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         Shown below are accepted and unreviewed papers in this session (withdrawn and rejected papers are not shown). Papers must be reviewed
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                                                             Ionic Liquids: From Knowledge to Application: Poster Session (Poster session #28036:
                                                             Contains 52 papers: 52 accepted.)
                                                                Organizer: Joan F. Brennecke, Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering,
                                                                             University of Notre Dame, 180 Fitzpatrick Hall, Notre Dame, IN 46556,
                                                                             jfb@nd.edu; Kenneth R. Seddon, QUILL Research Centre, Queen's University
                                                                             Belfast, David Keir Building, Stranmillis Road, Belfast BT9 5AG United Kingdom,
                                                                             k.seddon@qub.ac.uk
                                                                Organizer, Robin D. Rogers, Department of Chemistry and Center for Green Manufacturing /
                                                                Presiding: School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, The University of
                                                                             Alabama,Tuscaloosa / The Queen's University of Belfast, Stranmillis Road,
                                                                             Belfast, Northern Ireland BT9 5AG United Kingdom, rdrogers@bama.ua.edu
                            Final                        Move
         Start Preferred
                            Paper       Order   Accept    or Event
         Time Format
                           Number                        Copy
                                    1                        (1199119) Caffeine ionic liquids – dream or reality?. G. Gurau, K. Rogers, R. D. Rogers


                                    2                        (1198969) Liquid Ion Pairs and Dimeric Anions: Variations on Pharmaceutical Ionic liquids. D. R.
                                                             MacFarlane, J. L. Scott, K. Fraser, M. Forsyth, E. I. Izgorodina, K. Johansson
                                    3                        (1193449) Pyridine and nicotine as solvents for ionic liquids with related cationic structure. Z. P.
                                                             Visak, A. Rodriguez, A. B. Pereiro, J. N. A. Canongia Lopes, L. P. N. Rebelo
                                    4                        (1203457) Comparative toxicity of branched and straight chain alkyl functionality in ionic liquids. C.
                                                             McEntee, J. Gwon, X. Li, J. F. Wishart, S. I. Lall-Ramnarine
                                    5                        (1200750) Degradability by design: 1-hydroxyimidazole-derived salts as stable, yet degradable
                                                             ionic liquids. G. Laus, A. Schwaerzler, M. Hummel, K. Wurst, V. Kahlenberg, G. Bonn, H.
                                                             Schottenberger
                                    6                        (1202813) Designed to decompose. Task-specific ionic liquids incorporating N-acylium and
                                                             N-sulfonylium cations. K. Gaines, J. H. Davis Jr., R. A. O'Brien, K. M. Mattson

                                    7                        (1202643) Task-specific ionic liquids (TSILs) based on heterocyclic cations with directly
                                                             ring-attached aldehyde and benzoyl groups. Hydrate and Acetal Formation. K. M. Mattson, J. H.
                                                             Davis Jr., R. A. O'Brien, K. Gaines
                                    8                        (1202215) New Bronsted acidic TSILs. From computation-guided design to synthesis and
                                                             properties. J. H. Davis Jr., R. A. O'Brien, K. M. Mattson, K. Gaines, B. B. Plash, A. Wierzbicki, E.
                                                             A. Salter
                                    9                        (1204467) New amine functionalized ionic liquids for multi-mode acid gas capture. J. H. Davis Jr.,
                                                             R. A. O'Brien, K. Gaines, K. M. Mattson

                                    10                       (1202625) Study of ionic liquid solvation and aggregation by NMR spectroscopy and molecular
                                                             dynamics simulations. R. C. Remsing, Z. Liu, B. B. O'Brien, G. Moyna

                                    11                       (1191710) Specific interactions between salts and ionic liquids in aqueous salt solutions. L. I. N.
                                                             Tomé, F. R. Varanda, M. G. Freire, I. M. Marrucho, J. A. P. Coutinho

                                    12                       (1200280) Solvation of a small peptide molecule in room-temperature ionic liquids. Y. Shim, H. J.
                                                             Kim
                                    13                       (1198486) Synthesis and properties of ionic liquids derived from N-methyl-D-glucamine. G.
                                                             Chalumot, J. L. Anderson
                                    14                       (1196619) Decomposition of the ionic liquid 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolim ethylsulfate under ambient
                                                             conditions. L. E. Ficke, J. F. Brennecke
                                    15                       (1197837) Novel luminescent and magnetic ionic crystals. A. V. Mudring


                                    16                       (1204338) Template-Free Recyclable Growth of Magnetite Nanocrystals in Neat Ionic Liquid. J. D.
                                                             Woodward, A. J. Rondinone, G. A. Baker
                                    17                       (1190871) Molar refraction in a series of imidazolium- and phosphonium-based ionic liquids. M.
                                                             Tariq, J. N. A. Canongia Lopes, L. P. Rebelo




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                         18   (1190939) Phase equilibria in ionic liquid plus aromatic compound binary systems. M. Blesic, J. N.
                              A. Canongia Lopes, L. P. Rebelo
                         19   (1190885) Self-aggregation and fluorescence quenching of surfactant ionic liquids. M. Blesic, A.
                              Lopes, E. Melo, Z. Petrovski, N. Plechkova, J. N. A. Canongia Lopes, K. R. Seddon, L. P. Rebelo
                         20   (1203510) Tetraalkylphosphonium polyoxometalates as novel ionic liquids. M. L. Dietz, P. G.
                              Rickert, M. R. Antonio, M. A. Firestone, J. F. Wishart, T. Szreder, K -A. Kubatko

                         21   (1202259) Improved chemical analysis of lignocellulosic biomass through dissolution into ionic
                              liquids. L. M. Kline, R. Jena Kumar, D. G. Hayes, N. Labbe

                         22   (1202506) Utilizing elongational flow in the spinning of carbon fiber precursors from
                              1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride cellulose solutions. R. Sammons, J. Collier, T. Rials, S.
                              Petrovan
                         23   (1200708) Shear reology of 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride cellulose solutions including
                              solution character and preparation. J. R. Collier, J. Watson, B. Collier, S. Petrovan
                         24   (1202150) Molecular dynamics simulations of cellobiose in the ionic liquid
                              1-n-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride. Z. Liu, R. C. Remsing, P. B. Moore, G. Moyna

                         25   (1204504) Development of the Polymer Actuator Based on the Polymer Electrolyte Composed of
                              Ionic Liquids and ABA-type Triblock Copolymers. S. Imaizumi, Y. Kato, H. Kokubo, M. Watanabe

                         26   (1198640) Development of ionic liquid/polyimide copolymers for CO2/H2 membranes. P. Li, Q.
                              Zhao, J. L. Anderson, M. R. Coleman

                         27   (1190660) Thermodynamics properties for imidazolium ionic liquids + methyl methacrylate. W.
                              Fan, Q. Zhou, R. Yan, S. Zhang
                         28   (1198627) Imidazolium-based zwitterionic compounds bearing a fluorinated alkyl group and a
                              sulfonate group for proton exchange membrane. H. Kim, J. S. Lee, M. Cheong, H. S. Kim
                         29   (1204239) Generation and detection of radicals in ionic liquids . J. A. C. Clyburne, K. Ghandi, C.
                              Walsby

                         30   (1195709) Hydrogen halide-equivalent ionic liquids: Application in the ring opening of epoxides. J.
                              Salazar, J. M. Rodriguez, S. E. Lopez
                         31   (1196845) Kinetic Study of S-Alkylation of 2-Mercaptobenzimidazole by Allyl Bromide in the
                              Presence of Potassium Hydroxide. M -L. Wang, Y -C. Liu

                         32   (1203382) Electrochemical studies of the fries rearrangement in ionic liquids. G. T. Cheek
                         33   (1176766) Kinetic studies of rapid alkylation reaction in liquid-liquid biphasic reaction using acidic
                              ionic liquid catalyst. J. Joni, P. Wasserscheid

                         34   (1194201) Liquid-liquid electrochemisty of a new class of chiral hydrophobic room temperature
                              ionic liquids . J. B. Rollins, J. C. Conboy
                         35   (1196139) Atomistic modeling of densities and solubility parameters of ionic liquids. B. Derecskei,
                              A. Derecskei-Kovacs

                         36   (1200244) Atomistic simulation of the thermodynamic properties of organic hydrazine-derivatives
                              and hydrazinium-based energetic salts and ionic liquids. K. E. Gutowski, B. Gurkan, S.
                              Jayaraman, E. J. Maginn
                         37   (1200686) Considering partial ionic dissociation with electrolytic excess Gibbs energy models in an
                              asymmetric framework. L. D. Simoni, A. A. Augugliaro, J. F. Brennecke, M. A. Stadtherr
                         38   (1190924) The potential energy landscape of bis(fluorosulfonyl)amide. K. Shimizu, Y. Umebayashi,
                              K. Fujii, A. A. H. Pádua, J. N. A. Canongia Lopes
                         39   (1202769) Vibrational spectrum of [emin][TF2N] ion pair : A density functional study. . N. R.
                              Dhumal, H. J. Kim
                         40   (1199632) Solubility of gases in [hmim][Tf2N] and [hmim][eFAP]. Z. K. Lopez-castillo, D. E.
                              Kestel, J. F. Brennecke
                         41   (1198625) Gas sorption properties of ionic liquids. Q. Zhao, P. Li, M. R. Coleman, J. L. Anderson


                         42   (1193016) High-pressure Solubilities of Carbon Dioxide in [Cnmim][Tf2N] Ionic Liquids. P. J.
                              Carvalho, J. J. B. Machado, J. Pauly, J -L. Daridon, I. M. Marrucho, J. A. P. Coutinho
                         43   (1195818) Readily prepared and cost effective ionic liquids: Few steps more toward the industrial
                              application of CO2 separation using ionic liquids. H. S. Kim, J. Palgunadi, J. E. Kang

                         44   (1197196) Light gas separation with gelled room-temperature ionic liquid supported membranes.
                              B. A. Voss, J. E. Bara, D. L. Gin, R. D. Noble
                         45   (1199932) Pure gas solubilities and viscosities of task-specific ionic liquids. D. E. Kestel, D. F.
                              Rahill, J. C. de la Fuente, J. F. Brennecke
                         46   (1193273) Separation of liquids with triethylsulphonium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)-imide ionic
                              liquid. A. Marciniak, U. Domańska-Żelazna




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                                  47                        (1177162) ILTHERMO: Archival storage and retrieval of thermophysical properties. J. W. Magee,
                                                            Q. Dong, C. D. Muzny, A. Kazakov, V. Diky, J. A. Widegren, R. D. Chirico, K. N. Marsh, M. Frenkel
                                  48                        (1190857) Solubility of fluorinated compounds in ionic liquids. R. Ferreira, M. Blesic, J. Trindade, I.
                                                            M. Marrucho, J. N. A. Canongia Lopes, L. P. Rebelo
                                  49                        (1204248) Influence of the Anionic Species of a Molten Salt on Lipid Organization. K. O. Evans
                                  50                        (1202456) Interfacial Mass Transport in Biphasic Ionic Liquid/Organic solvent Systems.. A.
                                                            Ahosseini, L. Weatherley, A. M. Scurto
                                  51                        (1190444) LCST Behavior of Linear Polymers and Polymer Gels in Ionic Liquids and Its Possibility
                                                            in Material Science. M. Watanabe, T. Ueki, K. Kodama, A. Yamaguchi
                                  52                        (1197600) Transport properties of ionic liquids. S. S. Moganty, R. E. Baltus, P. Goonetillake, D.
                                                            Roy



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          1176766: Kinetic studies of rapid alkylation reaction in liquid-liquid biphasic reaction using acidic ionic liquid catalyst

          Ionic Liquids: From Knowledge to Application
          IEC 0 [1176766]: Kinetic studies of rapid alkylation reaction in liquid-liquid biphasic reaction using
          acidic ionic liquid catalyst
          Joni Joni, joni.joni@crt.cbi.uni-erlangen.de, Lehrstuhl für Chemische Reaktionstechnik, Friedrich-Alexander University of Erlangen-Nuremberg,
          Egerlandstrasse 3, 91052 Erlangen, Germany, Fax: +49-9131-8527421, joni.joni@crt.cbi.uni-erlangen.de, and Peter Wasserscheid,
          Wasserscheid@crt.cbi.uni-erlangen.de, Lehrstuhl für Chemische Reaktionstechnik, Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Erlangen D-91058, Germany

          ACCEPTED
          Topic Selection: Ionic Liquids: From Knowledge to Application: Poster Session

          Invited: N
          Preferred Presentation Format: Oral
          Consider for Sci-Mix: Y
          Special Equipment Needs: LCD projector, laser pointer
          Conforms to Bylaw 6: Y
          Last Modified: 2008-03-30

          Abstract
          Kinetic studies of cumene and meta-xylene isopropylation using the acidic ionic liquid 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride ([EMIM]Cl)/AlCl3 as catalyst
          showed the importance of the different products solubility in the acidic ionic liquid phase. However, since the acidic ionic liquid phase is very reactive it
          would be very difficult if not impossible to perform cross-solubility measurements under reaction condition. Our work try to overcome this limitation by
          introducing correction factors to the product concentrations in the organic phase based on COSMO-RS model, an implemented quantum chemistry and
          DFT calculation, of the relative product solubility in the acidic ionic liquid [EMIM][Al2Cl7]. This gave us a remarkably good prediction of the reaction
          kinetics. Moreover, our finding proves indirectly the suitability of COSMO-RS to understand kinetic aspects of industrial relevant ionic-liquid-organic
          biphasic reaction

