants Cheryl Stewart
including Pradeep Misra (whose help with the CSS confer-      and Laura Crane as well as a team of graduate students from
ence software system Paperplaza was truly invaluable) and     Boston University who contributed in multiple capacities,
Doug Lawrence.                                                namely, Wei Lai, Wei Li, Saikat Ray, and Xiaoyi Wu.
   Throughout the organization phase of the CDC, the CSS          Finally, the success of the conference heavily depends
Executive Committee provided continuing support and           on the professionalism and responsiveness of the hosting
shared the responsibility of several tasks, such as coordi-   hotel’s management and staff. We were fortunate to work
nating the Disadvantaged Countries Support Program            with a team at the Atlantis that provided resources and
(Rick Middleton), helping with all meetings peripheral to     support in all facets of our activities. Special thanks are
the CDC (Linda Bushnell), and providing continuing sup-       due to Bill Coteron and Herman Russell.
port and advice (Doug Birdwell). I would like to give                                          —Christos G. Cassandras
special thanks to the 2004 Vice President for Conference                                            2004 CDC General Chair




Workshop on Recent Advances
in Algebraic Systems and Control Theory


T
       he Workshop on Recent Advances in Algebraic
       Systems and Control Theory was held on
       23–24 January 2005 at the Georgia Institute of
Technology in Atlanta. The workshop brought
together 80 researchers and educators in mathemat-
ics, electrical engineering, and biomedical engineer-
ing to discuss recent advances in algebraic systems
theory and their applications to analysis, design, and
control of complex dynamical systems. The presen-
tations covered a broad range of topics and includ-
ed telecommunications, manufacturing, and Ed Kamen with his Ph.D. advisor and a former Ph.D. student. Ed’s
biomedical applications. The workshop was held in advisor, Robert Newcomb (right), is a professor emeritus at the Univer-
honor of Prof. Edward Kamen, who recently retired sity of Maryland. His former student, Frank Lewis (left), is a professor
from Georgia Tech. The workshop celebrated his at the University of Texas at Arlington.
seminal contributions to algebraic systems theory
and hierarchical control for manufacturing. Support for       The workshop started with warm remarks about Ed
this workshop was provided by the National Science Foun- Kamen by his Ph.D. advisor Robert Newcomb, as well as
dation (NSF) and by Georgia Tech.                          by his former Ph.D. student Frank Lewis. These remarks


June 2005                                      IEEE Control Systems Magazine                                             109
and behavior-based observers. Erik Verriest presented          lenges facing undergraduate control curricula. A consen-
the concept of nested pole sequences as a natural              sus emerged that including computer science technolo-
extension of the notion of poles to time-varying linear        gies, such as embedded systems and networking, in
systems and provided a stochastic interpretation. A            undergraduate control courses may play a significant role
technique for estimation and fault detection of produc-        in establishing control as a key discipline in electrical engi-
tion processes in semiconductor manufacturing was              neering programs.
described by Alan Krauss. Eduardo Sontag discussed                The success of this workshop would not have been pos-
control problems that arise in the biological sciences         sible without the assistance of many individuals. We espe-
and described various applications of monotone input-          cially thank Kishan Baheti for financial support from the
output systems to multistability and oscillations in cer-      NSF, Magnus Egerstedt for developing and maintaining the
tain biological feedback systems.                              workshop’s Web site and taking many photographs for
   Abstracts for these and other talks can be found at         posterity, and Pamela Halverson for tending to the many
http://users.ece.gatech.edu/~magnus/ProgramKamen.htm.          operational details behind the scenes.
   A panel discussion on control education was held on 24
January. The panel, consisting of Kishan Baheti, Christos                                                    —Yorai Wardi
Cassandras, Pramod Khargonekar, and Allen Tannenbaum,                                        Georgia Institute of Technology
engaged the audience in a lively discussion on the chal-                                                              Atlanta




