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According to Colombia's Defense Ministry, Fare membership has fallen from 20,766 members in 2002 to 8,777 in 2008, a drastic decrease that has generally been attributed to Uribe's iron-fisted "democratic security" policies. Due to the terms of CAFTA (Central American Free Trade Agreement), which came into effect in Costa Rica at the beginning of 2009, Costa Rican exports will be able to circumvent the $0.54 per gallon U.S. tariff levied on sugarcane ethanol originating directly from Brazil.

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									BRIEFS                                                                                                                                                  8
Colombia                                         May 27th marked the 45th anniversary of the estab-
                                                                                                               THE COUNCIL ON
Research Associate Juliana Sojo              lishment of the Revolutionary Armed Forced of Colombia
                                              (Farc). Founded in 1964 by a group of small landholders           HEMISPHERIC
who were suffering violent threats from the conservative government and rightest vigilantes, Farc is
one of several insurgent organizations created throughout Latin America during the 1960s. The inter-               AFFAIRS
                                                                                                                       1250 Connecticut Ave. NW
nal conflict that since has unfolded has left thousands dead and several million displaced.
                                                                                                                    Suite 1C Washington, DC 20036
   Under the Uribe presidency, the self-proclaimed Marxist-Leninist revolutionary guerrilla organiza-
                                                                                                             phone: 202.223.4975 e-mail: coha@coha.org
tion has taken a battering from the Colombian armed forces. According to Colombia’s Defense Min-
                                                                                                             fax: 202.223.4979     issn: 1275-559
istry, Farc membership has fallen from 20,766 members in 2002 to 8,777 in 2008, a drastic decrease
that has generally been attributed to Uribe’s iron-fisted “democratic security” policies.                        Washington Report on the Hemisphere
   Nevertheless, Farc is far from defeated. Despite recent well-publicized setbacks, the internationally              © 2009 Published Biweekly
recognized terrorist organization remains strong, proclaiming its ideological aim of overthrowing Co-             (23 Issues per Year Including Index)
lombia’s democratically-elected government. A communiqué issued by the Farc in celebration of its                by the Council on Hemispheric Affairs
recent anniversary stated “the decisive stage of the fight for peace has begun.” They then carried out a           June 18, 2009 Vol. 29 No. 11
number of terrorist actions that included bombing of bridges, attacks on police patrols and debilitat-       Chairperson: Judith Chiara
ing bomb attacks. Farc’s longevity can primarily be attributed to its involvement in drug trafficking,       Editor-in-Chief: Larry Birns
making cocaine its primary source of funding since the 1980s. This, of course, has seriously derailed        Managing Editor: Maya Wilson
the organization’s socialist goals, while building up a narco-industry earning approximately $400 to
                                                                                                             Associate Editor: Christina Conell
$600 million per year. President Uribe has shown no desire to negotiate with the revolutionary group
                                                                                                             Assistant Managing Editor: Britt Schneider
after the failed peace talks held by his predecessor.
                                                                                                             Illustrator: Margaret Scott
Costa Rica                                         On June 3rd, Brazilian President Luiz Inácio Lula da      Trustee Editorial Board: Peter G. Bourne, M.D.,
Research Associate Alexandra Deprez            Silva made his first official visit to Costa Rica. His dis-   former member of Carter White House; Charles
                                               cussions with President Oscar Arias focused mainly on         B. Dale, former President, The Newspaper Guild;
the topic of biofuels, revealing the continuity of Lula’s foreign energy policy –a policy he started in      Roger Wilkins, former editorial board member,
2006 with the objective of promoting ethanol production and consumption in Latin America. Lula’s             The New York Times, Washington Times, Washing-
visit served as an official endorsement for increased cooperation between Brazilian ethanol produc-          ton Star
tion companies and Costa Rican distillation facilities. Hydrous ethanol will be imported from Brazil,        Senior Research Fellows: Sean Burges, Ph.D;
further distilled into anhydrous ethanol in Costa Rica, and then exported to the United States. Due          Richard P. Claude, Ph.D; Frank Kendrick, Ph.D;
to the terms of CAFTA (Central American Free Trade Agreement), which came into effect in Costa               Nicholas Kozloff, Ph.D; Chris McGIllion; Mor-
Rica at the beginning of 2009, Costa Rican exports will be able to circumvent the
								
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