          1177162: ILTHERMO: Archival storage and retrieval of thermophysical properties

          Ionic Liquids: From Knowledge to Application
          IEC 0 [1177162]: ILTHERMO: Archival storage and retrieval of thermophysical properties
          Joseph W. Magee, joe.magee@nist.gov1, Qian Dong, qian.dong@nist.gov2, Chris D. Muzny, chris.muzny@nist.gov3, Andrei Kazakov,
          andrei.kazakov@nist.gov3, Vladimir Diky, vladimir.diky@nist.gov1, Jason A. Widegren, jason.widegren@nist.gov1, Robert D. Chirico,
          robert.chirico@nist.gov3, Kenneth N Marsh, ken.marsh@canterbury.ac.nz4, and Michael Frenkel, michael.frenkel@nist.gov3. (1) Physical & Chemical
          Properties Division, National Institute of Standards & Technology, 325 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80305-3328, joe.magee@nist.gov, (2) National Institute
          of Standards & Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899-8380, (3) Physical and Chemical Properties Division, National Institute of Standards and
          Technology, Boulder, CO 80305-3328, (4) Department of Chemical and Process Engineering, University of Canterbury, Christchurch, New Zealand

          ACCEPTED
          Topic Selection: Ionic Liquids: From Knowledge to Application: Poster Session

          Invited: N
          Preferred Presentation Format: PosterOnly
          Consider for Sci-Mix: N
          Conforms to Bylaw 6: Y
          Last Modified: 2008-03-30

          Abstract
          The development, scope, and functionality of the web-based ionic liquids database, ILTHERMO, are described. This archival database is available free
          to the public at the URL http://ilthermo.boulder.nist.gov/, and aims to provide users worldwide with up-to-date information from publications of
          experimental thermophysical properties for ionic liquids, including numerical property values, measurement methods, sample purities, purification
          methods, uncertainties and related bibliographic information. The database can be searched in terms of the ions constituting the ionic liquids, the ionic
          liquids themselves, and their properties, and through literature citation information. ILTHERMO presents information via a high-density data screen,
          which enables users to easily retrieve comprehensive ionic liquids data on one data page by navigating through a series of tables. ILTHERMO is an
          integral component of a distributed information system envisioned by an IUPAC Task Group (2003-020-2-100 Ionic Liquids Database). Since its release
          in July 2006, downloads from ILTHERMO have escalated to a rate that now exceeds 80,000 files per month. An international effort is now underway to
          fully populate the database with data from classic papers and also newly minted data as their journal articles are published. To date, this effort has been
          somewhat hendered, by the wide distribution of articles, which report some relevant thermophysical data, among numerous journals with different
          specializations. Authors are encouraged to send PDFs of their papers to robert.chirico@nist.gov to have their thermophysical property data added to
          ILTHERMO and thus accelerate its usage by the ionic liquids community.

          1190444: LCST Behavior of Linear Polymers and Polymer Gels in Ionic Liquids and Its Possibility in Material Science

          Ionic Liquids: From Knowledge to Application



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          IEC 0 [1190444]: LCST Behavior of Linear Polymers and Polymer Gels in Ionic Liquids and Its
          Possibility in Material Science
          Masayoshi Watanabe, mwatanab@ynu.ac.jp, Takeshi Ueki, d04sa101@ynu.ac.jp, Koichi Kodama, , and Ayuko Yamaguchi, , Department of
          Chemistry and Biotechnology, Yokohama National University, 79-5 Tokiwadai, Hodogaya-ku, Yokohama 240-8501, Japan, Fax: +81-45-339-3955

          ACCEPTED
          Topic Selection: Ionic Liquids: From Knowledge to Application: Poster Session

          Invited: Y
          Inviting Chair: Joan F. Brennecke, jfb@nd.edu
          Preferred Presentation Format: OralOnly
          Consider for Sci-Mix: N
          Conforms to Bylaw 6: Y
          Last Modified: 2008-03-30

          Abstract
          In this presentation, we report the experimental observations of the unique phase behavior of linear polymers and cross-linked polymer gels in ionic
          liquids (ILs) as solvents. Poly(benzyl methacrylate) (PBnMA) and its copolymers exhibit lower critical solution temperature (LCST)-type phase
          separation in common hydrophobic ILs such as 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethane sulfone)imide ([C2mim][NTf2]). The turbidity
          measurements for PBnMA/IL mixed systems reveal that the LCST-type phase separation temperatures change significantly with the changes in the
          chemical structures of polymers and ILs. Moreover, cross-linked PBnMA gels show reversible and discontinuous swelling change in [C2mim][NTf2] with
          the changes in temperature. As ILs are, in general, thermally and chemically stable and have negligible vapor pressure, these swelling changes could
          be utilized to develop stimuli-responsive smart materials, such as actuators, optical devices, and switching devices. As an example, the
          photo-responsive shape change of photochromic polymer gels will be presented.

          1190660: Thermodynamics properties for imidazolium ionic liquids + methyl methacrylate

          Ionic Liquids: From Knowledge to Application
          IEC 0 [1190660]: Thermodynamics properties for imidazolium ionic liquids + methyl methacrylate
          Wei Fan, wfan@home.ipe.ac.cn1, Qing Zhou, qzhou@home.ipe.ac.cn2, Ruiyi Yan, 2, and Suojiang Zhang, sjzhang@home.ipe.ac.cn 3. (1) College
          of Chemical Engineering, Kaifeng University, Daliang Road, Kaifeng 475004, China, Fax: 86-10-82627080, wfan@home.ipe.ac.cn, (2) Institute of
          Process Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190, China, (3) Prof. Institute of Process Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences,
          Bei Er Tiao No.1, Zhong Guan Cun, Beijing, Beijing 100190, China, Fax: 86-10-82627080, sjzhang@home.ipe.ac.cn

          ACCEPTED
          Topic Selection: Ionic Liquids: From Knowledge to Application: Poster Session

          Invited: N
          Preferred Presentation Format: PosterOnly
          Consider for Sci-Mix: N
          Conforms to Bylaw 6: Y
          Last Modified: 2008-03-30

          Abstract
          Thermodynamics properties such as density and viscosity for binary systems of imidazolium ionic liquids + methyl methacrylate (MMA) were measured
          over the entire concentration range in the temperature range from (383.15 to 353.15) K. From these experimental data, the excess molar volumes VE
          and viscosity deviations δη were calculated. The VE and δη
          were fitted to the Redlich-Kister equations using a multiparametric nonlinear regression method. Estimated coefficients of the Redlich-Kister equation
          and standard deviation calculated are also presented. The results show that the densities and viscosities are dependent strongly on MMA content and
          weakly temperature.

          1190857: Solubility of fluorinated compounds in ionic liquids

          Ionic Liquids: From Knowledge to Application
          IEC 0 [1190857]: Solubility of fluorinated compounds in ionic liquids
          Rui Ferreira, r.ferreira@itqb.unl.pt1, Marjana Blesic, m.blesic@itqb.unl.pt1, Joana Trindade, j.trindade@itqb.unl.pt1, I. M. Marrucho,
          imarrucho@dq.ua.pt2, José Nuno A. Canongia Lopes, jnlopes@ist.utl.pt3, and Luis PN. Rebelo, luis.rebelo@itqb.unl.pt 1. (1) Instituto de
          Tecnologia Quimica e Biologica, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Portugal, Av Republica, Apartado 127, 2781-901 Oeiras, Portugal, Fax:
          351-21-4411277, r.ferreira@itqb.unl.pt, luis.rebelo@itqb.unl.pt, (2) CICECO, Department of Chemistry, University of Aveiro, Aveiro 3810-193, Portugal,
          (3) Centro de Química Estrutural, Instituto Superior Técnico, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049 001 Lisboa, Portugal, jnlopes@ist.utl.pt

          ACCEPTED
          Topic Selection: Ionic Liquids: From Knowledge to Application: Poster Session

          Invited: N
          Preferred Presentation Format: Poster
          Consider for Sci-Mix:
          Conforms to Bylaw 6: Y
          Last Modified: 2008-03-30

          Abstract
          Systems that incorporate both ionic liquids and fluorinated compounds are an inherently appealing media from an environmental point of view. In this
          work we explore the mutual solubility of a large range of commonly used ionic liquids with partially fluorinated alcohols (C7 to C12 in carbon chain
          length) or perfluoroheptane. The corresponding T-x diagrams at atmospheric pressure were built using cloud-point determinations and the results were



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          analysed taking into account the shifts in the immiscibility envelope as a function of i) alkyl side-chain length of the cation; ii) nature of the polar groups
          in the anion or cation; iii) length of the fluorinated compound and iv) comparison with systems involving normal (and shorter) alcohols. The results show
          different trends that can be interpreted on a molecular basis and open up the possibility of using fluorinated compounds to promote miscibility between
          water and bistriflamide-based ionic liquids.

          1190871: Molar refraction in a series of imidazolium- and phosphonium-based ionic liquids

          Ionic Liquids: From Knowledge to Application
          IEC 0 [1190871]: Molar refraction in a series of imidazolium- and phosphonium-based ionic liquids
          Mohammad Tariq, m.tariq@itqb.unl.pt1, José Nuno A. Canongia Lopes, jnlopes@ist.utl.pt2, and Luis PN. Rebelo, luis.rebelo@itqb.unl.pt 1. (1)
          Instituto de Tecnologia Quimica e Biologica, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Portugal, Av Republica, Apartado 127, 2781-901 Oeiras, Portugal, Fax:
          351-21-4411277, m.tariq@itqb.unl.pt, luis.rebelo@itqb.unl.pt, (2) Centro de Química Estrutural, Instituto Superior Técnico, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049 001
          Lisboa, Portugal, jnlopes@ist.utl.pt

          ACCEPTED
          Topic Selection: Ionic Liquids: From Knowledge to Application: Poster Session

          Invited: N
          Preferred Presentation Format: Poster
          Consider for Sci-Mix:
          Conforms to Bylaw 6: Y
          Last Modified: 2008-03-30

          Abstract
          In this work we have measured the density and refraction index along two families of commonly used ionic liquids (based on the imidazolium and
          phosphonium cations) at different temperatures. The two studied families of ionic liquids also shared in many cases the same type of anion. The
          systematic and self-consistent nature of the experiments (all data were gathered usimg the same experimental procedures / techniques / compounds)
          allowed us to calculate and discuss the molar refraction of the studied systems as a function the nature of the anion, alkyl side-chain of the cation, and
          temperature. The molar free volume (that can be estimated from the molar refraction) along a given series of systems correlates quite well with
          available gas solubility data for those same systems.

          1190885: Self-aggregation and fluorescence quenching of surfactant ionic liquids

          Ionic Liquids: From Knowledge to Application
          IEC 0 [1190885]: Self-aggregation and fluorescence quenching of surfactant ionic liquids
          Marjana Blesic, m.blesic@itqb.unl.pt1, António Lopes, a.lopes@itqb.unl.pt1, Eurico Melo, eurico@itqb.unl.pt1, Zeljko Petrovski, zeljko@ist.utl.pt2,
          Natalia Plechkova, n.plechkova@qub.ac.uk3, José Nuno A. Canongia Lopes, jnlopes@ist.utl.pt4, Kenneth R. Seddon, k.seddon@qub.ac.uk3, and Luis
          PN. Rebelo, luis.rebelo@itqb.unl.pt 1. (1) Instituto de Tecnologia Quimica e Biologica, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Portugal, Av Republica,
          Apartado 127, 2781-901 Oeiras, Portugal, Fax: 351-21-4411277, m.blesic@itqb.unl.pt, luis.rebelo@itqb.unl.pt, (2) Centro de Quimica Fisica Molecular,
          Instituto Superior Técnico, 1049 001 Lisboa, Portugal, (3) QUILL Research Centre, Queen's University Belfast, Belfast BT9 5AG, United Kingdom, (4)
          Centro de Química Estrutural, Instituto Superior Técnico, 1049 001 Lisboa, Portugal

          ACCEPTED
          Topic Selection: Ionic Liquids: From Knowledge to Application: Poster Session

          Invited: N
          Preferred Presentation Format: Poster
          Consider for Sci-Mix:
          Conforms to Bylaw 6: Y
          Last Modified: 2008-03-30

          Abstract
          The aggregation behaviour in aqueous solution of a number of ionic liquids was investigated at ambient conditions using three techniques:
          fluorescence, interfacial tension and 1H NMR spectroscopy. For the first time, the fluorescence quenching effect has been used for the determination of
          critical micelle concentrations (CMCs). Both the influence of the alkyl side chain length and the type of ring in the cation (head) on the CMC were
          investigated. A comparison of the self-aggregation behaviour of ionic liquids based on 1-alkyl-3-methylimidazolium and 1-alkyl-3-methylpyridinium
          cations is provided. It was observed that 3-methylpyridinium ionic liquids could be used as quenchers for some fluorescence probes (fluorophores). As a
          consequence, a simple and convenient method to probe early evidence of aggregate formation was established.

          1190924: The potential energy landscape of bis(fluorosulfonyl)amide

          Ionic Liquids: From Knowledge to Application
          IEC 0 [1190924]: The potential energy landscape of bis(fluorosulfonyl)amide
          Karina Shimizu, karina.shimizu@ist.utl.pt1, Yasuhiro Umebayashi, yumescc@mbox.nc.kyushu-u.ac.jp2, Kenta Fujii, e5636@cc.saga-u.ac.jp3, Agílio A.
          H. Pádua, agilio.padua@univ-bpclermont.fr4, and José Nuno A. Canongia Lopes, jnlopes@ist.utl.pt1. (1) Centro de Química Estrutural, Instituto
          Superior Técnico, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049 001 Lisboa, Portugal, karina.shimizu@ist.utl.pt, jnlopes@ist.utl.pt, (2) Department of Chemistry, Kyushu
          University, Fukuoka, Japan, Fukuoka 812-8581, Japan, (3) Department of Chemistry and Applied Chemistry, Faculty of Science and Engineering, Saga
          University, Japan, Saga 840-8502, Japan, (4) Laboratoire Thermodynamique et Interactions Moléculaires, Université Blaise Pascal - CNRS, 24, avenue
          des Landais, 63177 Aubière, France, Fax: +33473407185, agilio.padua@univ-bpclermont.fr

          ACCEPTED
          Topic Selection: Ionic Liquids: From Knowledge to Application: Poster Session

          Invited: N



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Abstract Listing                                                                          http://oasys.acs.org/acs/236nm/iec/sessions/print.cgi?username=28036&...