Second IEEE International Conference on Intelligent Systems



T
       he Second IEEE International Conference on Intelli-         ●  “Bioinformatics: A Knowledge Engineering
       gent Systems took place from 22–24 June 2004 in                Approach,” N. Kasabov, New Zealand
       the Constantine and Helena resort near Varna, Bul-         ●   “Perspectives of Fuzzy Control: Lights and Shadows,”
garia. The conference was jointly organized by the IEEE               P. Albertos and A. Sala, Spain.
Instrumentation and Measurement Society, IEEE Control             The regular papers dealt with a broad range of prob-
Systems Society, and IEEE Systems, Man and Cybernetics         lems for intelligent systems, including artificial intelli-
Society (IEEE IM/CS/SMC) Joint Chapter of Bulgaria, the        gence, knowledge engineering, intelligent agents, neural
Union of Automation and Informatics, the Federation of         and fuzzy networks, intelligent data processing, intelli-
the Scientific-Technical Unions of Bulgaria, the ICT Devel-    gent control, and decision-making systems. New interdis-
opment Agency, and the Institute of Information Tech-          ciplinary problems, such as ontology and semantics in
nologies of the Bulgarian Academy of Sciences. Vladimir        the Internet and intuitionist logic, were also explored.
Jotsov was the general coordinator for the conference,         Two special sessions and a series of papers presented
Mincho Hadjiski was the chair of the organizing commit-        results on practical application of intelligent systems. A
tee, and Vassil Sgurev was the conference cochair.             large number of papers dealt with fuzzy sets.
   Among 245 submitted papers from 41 countries, the              Special attention was given to young scientists and
international program committee accepted seven plenary         students. There were five student sessions featuring sci-
papers, 72 technical papers, 32 poster papers, and 30 stu-     entific reports by graduate and undergraduate students.
dent papers for the conference proceedings. These              Additional tutorials for students were also presented.
papers were organized into two plenary sessions and 16         These events attracted a large number of young people
technical sessions, including two invited sessions and         to the conference. The conference participants had
two poster sessions.                                           numerous opportunities for informal contact during cof-
   The following plenary lectures were delivered:              fee breaks between the scientific sessions, visits to the
   ●  Diversity and Unity of Uncertainty Theories,” G. Klir,   nearby beach, and sightseeing through excursions to
      USA                                                      nearby sites.
   ●  “Quantum Computers,” Ph. Jorrand, France                    During the closing ceremony, the participants
   ●  “Computational Intelligence Approach to Real-World       expressed their enthusiasm for a follow-on Conference on
      Cooperative Vehicle Dispatching Problem,”K. Hirota,      Intelligent Systems planned for 2006.
      Japan
   ●  “Uncertain Variables and Their Applications in                                                       —Vladimir Jotsov
      Knowledge-Based Decision Systems,” Z. Bubnicki,                                   Institute of Information Technologies
      Poland                                                                                                   Sofia, Bulgaria


June 2005                                       IEEE Control Systems Magazine                                              111
of the proceedings CD that was made available to all reg-     Activities Ted Djaferis, who acted not only in that capacity
istered participants. Dawn had to deal with several unex-     but also repeatedly provided advice based on his experi-
pected problems due to difficulties faced by authors in       ence as a past CDC general chair.
properly formatting their paper files as well as last-            Frank Lewis, the 2003 CDC general chair, was of great
minute corrections. The last member of the Organizing         help in passing on the knowledge he acquired last year, as
Committee was the local arrangements chair, Yannis            were all of last year’s CDC Organizing Committee members,
Paschalidis. Superlatives fail to describe his contribu-      particularly Program Chair Chaouki Abdallah and Local
tions to the conference, both on site and prior to the        Arrangements Chair Jose Mireles.
event. Because of the location of the 2004 CDC, there             I also wish to thank once again our five industrial spon-
was no local arrangements chair to rely on, making his        sors, as well as Kishan Baheti of the NSF for helping us
duties all the more challenging.                              secure the student travel support grant and contributing
   A major part of the CDC is the processing of all submit-   to the CDC program as the organizer of a special session.
ted papers and invited session proposals, followed by             When the CDC is running, its brain center is the registra-
their review by members of the CSS Conference Editorial       tion desk, and those who worked there for a full week under
Board (CEB). This process is difficult and time critical. I   the leadership of Registration Chair Maria Elena Valcher
must express my gratitude to everyone who played a role       played a critical role in the conference’s success. I would
in it, starting with the CEB Chair Thomas Parisini, and       like to thank the registration desk assistants Cheryl Stewart
including Pradeep Misra (whose help with the CSS confer-      and Laura Crane as well as a team of graduate students from
ence software system Paperplaza was truly invaluable) and     Boston University who contributed in multiple capacities,
Doug Lawrence.                                                namely, Wei Lai, Wei Li, Saikat Ray, and Xiaoyi Wu.
   Throughout the organization phase of the CDC, the CSS          Finally, the success of the conference heavily depends
Executive Committee provided continuing support and           on the professionalism and responsiveness of the hosting
shared the responsibility of several tasks, such as coordi-   hotel’s management and staff. We were fortunate to work
nating the Disadvantaged Countries Support Program            with a team at the Atlantis that provided resources and
(Rick Middleton), helping with all meetings peripheral to     support in all facets of our activities. Special thanks are
the CDC (Linda Bushnell), and providing continuing sup-       due to Bill Coteron and Herman Russell.
port and advice (Doug Birdwell). I would like to give                                          —Christos G. Cassandras
special thanks to the 2004 Vice President for Conference                                            2004 CDC General Chair




