Using Games and Simulations in the Classroom by ProQuest

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When we started looking into the Software & Information Industry Association's best practices report on gaming in education with an eye to capturing some of its wisdom in an article for this issue of Multimedia & lnternet@Schools, we quickly found a piece by Lee Wilson on his Education Business Blog - and, in one stroke, both an author and an article that exactly suited our needs! Ed. A new, free white paper - "Best Practices for Using Games & Simulations in the Classroom" - that tackles the practical challenges teachers face when they use video games was released this past February by the Software & Information Industry Association's Education Division.

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									   [When we started looking into the Software & Information Industry
Association’s best practices report on gaming in education with an eye to
capturing some of its wisdom in an article for this issue of Multimedia &
Internet@Schools, we quickly found a piece by Lee Wilson on his
Education Business Blog—and, in one stroke, both an author and an
article that exactly suited our needs! So we asked Lee and the SIIA for
permission to republish the article so that we could succinctly spread the
word about the report and its contents to you, our K–12 library media and
technology specialist readers. Permission granted! So, herewith is Lee’s
article. If, after reading the article, you’d like more insight into the subject,
go back and read “Educational Gaming—From Edutainment to Bona Fide
21st-Century Teaching Tool,” by Ntiedo Etuk, in the November/December
2008 issue of MMIS. —Ed.]

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                                               May/June 2009   MULTIMEDIA & INTERNET@SCHOOLS   27
TECHNOLOGY      @   SCHOOLS




A           new, free white paper—“Best Practices for Using Games & Sim-
            ulations in the Classroom”—that tackles the practical chal-
            lenges teachers face when they use video games was released
            this past February by the Software & Information Industry As-
sociation’s Education Division. I was the author of the paper and the co-
chair of the working group that produced the paper.
   Barrels of ink and pixels by the gigabit have been spilled trying to an-
swer the question “Do video games work as teaching tools?” We started
from a simpler perspective: Assuming that games can support learning,
what are the practical tips that teachers can use to boost the odds of suc-
cess? We interviewed the pioneers in the classroom and at the companies
that have developed successful games and summarized their hard-won in-
sights in the paper.
   I excerpt the executive summary below. For the complete paper visit
the SIIA’s website and download the PDF (see the box).                              The full, 64-page SIIA
   Most of what we surfaced is applied common sense that goes with any             Education Division white
supplemental implementation. There are some key differences with games            paper is available free as a
that we emphasize in the paper.                                                      PDF at www.siia.net/
   The paper is organized into three main sections:                                education/foreducators/
   1. Selling the Idea—How can you convince your schoo
								
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