          Preferred Presentation Format: Oral
          Consider for Sci-Mix:
          Conforms to Bylaw 6: Y
          Last Modified: 2008-03-30

          Abstract
          The most prominent property of ionic liquids, viz. their low melting temperature as compared with common inorganic salts, is usually caused by the size,
          charge delocalization or asymmetry of the ions that compose them. The fact that those ions are generally non-rigid and can adopt different
          conformations is another key-feature that can partially explain the unusually low melting point of ionic liquids. One of the most conspicuous
          characteristics of bistriflamide-like anions is their ability to adopt different conformations by rotation of the two groups attached to the central nitrogen
          atom. This “flexibility” - as opposed to the “rigidity” of other more traditional anions - can explain the unique solvation properties and enhanced stability
          (and huge success) of bistriflamide-based ionic liquids. In this work we discuss the conformational landscape of the novel bis(fluorosulfonyl)amide
          anion, studied by ab initio, MD and Raman spectroscopy techniques.

          1190939: Phase equilibria in ionic liquid plus aromatic compound binary systems

          Ionic Liquids: From Knowledge to Application
          IEC 0 [1190939]: Phase equilibria in ionic liquid plus aromatic compound binary systems
          Marjana Blesic, m.blesic@itqb.unl.pt1, José Nuno A. Canongia Lopes, jnlopes@ist.utl.pt2, and Luis PN. Rebelo, luis.rebelo@itqb.unl.pt 1. (1)
          Instituto de Tecnologia Quimica e Biologica, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Portugal, Av Republica, Apartado 127, 2781-901 Oeiras, Portugal, Fax:
          351-21-4411277, m.blesic@itqb.unl.pt, luis.rebelo@itqb.unl.pt, (2) Centro de Química Estrutural, Instituto Superior Técnico, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049 001
          Lisboa, Portugal, jnlopes@ist.utl.pt

          ACCEPTED
          Topic Selection: Ionic Liquids: From Knowledge to Application: Poster Session

          Invited: N
          Preferred Presentation Format: Poster
          Consider for Sci-Mix:
          Conforms to Bylaw 6: Y
          Last Modified: 2008-03-30

          Abstract
          Benzene exhibits a peculiar type of fluid-phase behavior with bistriflamide-based ionic liquids: the corresponding phase diagrams show an area of
          immiscibility totally skewed towards benzene-rich compositions and complete miscibility up to 80% mole fraction of benzene in the ionic liquid. This fact
          suggested the existence in the liquid phase of clathrate-like structures and recent soild-liquid equilibrium studies unveiled the existence of an equimolar
          inclusion compound in the [emim][NTf2] + benzene binary mixture, with a congruent melting temperature above the melting temperatures of both
          benzene and the ionic liquid. In this work we have extended those studies by determining the solid-liquid and liquid-liquid phase diagrams of that same
          ionic liquid with totally or partially fluorinated benzene molecules.

          1191710: Specific interactions between salts and ionic liquids in aqueous salt solutions

          Ionic Liquids: From Knowledge to Application
          IEC 0 [1191710]: Specific interactions between salts and ionic liquids in aqueous salt solutions
          Luciana I. N. Tomé, l_tome@portugalmail.pt1, F. R. Varanda, fvaranda@ua.pt1, Mara G. Freire, maragfreire@ua.pt2, I. M. Marrucho,
          imarrucho@dq.ua.pt1, and J. A. P. Coutinho, jcoutinho@dq.ua.pt 1. (1) CICECO, Department of Chemistry, University of Aveiro, Campus
          Universitario de Santiago, Aveiro 3810-193, Portugal, Fax: 234-370084, l_tome@portugalmail.pt, jcoutinho@dq.ua.pt, (2) Instituto de Tecnologia
          Química e Biológica, ITQB2, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Oeiras 2780-901, Portugal

          ACCEPTED
          Topic Selection: Ionic Liquids: From Knowledge to Application: Poster Session

          Invited: N
          Preferred Presentation Format: PosterOnly
          Consider for Sci-Mix: Y
          Conforms to Bylaw 6: Y
          Last Modified: 2008-03-30

          Abstract
          Despite the importance of a detailed understanding of the phase behaviour of IL systems – crucial, for instance, for the optimization of the extraction
          and purification of metabolites in bioprocesses – data on the mutual solubilities between aqueous media containing inorganic salts and ILs are quite
          scarce, and the interpretation of the phenomena occurring in those systems is far from being well established. In this work, the effects of several
          sodium-based inorganic salts on the mutual solubilities between water and the [C4mim][C(CN)3] hydrophobic IL were investigated. The liquid-liquid
          phase equilibria of the ternary systems were experimentally obtained via turbidimetry and the dependence of the upper critical solution temperature with
          the nature and concentration of the anion was evaluated. Spectroscopic studies on these ternary systems have been carried providing further insight on
          the solvation of ionic liquids in aqueous saline solutions and on the molecular-level mechanisms by which both IL and inorganic salt ions operate.

          1193016: High-pressure Solubilities of Carbon Dioxide in [Cnmim][Tf2N] Ionic Liquids

          Ionic Liquids: From Knowledge to Application
          IEC 0 [1193016]: High-pressure Solubilities of Carbon Dioxide in [Cnmim][Tf2N] Ionic Liquids
          P. J. Carvalho, quijorge@ua.pt1, José J. B. Machado, jmachado@dq.ua.pt1, Jérôme Pauly, jerome.pauly@univ-pau.fr2, Jean-Luc Daridon, 2, I. M.
          Marrucho, imarrucho@dq.ua.pt1, and J. A. P. Coutinho, jcoutinho@dq.ua.pt 1. (1) CICECO, Department of Chemistry, University of Aveiro, Campus




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          Universitario de Santiago, Aveiro 3810-193, Portugal, Fax: 234-370084, quijorge@ua.pt, jcoutinho@dq.ua.pt, (2) Laboratoire des Fluides Complexes,
          Université de Pau et des Pays de L'Adour, Pau 64013, France

          ACCEPTED
          Topic Selection: Ionic Liquids: From Knowledge to Application: Poster Session

          Invited: N
          Preferred Presentation Format: PosterOnly
          Consider for Sci-Mix:
          Conforms to Bylaw 6: Y
          Last Modified: 2008-03-30

          Abstract
          Ionic liquids (ILs) are a novel class of organic salts commonly composed of relative large organic cations and organic or inorganic anions that cannot
          form an ordered crystal and thus remain liquid at or near room temperature. Unlike molecular liquids, the ionic nature of these compounds results in an
          unique combination of intrinsic physical properties such as high stability, large liquid temperature range, nonvolatility, high ionic conductivity,
          nonflammability and good solvation properties for both polar and nonpolar compounds. These outstanding characteristics, along with their easy
          manipulation, due to the possibility of interchangeability of thousands of cations and anions, gave ILs a status of “green” and “designer” solvents which
          hold promise a widespread applications, bridging industry and academia alike. The solubility of gases provide useful information on the fundamental
          knowledge for physical and chemical interactions between these compounds on the molecular level. Thus, to evaluate the applicability or even establish
          proposals of a specific IL for a target application the knowledge of phase behavior (solubility) is of most importance. In this work, solubility data of
          carbon dioxide (CO2) in the ionic liquids 1-alkyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide ([Cnmim][Tf2N], n=2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 10) are
          investigated at pressures up to 45 MPa and at temperatures between 288 K and 343 K. The ability of the Cubic-plus-Association equation of state (CPA
          EoS) for modeling the gas solubilities in ionic liquids, in the temperature and pressure range studied, is also evaluated. This equation of state combines
          the Soave-Redlich-Kwong (SRK) EoS for describing the physical interactions with the association contribution proposed by Wertheim, which explicitly
          accounts for hydrogen bonding (by several mixing rules and association schemes) and thus a better improvement towards other EoS can be
          accomplished.

          1193273: Separation of liquids with triethylsulphonium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)-imide ionic liquid

          Ionic Liquids: From Knowledge to Application
          IEC 0 [1193273]: Separation of liquids with triethylsulphonium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)-imide ionic
          liquid
          Andrzej Marciniak, a.marciniak@ch.pw.edu.pl
          and Urszula Domańska-Żelazna, , Physical Chemistry Division, Faculty of Chemistry, Warsaw University of Technology, Noakowskiego 3, 00-664
          Warsaw, Poland, a.marciniak@ch.pw.edu.pl

          ACCEPTED
          Topic Selection: Ionic Liquids: From Knowledge to Application: Poster Session

          Invited: N
          Preferred Presentation Format: PosterOnly
          Consider for Sci-Mix: N
          Conforms to Bylaw 6: Y
          Last Modified: 2008-03-30

          Abstract
          The activity coefficients at infinite dilution, γ13∞
          for different solutes: alkanes, alkenes, alkynes, cycloalkanes, aromatic hydrocarbons, alcohols, thiophene and water in the ionic liquid triethylsulphonium
          bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)-imide [Et3S][NTf2] were determined by gas-liquid chromatography at the temperatures from 298.15 K to 368.15 K. The partial
          molar excess enthalpies at infinite dilution values H1E,∞ were calculated from the experimental γ13∞ values obtained over the temperature range. The
          selectivities for the hexane/benzene, cyclohexane/benzene and other separation problems were calculated from the γ13∞ and compared to the literature
          values for other ionic liquids, NMP and sulfolane. This investigation is a continuation of our previous work on the measurement of γ13∞ using different
          ionic liquids. The results are compared to γ13∞ for different ionic liquids found in the literature in an attempt to understand the influence of the cation and
          anion on solute-solvent interactions.

          1193449: Pyridine and nicotine as solvents for ionic liquids with related cationic structure

          Ionic Liquids: From Knowledge to Application
          IEC 0 [1193449]: Pyridine and nicotine as solvents for ionic liquids with related cationic structure
          Zoran P Visak, visak@itqb.unl.pt1, Ana Rodriguez, aroguez@uvigo.es2, Ana Belem Pereiro, anab@uvigo.es2, José Nuno A. Canongia Lopes,
          jnlopes@ist.utl.pt3, and Luis Paulo N. Rebelo, luis.rebelo@itqb.unl.pt 4. (1) Technology Department/Molecular Thermodynamics, Instituto de
          Tecnologia Quimica e Biologica, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Portugal, Av Republica, Apartado 127, 2781-901 Oeiras, Portugal, Fax:
          +351-21-441-12-77, visak@itqb.unl.pt, (2) Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Vigo, 36310 Vigo, Spain, (3) Centro de Química
          Estrutural, Instituto Superior Técnico, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049 001 Lisboa, Portugal, jnlopes@ist.utl.pt, (4) Molecular Thermodynamics Group, Instituto
          de Tecnologia Química e Biológica (ITQB-UNL), Avenida da República (EAN), Oeiras 2781-901, Portugal, Fax: +351-21-4421161,
          luis.rebelo@itqb.unl.pt

          ACCEPTED
          Topic Selection: Ionic Liquids: From Knowledge to Application: Poster Session

          Invited: N
          Preferred Presentation Format: PosterOnly




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Abstract Listing                                                                            http://oasys.acs.org/acs/236nm/iec/sessions/print.cgi?username=28036&...


          Consider for Sci-Mix: N
          Conforms to Bylaw 6: Y
          Last Modified: 2008-03-30

          Abstract
          Solutions of ionic liquids and aromatic molecules exhibit unusual phase behaviour. Recently we have reported on the phase diagrams of nicotine
          solutions in ionic liquids and ionic liquid mixtures. In the current work we present solid-liquid and liquid-liquid phase demixing in solutions of pyridine or
          nicotine with the ionic liquids, 1-alkyl-3-methylpyridinium chlorides, [Cnmpyr]Cl (n = 4,6,10,16), structurally related to these aromatic molecules. The
          solubility of [Cnmpyr]Cl increases as the cationic alkyl chain decreases from n = 16 to n = 6 (in the case of pyridine) and from n =16 to n = 10 (in the
          case of nicotine) - however, in both cases this trend is turned round if the chain continues to shorten. For all the studied solutions pyridine is a better
          solvent compared to nicotine. In the case of nicotine the large aliphatic N-methyl pyrrolidine residue diminishes its solvent abilities towards the studied
          ionic liquids.

          1194201: Liquid-liquid electrochemisty of a new class of chiral hydrophobic room temperature ionic liquids

          Ionic Liquids: From Knowledge to Application
          IEC 0 [1194201]: Liquid-liquid electrochemisty of a new class of chiral hydrophobic room temperature
          ionic liquids
          Julie B. Rollins, rollins@chem.utah.edu
          and John C. Conboy, conboy@chem.utah.edu, Department of Chemistry, University of Utah, 315 S. 1400 E. RM 2020, Salt Lake City, UT 84112, Fax:
          801-587-9919, rollins@chem.utah.edu

          ACCEPTED
          Topic Selection: Ionic Liquids: From Knowledge to Application: Poster Session

          Invited: N
          Preferred Presentation Format: OralOnly
          Consider for Sci-Mix: N
          Conforms to Bylaw 6: Y
          Last Modified: 2008-03-30

          Abstract
          Room temperature ionic liquids (RTILs) have received much attention in the area of separations. More specifically, hydrophobic RTILs have shown the
          potential to replace volatile organic solvents in liquid-liquid separations. Chiral RTILs have been used in other separation techniques, such as gas
          chromatography, to separate enantiomers. Therefore, a chiral hydrophobic RTIL may show chiral selectivity in liquid-liquid extractions. A series of novel
          chiral hydrophobic room temperature ionic liquids (RTILs) based on an alpha-methylbenzylamine cation and bis(perfluoroalkylsulfonyl)imide anion have
          been synthesized and their physical properties: density, viscosity, conductivity, water content, and electrochemical stability have been investigated.
          These chiral RTILs are sufficiently hydrophobic to produce a polarizable window at the interface between two immiscible electrolyte solutions (ITIES).
          This is the first time that a chiral ITIES has been reported. This new class of chiral hydrophobic RTILs have the potential to enable enantiomeric
          selectivity across the ITIES. These studies open up new avenues to study transfer thermodynamics of chiral molecules across an organic/aqueous
          interface that have not been accessible in the past.

