City of Kingston 2003 Accessibility Plan - DOC

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					                The City of Kingston




                     Accessibility Plan
                         September 2003




    This publication is available in accessible formats upon
                             request.



                           Accessibility Advisory Committee (AAC)
                           Audrey Kobayashi - Chair
                           Ron Robinson - Vice Chair
                           Jennifer Hutson
                           David Grightmire
                           Rick Stacknick
                           Jane Tudor

216 Ontario Street
Kingston, Ontario
K7L 2Z3
City of Kingston Accessibility Plan - September 2003




           "Do not let what you cannot do
          interfere with what you can do."
                         John Wooden




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City of Kingston Accessibility Plan - September 2003

Table of Contents
1.0        EXECUTIVE SUMMARY .............................................................................................................4
2.0        INTRODUCTION ...........................................................................................................................7
3.0        OUR COMMITMENT TO ACCESSIBILITY PLANNING ......................................................9
4.0        MANAGEMENT PARAMETERS ..............................................................................................11
5.0        BARRIER IDENTIFICATION AND REMEDIATION ...........................................................12
   5.1         CORPORATE-WIDE......................................................................................................................12
   5.2         BUILDINGS AND PROPERTIES .....................................................................................................12
   5.3         CULTURAL SERVICES .................................................................................................................12
   5.4         ENGINEERING .............................................................................................................................13
   5.5         HOUSING ....................................................................................................................................13
   5.6         HUMAN RESOURCES ..................................................................................................................14
   5.7         KINGSTON ACCESS SERVICES (KAS) .......................................................................................14
   5.8         MUNICIPAL ELECTIONS ..............................................................................................................14
   5.9         PARKING .....................................................................................................................................15
   5.10        PURCHASING ..............................................................................................................................15
   5.11        RIDEAUCREST LONG TERM CARE FACILITY ..............................................................................15
   5.12        SOCIAL SERVICES ......................................................................................................................15
   5.13        TRANSIT ......................................................................................................................................16
6.0        FINDINGS .....................................................................................................................................17
   6.1 EXTERNAL CONSULTATIONS: SUMMARY ...........................................................................................18
   6.2 INTERNAL CONSULTATIONS: SUMMARY.............................................................................................19
7.0        THE PLAN ....................................................................................................................................20
   7.1      ACCESSIBILITY PROJECT TIMELINE AND RESOURCES ..............................................................20
   7.2      PROPOSED REMEDIATION AREAS..............................................................................................23
   7.3      ACTION PLAN..............................................................................................................................24
      7.3.1   “Safety” Projects ...................................................................................................................24
      7.3.2   “Infrastructure and Client Service” Projects ........................................................................24
      7.3.3   “Outreach” Projects .............................................................................................................28
      7.3.4   “Quick Fix” Projects .............................................................................................................29
APPENDIX “A”: TYPES OF DISABILITIES AND FUNCTIONAL LIMITATIONS .......................32
APPENDIX “B”: THE TERM DISABILITY ...........................................................................................35
APPENDIX “C”: STATISTICS CANADA DATA ON DISABILITIES................................................37
APPENDIX “D”: LITERATURE SOURCES ..........................................................................................39
APPENDIX “E”: EXTERNAL CONSULTATIONS ...............................................................................40
APPENDIX “F”: INTERNAL CONSULTATIONS ................................................................................47
APPENDIX “G”: MUNICIPAL HIGHLIGHTS ......................................................................................49




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City of Kingston Accessibility Plan - September 2003

1.0 Executive Summary
Purpose of the Ontarians with Disabilities Act
The Ontarians with Disabilities Act, 2001 (ODA) received Royal Assent on December
14, 2001. The purpose of the ODA is to improve opportunities for people with disabilities
through identification, removal and prevention of barriers to participation in the life of
the community. The ODA requires that the provincial and municipal governments and
key broader public sector organizations review their policies, programs and services
through the development of annual accessibility plans. Under the ODA, all municipalities
must prepare and make public all accessibility plans. Municipalities with populations of
over 10,000 must appoint an Accessibility Advisory Committee to help them prepare the
plan.

Management Structure for the City of Kingston’s Accessibility Project
The City of Kingston established an Accessibility Advisory Committee on November 5,
2002. The City’s created an 18 month contract for a full-time Accessibility Project Co-
ordinator position to support the Accessibility Advisory Committee in the development
and implementation of its accessibility plan. The Accessibility Project Co-ordinator
began work June 2, 2003, operating within the Office of the Commissioner, Department
of Community Services. A Technical Committee comprised of key staff within the 4
departments of the City was created in May 2003 to provide input, advice and expertise
on accessibility issues in their division.

Placing an “Accessibility Lens” on All City of Kingston Activities
The Accessibility Advisory Committee has recommended a statement expressing the
City’s commitment to accessibility. The underlying objective was to articulate an
operational philosophy where all municipal activities and facilities would be developed
and managed considering the need to reduce barriers. The value statement also sought to
situate the City’s commitment to accessibility within the larger context of the City’s
corporate mission statement. To that end, when the accessibility value statement is used,
reference will be made to the City’s mission statement. The accessibility value statement
is: The City of Kingston is a community that recognizes people are our most valuable
asset. To create opportunities for all people to enjoy our city and contribute as
productive citizens, we work to remove barriers in City of Kingston properties and
services for persons with disabilities. We define barriers to include physical and
architectural, communication, technological, and attitudinal impediments. We also create
public awareness and educate both the public, not-for-profit, and private sectors
regarding the requirements of the Ontarians with Disabilities Act, 2001, the Ontario
Building Code and the Ontario Human Rights Code.

Accessibility Project Research Process
Three streams of research were undertaken to understand local accessibility issues as it
relates to our municipal government: literature review, internal consultations, and
external consultations. The external consultations involved approximately 90 local
service providers, people with disabilities, and caregivers, and occurred mostly in June
and early July. The internal consultations involved middle- and senior-level managers
from all areas of the City of Kingston, and occurred mostly in July and early August.

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City of Kingston Accessibility Plan - September 2003

Findings
Internal Consultations: The City of Kingston’s degree of commitment to address
accessibility issues to this date can be understood to be ―good‖. Over the last 12 to 18
months, the City has undertaken over 55 initiatives to remediate barriers in areas
including publicly-owned buildings, housing, transit, parking, and parks.

External Consultations: The issue category generating the greatest number of comments
from the public was ―the need for public education about disabilities and related support
systems‖. There was almost twice the number of comments in this category relative to the
second most frequently cited set of issues. ―Public Education‖ was frequently mentioned
by people with concerns about a range of disabilities, and can be understood to have a
broad base of support for initiatives addressing information sharing, accessibility
awareness, and respect for others based on the philosophy of inclusiveness. The next set
of concerns –Access Bus, pedestrian traffic, programming, Public Transit, snow removal,
and sensitivity training – addressed actual and/or perceived deficiencies in municipal
service provision and better access to the City’s buildings, sidewalks and roads. Several
comments were made about the administration of the City’s accessibility project and
relate to topics such as City’s long-term commitment to accessibility, ongoing
information collection and sharing, and the need for broad representation of disability
types on the Accessibility Advisory Committee.

The Plan – Timeline and Activities
The approach taken in developing the City of Kingston’s first accessibility plan is ―high
level‖, focusing on where to go and what needs to be done – in a broad, general way.
We took this approach for the following reasons:
     The scope and complexity of operations of a municipality the size of Kingston is
        huge
     The Accessibility Advisory Committee, the Accessibility Project Co-ordinator,
        and Technical Committee were only recently recruited and would need time to
        enhance their capacities to do and support accessibility planning
     The timeframe for plan preparation and public consultation was very short – June,
        July, August and September (4 months)

Recognizing these constraints to our ability to produce a detailed blueprint, we
incorporated structures in this plan to further study our key accessibility issues, with the
objective of developing tactical activities, budgets and schedules that will eventually
remediate the barriers we’ve identified.

Phase 1: Develop the Plan for Year One
    Research and public consultation.
    4 months (June 1 to September 30, 2003).

Phase 2: Prepare for Implementation
    Generation of policy, program, and facility remediation options, supported with
       detailed operational information.
    6 months (October 1, 2003 to March 31, 2004).


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City of Kingston Accessibility Plan - September 2003

Phase 3: Implement Recommendations
    Executing and monitoring the City Council-endorsed options.
    1 to 2 years, depending on the particular accessibility projects (February 1 2004 to
       December 31, 2005).

Phase 4: Accessibility Planning beyond 2005
    Reviewing accessibility management structures and developing new objectives.
    Timing to be determined.

The Plan - Project Areas
1) SAFETY

2) INFRASTRUCTURE and SERVICE DELIVERY
     Accessibility Audits: Public Buildings, Snow Removal, Sidewalks and Roads
     Transportation
     Training
     Programming
     Communications and Information Technology

3) OUTREACH
     Public Education
     Tourism

There are also several ―quick fix‖ accessibility mini-projects that can probably be
implemented quickly and with relatively low cost, occurring concurrently with the other
project areas.

Implementation Issues
The Plan recommends that some sort of relationship be established between staff
involved with City projects that have accessibility implications, and the Accessibility
Project Coordinator and Accessibility Advisory Committee. The nature of the
relationship could range from information sharing through the distribution of reports and
comments on reports, to full participation by the Accessibility Project Coordinator and/or
an Accessibility Advisory Committee member(s) in the existing project. It is expected
that members of the City Staff will continue to provide expertise to the Accessibility
Advisory Committee/Accessibility Project Coordinator in undertaking further research
and report preparation. Plans emerging from the Options Research (Phase Two) will
identify areas that are a priority for budget considerations. It is anticipated that new
projects across the Corporation will integrate project-specific accessibility related
expenditures into their project proposals. Accessibility budget items will be integrated
within the appropriate Department’s 2004 operating and capital budgets.