Workshop on Recent Advances
in Algebraic Systems and Control Theory


T
       he Workshop on Recent Advances in Algebraic
       Systems and Control Theory was held on
       23–24 January 2005 at the Georgia Institute of
Technology in Atlanta. The workshop brought
together 80 researchers and educators in mathemat-
ics, electrical engineering, and biomedical engineer-
ing to discuss recent advances in algebraic systems
theory and their applications to analysis, design, and
control of complex dynamical systems. The presen-
tations covered a broad range of topics and includ-
ed telecommunications, manufacturing, and Ed Kamen with his Ph.D. advisor and a former Ph.D. student. Ed’s
biomedical applications. The workshop was held in advisor, Robert Newcomb (right), is a professor emeritus at the Univer-
honor of Prof. Edward Kamen, who recently retired sity of Maryland. His former student, Frank Lewis (left), is a professor
from Georgia Tech. The workshop celebrated his at the University of Texas at Arlington.
seminal contributions to algebraic systems theory
and hierarchical control for manufacturing. Support for       The workshop started with warm remarks about Ed
this workshop was provided by the National Science Foun- Kamen by his Ph.D. advisor Robert Newcomb, as well as
dation (NSF) and by Georgia Tech.                          by his former Ph.D. student Frank Lewis. These remarks


June 2005                                      IEEE Control Systems Magazine                                             109
Workshop participants. The workshop was held in honor of Ed Kamen’s career. Many of the participants are Ed’s colleagues,
students, friends, and admirers.

were followed by a single track of 22 technical lectures         cumvents the problem of the high complexity of the inter-
over a two-day period. Kishan Baheti gave an overview            polants. Christos Cassandras presented a sample-path tech-
of funding opportunities for nanoscale science and tech-         nique, based on stochastic fluid models, for control and
nology at the NSF. Robert Newcomb described a new                online optimization of high-speed networks. Hector Suss-
approach for designing neural systems based on physio-           mann presented a maximum principle for optimal control
logical structures. Yutaka Yamamoto presented a filter           problems, where state equations need not be continuous.
design procedure for applications in sound processing                Power applications were discussed by John Chiasson,
and image processing based on H-infinity control. Allen          who presented a method for computing the switching
Tannenbaum discussed a method for segmentation and               angles in a multilevel converter so as to produce the
registration in medical imagery, and its application to          required fundamental voltage without generating high-order
active-vision techniques for surgery and therapy.                harmonics. Michael Gazarik presented recent developments
   Sanjoy Mitter analyzed the Kalman filter in informational     in aircraft-based, infrared Fourier transform spectrometers
terms. This interpretation is based on the flow of informa-      at NASA Langley. Thanos Antoulas described recent results
tion from the initial state and observations on the condition-   on complexity reduction in dynamical systems involving a
al distribution of the state. Tryphon Georgiou described an      large number of first-order differential equations.
analytic-interpolation technique for optimal control that cir-       Pramod Khargonekar and D. Kalita discussed logic con-
                                                                 trollers for reconfigurable manufacturing systems. John Baras
                                                                 presented a realization theory for designing complex systems.
                                                                 The theory is based on vertical, cross-layer integration of
                                                                 functions associated with the design process. Kameshwar
                                                                 Poolla described recent challenges and efforts in developing a
                                                                 new class of wireless sensors for use in semiconductor manu-
                                                                 facturing, with on-board power, communications, and signal-
                                                                 processing electronics. Payam Torab presented a new
                                                                 algorithm for dynamic routing and wavelength assignment in
                                                                 wavelength division multiplexing networks, which allows par-
                                                                 tial wavelength conversion at the nodes. Bruce Lee surveyed
                                                                 recent results in control systems disturbance design.
                                                                     Panos Antsaklis discussed emerging architectures for
                                                                 networked control, whose design is influenced by tech-
                                                                 nological limitations and emerging applications in com-
                                                                 plex systems. Fred Daum and Jim Huang presented
Panel discussion. The panelists (from left) are Allen Tannen-
                                                                 theoretical results and numerical experiments that
baum, Pramod Khargonekar, Kishan Baheti, and Christos
                                                                 establish the curse of dimensionality as inherent in a
Cassandras. The discussion concerned challenges facing
undergraduate control education. An agreement emerged on         broad class of nonlinear filters. Paul Fuhrmann classi-
the importance of including computer science techniques in       fied and characterized observers for partial states and
the control curriculum.                                          provided a connection between state-space observers