          1195709: Hydrogen halide-equivalent ionic liquids: Application in the ring opening of epoxides

          Ionic Liquids: From Knowledge to Application
          IEC 0 [1195709]: Hydrogen halide-equivalent ionic liquids: Application in the ring opening of epoxides
          Jose Salazar, jsalazar@usb.ve, Jose Manuel Rodriguez, , and Simon E. Lopez, slopez@usb.ve, Departamento de Quimica, Universidad Simon
          Bolivar, Sartenejas Baruta, Caracas, Venezuela, Fax: 58 212 9063961, jsalazar@usb.ve

          ACCEPTED
          Topic Selection: Ionic Liquids: From Knowledge to Application: Poster Session

          Invited: N
          Comments to Organizer: I will register as a member at the meeting
          Preferred Presentation Format: PosterOnly
          Consider for Sci-Mix: Y
          Conforms to Bylaw 6: Y
          Last Modified: 2008-03-30

          Abstract
          A highly regioselective and efficient method for the synthesis of halohydrins (Cl,Br and I) by direct ring opening of epoxides ( 1,2
          epoxy-3-aryloxy-propanes and aryloxiranes) using an equivalente mixture of N-butylpyridinium halides (Cl,Br and I) and trifluoroacetic acid is described.
          This mixture acts as a solvent /reagent ionic liquid. The reactions are very fast , convenient, with rather high yields (90-95%) and are carried out at
          ambient temperatures with no side products other than N-butylpyridinium trifluoroacetate, which can be recovered after completion and reusable as a
          new potential ionic liquid. Other additional applications for these novel ionic liquid reagents are also described.

          1195818: Readily prepared and cost effective ionic liquids: Few steps more toward the industrial application of CO2
          separation using ionic liquids

          Ionic Liquids: From Knowledge to Application
          IEC 0 [1195818]: Readily prepared and cost effective ionic liquids: Few steps more toward the industrial
          application of CO2 separation using ionic liquids
          Hoon Sik Kim, khs2004@khu.ac.kr, Jelliarko Palgunadi, jelliarko@googlemail.com, and Je Eun Kang, -tomodazzi-@hanmail.net, Department of
          Chemistry, Kyung Hee University, 1-Hoegi-dong, Dongdaemun-gu, 130-701, Seoul, South Korea, Fax: 082-02-9663701, khs2004@khu.ac.kr,



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Abstract Listing                                                                          http://oasys.acs.org/acs/236nm/iec/sessions/print.cgi?username=28036&...


          jelliarko@googlemail.com

          ACCEPTED
          Topic Selection: Ionic Liquids: From Knowledge to Application: Poster Session

          Invited: N
          Preferred Presentation Format: PosterOnly
          Consider for Sci-Mix: Y
          Conforms to Bylaw 6: Y
          Last Modified: 2008-03-30

          Abstract
          Ionic liquids (ILs) which are salts at room temperature have open future applications in many fields. The finding of remarkable solubility of CO2 in ILs
          has led many research groups to study this type of salts as potential absorbents in the CO2 separation process. Melting point and viscosity are two
          major factors playing crucial role in the gas absorption employing ILs. Unfortunately, among huge number of possible ILs can be synthesized, only
          limited numbers of ILs are liquid below room temperature. Until recently, room temperature ILs from imidazolium-based ILs containing such as, PF6-,
          BF4-, Tf2N-, and other fluorinated anions have received much attention and have been studied comprehensively since they have very low melting
          points and show high CO2 absorption ability. For commercial applications, however, those salts seem to be not attractive due to multi steps preparation,
          high cost and negative impact to the environment. Hence, we explored some readily prepared, simple, and cost effective room temperature ILs which
          may be potential for the CO2 separation industrially. The existing interactions between ILs and CO2 are tried to explain qualitatively employing quantum
          chemical calculation.

          1196139: Atomistic modeling of densities and solubility parameters of ionic liquids

          Ionic Liquids: From Knowledge to Application
          IEC 0 [1196139]: Atomistic modeling of densities and solubility parameters of ionic liquids
          Bela Derecskei, bela.derecskei@millenniumchem.com
          and Agnes Derecskei-Kovacs, agnes.derecskei-kovacs@millenniumchem.com, Research Center Baltimore, Millennium Chemicals Inc, 6752 Bay
          Meadow Dr, Glen Burnie, MD 21060, bela.derecskei@millenniumchem.com

          ACCEPTED
          Topic Selection: Ionic Liquids: From Knowledge to Application: Poster Session

          Invited: N
          Preferred Presentation Format: Poster
          Consider for Sci-Mix: Y
          Conforms to Bylaw 6: Y
          Last Modified: 2008-03-30

          Abstract
          Due to the enormous variety of ionic liquids potentially available, the design of task-specific ionic liquids is gaining importance. Traditional solvents are
          often evaluated based on their solubility parameters to assess their compatibility with solutes. The analogous parameter values for ionic liquids are also
          useful, though their available is often limited. Consequently, solvent design and pre-screening of candidates by molecular modeling is an attractive
          alternative. In this work, the density and two component solubility parameter of a variety of ionic liquids were investigated using atomistic level molecular
          modeling. The ionic liquids chosen consisted of ethyl, butyl, and hexyl imidazolium cations in conjunction with the Cl-, [(CN)2N] -, [CF3CO2]- and [Tf2N]-
          anions. It was found that the density could be calculated with satisfactory accuracy with the exception of systems containing the Cl anion and that both
          ions in the ionic liquid had a strong impact on the solubility parameter.

          1196619: Decomposition of the ionic liquid 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolim ethylsulfate under ambient conditions

          Ionic Liquids: From Knowledge to Application
          IEC 0 [1196619]: Decomposition of the ionic liquid 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolim ethylsulfate under
          ambient conditions
          Lindsay E. Ficke, lficke@nd.edu
          and Joan F. Brennecke, jfb@nd.edu, Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of Notre Dame, 182 Fitzpatrick Hall, Notre
          Dame, IN 46556, lficke@nd.edu

          ACCEPTED
          Topic Selection: Ionic Liquids: From Knowledge to Application: Poster Session

          Invited: N
          Preferred Presentation Format: Poster
          Consider for Sci-Mix: N
          Conforms to Bylaw 6: Y
          Last Modified: 2008-03-30

          Abstract
          The ionic liquid 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium ethylsulfate ([emim][EtSO4]) was found to decompose over time by reacting with water to form
          1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium hydrogen sulfate ([emim][HSO4]) and ethanol under ambient conditions. This was discovered when checking the batch to
          batch consistency for heat of mixing measurements. Three batches were compared: two commercial samples purchased from Solvent Innovations in
          2004 and 2007, and a batch made in-house in 2006. The decomposition products were confirmed by mass spectrometry. Quantitatively, nuclear
          magnetic spectroscopy (NMR) revealed that the 2004 and 2006 batches were 22 % and 26 % decomposed, respectively. The decomposition of the
          2007 batch was under the detection limit of the instrument (< 1 % decomposed). Due to the composition and property changes with time, [emim][EtSO4]
          will not be a good candidate for many potential applications.




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          1196845: Kinetic Study of S-Alkylation of 2-Mercaptobenzimidazole by Allyl Bromide in the Presence of Potassium
          Hydroxide

          Ionic Liquids: From Knowledge to Application
          IEC 0 [1196845]: Kinetic Study of S-Alkylation of 2-Mercaptobenzimidazole by Allyl Bromide in the
          Presence of Potassium Hydroxide
          Maw-Ling Wang, chmmlw@sunrise.hk.edu.tw, Department of Environmental Engineering, Hungkuang University, No. 34, Chung-Che Road, Shalu,
          Taichung County 43302, Taiwan, Fax: +886-4-2652-9226, chmmlw@sunrise.hk.edu.tw, and Yen-Chun Liu, blliu@mail.wfc.edu.tw, Department of
          Chemical Engineering, Wu-Feng Institute of Technology, Ming-Hsiung, Chiayi County 62513, Taiwan

          ACCEPTED
          Topic Selection: Ionic Liquids: From Knowledge to Application: Poster Session

          Invited: N
          Preferred Presentation Format: Poster
          Consider for Sci-Mix: Y
          Conforms to Bylaw 6: Y
          Last Modified: 2008-03-30

          Abstract
          The S-alkylation (substitution on sulfur atom) of 2-mercaptobenzimidazole (MBI) by ally bromide (RBr) was successfully carried out in an aqueous
          solution of KOH/organic solvent two-phase medium. The reaction, which may take place either in the organic phase or on the interface, is greatly
          enhanced in the presence of KOH without the aid of quaternary salts as the catalyst to promote the reaction. No product was obtained from N-alkylation
          (substitution on nitrogen atom) during or after the reaction period by using a limited amount of ally bromide (RBr) relative to that of MBI. Based on the
          experimental evidence, the kinetic behaviors and the characteristics of the reaction are sufficiently described by the pseudo-first order rate law. The
          effects of the reaction conditions, including the agitation speed, the amount of KOH, volume of water, volume of dichloromethane, amount of allyl
          bromide, amount of 2-mercaptobenzimidazole, organic solvents and temperature on the conversion of allyl bromide and the apparent rate constants
          (kapp) were investigated in detailed. Peculiar result is obtained in studying the effect of the volume of water on the conversion (or the reaction rate) in
          this work. Rational explanations are provided for the observed phenomena from experimental results.

          1197196: Light gas separation with gelled room-temperature ionic liquid supported membranes

          Ionic Liquids: From Knowledge to Application
          IEC 0 [1197196]: Light gas separation with gelled room-temperature ionic liquid supported membranes
          Bret A Voss, bret.voss@colorado.edu, Department of Biological and Chemical Engineering, University of Colorado, Boulder, 424 UCB, Boulder, CO
          80309-0424, bret.voss@colorado.edu, Jason E. Bara, jason.bara@colorado.edu, Department of Chemical & Biological Engineering, University of
          Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309-0424, Douglas L. Gin, gin@spot.colorado.edu, Department of Chemical & Biological Engineering, and Department of
          Chemistry & Biochemistry, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309, and Richard D. Noble, nobler@colorado.edu, Department of Chemical and
          Biological Engineering, University of Colorado at Boulder, Boulder, CO 80309-0424

          ACCEPTED
          Topic Selection: Ionic Liquids: From Knowledge to Application: Poster Session

          Invited: Y
          Inviting Chair: Dr. Mark B. Shiflett, mark.b.shiflett@usa.dupont.com
          Preferred Presentation Format:
          Consider for Sci-Mix: Y
          Conforms to Bylaw 6: Y
          Last Modified: 2008-03-30

          Abstract
          Supported ionic liquid membranes (SILMs) have shown a higher permeability and selectivity for CO2 than current polymer membranes, but they have
          poor mechanical stability, and the ionic liquid (IL) will leach out if high pressures are applied. Low molecular-weight organic gelators (LMOGs) can form
          mechanically stable, non-covalent networks that gel many organic solvents. In this study, LMOG-gelled 1-hexyl-3-methylimidazolium
          bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide (hmim/Tf2N) was examined as new type of SILM with better mechanical properties. The CO2 permeability of the
          LMOG-gelled hmim/Tf2N membrane was determined to be similar to the neat RTIL. However, the gel can retain its shape when cut, and is mechanically
          robust enough to support objects placed on top of it. It is believed that the gas solubility and transport properties of the gel and the neat hmim/Tf2N are
          similar because the gel is 98.5% IL. Initial results show that LMOGs could gel any IL to increase mechanical stability without reducing gas transport
          properties.

          1197600: Transport properties of ionic liquids

          Ionic Liquids: From Knowledge to Application
          IEC 0 [1197600]: Transport properties of ionic liquids
          Surya Sekhar Moganty, mogantys@clarkson.edu1, Ruth E. Baltus, baltus@clarkson.edu1, Pubudu Goonetillake, 2, and Dipankar Roy, 2. (1)
          Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Clarkson University, Potsdam, NY 13699, mogantys@clarkson.edu, (2) Department of Physics,
          Clarkson University, Potsdam, NY 13699

          ACCEPTED
          Topic Selection: Ionic Liquids: From Knowledge to Application: Poster Session

          Invited: N
          Preferred Presentation Format: OralOnly
          Consider for Sci-Mix: N




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Abstract Listing                                                                             http://oasys.acs.org/acs/236nm/iec/sessions/print.cgi?username=28036&...


          Conforms to Bylaw 6: Y
          Last Modified: 2008-03-30

          Abstract
          In this presentation, results from fundamental studies of the transport characteristics of carbon dioxide and propylene gases in room temperature ionic
          liquids (RTILs) are reported. Carbon dioxide was selected because it is a commonly studied gas by many ionic liquid researchers. Propylene was
          selected because it has a similar molecular weight as CO2 but very different chemistry and structure. Carbon dioxide and propylene gas solubilities and
          diffusivities were measured using a pressure transient technique [1] in different ionic liquids at different temperatures. The relative roles played by the
          cation and anion on the solubilities of these gases will be discussed. The entropies and enthalpies of absorption will also be reported and discussed.
          Diffusion coefficient results are used to develop a general correlation relating gas diffusivity to ionic liquid properties and solute properties. Finally, cyclic
          voltammetry and impedance spectroscopy were used to measure the diffusion coefficients of ferrocene, ethylferrocene, and 1-1'-dimethylferrocene in a
          variety of ionic liquids at different concentrations and temperatures. The role of ferrocene side groups and the properties of ionic liquids on diffusivities
          will be discussed.