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City of Kingston Accessibility Plan - September 2003

2.0 Introduction
People with disabilities represent a significant and growing part of our population.
According to Statistics Canada, about 1.9 million Ontarians - about 16% of the
population - have disabilities. Disability tends to increase with age. Because our overall
population is aging, it is estimated that in two decades 20% of the population will have
disabilities. Enhancing the ability of people with disabilities to live independently and
contribute to the community will have positive effects on our future prosperity.

Two pieces of legislation address accessibility in Ontario. The Ontario Human Rights
Code, 1981 states that ―Every person has a right to equal treatment with respect to
services, goods and facilities, without discrimination because of race, ancestry, place of
origin, colour, ethnic origin, citizenship, creed, sex, age, marital status, or disability.‖ The
Ontarians with Disabilities Act, 2001 (ODA) addresses the need to improve opportunities
for people with disabilities through identification, removal and prevention of barriers to
participation in the life of the community. The ODA requires that the provincial and
municipal governments and key broader public sector organizations review their policies,
programs and services through the development of annual accessibility plans.

Municipal governments play a crucial role in the planning and development of our
communities: in their streets, parks, public transit, libraries, social housing, ambulance
services, public buildings, elections, and a vast array of community services.
Responsibilities, which include enforcing the barrier-free access requirements of the
Ontario Building Code and implementing key accessibility considerations under the
ODA, are crucial to realizing a vision of local communities that improve accessibility and
mobility for their residents. Under the ODA, all municipalities must prepare and make
public all accessibility plans. Municipalities with populations of over 10,000 must
appoint an Accessibility Advisory Committee (AAC) to help them prepare the plan. The
Ontario Ministry of Citizenship is supporting and monitoring the progress of compliance
with the ODA.

The ODA adopts the broad definition for disability that is set out in the Ontario Human
Rights Code. ―Disability‖ is:

any degree of physical disability, infirmity, malformation or disfigurement that is caused
by bodily injury, birth defect or illness and, without limiting the generality of the
foregoing, includes diabetes mellitus, epilepsy, a brain injury, any degree of paralysis,
amputation, lack of physical co-ordination, blindness or visual impediment, deafness or
hearing impediment, muteness or speech impediment, or physical reliance on a guide dog
or other animal or on a wheelchair or other remedial appliance or device, a condition of
mental impairment or a developmental disability, a learning disability, or a dysfunction
in one or more of the processes involved in understanding or using symbols or spoken
language, a mental disorder, or an injury or disability for which benefits were claimed or
received under the insurance plan established under the Workplace Safety and Insurance
Act, 1997.



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City of Kingston Accessibility Plan - September 2003

A ―barrier‖ is anything that prevents a person with a disability from fully participating in
all aspects of society because of his or her disability, including a physical barrier, an
architectural barrier, an informational or communications barrier, an attitudinal barrier, a
technological barrier, a policy or a practice.

An example of each of the different kinds of barriers is shown below:

Barrier type       Example
                   A door knob that cannot be operated by a person with limited upper-
Physical
                   body mobility and strength
Architectural      A hallway or door that is too narrow for a wheelchair or scooter
Informational      Typefaces that are too small to be read by a person with low-vision
Communicational A professor who talks loudly when addressing a deaf student
Attitudinal        A receptionist who ignores a customer in a wheelchair
Technological      A paper tray on a laser printer that requires two strong hands to open
                   A practice of announcing important messages over an intercom that
Policy/Practice
                   people with hearing impairments cannot hear clearly

People with disabilities face unnecessary barriers almost everywhere: at home, at work, at
school, in parks, in recreational facilities, in the streets, in theatres, in stores and in
restaurants. Barriers prevent people with disabilities from going to school and to work.
According to the 1991 Statistics Canada ―Health and Activity Limitations‖ (HALS)
Survey, only 6% of adults with disabilities in Ontario have a university degree, compared
to 15% of adults without a disability; and only 49% of working age people with
disabilities were employed.

Barrier-removal is the process by which disabling conditions are eliminated. When
barriers pass unnoticed and are not removed, people with disabilities are prevented from
participating fully, and stereotypes about what people with disabilities can and cannot do
are perpetuated. Many people with disabilities identify attitude as the major barrier they
encounter. People with disabilities experience attitudinal barriers as stigma and prejudice.
Attitudinal barriers, when unchallenged, serve to legitimate discrimination.




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City of Kingston Accessibility Plan - September 2003

3.0 Our Commitment to Accessibility Planning
Removing and preventing barriers requires coordination with and cooperation among
many parts of an organization. The Ministry of Citizenship recommended that
organizations articulate their commitment to accessibility planning through a mission
statement or corporate goal regarding barrier identification, removal and prevention.
Once endorsed by City Council, this statement of commitment can be communicated
widely throughout the organization and community.

The Accessibility Advisory Committee and Accessibility Project Coordinator developed
the statement of commitment, which they have called a ―value statement‖, found below.
The underlying objective was to articulate a philosophy of placing an accessibility lens
on all municipal activities. The value statement also sought to situate the City’s
commitment to accessibility within the larger context of the City’s corporate mission
statement. To that end, when the accessibility value statement is used, reference will
always be made to the City’s mission statement.



           The City of Kingston’s “Accessibility Value Statement”

The City of Kingston is a community that recognizes people are our most
valuable asset. To create opportunities for all people to enjoy our city and
contribute as productive citizens, we work to remove barriers in City of
Kingston properties and services for persons with disabilities. We define
barriers to include physical and architectural, communication, technological,
and attitudinal impediments. We also create public awareness and educate
both the public, not-for-profit, and private sectors regarding the requirements
of the Ontarians with Disabilities Act, 2001, the Ontario Building Code and
the Ontario Human Rights Code.




                  The City of Kingston’s “Mission Statement”

To enhance the quality of life for present and future generations by
providing progressive, professional services and leadership that reflect the
needs of all those who work, live, visit or play in the City of Kingston.




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City of Kingston Accessibility Plan - September 2003

In order to create conditions and opportunities that will strive to include people with
disabilities in all aspects of living in Kingston, the City of Kingston will implement the
measures described in the Ontarians with Disabilities Act. The City of Kingston will
comply with the Ontarians with Disabilities Act in the following ways:
     Report on the measures the municipality has taken to identify, remove and prevent
        barriers to people with disabilities
     Describe the measures in place to ensure the municipality assesses its proposals
        for by-laws, policies, programs, practices and services to determine their effects
        on accessibility for people with disabilities
     List the by-laws, policies, programs, practices and services the municipality will
        review in the coming year to identify barriers to people with disabilities
     Describe the measures the municipality intends to take in the coming year to
        identify, remove and prevent barriers to people with disabilities, including final
        obligations and funding sources
     Make the accessibility plans available to the public

The approach taken in developing the City of Kingston’s first accessibility plan is ―high
level‖, focusing on where to go and what needs to be done – in a broad, general way.
We took this approach for the following reasons:
     The scope and complexity of operations of a municipality the size of Kingston is
        huge
     The Accessibility Advisory Committee, the Accessibility Project Co-ordinator,
        and Technical Committee were only recently recruited and would need time to
        enhance their capacities to do and support accessibility planning
     The timeframe for plan preparation and public consultation was very short – June,
        July, August and September (4 months)

Recognizing these constraints to our ability to produce a detailed blueprint, we
incorporated structures in this plan to further study our key accessibility issues, with the
objective of developing tactical activities, budgets and schedules that will eventually
remediate the barriers we have identified.




                                            - 10 -
City of Kingston Accessibility Plan - September 2003

4.0 Management Parameters
The City of Kingston established an Accessibility Advisory Committee on November 5,
2002. The first meeting of the Accessibility Advisory Committee was May 12, 2003.

Approval for the hiring of an Accessibility Project Co-ordinator, as a term position, was
given by City Council December 3, 2002. The length of the contract is 18 months, with
the Accessibility Project Co-ordinator beginning the job on June 2, 2003. The
Accessibility Project Co-ordinator works fulltime, supporting the Accessibility Advisory
Committee and City Staff to develop, implement and monitor the City’s Accessibility
Plan. The Accessibility Project Co-ordinator works within the Office of the
Commissioner, Department of Community Services.

A Technical Committee comprised of key staff within the 4 departments of the City was
created in May 2003 to provide input, advice and expertise on accessibility issues in their
division.

The areas within our municipal structure covered by the Accessibility Plan are outlined
below:

Community Services                             Operations
   Social Services, Program Delivery              Transit
   Social Services, Administration                Roads
   Social Housing Program Delivery                Solid Waste
   Cultural Services                              Buildings and Properties
   Fire and Rescue                                Fleet
   Long Term Care (Rideaucrest)                   Parking
                                                   Airport
Planning and Development                       Corporate Services
    Planning                                      Finance
    Building and Licensing                        Human Resources
    Environment                                   Information Systems
    Engineering                                   Council Support
                                                   Client Services
                                                   Legal
Strategic Initiatives and Corporate
Communications




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City of Kingston Accessibility Plan - September 2003

5.0 Barrier Identification and Remediation

5.1   Corporate-wide
     The City of Kingston’s Strategic Plan’s ―Vision Statement‖ proclaims: Kingston
      is a healthy community where history and innovation thrive. People are our most
      valuable asset so we take pride in our local government and ensure prosperity is
      widely shared among our residents.
     The City hired a fulltime employee as Accessibility Project Co-ordinator June 2,
      2003.
     Voice activated call routing is available on both the City’s 546-0000 and 546-
      4291 phone lines. We will be voice activating the 384-1770 phone line (the
      Planning Development Services Department on Midland Avenue) by the end of
      2003. Voice activation provides concise information about services and contact
      persons, based on speech input.