110                                              IEEE Control Systems Magazine                                         June 2005
and behavior-based observers. Erik Verriest presented          lenges facing undergraduate control curricula. A consen-
the concept of nested pole sequences as a natural              sus emerged that including computer science technolo-
extension of the notion of poles to time-varying linear        gies, such as embedded systems and networking, in
systems and provided a stochastic interpretation. A            undergraduate control courses may play a significant role
technique for estimation and fault detection of produc-        in establishing control as a key discipline in electrical engi-
tion processes in semiconductor manufacturing was              neering programs.
described by Alan Krauss. Eduardo Sontag discussed                The success of this workshop would not have been pos-
control problems that arise in the biological sciences         sible without the assistance of many individuals. We espe-
and described various applications of monotone input-          cially thank Kishan Baheti for financial support from the
output systems to multistability and oscillations in cer-      NSF, Magnus Egerstedt for developing and maintaining the
tain biological feedback systems.                              workshop’s Web site and taking many photographs for
   Abstracts for these and other talks can be found at         posterity, and Pamela Halverson for tending to the many
http://users.ece.gatech.edu/~magnus/ProgramKamen.htm.          operational details behind the scenes.
   A panel discussion on control education was held on 24
January. The panel, consisting of Kishan Baheti, Christos                                                    —Yorai Wardi
Cassandras, Pramod Khargonekar, and Allen Tannenbaum,                                        Georgia Institute of Technology
engaged the audience in a lively discussion on the chal-                                                              Atlanta




Second IEEE International Conference on Intelligent Systems



T
       he Second IEEE International Conference on Intelli-         ●  “Bioinformatics: A Knowledge Engineering
       gent Systems took place from 22–24 June 2004 in                Approach,” N. Kasabov, New Zealand
       the Constantine and Helena resort near Varna, Bul-         ●   “Perspectives of Fuzzy Control: Lights and Shadows,”
garia. The conference was jointly organized by the IEEE               P. Albertos and A. Sala, Spain.
Instrumentation and Measurement Society, IEEE Control             The regular papers dealt with a broad range of prob-
Systems Society, and IEEE Systems, Man and Cybernetics         lems for intelligent systems, including artificial intelli-
Society (IEEE IM/CS/SMC) Joint Chapter of Bulgaria, the        gence, knowledge engineering, intelligent agents, neural
Union of Automation and Informatics, the Federation of         and fuzzy networks, intelligent data processing, intelli-
the Scientific-Technical Unions of Bulgaria, the ICT Devel-    gent control, and decision-making systems. New interdis-
opment Agency, and the Institute of Information Tech-          ciplinary problems, such as ontology and semantics in
nologies of the Bulgarian Academy of Sciences. Vladimir        the Internet and intuitionist logic, were also explored.
Jotsov was the general coordinator for the conference,         Two special sessions and a series of papers presented
Mincho Hadjiski was the chair of the organizing commit-        results on practical application of intelligent systems. A
tee, and Vassil Sgurev was the conference cochair.             large number of papers dealt with fuzzy sets.
   Among 245 submitted papers from 41 countries, the              Special attention was given to young scientists and
international program committee accepted seven plenary         students. There were five student sessions featuring sci-
papers, 72 technical papers, 32 poster papers, and 30 stu-     entific reports by graduate and undergraduate students.
dent papers for the conference proceedings. These              Additional tutorials for students were also presented.
papers were organized into two plenary sessions and 16         These events attracted a large number of young people
technical sessions, including two invited sessions and         to the conference. The conference participants had
two poster sessions.                                           numerous opportunities for informal contact during cof-
   The following plenary lectures were delivered:              fee breaks between the scientific sessions, visits to the
   ●  Diversity and Unity of Uncertainty Theories,” G. Klir,   nearby beach, and sightseeing through excursions to
      USA                                                      nearby sites.
   ●  “Quantum Computers,” Ph. Jorrand, France                    During the closing ceremony, the participants
   ●  “Computational Intelligence Approach to Real-World       expressed their enthusiasm for a follow-on Conference on
      Cooperative Vehicle Dispatching Problem,”K. Hirota,      Intelligent Systems planned for 2006.
      Japan
   ●  “Uncertain Variables and Their Applications in                                                       —Vladimir Jotsov
      Knowledge-Based Decision Systems,” Z. Bubnicki,                                   Institute of Information Technologies
      Poland                                                                                                   Sofia, Bulgaria


June 2005                                       IEEE Control Systems Magazine                                              111

								
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