          References:

          1. Ying Hou and Ruth Baltus, Ind .Eng. Chem. Res, 46, 8166, 2007.

          1197837: Novel luminescent and magnetic ionic crystals

          Ionic Liquids: From Knowledge to Application
          IEC 0 [1197837]: Novel luminescent and magnetic ionic crystals
          Anja V Mudring, anja.mudring@rub.de, Anorganische Chemie I - Festkoerperchemie und Materialien, Ruhr University Bochum, NCDF 04/398,
          Bochum 44780, Germany, anja.mudring@rub.de

          ACCEPTED
          Topic Selection: Ionic Liquids: From Knowledge to Application: Poster Session

          Invited: N
          Preferred Presentation Format: Oral
          Consider for Sci-Mix: Y
          Conforms to Bylaw 6: Y
          Last Modified: 2008-03-30

          Abstract
          Metal-containing ionic liquids are auspicious new materials that can favourably combine the properties of ionic liquids with additional magnetic,
          photophysical/optical or catalytic properties that origin from the metal. The metal gets incorporated in the IL in the form of a complex anion. We report
          on an unprecedented series of low melting lanthanide containing ionic liquids with excellent photophysical properties (lifetime, color purity). Using
          lanthanides with high effective magnetic moments yields such as Dy yields ionic liquids that can be easily manipulated by external magnetic fields and
          are superior to the known transition metal ionic liquids. Through modification of the cation ionic liquids that combine liquid crystalline properties with
          luminenscence and magnetism can be obtained offering the possibility of magnetic phase switching. Compounds luminescing in the three basic colors
          blue, red and green that could be of use in lightening devices will be presented.

          1198486: Synthesis and properties of ionic liquids derived from N-methyl-D-glucamine

          Ionic Liquids: From Knowledge to Application
          IEC 0 [1198486]: Synthesis and properties of ionic liquids derived from N-methyl-D-glucamine
          Guillaume Chalumot, guillaume.chalumot@laposte.net
          and Jared L Anderson, Jared.Anderson@UToledo.edu, Department of Chemistry, The University of Toledo, 2801 W. Bancroft Street; MS 602, Toledo,
          OH 43606, guillaume.chalumot@laposte.net

          ACCEPTED
          Topic Selection: Ionic Liquids: From Knowledge to Application: Poster Session

          Invited: N
          Preferred Presentation Format: PosterOnly
          Consider for Sci-Mix: Y
          Conforms to Bylaw 6: Y
          Last Modified: 2008-03-30

          Abstract
          A new class of ionic liquids and room temperature ionic liquids based on N-methyl-D-glucamine have been synthesized and characterized. This class of
          compounds is unique due to the complexing ability of the parent amine towards borate ion and boric acid. The conversion the molecule's secondary
          amine to a quaternary amine by nucleophilic substitution using various alkyl halides leads to products that exhibit unique physico-chemical properties.

          1198625: Gas sorption properties of ionic liquids

          Ionic Liquids: From Knowledge to Application
          IEC 0 [1198625]: Gas sorption properties of ionic liquids
          Qichao Zhao, zqichao@UTNet.UToledo.edu 1, Pei Li, pli8@UTNet.UToledo.edu2, Maria R. Coleman, macolema@eng.utoledo.edu2, and Jared L
          Anderson, Jared.Anderson@UToledo.edu1. (1) Department of Chemistry, The University of Toledo, 2801 W. Bancroft Street; MS 602, Toledo, OH
          43606, zqichao@UTNet.UToledo.edu, (2) Department of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, University of Toledo, Toledo, OH 43606

          ACCEPTED
          Topic Selection: Ionic Liquids: From Knowledge to Application: Poster Session



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           Invited: N
           Preferred Presentation Format: PosterOnly
           Consider for Sci-Mix: Y
           Conforms to Bylaw 6: Y
           Last Modified: 2008-03-30

           Abstract
           Room temperature ionic liquids (RTILs) are salts that are liquid at room temperature and possess numerous advantages that make them widely
           applicable in many fields of science. One of the unique properties inherent to RTILs is that certain classes of imidazolium-based ionic liquids have
           remarkable solubility of CO2. The current need for carbon capturing technology and the need for high throughput, robust membranes for sequestering
           H2 during coal gasification further underscore the need for a fundamental understanding of how the RTIL structure can be tailored for desired gas
           sorption behavior. RTIL monomers were successfully synthesized and fully characterized by 1H-NMR and ESI-MS. Gas sorption properties of these
           monomers will be presented. By combining the high CO2 solubility of the designed RTIL monomers within a polyimide or polydimethylsiloxane polymer
           backbone, new classes of polymer membranes will be synthesized.

           1198627: Imidazolium-based zwitterionic compounds bearing a fluorinated alkyl group and a sulfonate group for proton
           exchange membrane

           Ionic Liquids: From Knowledge to Application
           IEC 0 [1198627]: Imidazolium-based zwitterionic compounds bearing a fluorinated alkyl group and a
           sulfonate group for proton exchange membrane
           Heehwan Kim, ak0331@hanmail.net1, Je Seung Lee, leejs70@khu.ac.kr2, Minserk Cheong, mcheong@khu.ac.kr2, and Hoon Sik Kim,
           khs2004@khu.ac.kr2. (1) Department of Chemistry, KyungHee University, 1, Hoegi-Dong, Dongdaemoon-gu, Seoul, South Korea,
           ak0331@hanmail.net, (2) Department of Chemistry, Kyung Hee University, Seoul 130-701, South Korea

           ACCEPTED
           Topic Selection: Ionic Liquids: From Knowledge to Application: Poster Session

           Invited: N
           Preferred Presentation Format: PosterOnly
           Consider for Sci-Mix: N
           Conforms to Bylaw 6: Y
           Last Modified: 2008-03-30

           Abstract
           Introduction of a fluorinated alkyl group on the imidazolium ring was found to significantly improve the thermal stability and the conductivity of the
           zwitterionic compounds. Imidazolium-based zwitterionic compounds bearing a fluorinated alkyl group and a sulfonate group were synthesized and
           tested for there conductivities for use as proton exchange membranes of fuel cell.

           1198640: Development of ionic liquid/polyimide copolymers for CO2/H2 membranes

           Ionic Liquids: From Knowledge to Application
           IEC 0 [1198640]: Development of ionic liquid/polyimide copolymers for CO2/H2 membranes
           Pei Li, pli8@UTNet.UToledo.edu1, Qichao Zhao, zqichao@UTNet.UToledo.edu2, Jared L Anderson, Jared.Anderson@UToledo.edu2, and Maria R.
           Coleman, macolema@eng.utoledo.edu1. (1) Department of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, University of Toledo, 3064 Nitschke, Toledo, OH
           43606, pli8@UTNet.UToledo.edu, (2) Department of Chemistry, The University of Toledo, Toledo, OH 43606

           ACCEPTED
           Topic Selection: Ionic Liquids: From Knowledge to Application: Poster Session

           Invited: N
           Preferred Presentation Format: PosterOnly
           Consider for Sci-Mix: Y
           Conforms to Bylaw 6: Y
           Last Modified: 2008-03-30

           Abstract
           While coal gasification is a promising method of hydrogen production because of abundant coal reserves and low price, an efficient method to purify the
           hydrogen steam is an important step for industrial application. Polymeric membrane separation is an economical process for gas purification but
           typically focus on diffusion based separations that are not appropriate for selectively permeating CO2 relative to H2 and CO. New membrane materials
           have been designed using ionic liquid monomers within a polyimide backbone. The purpose of the ionic liquid monomers is to enhance the solubility of
           CO2 to produce reverse selective membranes to recover sequestration ready carbon dioxide. Random copolymers consisting of an aromatic
           dianhydride and diamine with amine functionalized ionic liquid monomers has been successfully synthesized and characterized. The pure gas transport
           properties over a range of temperatures were measured along with gas sorption in the IL monomers for comparison. The glass transition temperature,
           FTIR spectroscopy, molecular weight and mechanical properties of the polyimide copolymers will also be presented.

           1198969: Liquid Ion Pairs and Dimeric Anions: Variations on Pharmaceutical Ionic liquids

           Ionic Liquids: From Knowledge to Application
           IEC 0 [1198969]: Liquid Ion Pairs and Dimeric Anions: Variations on Pharmaceutical Ionic liquids
           Douglas R MacFarlane, d.macfarlane@sci.monash.edu.au1, Janet L. Scott, janet.scott@sci.monash.edu.au1, Kevin Fraser,
           kevin.fraser@sci.monash.edu.au1, Maria Forsyth, 2, Ekaterina I. Izgorodina, Katya.Izgorodina@sci.monash.edu.au1, and katarina Johansson,



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           katarina.johansson@sci.monash.edu.au1. (1) School of Chemistry, Monash University, Wellington Road, Clayton VIC 3800, Australia, Fax: 613 9905
           4597, d.macfarlane@sci.monash.edu.au, (2) Department of Materials Engineering and ARC Centre for Electromaterials Science, Monash University,
           Clayton VIC 3800, Australia

           ACCEPTED
           Topic Selection: Ionic Liquids: From Knowledge to Application: Poster Session

           Invited: N
           Preferred Presentation Format: OralOnly
           Consider for Sci-Mix:
           Special Equipment Needs: standard
           Conforms to Bylaw 6: Y
           Last Modified: 2008-03-30

           Abstract
           Pharmaceutical Ionic Liquids are liquid salts of pharmaceutically active ions. In preparing a range of such materials we have found that (i) some
           examples are better described as liquid ion pairs, than ionic liquids and (ii) protic salts formed from acid-base mixtures are, in some cases, more ionic
           when the mole ratio of acid to base is 2:1 than at 1:1. These variations on the basic ionic liquid concept and their consequences are discussed.

           1199119: Caffeine ionic liquids – dream or reality?

           Ionic Liquids: From Knowledge to Application
           IEC 0 [1199119]: Caffeine ionic liquids – dream or reality?
           Gabriela Gurau, g.gurau@qub.ac.uk, QUILL, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, The Queen's University of Belfast, Stranmillis Road,
           Belfast, United Kingdom, g.gurau@qub.ac.uk, Kristin Rogers, , Department of Chemistry, Center for Green Manufacturing, and Alabama Institute of
           Manufacturing Excellence, The University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487, and Robin D. Rogers, rdrogers@bama.ua.edu, Department of Chemistry
           and Center for Green Manufacturing / School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, The University of Alabama,Tuscaloosa / The Queen's University
           of Belfast, Belfast, Northern Ireland BT9 5AG, United Kingdom

           ACCEPTED
           Topic Selection: Ionic Liquids: From Knowledge to Application: Poster Session

           Invited: N
           Preferred Presentation Format: PosterOnly
           Consider for Sci-Mix: Y
           Conforms to Bylaw 6: Y
           Last Modified: 2008-03-30

           Abstract
           Even after more than a century of investigation, caffeine still has the ability to surprise, especially when it comes to its biological properties. Despite the
           huge amount of research focused on caffeine over the years, the number of salts reported in the literature is actually very small. Given the incredible
           range of counterions available using an ionic liquid approach, we sought to develop new routes to caffeine-based salts based on pairing caffeinium with
           ionic liquid-forming anions. In this presentation, the synthetic approaches, resulting properties, and potential applications of these salts will be
           discussed.

           1199632: Solubility of gases in [hmim][Tf2N] and [hmim][eFAP]

           Ionic Liquids: From Knowledge to Application
           IEC 0 [1199632]: Solubility of gases in [hmim][Tf2N] and [hmim][eFAP]
           Zulema K. Lopez-castillo, Zulema.K.Lopez-Castillo.1@nd.edu, Devan E. Kestel, dkestel@nd.edu, and Joan F. Brennecke, jfb@nd.edu, Department
           of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556, Fax: 574-631-8366, Zulema.K.Lopez-Castillo.1@nd.edu

           ACCEPTED
           Topic Selection: Ionic Liquids: From Knowledge to Application: Poster Session

           Invited: N
           Preferred Presentation Format: Poster
           Consider for Sci-Mix: N
           Conforms to Bylaw 6: Y
           Last Modified: 2008-03-30

           Abstract
           The solubility of pure gases were measured in the ionic liquids 1-n-hexyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluomethylsulfonyl)imide ([hmim][Tf2N]) and
           1-hexyl-3-methylimidazolium tris(pentafluoroethyl)trifluoro phosphate ([hmim][eFAP]) using a magnetic suspension balance and an intelligent
           gravimetric analyzer at temperatures from 25 up to 80 °C and pressures up to 100 bar. Gases investigated include CO2, N2, O2, H2, Ar, CH4 and SO2.
           We are also investigating the solubility of gas mixtures in these two ionic liquids. Results indicate that physical absorption is predominant in all cases.
           Additionally, the density of [hmim][Tf2N]/CO2 mixtures have been measured at temperatures up to 120 °C and pressures up to 20 bar. Results show
           that the density of [hmim][Tf2N]/CO2 decreases with temperature and pressure. Water contents were in the range of 15 to 130 ppm.