5.2   Buildings and Properties
     Retrofits to washrooms on the main floor of City Hall (for wheelchair
      accessibility) have been made.
     An assisted listening system (wireless microphone and earphone hardware) is
      available in Council Chambers.
     An automated door and wheelchair ramp have been installed at Memorial Centre.
     The Portsmouth Olympic Harbour building has been made wheelchair accessible.
     Installation of an automated door at side entrance of City Hall is planned for late
      2003.
     Accessibility retrofits for the City Hall elevator are planned for late 2003.
     Installation of a wheelchair ramp for 211 Counter Street facility is planned for late
      2003.
     Improvements in wheelchair accessibility at the Grand Theatre are planned for
      late 2003.
     Installation of a wheelchair ramp and other accessibility features at the Social
      Service building on Stephen Street are planned for 2004.

5.3   Cultural Services
     Rotary Park (near Lemoine Point) has an accessible playground.
     McCullough Park (west side of Portsmouth, south of Bath) has accessible swings.
     City Park (south of the Provincial Court House) will get an accessible playground,
      with construction set to begin in November.
     City Park will get accessible splash pads, with construction set to begin in the
      spring of 2004.
     Pathways are being widened to accommodate a variety of mobility issues, at the
      point in their lifecycle that they need to be replaced.




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City of Kingston Accessibility Plan - September 2003


5.4   Engineering
     A Pedestrian Countdown Device is currently being tested at Sir John A.
      MacDonald and Elmwood (next to the Loblaw’s Supermarket). At wide and busy
      intersections, these devices can increase the comfort level of pedestrians by
      providing an indication of the amount of crossing time available.
     An Audible Pedestrian Signal is planned for testing, at the intersection of Sir John
      A. MacDonald and Bath, in late 2003. Audible Pedestrian Signals are particularly
      beneficial for people with vision impairments.
     The current process of installing curb cuts involves public consultation and
      communication. The City’s Construction Supervisor is in regular contact with
      wheelchair users regarding their ―problem‖ intersections. This information is
      integrated with suggestions coming from City Councillors, City Staff, and the
      general public. Potential remediation is prioritized based on vehicle and
      pedestrian traffic volume, and proximity to facilities such as transit, seniors’
      residences, and schools. The list of planned curb cuts is published annually in a
      pull-out section of the bi-weekly newspaper, Kingston This Week. This
      information is also posted on the City’s website, and bulletins are distributed to
      residents in the vicinity of the curb cuts.

5.5   Housing
   In June 2003 the City of Kinston, as the Service Manager, adopted a broad
    ―cascading age‖ policy to ensure an inclusive tenant selection process for a vacant
    geared-to-income accommodation, and to increase the availability of rent-geared-
    to-income units for older adults, including individuals with disabilities.
   A ―modified units‖ inventory, by unit size, is being developed. Currently, 13
    designated supportive housing providers offer ―special needs‖ housing. Sixty-nine
    households were accommodated in modified units with wheelchair accessibility
    and 97 households received supportive services.
   Maps with project locations were prepared and are available at the Social Housing
    Registry and Urban and Rural access Points for all applicants who seek affordable
    housing in the service area. Accessibility features of each unit will be identified
    through a detailed survey and site visits in 2004.
   Housing Providers have been made aware of the Ontarians with Disabilities Act
    and amendments to the Social Housing Reform Act with respect to accessible
    units. As a part of the 2003 training program, a revised Ministry of Municipal
    Affairs and Housing ―Guide to Special Needs Housing‖ was delivered to 13
    designated supportive housing providers.
   A 24-page public information guide ―Rent-Geared-to-Income Assistance and
    Special Needs Housing‖ has been published and is available through the Social
    Housing Registry. The guide is provided as a part of the application package for
    rent-geared-to-income assistance.




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City of Kingston Accessibility Plan - September 2003


5.6     Human Resources
       Policies have been established regarding Employment Equity for designated
        groups – women, native people, and people with disabilities, visible and ethnic
        minorities.
       Corporate training is offered to all employees regarding Human Rights issues, and
        various workshops have been offered that serve to raise awareness about people
        with disabilities.
       Managers and Supervisors across the corporation have been offered training on
        ―commitment to accommodate‖.
       Human Resources staff involved in return-to-work issues have received special
        training.
       Employee Assistance Program information is made available to all employees
        through a print orientation package upon hiring and through regular updates via
        the City’s electronic newsletter, ―eCity News‖.
       A voice-automated system for external job seekers has been installed.

5.7     Kingston Access Services (KAS)1
       A KAS website provides information about services.
       Rider feedback forms are available on all buses.
       A complaint tracking/customer service system is well-established and reviewed
        periodically by the KAS Board of Directors.
       All drivers receive five days of training prior to their job commencement, a half-
        day of which is an education session where they experience being in a wheelchair.
        Drivers also receive training in safety, courtesy, disability awareness, and first aid.

5.8     Municipal Elections
       A working group was formed to investigate ―best case‖ practices in other
        municipalities.
       Research is being undertaken on the feasibility of establishing a ―roving‖ poll.
       A communication campaign will encourage people with disabilities to vote at
        advance polls and thereby avoid delays and receive more comprehensive
        attention.
       A dedicated phone line, and a TTY phone line, will be established to assist people
        with disabilities.
       Workers will receive training related to people with disabilities.
       Print enlargers will be available at voting locations.
       All locations are wheelchair accessible.




1
 Kingston Access Services provides an important transportation service for people with mobility
disabilities in Kingston’s urban and rural areas through the “Access Bus”. Kingston Access Services is an
independently governed organization; the majority of its income comes from the City.

                                                  - 14 -
City of Kingston Accessibility Plan - September 2003


5.9      Parking
        Public consultation activities on accessibility, resulting from the recommendations
         of the Parking Advisory Committee, are currently underway.
        Greater effort is being focused on enforcement related to the misuse of designated
         parking spaces.
        Research is planned to: determine the need for off-street disabled parking spaces;
         review the appropriateness of current dimensions of disabled spaces; and to
         examine the pricing policies for designated parking for people with disabilities.
        The City has provided more than the minimum required number of designated
         spaces.
        It has located many of the designated spaces in its parking garages on ground
         level and close to building exits.

5.10 Purchasing
        City procedures for tendering and evaluating Requests for Proposals will be
         modified to accommodate the Ontarians with Disabilities Act obligations (s.13).2
        It is expected that 3% to 5% of the overall merit of a submitted proposal to the
         City will be based on the assessment of the vendor’s stated accessibility-friendly
         policies and facilities.

5.11 Rideaucrest Long Term Care Facility
        Automated doors, delayed open/close timings on elevators, wider hallways and
         doorways were integrated into the initial architectural design.
        Books on tape are available in the library.
        Telephones with large buttons are available to residents on request.
        Emergency response system includes vibrating pagers and visual alarms for
         people with deaf/hard of hearing impairments.
        Modifications of interior design (lighting, colors, and floor and wall patterns) are
         planned throughout 2004.
        A policy to provide assistive devices required to promote independence for the
         residents of Rideaucrest has been implemented.

5.12 Social Services
        The Social Services Building at 262 Montreal Street is wheelchair accessible.
        Case workers have received training in ―client service‖, related to language and
         literacy.
        Oakwood, the City’s childcare facility, fully integrates children with disabilities
         into all programming, and provides customized care-plans for these children.




2
 Regarding "purchasing", Section 13 of the Act states: In deciding to purchase goods or services through
the procurement process for the use itself, its employees or the public, the council of every municipality
shall have regard to the accessibility for persons with disabilities to the goods and services.

                                                   - 15 -
City of Kingston Accessibility Plan - September 2003


5.13 Transit
     All new buses have a ―kneeling’ feature to improve accessibility.
     All new bus purchases are designed using low-floor technology to eliminate
      entrance and exit steps.
     Easier access elements (such as brightly colored grab-bars and handrails) are
      installed in all new vehicles.
     All drivers are required to take a half-day disability sensitivity training session
      offered by the Canadian Urban Transit Association.
     Maps, schedules, and bus stop signs/route transfers have been color-coded (based
      on advice provided by the CNIB).
     The Transit Building at 181 Counter is wheelchair accessible.




                                         - 16 -
City of Kingston Accessibility Plan - September 2003

6.0 Findings
Three streams of research were undertaken to understand the issues as they relate to
accessibility and the City of Kingston:
    literature review
    external consultations
    internal consultations

Over 27 sources of information related to accessibility were reviewed. A breakdown of
categories is shown below.3

Communicating with persons with disabilities                                                   7
Public sector information addressing accessibility                                             6
Magazines, websites, electronic newsletters of public and not-for-profit organizations         4
addressing accessibility
Quality of Life studies                                                                        4
Accessibility plans from other Ontario municipalities                                          3
Local directories addressing accessibility                                                     3

Some of the information found though the literature review and primary research process
is included in the following appendices:
      Appendix ―A‖: Types of Disabilities and Functional Limitations
      Appendix ―B‖: The Term Disability
      Appendix ―C‖: Statistics Canada Information on Disabilities
      Appendix ―D‖: Literature Sources
      Appendix ―E‖: External Consultations (Methods and Findings)
      Appendix ―F‖: Internal Consultations (Methods and Findings)
      Appendix ―G‖: Municipal Highlights

External consultations, in the form of personal interviews and focus groups, occurred
mostly in June and early July. Approximately 90 people participated in this process.
About half were local service providers. The remaining half was people with disabilities
and caregivers.

Internal consultations occurred mostly in July and early August. Approximately 20
middle- and senior-level managers across the City of Kingston participated in this
process. Approximately half responded to a Ministry of Citizenship survey measuring
municipal accessibility performance. The other managers responded to a questionnaire on
barrier remediation in their functional area.




3
    For a complete list of sources reviewed, please refer to Appendix D: Literature Sources.

                                                     - 17 -
City of Kingston Accessibility Plan - September 2003


6.1 External Consultations: Summary
The issue category generating the greatest number of comments (46) was ―public
education‖, with one and a half times the number of comments as the second most
frequently commented-on issue category. This issue was frequently cited by people with
concerns about a range of disabilities, and can be understood to have a broad base of
support for initiatives addressing information sharing, accessibility awareness, and
respect for others based on the philosophy of inclusiveness.


                                 Issue List, Ranking

                               Public education
                                    Access Bus
            Pedestrian traffic, roads/sidewalks
                             Sensitivity training
                                  Snow removal
                                   Public transit
                                   Programming
       Administration of municipal accessibility
                                        Housing
                Licensing, by-law enforcement
                         Buildings, site reviews
                                        Tourism
                        Accessible washrooms
                       Accessible playgrounds
                                 Special parking
                                          Health
                   Accessible communications
                                  Lemoine Point

                                                    0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 45 50


The next set of concerns addresses critical actual and/or perceived deficiencies in
municipal service provision:
    Access Bus (28)
    Pedestrian traffic (25)
    Sensitivity training (21)
    Snow removal (19)
    Public Transit (18)
    Programming (17)

Criticisms about Access Bus centered on long lead time and narrow eligibility criteria.
Criticisms about pedestrian traffic centered on the accessibility of sidewalks to
wheelchairs and scooters and the need for more, and better signaled, intersections for

                                               - 18 -
City of Kingston Accessibility Plan - September 2003

people with a range of impairments. Sensitivity training (in terms of improved tangible
client service, and also for demonstrating a measure of respect and acknowledgement for
people with disabilities) was seen to be important for all City Staff and City Councillors,
with most of the comments about the need for more training targeting the City’s bus
drivers. Comments about snow removal generally centered on the need to do more, and
do it better. Concerns about programming centered on the need for more programs for
people with various types of disabilities, and the need for pricing mechanisms that
address the common (though not universally experienced) economic hardship of people
with disabilities.

There were a set of comments, grouped together under the label ―Administration of
municipal accessibility‖ (11), which can be seen to be important to the City’s efforts to
improve accessibility, from a public accountability perspective. Concerns were expressed
about the City’s long-term commitment to accessibility, ongoing information collection
and sharing, and the need for broad representation of disability types on the Accessibility
Advisory Committee.4


6.2 Internal Consultations: Summary
In general, the City of Kingston’s degree of commitment to address accessibility issues to
date, as articulated by members of the City of Kingston’s Technical Committee and
summarized by the author, can be understood to be ―good‖. Over 55 projects addressing
barrier removal have been undertaken in the last 12 to 18 months.5

Many of the comments made by the Technical Committee echoed views expressed by
citizens in the external consultations. A few new problem areas were identified and are
listed below:
  There is inconsistent assessment of accessibility in public consultation, planning and
     communication activities across the range of all City activities.
  A comprehensive inventory of accessibility features in municipally owned buildings
     and roads/sidewalks has yet to be developed.
  The City is inconsistent in offering information technology support for people with
     disabilities; and it is not certain that staff have competency in using this technology.
  Social Services’ interviewing and counseling services are not accessible to people
     who have a deaf-hearing or vision impairment.




4
    Please refer to Appendix E: External Consultations for a detailed analysis of the findings.
5
    Please refer to Appendix F: Internal Consultations for a detailed analysis of the findings.

                                                      - 19 -
City of Kingston Accessibility Plan - September 2003

7.0 The Plan

7.1      Accessibility Project Timeline and Resources

                                      Q.3-    Q.4-    Q.1-    Q.2-   Q.3-   Q.4-   Q.1-   Q.2-   Q.3-   Q.4-   Q.1-
Activities                            03      03      04      04     04     04     05     05     05     05     06

Phase 1: Develop the plan
Situation Analysis
Plan Preparation
Consultation
Plan Delivery
Communications

Phase 2: Prepare for
implementation
Management structure linkages
"Options" research
Prioritization & report preparation
City Council review

Phase 3: Implement recommendations
Remediation activities by Divisions
Progress evaluation by AAC
Report to City Council

Phase 4: Accessibility planning beyond 2005
Situation Analysis
Plan Preparation
Consultation
Communications

Most of the project areas will require further ―options‖ research, leading to prioritization
by the Accessibility Advisory Committee and budgeting by Staff from the areas being
remediated, before being implemented. Implementation timelines will need to adjust to
reflect the decisions City Council makes in assessing the budgetary requests from the
Accessibility Advisory Committee. Accessibility budget items will be integrated within
the appropriate Department’s 2004 operating and capital budgets. It is anticipated that
new projects across the Corporation will integrate project specific accessibility related
expenditures into their project proposals.

It is suggested that an Accessibility Advisory Committee member and the Accessibility
Project Coordinator link to as many current City projects as possible, thereby establishing
the foundation for ―placing an accessibility lens on all municipal activities‖. The nature
of the relationship could range from information sharing through the distribution of


                                                     - 20 -
City of Kingston Accessibility Plan - September 2003

reports and comments on reports, to full participation by the Accessibility Project
Coordinator and/or an Accessibility Advisory member(s) in the existing project.
The actual Accessibility Advisory Committee representatives and their terms of reference
on these existing City project committees have yet to be established, and would need to
reflect the input from the City’s Senior Management Group. It is also expected that to
undertake the full range of proposed projects, the size of the Accessibility Advisory
Committee would need to expand from its current size of 5, to 10 or 12.6

The Accessibility Advisory Committee could also link to several of the City’s strategic
planning initiatives currently underway. For example, Public Education projects related
to accessibility would benefit from linking to the City’s ―Livable City Design Awards‖, a
program which recognizes and promotes excellence in urban design, publicizes the City’s
interest in design leadership by example, and assists in raising the quality of life and
image of the City.7

Some of the recommended activities in the Phase 2 of the plan are outlined below:

Management                   Reassess the functions of the Accessibility Advisory Committee
structure linkages            in view of the recommendation for increased activity
                             Recruit new members to the Accessibility Advisory Committee
                             Explore communication linkage options between the
                              Accessibility Advisory Committee and current City projects
                              (departmental project checklists, Accessibility Advisory
                              Committee representation on City committees, creation of task
                              forces, etc.)
Options research             Develop a structure for research and report preparation
                              (Accessibility Advisory Committee and Division Staff),
                              addressing as many of the 8 accessibility project areas as can be
                              reasonably accommodated
                             Consider various financing and funding alternatives
                             Organize public consultation as required
Prioritization and           Consider and articulate criteria for prioritizing remediation
report preparation            efforts
                             Synthesize the various accessibility project reports into a master-
                              plan
                             Consider developing special events associated with
                              implementation activities throughout 2004
                             Prepare a communications plan addressing the proposed
                              remediation projects


6
  The City’s Council Support Division has prepared an analysis of existing projects in terms of estimated
workload. The Accessibility Project Co-ordinator has prepared an analysis of linkages between City
projects and Accessibility Plan priority areas. Both analyses could facilitate the structuring of the linkages
between City projects and AAC members.
7
  More information on the “Livable City Design Awards” can be found on the City’s website at
www.cityofkingston.ca/business/development/livablecity/ or by contacting Mark Gladysz, Heritage
Planner, at 384-1770, ext. 3256.

                                                    - 21 -
City of Kingston Accessibility Plan - September 2003


City Council        Develop a structure for remediation project management (Division
review               Staff and Accessibility Project Co-ordinator)
                    Report quarterly to City Council



All 4 phases of the accessibility plan would require the following resource allocation:

Accessibility Project Co-ordinator:
 Full time, until contract expiry on December 31-04.

Accessibility Advisory Committee:
 Quarterly plenary meetings to monitor project progress and address new issues.
 Remediation project meetings as required.

Divisions:
 Advice to Accessibility Advisory Committee as required.
 Remediation project budgeting (asset purchases and improvements).
 Operational management of the remediation project.




                                           - 22 -
City of Kingston Accessibility Plan - September 2003

7.2    Proposed Remediation Areas
1) SAFETY

2) INFRASTRUCTURE and SERVICE DELIVERY
     Accessibility Audits: Buildings, Snow Removal, and Sidewalks/Roads
     Transportation
     Training
     Programming
     Communications and Information Technology

3) OUTREACH
     Public Education
     Tourism

There are also several ―quick fix‖ accessibility mini-projects that can probably be
implemented quickly and with relatively low cost, occurring concurrently with the other
project areas. These are discussed in Section 7.3.4.

It is expected that the ―Safety‖ projects would have a relatively short time frame for
implementation, perhaps half a year to a year. ―Infrastructure and Service Delivery‖
would have a longer time frame, perhaps a year or more. ―Outreach‖, because of the
broader implications for the entire community and the need to involve a wide range of
stakeholders, would likely have the longest time frame, perhaps two or more years.

The illustration below depicts the conceptualization of accessibility project
implementation.




                                                      Safety


                                                      Infrastructure and
                                                      Service Delivery

                                                      Outreach




                       6 months
                       12 months
                       24 months




                                           - 23 -
City of Kingston Accessibility Plan - September 2003


7.3    Action Plan


7.3.1 “Safety” Projects
Goal
Identify and remediate the most critical barriers that could affect people with disabilities.

Themes/Issues
 Development of ―fire refuge‖ areas in public buildings for people with disabilities
 Electricity generators to charge power wheelchairs and other assistive devices
 Neighborhood inventory of locations of people with disabilities
 Emergency response systems within public facilities (additional visual and audible
   signals, consideration of ―floor warden‖ systems)
 Police and Fire Services (physical and communicational accessibility to crisis
   response systems—signage, safety apparatus instructions, wayfinding mechanisms)
 Sensitivity training for frontline employees

Actions
a) Consider options related to emergency signaling systems in municipally-owned
   facilities (multiple redundancies for vision and hearing)
b) Review emergency management and evacuation protocols considering people with all
   types of disabilities in municipally-owned facilities
c) Consider licensing requirements of private-sector organizations regarding alarm
   signaling and evacuation procedures
d) Develop training as required
e) Do operational, communications and capital planning


7.3.2 “Infrastructure and Client Service” Projects
Accessibility Audits: Public Buildings, Snow Removal, Sidewalks/Roads
Goal
Collect information about accessibility features within buildings, operational procedures
for repairing and budgeting for snow removal, and sidewalk/road improvements related
to accessibility.