           1199932: Pure gas solubilities and viscosities of task-specific ionic liquids

           Ionic Liquids: From Knowledge to Application
           IEC 0 [1199932]: Pure gas solubilities and viscosities of task-specific ionic liquids
           Devan E Kestel, dkestel@nd.edu, Daniel F Rahill, drahill@nd.edu, Juan C. de la Fuente, jdelafue@nd.edu, and Joan F. Brennecke, jfb@nd.edu,
           Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of Notre Dame, 182 Fitzpatrick Hall, Notre Dame, IN 46556, dkestel@nd.edu



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           ACCEPTED
           Topic Selection: Ionic Liquids: From Knowledge to Application: Poster Session

           Invited: N
           Preferred Presentation Format: Poster
           Consider for Sci-Mix: N
           Conforms to Bylaw 6: Y
           Last Modified: 2008-03-30

           Abstract
           Task-specific ionic liquids (TSILs) are ionic liquids containing an appended functional group which chemically complexes with a solute molecule of
           interest. The TSILs in this study contain an appended amine group which chemically reacts with carbon dioxide. The chemical complexation of the TSIL
           with carbon dioxide provides the potential for further carbon dioxide storage capacity than is possible in ionic liquids which only physically absorb carbon
           dioxide. It has been visually observed previously that there is a sharp increase in viscosity of the TSIL upon chemical complexation with carbon dioxide.
           Experimentally determined carbon dioxide solubility isotherms are reported for various TSILs at room temperature. In addition, experimentally
           determined viscosities are reported for these TSILs.

           1200244: Atomistic simulation of the thermodynamic properties of organic hydrazine-derivatives and
           hydrazinium-based energetic salts and ionic liquids

           Ionic Liquids: From Knowledge to Application
           IEC 0 [1200244]: Atomistic simulation of the thermodynamic properties of organic hydrazine-derivatives
           and hydrazinium-based energetic salts and ionic liquids
           Keith E. Gutowski, kgutowski@nd.edu, Burcu Gurkan, beksiogl@nd.edu, Saivenkataraman Jayaraman, sjayaram@nd.edu, and Edward J. Maginn,
           ed@nd.edu, Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of Notre Dame, 182 Fitzpatrick Hall, Notre Dame, IN 46556,
           kgutowski@nd.edu

           ACCEPTED
           Topic Selection: Ionic Liquids: From Knowledge to Application: Poster Session

           Invited: N
           Preferred Presentation Format: Poster
           Consider for Sci-Mix: Y
           Conforms to Bylaw 6: Y
           Last Modified: 2008-03-30

           Abstract
           Low melting salts and ionic liquids (ILs) have been considered as alternatives to molecular energetic compounds and propellants, with other favorable
           properties including high densities, negligible vapor pressures, and high thermal stabilities. Salts and ILs made from hydrazine and its derivatives are
           particularly desirable as hydrazine-based chemistry has a long history within the aerospace field. Simulations are attractive alternatives to experiments
           involving hydrazines due to intrinsic hazards. We have developed transferable classical forcefield (FF) parameters for the simulation of hydrazine
           (N2H4) and organic derivatives, including monomethylhydrazine (MMH), unsymmetrical dimethylhydrazi e (UDMH), ethylhydrazine (MEH), and
                                                                                                                      n
           2-hydroxyethylhydrazine (2-HEH). The FF was extended to study hydrazinium-based salts, inclu        ding the [N2H5][NO3], [MMH][NO3], and [UDMH][NO3]
           series. The FF was validated against experimental data, including liquid and crystal densities, heats of vaporization, vapor-liquid equilibria, heat
           capacities, and melting points. Notably, predictions for the low-melting, energetic IL, 2-hydroxyethylhydrazinium nitrate [2-HEH][NO3], an alternative,
           safer candidate to current propellants, were made.

           1200280: Solvation of a small peptide molecule in room-temperature ionic liquids

           Ionic Liquids: From Knowledge to Application
           IEC 0 [1200280]: Solvation of a small peptide molecule in room-temperature ionic liquids
           Youngseon Shim, yshim@andrew.cmu.edu
           and Hyung J. Kim, hjkim@cmu.edu, Department of Chemistry, Carnegie Mellon University, 4400 Fifth Ave, Pittsburgh, PA 15213,
           yshim@andrew.cmu.edu

           ACCEPTED
           Topic Selection: Ionic Liquids: From Knowledge to Application: Poster Session

           Invited: N
           Preferred Presentation Format: Poster
           Consider for Sci-Mix: N
           Conforms to Bylaw 6: Y
           Last Modified: 2008-03-30

           Abstract
           In this presentation, we discuss structural properties of a small peptide molecule with 6 residues modelled after metal-binding siderochrome immersed
           in room-temperature ionic liquids (RTILs). We considered RTILs based on 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium cations via molecular dynamics simulations in a
           flexible, all-atom description. We studied two anionic species, hexafluorophosphate and chloride, to understand how the peptide stabilization is
           influenced by anion properties such as hydrophobicity/hydrophilicity or hydrogen bonding capa   bility. For additional insight, we also examined solvation in
           two normal solvents, water and dimethylsulfoxide. It is found that chloride anion exerts a strong influence on peptide structure in solution through
           significant modulation of hydrogen bonding. Also Coulombic interactions between the solute and RTILs play an important role. We will also consider
           briefly transport properties of the peptide solute in RTILs.

           1200686: Considering partial ionic dissociation with electrolytic excess Gibbs energy models in an asymmetric



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           framework

           Ionic Liquids: From Knowledge to Application
           IEC 0 [1200686]: Considering partial ionic dissociation with electrolytic excess Gibbs energy models in
           an asymmetric framework
           Luke D. Simoni, Luke.D.Simoni.1@nd.edu, Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering, University of Notre Dame, 182 Fitzpatrick Hall, Notre Dame, IN
           46556, Fax: 574-631-8366, Luke.D.Simoni.1@nd.edu, Alexander A. Augugliaro, aaugugli@nd.edu, Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University
           of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556, Joan F. Brennecke, jfb@nd.edu, Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of Notre
           Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556, and Mark A. Stadtherr, markst@nd.edu, Department of Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering, University of Notre Dame,
           Notre Dame, IN 46556

           ACCEPTED
           Topic Selection: Ionic Liquids: From Knowledge to Application: Poster Session

           Invited: N
           Preferred Presentation Format: Poster
           Consider for Sci-Mix:
           Conforms to Bylaw 6: Y
           Last Modified: 2008-03-30

           Abstract
           Ionic liquids (ILs), like all electrolytes, ionize to varying degrees in different phases, and adequate physical description of their ionic state is important to
           modeling their liquid-liquid equilibrium (LLE) behavior. In this work, we show that LLE predictions are more accurate when the degree of electrolytic
           dissociation is considered. We also use a simple, theoretical method for calculating the degree of IL dissociation using only conductivity and viscosity
           measurements. These degrees of ionization are incorporated into well known electrolyte activity coefficient models, depending on mixed-solvent
           dielectric constants and IL concentrations. An asymmetric framework allows discrete differences in the degree of ionization between liquid phases
           enhancing the predictions further.

           1200708: Shear reology of 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride cellulose solutions including solution character and
           preparation

           Ionic Liquids: From Knowledge to Application
           IEC 0 [1200708]: Shear reology of 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride cellulose solutions including
           solution character and preparation
           John R. Collier, john.collier@eng.fsu.edu, Chemical and Biomedical Engineering, Florida State University, A164, FSU/FAMU College of Engineering,
           Tallahassee, FL 32312, john.collier@eng.fsu.edu, Joy Watson, louise29072@yahoo.com, Technology Center 1700, US Patent and Trademark
           Office, 126 Lancelot Court, Lexington, SC 29072, louise29072@yahoo.com, Billie Collier, bcollier@mailer.fsu.edu, Dean College of Human Sciences,
           Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32312, and S Petrovan, , Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996

           ACCEPTED
           Topic Selection: Ionic Liquids: From Knowledge to Application: Poster Session

           Invited: N
           Preferred Presentation Format: Oral
           Consider for Sci-Mix:
           Special Equipment Needs: standard equipment
           Conforms to Bylaw 6: Y
           Last Modified: 2008-03-30

           Abstract
           This study focused on the effects of preparation and composition on the shear rheology of cellulose in the ionic liquid 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium
           chloride ([Bmim]Cl) including different degrees of polymerization, (i.e. average molecular weight), manual versus high shear mixing and various
           cellulose, lignin and hemicellulose concentrations. Solutions with lower degrees of polymerization behaved as viscous dominated liquids, and the
           solution with the highest degree of polymerization showed viscoelastic properties. Mechanically prepared solutions exhibited viscoelastic properties
           except for one solution. Lignin and xylose, a typical hemicellulose monomer, were added to some solutions to simulate the wood pulp composition
           which increased the complex viscosity of solutions and displayed viscoelastic properties. The rheology implies that a liquid crystalline structure develops
           at higher degrees of polymerization, higher concentration, and lower temperatures. The shear flow activation energies of the solutions were determined
           from the shift factors with respect to temperature and were higher than some polymeric melts.

           1200750: Degradability by design: 1-hydroxyimidazole-derived salts as stable, yet degradable ionic liquids

           Ionic Liquids: From Knowledge to Application
           IEC 0 [1200750]: Degradability by design: 1-hydroxyimidazole-derived salts as stable, yet degradable
           ionic liquids
           Gerhard Laus, gerhard.laus@uibk.ac.at1, Alexander Schwaerzler, alexander.schwaerzler@student.uibk.ac.at1, Michael Hummel, 1, Klaus Wurst, 1,
           Volker Kahlenberg, 2, Guenther Bonn, 1, and Herwig Schottenberger, 1. (1) Faculty of Chemistry, University of Innsbruck, Innrain 52a, 6020 Innsbruck,
           Austria, gerhard.laus@uibk.ac.at, alexander.schwaerzler@student.uibk.ac.at, (2) Institute of Mineralogy and Petrography, University of Innsbruck, 6020
           Innsbruck, Austria

           ACCEPTED
           Topic Selection: Ionic Liquids: From Knowledge to Application: Poster Session

           Invited: N




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           Preferred Presentation Format: PosterOnly
           Consider for Sci-Mix: Y
           Conforms to Bylaw 6: Y
           Last Modified: 2008-03-30

           Abstract
           ‘Degradability by design' is a promising concept which has been implemented by the incorporation of a N–O moiety into imidazolium-based ionic liquids,
           e.g. 1,3-dimethoxyimidazolium triflimide. There is ample evidence that ILs are not inert and can be degraded by oxidation or irradiation. In contrast,
           reduction reactions are valuable for degradation of ILs as well as for synthetic purposes. 1,3-Dihydroxyimidazolium salts (diprotic Broensted-acidic ILs)
           are readily reduced to imidazole, a natural product. 1,3-Dimethoxyimidazolium salts are also degradable to imidazole by stepwise catalytic
           hydrogenation. From the intermediate 1-methoxyimidazole, 1-alkyl-3-methoxyimidazolium salts as new ILs can be generated which in turn can be
           hydrogenated to 1-alkylimidazoles. The cationic species can be also destroyed under alkaline conditions. An unexpected degradation pathway under
           mild alkaline conditions is presented. Alkaline or reductive conditions are both viable paths for waste-water treatment. Thus, ‘degradability by design'
           may lead to even ‘greener' solvents and technical working fluids.

           1202150: Molecular dynamics simulations of cellobiose in the ionic liquid 1-n-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride

           Ionic Liquids: From Knowledge to Application
           IEC 0 [1202150]: Molecular dynamics simulations of cellobiose in the ionic liquid
           1-n-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride
           Zhiwei Liu, z.liu@usip.edu 1, Richard C. Remsing, rremsing@mail.usp.edu2, Preston B. Moore, p.moore@usp.edu2, and Guillermo Moyna,
           g.moyna@usp.edu2. (1) Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of the Sciences in Philadelphia, West Center for Computational
           Chemistry and Drug Design, 600 South 43rd Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104, Fax: 215-596-8543, z.liu@usip.edu, (2) Department of Chemistry &
           Biochemistry and West Center for Computational Chemistry and Drug Design, University of the Sciences in Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA 19104

           ACCEPTED
           Topic Selection: Ionic Liquids: From Knowledge to Application: Poster Session

           Invited: N
           Preferred Presentation Format: Poster
           Consider for Sci-Mix: Y
           Conforms to Bylaw 6: Y
           Last Modified: 2008-03-30

           Abstract
           N,N'-Dialkylimidazolium ionic liquids (ILs) show promise as non-derivatizing “green” solvents for the dissolution and processing of cellulose. In order to
           better understand how these ILs solvate this and other polysaccharides at the molecular level, we have performed molecular dynamics (MD) simulations
           of cellobiose in 1-n-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride ([C4mim]Cl) at 0.5, 2.5, 5.0, 7.5 and 10.0 wt % at 363 K of 15 ns or more. Static and
           thermodynamic quantities, such as radial distribution functions, 3D structural features of IL species and between [C4mim]Cl moieties and cellobiose,
           and diffusion coefficients for the different species, have been derived from the simulations, and their relations to the weight concentrations of cellobiose
           are analyzed. In particular, the interactions between [C4mim]Cl moieties and cellobiose molecules, in which the IL Cl- ions interact with the carbohydrate
           OH groups through hydrogen bonding, are studied in detail. The simulation results agree well with 13C and 35/37Cl relaxation and 1H diffusion NMR
           studies.

           1202215: New Bronsted acidic TSILs. From computation-guided design to synthesis and properties

           Ionic Liquids: From Knowledge to Application
           IEC 0 [1202215]: New Bronsted acidic TSILs. From computation-guided design to synthesis and
           properties
           James H. Davis Jr., jdavis@jaguar1.usouthal.edu, Richard A. O'Brien, , Kaila M. Mattson, jdavis@jaguar1.usouthal.edu, Kyle Gaines,
           jdavis@jaguar1.usouthal.edu, Brianne B. Plash, , Andrzej Wierzbicki, , and E. Allen Salter, , Department of Chemistry, University of South Alabama,
           Chemistry 223, Mobile, AL 36688, Fax: 251-460-7359, jdavis@jaguar1.usouthal.edu

           ACCEPTED
           Topic Selection: Ionic Liquids: From Knowledge to Application: Poster Session

           Invited: N
           Preferred Presentation Format: Oral
           Consider for Sci-Mix: Y
           Conforms to Bylaw 6: Y
           Last Modified: 2008-03-30

           Abstract
           As reagents or catalysts, task-specific ionic liquids (TSILs) incorporating strongly Bronsted acidic functional groups offer the same vapor-free and
           (commonly) biphasic characteristics manifested by solid acid catalysts while being dust-free and immune to surface deactivation (coking). In the years
           since our first report of these systems (2002), we have prepared a number of variants of our initial imidazolium and phosphonium based materials.
           Recently, we have turned to ab initio calculations to guide our design process, to good effect. In this paper we will discuss the outcome of these
           calculations as well as the simple, highly-efficient synthesis and properties of a library of new acidic TSILs and ionic soft materials (ISMs).