Themes/Issues
 Accessibility audits of City-owned buildings, sidewalks and roads
 Development of plans for improved snow removal on public property (bus shelters,
   designated parking spots on public property, better enforcement regarding snow
   removal on commercial property licensed by the City)
 Development of plans for improving road and sidewalk conditions (signals for people
   with hearing impairments, location/height of buttons-switches, textured detectable
   warnings at curb-cuts, duration of pedestrian cycle)



                                            - 24 -
City of Kingston Accessibility Plan - September 2003

   Development of plans for remediating buildings (improved lighting and
    acoustics/sound reinforcement, signage, ramps, provision of wheelchairs at municipal
    facilities, access and storage space for wheelchairs and scooters at municipal
    facilities)

Actions
a) Review RFP protocols for consultants
b) Develop a rationale for prioritization of remediation projects
c) Develop a strategy for installing more accessible washrooms in public facilities; and
   ensuring that the washrooms will accommodate motorized scooters
d) Consider adopting “universal design” standards or some other enhanced-Ontario
   Building Code set of building standards
e) Consider providing assistive devices at all City-owned facilities (wheelchairs,
   walkers, Pocket Talkers, TTY phones)
f) Consider hearing and vision parameters (acoustics, signage, lighting), in addition to
   mobility parameters, when designing or renting public meeting spaces
g) Consider installing more places for people to rest (in buildings, parks, and sidewalks)
h) Do operational, communications and capital planning


Public Transportation
Goal
Improve the level of satisfaction for people with all types of disabilities regarding client
service and the effectiveness of the service provision.

Themes/Issues
 Public Transit + KAS + privately owned (not municipally funded) accessible taxis
 Harmonization of pricing to riders
 Higher client service standards for transit drivers
 Better routes for Public Transit (more direct, more frequent)
 Better route information in vehicles and bus stops (signage, maps)
 Consistent docking stations at shopping malls
 Storage space for wheelchairs/strollers/walkers

Actions
a) Do operational review regarding storage and signage issues
b) Review client “pricing” and “eligibility” policies (consistency across the various
   types of disability and with the general public)
c) Consider more sensitivity training for drivers, and a system for assessing their
   progress in this regard
d) Investigate options related to “accessible taxis” (lower fees, special licenses, free
   licenses, tax incentive)
e) Do operational, communications and capital planning




                                            - 25 -
City of Kingston Accessibility Plan - September 2003


Training
Goal
Improve the sensitivity of staff to the philosophy of “inclusiveness”, and in interactions
with people with disabilities.

Themes/Issues
 Understanding various disabilities
 Knowledge of assistive devices (what the City offers, how to use)

Actions
a. Consider inviting local accessibility/disability service providers to make presentations
   to staff, addressing the theme of “wellness” within employee assistance programming
b. Continue to empower the Corporate Employee Education and Development
   Committee (CEED) to develop accessibility training for employees
c. Continue to integrate accessibility training research with other needs assessment
   surveys being conducted by Human Resources
d. Consider integrating “certification in accessibility training” as part of a staff
   member’s performance review
e. Do operational, communications and capital planning


Programming
Goal
Develop inclusive recreational programming.

Themes/Issues
 Do accessibility audits for recreational programming (evaluating accessibility of
   informational and resource material, image portrayal in promotional catalogues,
   accessibility of registration processes, accessibility of the physical space)
 Consider pricing policies that enable people with disabilities and/or people below a
   certain income threshold, to get discounts on programming
 Consider providing childcare support to enable caregivers with children to participate
   in programming

Actions
a. Consider developing a task force (Legal, Finance, Communications, accessibility
   stakeholders, Accessibility Advisory Committee) to define terms of reference
b. Develop public consultation process
c. Prepare recommendations to City Council




                                           - 26 -
City of Kingston Accessibility Plan - September 2003


Communications and Information Technology
Goal
Improve citizen access to information from/about City Hall (form and content). Improve
the physical access to communication technology on municipal property.

Themes/Issues
 Development and integration of a citizen comment/complaint tracking system
 Identification and removal of barriers related to information technology (height of pay
   phones, availability of TTY phone systems)
 Staff training in using and teaching the use of this technology
 City’s website accessible to people with vision and hearing impairments based on
   recognized guidelines (for example, W3C’s ―Accessibility Initiative‖ or the American
   Architectural and Transportation Barriers Compliance Board’s ―Section 508‖
   requirements)
 City’s print information (minutes of meetings, brochures, directories, advertising,
   available for adaptation in multiple formats (large font, audio cassette, Braille,
   computer disk) and available in a timely manner, City’s print information written in a
   ―plain language‖ manner
 Provision of interpretation and/or assistive listening devices at public meetings for
   people with hearing impairments

Actions
a) Consider options related to the provision of text-reading software for staff and clients
b) Consider options related to assistive listening devices at all client service areas
c) Review the effectiveness of the current system of assistive listening devices in
   Council Chambers and Memorial Hall in City Hall, and Memorial Arena and Grand
   Theatre
d) Consider options related to messaging and public address systems that augment the
   audio transmissions through these devices (electronic billboards, email messaging,
   bulletin boards)
e) Do operational, communications and capital planning




                                           - 27 -
City of Kingston Accessibility Plan - September 2003


7.3.3 “Outreach” Projects

Public Education
Goal
Increase the awareness of City Councillors, the media, and the general public about
accessibility and inclusiveness.

Themes/Issues
 The City as ―enabler/facilitator‖: creating and promoting opportunities for existing
   community service providers to share information with City staff and the general
   public
 Modeling good behavior and values: ―Best case‖ practices of local organizations; an
   awards program acknowledging local leadership in accessibility
 Development of standards (or support for the development of standards by local
   service providers) for the definition of the use ―accessible‖ and usage of the word
   ―accessible‖ for commercial purposes
 Creation of a reliable, current directory of local support services for people with
   disabilities

Actions
a) Organize a series of public education events (i.e. Mayor’s Round Tables) on topics
   such as transportation, tourism, housing, health, for people with disabilities and
   related service providers, integrating with the special events of local accessibility
   service providers
b) Develop an awards program (criteria for nominations, development and solicitation of
   prizes and/or honorary awards for winners) and/or link with existing similar
   initiatives like the “Livable City Design Awards”
c) Consider developing a “mentor” program, whereby local organizations who have
   been acknowledged for their accessibility-friendliness, can partner/support
   organizations interested in becoming more accessibility-friendly
d) Research existing criteria for rating accessibility (work with stakeholder groups)
e) Support the development and distribution of directories, calendars/maps, and web-
   based resources related to the provision of community-based services for people with
   disabilities (perhaps involving the Community Information Centre, local and regional
   libraries, local education providers in conjunction with local accessibility service
   providers)
f) Consider developing mapping and other user interactive databases through the City’s
   GIS unit
g) Do operational, communications and capital planning




                                          - 28 -
City of Kingston Accessibility Plan - September 2003


Tourism
Goal
Increase the number of tourists and visitors to Kingston who have a disability.

Themes/Issues
 Identify existing facilities and features of City-owned/operated, and private-sector
   tourist-related enterprises that are accessible to some degree, with the objective of
   developing a marketing campaign
 Research existing criteria for rating accessibility in partnership with stakeholder
   groups
 Develop mapping and other user interactive databases through the City’s Geographic
   Information Systems (GIS) department
 Tour Trolley is not accessible (mobility, hearing)
 Do operational, communications and capital planning

Actions
a. Consider developing a task force (Information Systems, Strategic Initiatives and
   Communications, Kingston Economic Development Corporation (KEDCO),
   Chamber of Commerce, Downtown Business Improvement Area (DBIA),
   accessibility stakeholders, Accessibility Advisory Committee) to define terms of
   reference
b. Develop public consultation process
c. Develop a plan for making the Tour Trolley accessible
d. Prepare recommendations to City Council


7.3.4 “Quick Fix” Projects
Goal
Begin addressing immediately issues that have a combination of the following
characteristics: low cost, have already been budgeted for, demonstrate the City’s
commitment to accessibility, and set the foundation for further accessibility development.

Themes/Issues
 Provision of Braille on business cards for certain staff and politicians
 Purchasing of a portable assistive listening system for use at City meetings, public
   consultations, and focus groups
 Site plan reviews by the Accessibility Advisory Committee
 Offering of opportunities for Service Providers involved with disability issues to
   make presentations to staff within a Human Resource/Staff Development - Wellness
   framework (EAP workshops, messages on “eCity News”)
 Development of an Accessibility Project web page within the City’s website
   containing information emanating from Accessibility Advisory Committee activity;
   create hyperlinks to other governmental services connected with disability issues, and
   to the Information Kingston website
 Preparation of communications materials associated with meetings, public
   consultations, and focus groups in multiple formats
                                          - 29 -
City of Kingston Accessibility Plan - September 2003

   If road work is being undertaken, to install temporary signage indicating that sidewalk
    passage further down the block is not accessible
   Developing an insert on “inclusiveness, and City of Kingston training opportunities”
    in the new employee/new Councilor orientation package

Actions
a. Upon endorsement by the City’s Senior Management Group and City Council, to
   develop an implementation plan through the Accessibility Project
   Coordinator/Accessibility Advisory Committee.
b. To monitor progress through 2004 and report periodically to the Management Group
   and City Council.




                                          - 30 -
City of Kingston Accessibility Plan - September 2003




  "There are two ways of meeting difficulties.
            You alter the difficulties
     or you alter yourself to meet them."
                        Phyllis Bottome




                              - 31 -
City of Kingston Accessibility Plan - September 2003

APPENDIX “A”: TYPES OF DISABILITIES AND
FUNCTIONAL LIMITATIONS
A person’s disability may make it physically or cognitively hard to perform everyday
tasks such as operating a keyboard, reading a sign, differentiating colours, distinguishing
sounds, climbing stairs, grasping small items, remembering words, or doing arithmetic.
The functional limitations associated with twelve different kinds of disabilities, and the
effects of these limitations on an individual’s ability to perform everyday tasks, are
described below.

Physical
Physical disabilities include minor difficulties moving or coordinating a part of the body,
muscle weakness, tremors and in extreme cases, paralysis in one or more parts of the
body. Physical disabilities can be congenital, such as Muscular Dystrophy; or acquired,
such as tendonitis.

Physical disabilities affect an individual’s ability to:
    Perform manual tasks, such as hold a pen, grip and turn a key, type on a keyboard,
       click a mouse button, and twist a doorknob
    Control the speed of one’s movements
    Coordinate one’s movements
    Move rapidly
    Experience balance and orientation
    Move one’s arms or legs fully, e.g., climb stairs
    Move around independently, e.g., walk any distance, easily get into or out of a
       car, stand for an extended period
    Reach, pull, push or manipulate objects
    Have strength or endurance

Hearing
Hearing loss includes problems distinguishing certain frequencies, sounds or words, and
ringing in the ears and total (profound) deafness. A person who is deaf, deafened or hard-
of-hearing may be unable to use a public telephone, understand speech in noisy
environments, or pronounce words clearly enough to be understood by strangers.

Speech
Speech disability is a partial or total loss of the ability to speak. Typical voice disorders
include problems with:
     Pronunciation
     Pitch and loudness
     Hoarseness or breathiness
     Stuttering or slurring

People with severe speech disabilities sometimes use manual or electronic
communication devices. Individuals who have never heard may have speech that is hard
to understand.

                                             - 32 -
City of Kingston Accessibility Plan - September 2003


Vision
Vision disabilities range from slightly reduced visual acuity to total blindness. A person
with reduced visual acuity may have trouble reading street signs, recognizing faces, or
judging distances. They might find it difficult to maneuver, especially in an unfamiliar
place. He or she may have a very narrow field of vision, be unable to differentiate
colours, have difficulties navigating or seeing at night, or require bright lights to read.
Most people who are legally blind have some vision.

Deaf-blind
Deaf-blindness is a combination of hearing and vision loss. It results in significant
difficulties accessing information and performing activities of daily living. Deaf-blind
disabilities interfere with communication, learning, orientation and mobility.

Individuals who are deaf-blind communicate using various sign language systems,
Braille, standard PCs equipped with Braille displays, telephone devices for the deaf-blind
and communication boards. They navigate with the aid of white canes, service animals,
and electronic navigation devices.

People who are deaf-blind may rely on the services of an Intervener. Interveners relay
and facilitate auditory and visual information and act as sighted guides. Interveners are
skilled in the communication systems used by people who are deaf-blind, including sign
language and Braille.

Smell
Smell disability is the inability to sense, or a hypersensitivity to odours and smells. A
person with a smelling disability may have allergies to certain odours, scents or
chemicals or may be unable to identify dangerous gases, smoke, fumes and spoiled food.

Taste
Taste disability limits the ability to experience the four primary taste sensations:
sweetness, bitterness, saltiness and sourness. A person with a taste disability may be
unable to identify ingredients in food, spoiled food, or noxious substances.

Touch
Touch disability alters the ability to sense surfaces and their texture or quality, including
temperature, vibration and pressure. Touching sensations may be heightened, limited,
absent (numbness), or may cause pain or burning.

A person with a touch disability may be unable to detect (or be insensitive to) heat, cold
or changing temperatures. Alternatively, a person with a touch disability may be
hypersensitive to sound, physical vibrations, or heated surfaces or air.

Intellectual
An intellectual disability affects an individual’s ability to think and reason. The disability
may be caused by genetic factors (e.g., Downs Syndrome), exposure to environmental
toxins (as in Fetal Alcohol Syndrome), brain trauma and psychiatric conditions. A person
with an intellectual disability may have difficulty with:
                                            - 33 -
City of Kingston Accessibility Plan - September 2003

      Language: understanding and using spoken or written information
      Concepts: understanding cause and effect
      Perception: taking in and responding to sensory information
      Memory: retrieving and recognizing information from short- or long-term
       memory
      Recognizing problems, problem solving and reasoning

Mental health
There are three main kinds of mental health disabilities:
    Anxiety: a state of heightened nervousness or fear related to stress
    Mood: sadness or depression
    Behavioural: being disorganized; making false statements or inappropriate
       comments; telling distorted or exaggerated stories

People with mental health disabilities may seem edgy or irritated; act aggressively;
exhibit blunt behaviour; be perceived as being pushy or abrupt; start laughing or get
angry for no apparent reason.

Learning
Learning disabilities are disorders that affect verbal and non-verbal information
acquisition, retention, understanding, processing, organization and use. People with
learning disabilities have average or above-average intelligence, but take in information,
retain it, and express knowledge in different ways. Learning disabilities affect reading
comprehension and speed; spelling; the mechanics of writing; manual dexterity; math
computation; problem solving; processing speed; the ability to organize space and
manage time; and orientation, directions and way finding.

Other
Disabilities that result from other conditions, accidents, illnesses, and diseases, including
ALS (Lou Gehrig disease), asthma, diabetes, cancer, HIV/AIDS, environmental
sensitivities, seizure disorders, heart disease, stroke, and problems stemming from joint
replacement.


Source: Briefing Note from the Association of Municipal Managers, Clerks and
Treasurers of Ontario, distributed at the July 19 and 20, 2003 “Preparing Municipal
Accessibility Plans” workshop; also found on the Ministry of Citizenship’s
“accessibility” website.




                                            - 34 -
City of Kingston Accessibility Plan - September 2003

APPENDIX “B”: THE TERM DISABILITY
The disability continuum
There is no universally accepted meaning for the word ―disability.‖ Most definitions,
however, can be placed on a continuum. At one end of the spectrum, disability is
explained in terms of medical conditions (medical model). At the opposite end, disability
is explained in terms of the social and physical contexts in which it occurs
(environmental model).
                  Design flaw in the                     Health problem in
                  environment                            an individual

The medical model focuses on deficiencies, symptoms and treatments. The World Health
Organization’s (WHO) 1976 definition for disability, for example, is ―any restriction or
lack (resulting from an impairment) of ability to perform an activity in the manner or
within the range considered normal for a human being.‖ Medical model definitions
promote the idea that disability is a deviation from the norm.

Accessibility
Many people with disabilities are troubled by definitions that regard disability as
abnormal, preferring instead to portray disability as commonplace, natural, and in fact,
inevitable. As people age, they experience gradual declines in visual acuity, auditory
sensitivity, range of motion, bodily strength and mental powers. Significant functional
limitations affect almost half of people between the ages of 55 and 79, and over 70% of
people over 80. Beyond middle age, disability is the norm.
The environmental model explains disability in relation to social and physical contexts. In
this view, the environment, not an individual’s medical condition, causes disability. For
example, during an electrical blackout, a person who is completely blind can effortlessly
navigate around the home, hammer nails, and, if a Braille user, read a novel. A sighted
person would be unable to perform these tasks easily, if at all. In this example, the
environment disables the sighted person.
The environmental model emphasizes that people with disabilities are capable human
beings, and that it is barriers, not medical conditions, that are disabling. Disability results
when people design a world for their way of living only, without taking into account the
natural — and foreseeable — variability among human beings. In other words, disability
is a consequence of design flaws in the built and human environments.
All barriers are human-made. If design problems cause barriers, then disabilities can be
eliminated — or minimized — by modifying how we live, the tools we use, and our
intuitions about the proper way to do things. If systemic barriers cause disabilities, the
disabilities can be eliminated by modifications to policies, plans and processes. If
attitudes cause barriers, then disability awareness, respect and an understanding of
positive interaction with people with disabilities will remove barriers.
Specialized medical knowledge may be needed to treat diseases and symptoms, but not to
address barriers. Barriers, not medical conditions, prevent people with disabilities from
participating fully in life.
                                             - 35 -
City of Kingston Accessibility Plan - September 2003


Source: Briefing Note from the Association of Municipal Managers, Clerks and
Treasurers of Ontario, distributed at the July 19 and 20, 2003 ―Preparing Municipal
Accessibility Plans‖ workshop; also found on the Ministry of Citizenship’s
―accessibility‖ website.




                                          - 36 -
City of Kingston Accessibility Plan - September 2003

APPENDIX “C”: STATISTICS CANADA DATA ON
DISABILITIES
Disability by Type, Canadian Population
                                                   ch nta o wn
                                                           n
                                               Sp o pm Un k

                                                         l
                                                      e
                                                    l
                                                  ve

                                                 ee
                                               De



                                             y
                                           or
                               gi arn em
                                         M

                                        g
                                      in
                                   Le

                                    l
                                 ca
                             lo
                          ho

                           g
                 in ein
                        yc
                     Ps

                     Se
                   g
               ar
            He
    in lity
        i
      Ag
  Pa
                                               y
                                 ilit
                               ob




                                                                 0   20   40     60     80
                        M




                               Disability Type Percentage
                                       Mobility              72
                                           Pain              70
                                         Agility             67
                                       Hearing               30
                                        Seeing               17
                                 Psychological               15
                                      Learning               13
                                       Memory                12
                                       Speech                11
                                Developmental                 4
                                     Unknown                  3
                                   Note: 80% of persons 15+
                                     have multiple disabilities




                                                                               - 37 -
City of Kingston Accessibility Plan - September 2003

Disability by Age, Canadian Population

                      Percentage


    65+

  15-64

   0-14

          0      10     20         30   40        50



 Age          Percentage
 0-14                 3.3
 15-64                9.9
 65+                40.5

Source: PALS 2001. The 2001 Participation and Activity Limitation Survey (PALS)
is a post-censal survey of adults and children whose everyday activities are limited
because of a condition or health problem. A sample of those persons who answered "Yes"
to the 2001 Census disability filter questions were included in the PALS survey
population. Approximately 8,000 children (aged 0 to 14) livings in households in the 10
provinces were selected to participate in the children's component of the survey. Persons
living in institutions, on Indian reserves and in the Yukon, Northwest Territories or
Nunavut were excluded. The data were collected after the 2001 Census, between
September 2001 and January 2002. Note that information on children with disabilities
was gathered through interviews with their parents or guardians.