           1202259: Improved chemical analysis of lignocellulosic biomass through dissolution into ionic liquids

           Ionic Liquids: From Knowledge to Application
           IEC 0 [1202259]: Improved chemical analysis of lignocellulosic biomass through dissolution into ionic


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           liquids
           Lindsey M. Kline, lkline@bushbros.com, Bush Brothers and Company, 1016 E. Weisgarber Rd., Knoxville, TN 37909, Rajesh Jena Kumar,
           rjena@utk.edu, Biosystems Engineering and Soil Science, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996-4531, Douglas G. Hayes,
           dhayes1@utk.edu, Biosytems Engineering and Soil Science, University of Tennessee, 2506 E.J. Chapman Drive, Knoxville, TN 37996-4531, Fax:
           865-974-4514, dhayes1@utk.edu, and Nicole Labbe, nlabbe@utk.edu, Department of Forestry, Wildlife & Fisheries, University of Tennessee, Forest
           Products Center, Knoxville, TN 37996-4570

           ACCEPTED
           Topic Selection: Ionic Liquids: From Knowledge to Application: Poster Session

           Invited: N
           Preferred Presentation Format: Poster
           Consider for Sci-Mix: Y
           Conforms to Bylaw 6: Y
           Last Modified: 2008-03-30

           Abstract
           Rapid chemical analysis of lignocellulosic biomass is an enabling technology for the biorefinery, to allow for the proper pretreatment conditions to be
           utilized, and to best direct the utilization of the specific feedstock; for example, cellulose-rich feedstocks directed toward biofuels production. The
           currently employed protocol for determining the mass fraction of glucan, xylan, lignin, ash, and other components, is laborious, prone to error, and
           presents safety hazards to the analytical chemist. We have employed dissolution of whole biomass into ionic liquids, [Emim] and [Bmim] salts, as a
           means of improving the protocol. The mass fraction of lignin is determined directly through ultraviolet-visible spectrophotometry or mid-range FTIR
           spectroscopy. The quantification of the saccharide units of cellulose and hemicellulose occurs via enzymatic hydrolysis in water-ionic liquid solutions.
           The newly developed approach was applied to quantify the lignin and cellulose content of yellow poplar. The spectrophotometric and FTIR approaches
           for lignin quantification were within 14% and 2% differences, respectively, of the result obtained using the standard protocol. The employment of
           cellulase with water / [Bmim][Cl] (or [Emim][Cl] ) 90/10 v/v, followed by HPLC analysis, yielded a glucose a mass fraction 5-10% higher than that
           predicted by the standard protocol.

           1202456: Interfacial Mass Transport in Biphasic Ionic Liquid/Organic solvent Systems.

           Ionic Liquids: From Knowledge to Application
           IEC 0 [1202456]: Interfacial Mass Transport in Biphasic Ionic Liquid/Organic solvent Systems.
           Azita Ahosseini, hosseini@ku.edu, Laurence Weatherley, lweather@ku.edu, and Aaron M. Scurto, ascurto@ku.edu, Department of Chemical and
           Petroleum Engineering, University of Kansas, 4132 Learned Hall, 1530 W. 15th St., Lawrence, KS 66045, Fax: 785-864-4967, hosseini@ku.edu,
           ascurto@ku.edu

           ACCEPTED
           Topic Selection: Ionic Liquids: From Knowledge to Application: Poster Session

           Invited: N
           Preferred Presentation Format: OralOnly
           Consider for Sci-Mix:
           Conforms to Bylaw 6: Y
           Last Modified: 2008-03-30

           Abstract
           A variety of applications of ionic liquids (ILs) in reactions/catalysis, separations, sensors, etc. often are based upon biphasic systems (liquid-liquid,
           liquid-vapor, solid-liquid, etc.). However, little interfacial mass transfer data exists in the literature for any systems, despite the large number of possible
           ionic liquids, immiscible phases and potential solutes. Moreover, most experimental mass transfer rates measured at certain conditions are only valid in
           narrow or limited ranges of solubility, viscosity, geometry, fluid flow regimes, etc. and require further experiments for other regions. Here, the phase
           equilibrium, viscosity, diffusivity, interfacial tension, and interfacial mass transport will be presented for a model binary biphasic system, 1-octene and
           1-hexyl-3-methyl-imidazolium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide ([HMIm][Tf2N]), which has applications in catalysis and separations. Mass transfer data
           will be presented for [HMIm][Tf2N]/1-octene for flat interfaces and for droplets of IL in a continuous organic phase. The robust mass transfer model of
           Weatherley and Petera will be utilized to correlate and predict the mass transfer rates for this and any geometry and any hydrodynamic regime based
           upon limited physical property and thermodynamic data.

           1202506: Utilizing elongational flow in the spinning of carbon fiber precursors from 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium
           chloride cellulose solutions

           Ionic Liquids: From Knowledge to Application
           IEC 0 [1202506]: Utilizing elongational flow in the spinning of carbon fiber precursors from
           1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride cellulose solutions
           RJ Sammons, rgelderl@utk.edu1, JR Collier, jcollier2@fsu.edu2, TG Rials, trials@utk.edu1, and S Petrovan, 3. (1) Forest Products Center, University
           of Tennessee, 2506 Jacob Dr, Knoxville, TN 37996, rgelderl@utk.edu, (2) Chemical and Biomedical Engineering, FAMU/FSU, Tallahassee, FL 32320,
           (3) Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996

           ACCEPTED
           Topic Selection: Ionic Liquids: From Knowledge to Application: Poster Session

           Invited: N
           Preferred Presentation Format: Oral
           Consider for Sci-Mix:
           Conforms to Bylaw 6: Y
           Last Modified: 2008-03-30




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           Abstract
           A new developing area of research deals with the interactions of cellulose with environmentally benign solvents such as ionic liquids (ILs). In this case
           the use of 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride [Bmim]Cl. From these solutions and utilizing elongational flow spinning techniques, highly oriented,
           highly crystalline, low defect fibers were produced. One prime consideration for carbon fiber precursors was the degree and size of defects. The
           elongational flow imposition of orientation inside the hyperbolic dies was especially effective since defects are compressed by the die walls rather than
           expanded in free surface drawing. By comparing the fibers spun using differing rheological parameters, an understanding of how the cellulose fibers
           orient and crystallize under different conditions was determined.

           1202625: Study of ionic liquid solvation and aggregation by NMR spectroscopy and molecular dynamics simulations

           Ionic Liquids: From Knowledge to Application
           IEC 0 [1202625]: Study of ionic liquid solvation and aggregation by NMR spectroscopy and molecular
           dynamics simulations
           Richard C. Remsing, rremsing@mail.usp.edu1, Zhiwei Liu, z.liu@usip.edu2, Brendan B. O'Brien, 3, and Guillermo Moyna, g.moyna@usp.edu1. (1)
           Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry and West Center for Computational Chemistry and Drug Design, University of the Sciences in Philadelphia,
           600 South 43rd Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104, rremsing@mail.usp.edu, (2) Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of the Sciences in
           Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA 19104, (3) Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry, University of the Sciences in Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA 19104

           ACCEPTED
           Topic Selection: Ionic Liquids: From Knowledge to Application: Poster Session

           Invited: N
           Preferred Presentation Format: Poster
           Consider for Sci-Mix: Y
           Conforms to Bylaw 6: Y
           Last Modified: 2008-03-30

           Abstract
           Solvation and aggregation in solutions of N,N'-dialkylimidazolium ILs and water or dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) were examined using 1H and 35/37Cl
           chemical shift perturbations, 13C and 35/37Cl relaxation, and 1H diffusion measurements, in combination with molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. By
           probing concentrations ranging from the neat IL to near-infinite dilution, the NMR experiments show that although some level of aggregation is observed
           at high salt concentrations, these ILs behave as typical electrolytes in aqueous solutions with both ions solvated by water at low concentrations. On the
           other hand, the interactions between cations and anions appear to strengthen as the concentration of DMSO increases. These results were
           corroborated by MD simulations at representative IL:solvent compositions, which were also instrumental to examine the static and dynamic behavior of
           the systems at the atomic level. The implications of these findings on the use of IL-based solvent systems is discussed.

           1202643: Task-specific ionic liquids (TSILs) based on heterocyclic cations with directly ring-attached aldehyde and
           benzoyl groups. Hydrate and Acetal Formation

           Ionic Liquids: From Knowledge to Application
           IEC 0 [1202643]: Task-specific ionic liquids (TSILs) based on heterocyclic cations with directly
           ring-attached aldehyde and benzoyl groups. Hydrate and Acetal Formation
           Kaila M. Mattson, jdavis@jaguar1.usouthal.edu, James H. Davis Jr., jdavis@jaguar1.usouthal.edu, Richard A. O'Brien, , and Kyle Gaines,
           jdavis@jaguar1.usouthal.edu, Department of Chemistry, University of South Alabama, Chemistry 223, Mobile, AL 36688, jdavis@jaguar1.usouthal.edu

           ACCEPTED
           Topic Selection: Ionic Liquids: From Knowledge to Application: Poster Session

           Invited: N
           Preferred Presentation Format: PosterOnly
           Consider for Sci-Mix: Y
           Conforms to Bylaw 6: Y
           Last Modified: 2008-03-30

           Abstract
           While all aldehydes and ketones are susceptible to the equilibrium formation of hydrates and acetals, those directly attached to strongly
           electron-withdrawing moieties are especially susceptible. In this poster we will outline the synthesis and characterization of several new task-specific
           ionic liquids (TSILs) based on N-heterocyclic cations with aldehyde or benzoyl groups directly attached to the ring. We will discuss the behavior of these
           species vis-a-vis hydrate and acetal formation, and their potential utility as slow-release materials.

           1202769: Vibrational spectrum of [emin][TF2N] ion pair : A density functional study.

           Ionic Liquids: From Knowledge to Application
           IEC 0 [1202769]: Vibrational spectrum of [emin][TF2N] ion pair : A density functional study.
           Nilesh Ramchandra Dhumal, ndhumal@andrew.cmu.edu
           and Hyung J Kim, , Department of Chemistry, Carnegie Mellon University, 4400 Fifth Ave., Pittsburgh, PA 15213, ndhumal@andrew.cmu.edu

           ACCEPTED
           Topic Selection: Ionic Liquids: From Knowledge to Application: Poster Session

           Invited: N
           Preferred Presentation Format: PosterOnly
           Consider for Sci-Mix:




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Abstract Listing                                                                             http://oasys.acs.org/acs/236nm/iec/sessions/print.cgi?username=28036&...


           Conforms to Bylaw 6: Y
           Last Modified: 2008-03-30

           Abstract
           In present study, density functional method is employed to study molecular interactions in 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium and
           bis(trifluromethylsulfonyl)imide ions. Different conformers are simulated with respect to the possible molecular interactions between cation and anion in
           gas the phase and a continuum solvent environment. Manifestation of these molecular interactions in different environments as seen in vibrational
           spectra is discussed. Comparison of theoretical results is also made with experimental observations. Direction of the frequency shifts of characteristics
           vibrations relative to those in free anion and cations are explained by calculating difference electron density coupled with electron density topography.

           1202813: Designed to decompose. Task-specific ionic liquids incorporating N-acylium and N-sulfonylium cations

           Ionic Liquids: From Knowledge to Application
           IEC 0 [1202813]: Designed to decompose. Task-specific ionic liquids incorporating N-acylium and
           N-sulfonylium cations
           Kyle Gaines, jdavis@jaguar1.usouthal.edu, James H. Davis Jr., jdavis@jaguar1.usouthal.edu, Richard A. O'Brien, , and Kaila M. Mattson,
           jdavis@jaguar1.usouthal.edu, Department of Chemistry, University of South Alabama, Chemistry 223, Mobile, AL 36688, jdavis@jaguar1.usouthal.edu

           ACCEPTED
           Topic Selection: Ionic Liquids: From Knowledge to Application: Poster Session

           Invited: N
           Preferred Presentation Format: PosterOnly
           Consider for Sci-Mix: Y
           Conforms to Bylaw 6: Y
           Last Modified: 2008-03-30

           Abstract
           Though far less common than quaternization by alkylation, quaternization of tertiary amines and N-heterocycles by acylation or sulfonylation is also
           known. However, unlike typical quaternary ammonium cations, the latter are quite reactive and decompose when exposed to protic nucleophiles. In this
           poster, we will discuss our efforts to prepare ionic liquids containing cations with these types of labile functionalities, and will outline some potential uses
           for these types of compounds.

           1203382: Electrochemical studies of the fries rearrangement in ionic liquids

           Ionic Liquids: From Knowledge to Application
           IEC 0 [1203382]: Electrochemical studies of the fries rearrangement in ionic liquids
           Graham T. Cheek, cheek@usna.edu, Chemistry Department Stop 9b, United States Naval Academy, Stop 9b, 572M Holloway Road, Annapolis, MD
           21402, Fax: 410-293-2218, cheek@usna.edu

           ACCEPTED
           Topic Selection: Ionic Liquids: From Knowledge to Application: Poster Session

           Invited: N
           Preferred Presentation Format: Oral
           Consider for Sci-Mix:
           Conforms to Bylaw 6: Y
           Last Modified: 2008-03-30

           Abstract
           The Fries rearrangement, involving the rearrangement of aromatic esters to hydroxyketones, has been studied in various ionic liquids. Most of the
           present work has been carried out in aluminum chloride : 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride or in 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate. The
           reaction is catalyzed by Lewis acids ( aluminum chloride, boron trifluoride, titanium(IV) chloride ), and the progress of the reaction has been followed
           using electrochemical methods such as cyclic voltammetry.