                                             - 38 -
City of Kingston Accessibility Plan - September 2003

APPENDIX “D”: Literature Sources
     Abilities magazine
     Canada Mortgage and Housing, Examining the Housing Choices of Individuals
      with Disabilities
     Enablelink.org
     Federation of Canadian Municipalities, Quality of Life in Canadian Communities-
      2003
     Human Resources Development Canada, A Way with Words
     Human Resources Development Canada, Disability Benefits
     Human Resources Development Canada, In Unison 2000 – Persons with
      Disabilities in Canada
     Inclusion.com
     Independent Living Centre - Kingston, Access Kingston 2001
     Independent Living Centre - Kingston, Access Kingston Tourism
     Independent Living Centre - Kingston, Rural Active Living for People with
      Disabilities
     Industry Canada - Assistive Devices Industry Office, Manager’s Guide to
      Multiple Formats
     Ministry of Citizenship’s Accessibility Directorate, Best Practices in Accessibility
      Planning; A Guide to Annual Accessibility Planning; A Guide to Municipal Accessibility
      Planning; Municipal Obligations; "How To" Guide to Establishing A Municipal Accessibility
      Advisory Committee (AAC);
     Ministry of Citizenship’s Accessibility Directorate, Guide to Government of Ontario
      Programs and Services for People with Disabilities; Guide to Multiple Formats for
      Communications; Planning for Accessible Meetings
     Ontarians with Disabilities Act Committee (newsletters from David Lepofsky)
     Ontario Disability Support Program, ODSP Handbook
     Ontario Ministry of Tourism and Recreation, Open for Business (1991)
     Service Canada Access Centre, A Way with Words and Images
     Service Canada Access Centre, Advancing the Inclusion of Persons with
      Disabilities
     Sisters of Providence of St. Vincent de Paul, Social Audit - City of Kingston, 2003
     Social Planning Council, Quality of Life in Kingston and Area, 2001-2002
     Statistics Canada, PALS and HALS
     Toronto Joint Citizen’s Committee for People with Disabilities, Planning a
      Barrier-Free City of Toronto
     Township of Montague, Accessibility Plan-2002
     Vancouver International Airport Authority, Barrier Free Access
     York Region, Understanding Barriers: York Region’s Accessibility Plan 2003




                                              - 39 -
City of Kingston Accessibility Plan - September 2003

APPENDIX “E”: EXTERNAL CONSULTATIONS
Method: Personal Interviews
    The interviewer and report-writer was the City of Kingston’s Accessibility Project
      Coordinator
    Interviews were unstructured conversation, generally beginning with the
      interviewer asking, ―What do you see as the issues the City needs to address in its
      accessibility plan?‖
    The interviews usually were 1 hour, and were generally conducted at the
      stakeholder’s office.
    The interviews were generally one-on-one, though occasionally there was more
      than 1 representative from a stakeholder organization.
    The interviews referred to in this report were conducted from the beginning of
      June to the end of July, 2003.
Method: Public Consultation Meeting and Focus Groups
    A joint public consultation event was held with Queen’s University on July 3.
      Approximately 40 people attended. The meeting was mobility, hearing and vision
      accessible.
    Participants at the July 3 meeting had the opportunity to voice their concerns.
      Several of the individuals who spoke at this meeting were later interviewed, using
      the method described in the Personal Interview section above.
    Focus groups organized solely by the City of Kingston were held in mid August
      to share information about the first draft of the plan, and solicit comments on the
      draft of the plan. Efforts were made to invite people with disabilities and their
      caregivers (rather than service providers, many of whom had already been
      interviewed). The focus groups were:
          o Seniors with disabilities: Mon., Aug.11, 1:30 to 3:00, Rideaucrest
          o Youth with disabilities: Tue., Aug. 12, 3:00 to 4:30, Rideaucrest
          o General public: Wed., Aug. 13, 5:30 to 7:00, Rideaucrest
    All the focus groups were mobility and vision accessible. The General Public
      focus group was also hearing accessible.
    Comments from focus groups participants that were not already noted from earlier
      data collection methods were integrated in the overall reporting of frequency of
      issues.

Notes about the grouping of respondent remarks
    The Number preceding the issue label is the number of times related remarks
       within a category were expressed.
    Category labels were developed by the interviewer/report-writer
    The remarks made by respondents were generally offered without prompting by
       the interviewer. Occasionally, the interviewer would probe a comment made by
       the respondent, and this often generated more comments on that particular issue.
    This is qualitative analysis, and should not be understood to be statistically
       reliable information.



                                         - 40 -
City of Kingston Accessibility Plan - September 2003

Consultation Log
          8 Personal interviews with people with disabilities and caregivers
         35 Public consultation at Queen’s (Jul. 3-03)
         14 Focus group #1 (Aug. 11-03)
          4 Focus group #2 (Aug. 12-03)
         12 Focus group #3 (Aug. 13-03)
 Subtotal =
         73

            Personal interviews with local service providers:
CHS         Canadian Hearing Society
CMHA        Canadian Mental Health Association
CNIB        Canadian National Institute of the Blind
COA         Frontenac Kingston Council On Aging
CPA         Canadian Paraplegic Association
ESS         Easter Seal Society
FCMHS       Frontenac Community Mental Health Services
FOLP        Friends of Lemoine Point
Health Unit KFLA Health Unit
KAS         Kingston Access Services
KDCIC       Kingston District Community Information Centre
KDACL       Kingston and District Association for Community Living
KEYS        Kingston Employment and Youth Services
LDAK        Learning Disabilities Association, Kingston
MSS         Multiple Sclerosis Society
NKCHC       North Kingston Community Health Centre
ODSP        Ontario Disability Support Program—Employment Support (Ministry of
            Community, Family and Children’s Services)
OMOD        Ontario March of Dimes
SPC         Social Planning Council of Kingston and Area
UW          United Way, KKLA
Subtotal =
20
            Total = 93




                                         - 41 -
City of Kingston Accessibility Plan - September 2003

46 - Public education
Description                                                                       Frequency
Create special events and public education events that encourage people               9
with all types of disabilities to participate
Identify Best Case practices; profile supportive business and NGO leaders            8
Develop or adopt a rating system for businesses and other organizations              8
licensed by the City
Identify and utilize opportunities to permit service providers to share              6
information regularly with the broad community
Develop a ―citizenship awards‖ or ―mayor’s roundtable‖ event; consider               5
developing experiential sensitivity events for City Councillors, the Media,
and the Public
Use simple language in print communications                                          3
Emphasize the positive in media relations                                            2
Obtain statistics related to accessibility                                           2
Use more images showing people with disabilities in positive activities              1
Utilize the City’s website                                                           1
The Ministry of Citizenship’s video ―Through Other Eyes‖ is good                     1

28 – Kingston Access Service (Access Bus)
Description                                                                       Frequency
Existing special transportation service needs to be increased or augmented           14
(reservation lead time is too long, eligibility criteria too restrictive, many
seniors have had driver’s license revoked)
Support an ―access taxi‖ system (special car/van; chits for eligible clientele)      10
Other options (use of volunteers, etc.)?                                              4

25 - Pedestrian traffic, road and sidewalk conditions, street lighting, street signage
Description                                                                      Frequency
Install more audible traffic signals                                                 5
Ensure the incline of curb-cuts and ramps meets building code; a 1‖ lip is           4
too difficult to cross
Repair bumps and cracks in sidewalks and roads                                       3
Increase the duration of the crossing time at John A. and Princess                   2
Create more places to rest (benches, etc.)                                           2
Street numbers on house are difficult to see: Develop incentives for                 1
landlords and tenants to use large numbers; develop an interactive GIS
system for public use; add house number range to street signs
There needs to be more attention paid to replacing burnt-out bulbs in                1
overhead lamps
Install ―Under Construction‖ or ―No Exit‖ signage when doing sidewalk                1
repairs on all corners of the block
Develop and distribute a map or other document showing current and                   1
planned sidewalk and road repairs
Place traffic signal buttons in a location that is accessible for people in          1
wheelchairs

                                           - 42 -
City of Kingston Accessibility Plan - September 2003

Design sidewalks that incline to both edges from the sidewalk centre               1
Install a crosswalk at Johnson and John A.                                         1
Install sidewalks on John A.                                                       1
Install sidewalks in north-end                                                     1

21 - Sensitivity training for City employees, City Councillors
Description                                        Frequency
Bus drivers                                           10
All staff                                              4
City Councillors                                       3
Tourism operators (ticket vendors, guides, etc.)       1
Life guards                                            1
Librarians                                             1
Snow plow drivers                                      1

19- Snow removal
Description                                                                     Frequency
Increase the snow removal budget; make the system more effective                   10
Operational procedures for snow plowing create new problems (block                  3
driveway, mounds of packed snow difficult to walk across, paths to/from
bus shelters, etc.)
Ensure narrow streets and bus shelters are cleared quickly                         3
Educate citizens to do more to remove ice and snow on their own property           3

18 - Public transit
Description                                                                     Frequency
Create more frequent and direct routes to locations frequented by people            4
with disabilities or others who experience barriers to inclusion
Allocate space on buses for wheelchairs, walkers and strollers                     2
Ensure that buses at the Kingston Shopping Centre consistently dock at the         2
same location.
Review pricing policy (e.g., $25/yr. annual for people with vision                 3
impairments, subsidies for people below a certain income level, etc.)
Steps to buses too steep; ―kneeling‖ bus feature not used enough                   2
Bus signs should have route maps, indicating the direction flow of the route.      1
The signage should be readable by people with vision impairments
Ensure that bus drivers don’t accelerate from a stop until all passengers are      1
seated
Improve Sunday service                                                             1
Improve service to Fairmount Home (Glenburnie)                                     1
Expand the job description of bus drivers to require that they help people         1
with wheelchairs, walkers, etc.