           1203457: Comparative toxicity of branched and straight chain alkyl functionality in ionic liquids

           Ionic Liquids: From Knowledge to Application
           IEC 0 [1203457]: Comparative toxicity of branched and straight chain alkyl functionality in ionic liquids
           Catherine McEntee, CMcentee@Kingsborough.edu1, Jinhee Gwon, jcgwon@gmail.com2, Xing Li, XLI89@tigermail.qcc.cuny.edu2, James F.
           Wishart, wishart@bnl.gov3, and Sharon I. Lall-Ramnarine, slallramnarine@qcc.cuny.edu2. (1) Biology, Kingsborough Community College, CUNY, 2001
           Oriental Boulevard, Brooklyn, NY 11235, Fax: 718-368-4873, CMcentee@Kingsborough.edu, (2) Department of Chemistry, Queensborough Community
           College, CUNY, Bayside, NY 11364, (3) Department of Chemistry, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973

           ACCEPTED
           Topic Selection: Ionic Liquids: From Knowledge to Application: Poster Session

           Invited: N
           Preferred Presentation Format: Poster
           Consider for Sci-Mix: Y
           Conforms to Bylaw 6: Y
           Last Modified: 2008-03-30

           Abstract


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           In this work a series of imidazolium, pyridinium and pyrrolidinium halide salts have been prepared and converted into ionic liquids bearing phosphate
           and bis(trifyl)imide anions. ILs were synthesized using both straight and branched chain alkyl substituents of varying chain lengths. Reaction conditions
           were kept constant with the exception of temperature which was varied to produce ILs with varying degrees of color. The effects of purity (in terms of
           color), alkyl chain length and branching were examined using microorganism and in vitro seed germination assays. Preliminary results for halide ILs
           indicate that chain length affects toxicity as expected from reports in the literature. Color (purity) does not seem to have an effect on toxicity. Further, the
           seed germination assay appears to be several-fold more sensitive than the assay using microorganisms. This work was supported in part at BNL by the
           U.S. DOE Office of Basic Energy Sciences under contract # DE-AC02-98CH10886.

           1203510: Tetraalkylphosphonium polyoxometalates as novel ionic liquids

           Ionic Liquids: From Knowledge to Application
           IEC 0 [1203510]: Tetraalkylphosphonium polyoxometalates as novel ionic liquids
           Mark L. Dietz, dietzm@uwm.edu, Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry, University of Wisconsin - Milwaukee, 3210 N. Cramer Street, Milwaukee,
           WI 53211, dietzm@uwm.edu, Paul G. Rickert, rickert@anl.gov, Chemistry Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439-4831, Mark R.
           Antonio, , Chemical Sciences & Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439, Millicent A. Firestone, firestone@anl.gov,
           Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439, James F. Wishart, wishart@bnl.gov, Department of Chemistry,
           Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973, Tomasz Szreder, tomaszek@bnl.gov, Chemistry Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory,
           Upton, NY 11973, and Karrie-Ann Kubatko, kkubatko@miami.edu, Department of Geological Sciences, University of Miami, Coral Gables, FL
           33146-0401

           ACCEPTED
           Topic Selection: Ionic Liquids: From Knowledge to Application: Poster Session

           Invited: N
           Preferred Presentation Format: PosterOnly
           Consider for Sci-Mix: Y
           Conforms to Bylaw 6: Y
           Last Modified: 2008-03-30

           Abstract
           The pairing of a Lindqvist or Keggin polyoxometalate (POM) anion, redox-active metal-oxide clusters formed via the pH-controlled condensation of
           d-block metal-oxygen octahedra (M-O6, with for example, M = Mo6+ and W6+) and p-block tetrahedra (X-O4, with for example, X = Al3+, Si4+, and
           P5+), with an appropriate tetraalkylphosphonium cation, [R3R′P]+, has been shown to yield an original family of ionic liquids, among them salts liquid at
           or near ambient temperature. Detailed characterization of the physicochemical properties of several such “liquid POMs” by a combination of thermal
           analysis, voltammetry, temperature-dependent viscometry, and conductance measurements suggests various potential applications for these IL-POM
           composites in separations, electrochemistry, and catalysis.

           1204239: Generation and detection of radicals in ionic liquids

           Ionic Liquids: From Knowledge to Application
           IEC 0 [1204239]: Generation and detection of radicals in ionic liquids
           Jason A. C. Clyburne, jason.clyburne@smu.ca, Department of Chemistry, Saint Mary's University, 923 Robie St., Halifax, NS B3H 3C3, Canada,
           jason.clyburne@smu.ca, Khashayar Ghandi, kghandi@mta.ca, Department of Chemistry, Mount Allison University, Sackville, NB E4L 1G8, Canada,
           and Charles Walsby, , Department of Chemistry, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, BC V5A 1S6, Canada

           ACCEPTED
           Topic Selection: Ionic Liquids: From Knowledge to Application: Poster Session

           Invited: N
           Preferred Presentation Format: PosterOnly
           Consider for Sci-Mix: Y
           Conforms to Bylaw 6: Y
           Last Modified: 2008-03-30

           Abstract
           Ionic liquids offer hope for curbing the volume of emissions from processes involving volatile organic solvents and, perhaps more importantly, afford an
           opportunity to perform new or unprecedented chemistry on the industrial scale. Central to the use of ionic liquids as solvent systems for reactive
           molecules is an understanding of their decomposition pathways. Perhaps the most significant and detrimental side reaction of many ionic liquids is their
           reactivity with basic or electron rich species. In many cases, deprotonation reactions or decomposition of the ionic liquid through electrochemical
           processes results in unwanted side reactions. We have prepared new solutions of phosphonium ionic liquids containing reactive species such as
           borane and Grignard reagents, and have studied their reactivity in some detail. For instance, Grignard reagents form persistent solutions in
           phosphonium ionic liquids, and in these highly polar media, they undergo facile electron transfer reactions. Furthermore, using the hydrogen atom
           surrogate muonium, we have generated transient radicals and compared their properites in both ionic and molecular solvents.

           1204248: Influence of the Anionic Species of a Molten Salt on Lipid Organization

           Ionic Liquids: From Knowledge to Application
           IEC 0 [1204248]: Influence of the Anionic Species of a Molten Salt on Lipid Organization
           Kervin O. Evans, Kervin.Evans@ars.usda.gov, New Crops & Processing Technology, NCAUR-ARS, USDA, 1815 N. University Street, Peoria, IL
           61604, Kervin.Evans@ars.usda.gov

           ACCEPTED
           Topic Selection: Ionic Liquids: From Knowledge to Application: Poster Session

           Invited: N




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           Preferred Presentation Format: Oral
           Consider for Sci-Mix: N
           Special Equipment Needs: standard
           Conforms to Bylaw 6: Y
           Last Modified: 2008-03-30

           Abstract
           Room-temperature molten salts have become the solvent of choice to replace organic solvents in processing commodity plant lipids. By replacing the
           typical organic solvent with molten salts, one reduces common hazards such as volatility and flammability that are associated with organic solvent use.
           In addition, molten salts are excellent alternatives to organic solvents because the salts have chemical/thermal stability, high ionic conductivity, excellent
           electrochemical stability, and tuneability for chemical/physical properties. The effects that a series of 1-buty-3-methylimidazolium-based
           room-temperature molten salts had on lipid organizations were explored. Fluorescence microscopy was used to determine whether four molten salts
           affected how phospholipids organized into giant unilamellar vesicles. Analysis showed that the general spherical shape was not affected much, but
           secondary structures such as aggregation and concentric behaviors were affected. Further work continues that assesses whether or not increased
           concentrations of molten salts have greater effects on lipid organization. These fundamental findings should shed light on how best to process lipids in
           room-temperature molten salts.

           1204338: Template-Free Recyclable Growth of Magnetite Nanocrystals in Neat Ionic Liquid

           Ionic Liquids: From Knowledge to Application
           IEC 0 [1204338]: Template-Free Recyclable Growth of Magnetite Nanocrystals in Neat Ionic Liquid
           Jonathan D. Woodward, woodwardjd@ornl.gov 1, Adam J. Rondinone, rondinoneaj@ornl.gov2, and Gary A. Baker, 1. (1) Chemical Sciences
           Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, 4500N, 1 Bethel Valley Road, Oak Ridge, TN 37831, woodwardjd@ornl.gov, (2) Center for Nanophase
           Materials Sciences, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6201

           ACCEPTED
           Topic Selection: Ionic Liquids: From Knowledge to Application: Poster Session

           Invited: N
           Preferred Presentation Format: OralOnly
           Consider for Sci-Mix: Y
           Conforms to Bylaw 6: Y
           Last Modified: 2008-03-30

           Abstract
           We focus primarily on the production of magnetite nanocrystals (NCs) synthesized via thermal decomposition of an organometallic precursor within the
           room temperature ionic liquid (RTIL) trihexyltetradecylphosphonium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonimide), [P6,6,6,14][Tf2N], which plays the dual role of bulk
           solvent and templating (coordinating) agent. The magnetite phase was confirmed by powder x-ray diffraction (PXRD) while transmission electron
           microscopic (TEM) results reveal relatively monodispersed nanocrystals in the absence of large aggregates. X-ray fluorescence (XRF) and FTIR
           measurements indicate the presence of [P6,6,6,14][Tf2N] as capping agent on the NC surface. The cleaned NCs are well dispersed in hexane and other
           apolar solvents, whereas they are insoluble in polar solvents such as the lower alcohols. A concentrated dispersion within the RTIL produces a
           “solvent-less” magnetically-responsive ionoferrofluid. Highly crystalline, narrow dispersion magnetite NCs are also formed by recovering and reusing the
           RTIL phase, validating the recyclability of the RTIL in the production of various metal oxides by this approach.

           1204467: New amine functionalized ionic liquids for multi-mode acid gas capture

           Ionic Liquids: From Knowledge to Application
           IEC 0 [1204467]: New amine functionalized ionic liquids for multi-mode acid gas capture
           James H. Davis Jr., jdavis@jaguar1.usouthal.edu, Richard A. O'Brien, , Kyle Gaines, jdavis@jaguar1.usouthal.edu, and Kaila M. Mattson,
           jdavis@jaguar1.usouthal.edu, Department of Chemistry, University of South Alabama, Chemistry 223, Mobile, AL 36688, Fax: 251-460-7359,
           jdavis@jaguar1.usouthal.edu

           ACCEPTED
           Topic Selection: Ionic Liquids: From Knowledge to Application: Poster Session

           Invited: N
           Comments to Organizer: I have requested an 'oral only' and 'oral preferred' presentation for two other abstracts; two others have been submitted as
           poster only. While I would really prefer to present the 'oral only' in that form, I am happy to be flexible as to the mode of pre
           Preferred Presentation Format: Poster
           Consider for Sci-Mix: Y
           Conforms to Bylaw 6: Y
           Last Modified: 2008-03-30

           Abstract
           We recently reported a highly efficient 'combi-click' approach for the synthesis of libraries of amine-functionalized task-specific ionic liquids (TSILs) and
           ionic soft materials (ISMs) for use in the reactive capture of CO2 (Chem. Mater., 2007). All of the reactive ions prepared using this approach featured
           secondary amine groups, which were found to facilitate the gas capture via carmbamate formation. In the present paper we will discuss the extension of
           this approach to the creation of TSILs with tertiary amines and with both tertiary/ and secondary amine functionalities, capable of gas capture via the
           formation of both carbamates and carbonates.

           1204504: Development of the Polymer Actuator Based on the Polymer Electrolyte Composed of Ionic Liquids and
           ABA-type Triblock Copolymers

           Ionic Liquids: From Knowledge to Application



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           IEC 0 [1204504]: Development of the Polymer Actuator Based on the Polymer Electrolyte Composed of
           Ionic Liquids and ABA-type Triblock Copolymers
           Satoru Imaizumi, d07ga511@ynu.ac.jp, Yuichi Kato, , Hisashi Kokubo, , and Masayoshi Watanabe, mwatanab@ynu.ac.jp, Department of Chemistry
                                                                                                        01,
           and Biotechnology, Yokohama National University, 79-5 Tokiwadai, Hodogaya-ku, Yokohama 240-85 Japan, d07ga511@ynu.ac.jp

           ACCEPTED
           Topic Selection: Ionic Liquids: From Knowledge to Application: Poster Session

           Invited: N
           Preferred Presentation Format: PosterOnly
           Consider for Sci-Mix: Y
           Conforms to Bylaw 6: Y
           Last Modified: 2008-03-30

           Abstract
           Highly ion-conducting polymer electrolytes can be applied for a wide variety of solid-state electrochemical devices due to their inherent properties such
           as film processability, flexibility, practicable ionic conductivity, and wide potential window. Recently, many researches on the application of an
           ion-conducting polymer electrolyte to ionic EAPs (electroactive polymers) have been seen. In this research, we have developed a new polymer actuator
           using ABA-type triblock copolymers. The blockcopolymers where the B segment is selectively soluble in an ionic liquid, form flexible, transparent, and
           self-standing gels ("ion-gel") by mixing with an ionic liquid due to the self-assembly of the blockcopolymers. The ionic conductivity and mechanical
           properties of the ion-gels were investigated. Moreover, the obtained ion-gels were applied to polymer actuators. The actuators have a trilaminar
           structure, where an ion-gel film was sandwiched between two flexible carbon electrodes, and were evaluated in terms of the actuation-performance.




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