                                          - 43 -
City of Kingston Accessibility Plan - September 2003

17 - Programming
Description                                                                       Frequency
Offer financial support and incentives to people with disabilities to enroll in       5
recreational, job-training programs, and attend City-sponsored events
Develop more programming that is disabled-friendly (emphasize                        3
commonality, acknowledge differences)
Offer support to organizations to do progressive and comprehensive job               3
training for people with developmental disabilities
Offer financial support and incentives to people with disabilities to hire           2
childcare to permit them to enroll in programming and attend events
Offer more programming for people with disabilities in rural areas of the            1
municipality
Clarify the guidelines for the funding of social service programs by the City        1
Support NFP organizations in preparing funding proposals to the City                 1
Create more programs teaching use of the internet; make computers more               1
available

11 – Administration of municipal accessibility
Description                                                                       Frequency
Provide permanent, or at least long term, financial support for a City of             3
Kingston Accessibility Office
Support needs to be provided to citizens who want to attend public meetings          2
but need childcare
Don’t exclusively rely on City Hall to address accessibility: Self-advocate;         2
join citizen action groups
Accessibility Advisory Committee needs representation of all disability              2
types
How can someone get on the Accessibility Advisory Committee                          1
How can individual citizens and citizen groups make their opinions known             1
to City Hall?

9 - Housing
Description                                                                       Frequency
Create more RGI housing for people with disabilities                                  3
Create more public housing for youth with disabilities                                2
Mixing older and younger tenants is problematic                                       2
The amount of documentation required to get an accessible apartment in                2
Public Housing is onerous

9 - Buildings, site reviews
Description                                                                       Frequency
Get professional expertise to support Accessibility Advisory Committee                2
Public meeting places need better acoustics and assisted listening devices            2
Install more tactile markers and floor indication chimes in elevators                 1
Install better lighting in all City-owned buildings                                   1
Deaf and hard-of-hearing people need visual fire alarms                               1

                                            - 44 -
City of Kingston Accessibility Plan - September 2003

Evacuation and crisis management strategies should address accessibility            1
The City should move to establish higher levels of accessibility than those         1
provided in the Ontario Building Code… well-designed building benefits
everyone

9- Licensing and by-law enforcement
Description                                                                     Frequency
Pressure restaurants to install accessible doors, washrooms and ramps               2
Enforce the by-law that requires shop and restaurant owners to remove               2
obstacles (flower boxes, sandwich-board signs, etc.)
Pressure movie theatres to offer better seating for people with mobility            1
impairments
Pressure landlords to install visual fire alarms and door bells for deaf and        1
hard-of-hearing tenants (currently it is the tenant’s expense)
Ensure that shopping malls comply with existing by-law to make floors less          1
slippery
Enforce existing parking by-laws related to disabilities strictly                   1
Enforce by-laws dealing with jay-walking and aggressive driving behavior            1

7 - Accessible washrooms on waterfront and downtown
Description                                                      Frequency
Increase the number of accessible washrooms in the downtown core     4
The washroom in the Tourist office is not accessible to scooters     2
Ensure that the washrooms are accessible year-round                  1

7 - Tourism
Description                                                                     Frequency
Develop Kingston as a desirable destination for people with disabilities            3
Rate local tourism service providers in terms of accessibility                      2
Make the Confederation Tour Trolley Bus accessible                                  1
Encourage public- and private-sector partnerships to support a tourism              1
marketing initiative

3 - Accessible playgrounds
Description                                                                    Frequency
Seek ways of offsetting the high cost of playground equipment                       2
Increase the number of accessible playgrounds                                       1

3 - Special parking
Description                                                                     Frequency
Motivate shopping malls to enforce the exclusive use of their special               2
parking spots by those holding permits
Create more designated spaces                                                       1




                                          - 45 -
City of Kingston Accessibility Plan - September 2003

2 - Health
Description                                                           Frequency
Ensure more health services are accessible (examination tables, etc.)     2

2- Accessible Communications
Description                                                                     Frequency
Offer information about municipal services, programs, bills, etc. in multiple       1
formats
Improve voice-mail service at City Hall (simpler, connection with live             1
operator 24/7)

1- Lemoine Point
Description                                                      Frequency
Need for financial support to make Lemoine Point more accessible     1




                                          - 46 -
City of Kingston Accessibility Plan - September 2003

APPENDIX “F”: INTERNAL CONSULTATIONS
Method
    The researcher and report-writer was the City of Kingston’s Accessibility Project
      Co-ordinator.
    Respondents were the City’s Technical Committee/Working Group.
    Initially, representatives of 12 divisions/departments comprised the Technical
      Committee. The size of this group grew to 19 divisions and departments at the
      time of this writing.
    Data collection consisted of surveys and/or interviews, and took place from July
      to early August, 2003.
    Interviews were generally 1 hour, and were conducted at the respondent’s office
      or in a board room at City Hall.
    Interviews were generally one-on-one, though occasionally there was more than 1
      representative from a division/department.
    One of two survey tools were used: The Ministry of Citizenship’s Accessibility
      Quotient (which poses 67 questions on municipal accessibility)8; or a 5 question
      survey (developed by the Accessibility Project Co-ordinator) addressing barrier
      identification, removal, and communication strategy.

Internal Consultations: Issue Rankings from the
"Accessibility Quotient" Survey

The survey was developed by the Ministry of Citizenship for the municipality's
Working Group.
The rankings are interpretations made by the researcher based on a combination
of surveys and interviews.
The numbers in the ranking categories are percentages (frequency of occurrence
in a category/number of questions).
The number of questions in each category varies (from
3 to 14).




8 The original twelve members of the City of Kingston’s Technical Committee received an audit tool called
the Accessibility Quotient Audit. The audit identified the municipality’s present accessible facilities,
policies, programs and services and identified some barriers to accessibility. This barrier identification
became the starting point for activities to be completed in 2003/04 for the 2003/04 Municipal Accessibility
Plan.


                                                  - 47 -
City of Kingston Accessibility Plan - September 2003

Technical Committee: How much is the City doing regarding accessibility?

                                             "Not at     "Somewhat" "Quite a      "Don't
                                              all"                    bit"        know"
Municipal Practices                              0.20          0.40       0.40        0.00
Human Resources                                  0.00          0.75       0.25        0.00
Council and Administration                       0.00          0.22       0.56        0.33
Planning                                         0.18          0.54       0.18        0.09
Housing                                          0.00          1.00       0.00        0.00
Operations                                       0.00          0.78       0.11        0.11
Transportation                                   0.00          0.75       0.25        0.00
Social Services                                  0.14          0.14       0.57        0.14
(admin./childcare/OW/Rideaucrest)
Cultural Services                                0.33           0.66       0.00       0.00

                                    median       0.00           0.66       0.25       0.00


Technical Committee/Working Group: Consultation Log
Buildings and Properties               Barclay Mayhew
Communications                         Kim Jamieson and Laura Seiffert
Cultural Services                      Kristine Hebert
Elections                              Carolyn Downs and Kathy Irwin
Emergency Response                     John Cross
Engineering                            Deanna Green
Fire and Rescue                        Carl Young
Housing                                Mila Kolokolnikova
Human Resources                        Debbie Lavallee
Information Systems                    Jim de Hoop
Legal Services                         Alan McLeod
Parking                                Paul Nichols and Greg McLean
Planning                               George Wallace, Shirley Bailey, Cherie
                                       Mills, Mark Gladysz
Purchasing                             Janis Morrison
Rideaucrest                            Bonnie Carter, Rose Bell, and John Smith
Roads                                  Damon Wells
Social Services                        Tanie Steacy and Adéle Lafrance
Strategic Initiatives                  Sheila Hickey
Transit                                Malcolm Morris
 Total: 28 people over 19 areas




                                        - 48 -
City of Kingston Accessibility Plan - September 2003

APPENDIX “G”: MUNICIPAL HIGHLIGHTS
Location
 The City of Kingston is located on the north shore of Lake Ontario where the lake
   flows into the St. Lawrence River. Kingston is situated halfway between Toronto and
   Montreal.

Population
 108,158 persons (2001 Census Canada)

Council/Government Seat
 Mayor and 12 District Councillors. (Term of office Dec. 1 , 2000 to Nov. 30, 2003)

Heritage Resources
 Over 350 buildings and 1 Heritage District, the Market Square, designated under the
   Ontario Heritage Act in the former City of Kingston
 21 properties, 1 cemetery, and 1 Heritage District, Barriefield Village, designated
   under the Ontario Heritage Act in the former Pittsburgh Township
 The Rideau Canal operates as a functional navigable waterway and is designated as a
   National Heritage Site
 The Frontenac County Court House, the dry docks of the Museum of the Great Lakes
   and Kingston General Hospital also are designated as National Heritage Sites

Economic Development
 According to Census Canada (1996), the major employers operate in the area of
   health and social services (14.4% of workforce), government services (13.7%),
   education (13.5%), retail trade services (12.8%), hospitality services (8.4%), and
   manufacturing services (7.4%).
 Total labour force in the City is approximately 57,000 individuals
 In 1998, 3.1 million tourists/visitors spent $250.5 million dollars in the former
   Frontenac County, which includes Kingston
 Agriculture is a viable industry in the City, and employs more than 500 persons
 Total 1996 farm gates sales, from the City’s 237 farms, was $15.1 million dollars and
   total farms expenditures were $13.4 million. In addition the Frontenac and Pittsburgh
   Institutions produced over $1.8 million dollars worth of food products (1992 fiscal
   year)
 The historic Downtown accounts for 28% of the City’s commercial space, includes
   1,500 residential units and is home to about 3,000 persons
 In 1998, 62% of the commercial space was situated within the old City, with 37% in
   the former Kingston Township and 2% in the former Pittsburgh Township
 The City-owned airport is evolving as a regional service centre and was used by over
   76,000 passengers in 1999
 The new City has sufficient land designated in its three Official Plans for retail
   commercial growth for the next 20 years.



                                         - 49 -