EXAMPLE FOREST STEWARDSHIP PLAN by fhv85860

VIEWS: 27 PAGES: 16

									   EXAMPLE FOREST STEWARDSHIP PLAN


 ALL INFORMATION IN THIS REPORT IS
USED FOR EXAMPLARY PURPOSES ONLY.
  THE INFORMATION AND DATA ARE
EXERPTS FROM A SPECIFIC PROJECT AND
CANNOT BE APPLIED TO OTHER REPORTS.
                                      TABLE OF CONTENTS

I.     GOALS AND OBJECTIVES …………………………………………………………3
II.    PROPERTY DESCRIPTION AND DISCUSSION …………………………………….3
       A)   Property Location         …………………………………………………………………...3
       B)   Property Description      …………………………………………………………………...3
       C)   Property Map      …………………………………………………………………………...4
       D)   Management Compartments          …………………………………………………………...5
       E)   Climate …………………………………………………………………………………...8
       F)   Land Use History …………………………………………………………………………...8
       G)   Public Issues: Impact of forest management activities …………………………………...8
       H)   Social, Economic, and Market Conditions        …………………………………………...9
III.   INVENTORY ……………………………………………………………………….9
       A)   Type of Cruise and Accuracy …………………………………………………………...9
       B)   Stocking Table ………………………………………………………………………….10
       C)   Forest Insect and Disease Infestations ………………………………………………….11
       D)   Fire Hazard Rating       ………………………………………………………………….11
       E)   Soil Types        ………………………………………………………………………….12
       F)   Access, Roads, and Trails        ………………………………………………………….14
       G)   Aquatic, Riparian, or Wetland Features ………………………………………………….14
       H)   Landmarks and Cultural Features        ………………………………………………….14
       I)   Noxious Weeds ………………………………………………………………………….14
       J)   Wildlife Species ………………………………………………………………………….14
       K)   Threatened and Endangered Species      ………………………………………………….15
       L)   Recreational, Scenic, and Aesthetic Resources ………………………………………….15
       M)   Archeological Sites      ………………………………………………………………….15
V.     MANAGEMENT PRESCRIPTIONS, IMPLEMENTATION SCHEDULE, AND
       IMPLEMENTATION RECORDS …………………………………………………15
       A) Management Discussion and Prescriptions     ………………………………………….15
       B) Annual Work Plans with Implementation Records  ………………………………….17
VI.    LITERATURE CITED              ………………………………………………………..27
VII. APPENDICES             ………………………………………………………………28
       A) Wildlife Species Lists    ………………………………………………………………….29
       B) Noxious Weeds             ………………………………………………………….35




                                   Example Forest Stewardship Plan
                                                  2
                                   I. GOALS AND OBJECTIVES

The goals for this plan were developed by the landowner through conversations and a site walk.
      a) wildfire mitigation,
      b) improvement in forest health and vigor,
      c) habitat preservation, and
      d) production of forest products for markets in Colorado.

These goals may be achieved through the implementation of the following objectives:
       a) creation of wildfire defensible spaces around all buildings,
       b) forest thinning to reduce canopy density and competition between trees, and
       c) sanitation cutting of trees infected with dwarf mistletoe, Arceuthobium vaginatum.



                       II. PROPERTY DESCRIPTION AND DISCUSSION


A) Property Location
The XXX property (address) is located X miles west of X , El Paso County, Colorado.

                                            Address




B) Property Description
The approximately XX acre property ranges in elevation between 6600’ and 7200’; and is bordered by
XX Canyon Road to the south and is adjacent to the XX Creek on the north (see property on page 4).
A riparian area bisects the property into a western and eastern component, no other wetlands were
found. Ponderosa pine trees (Pinus ponderosa) form pure stands on southern slopes and mix with
Douglas-fir (Psuedotsuga menziesii) and Rocky Mountain Juniper (Juniperus scopulorum) on
northern, eastern, and western slopes. Small grasslands are apparent in the southern portion of the
property. Evidence of previous thinning can be found throughout all treatable areas and few mature
trees (older than 200 years) are present. The vast majority of all trees on site are young and small in

                                   Example Forest Stewardship Plan
                                                  3
      Property Map

Example Forest Stewardship Plan
               4
diameter. Dwarf mistletoe (Arceuthobium vaginatum) is moderate to severe in many places, and in
conjunction with drought, has resulted in some tree mortality; no mountain pine beetle infested trees
were found. The understory contains a robust mixture of grasses, forbs, sedges, and shrubs; typical
understory genera include: Carex, Bromus, Ribes, Juniperus, Artemisia, Heterothecia, Achillea, and
Penstemon. Cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum) is the most abundant noxious weed. Soils are coarse in
texture and are derived from decomposed granite. The property is adjacent to mining claims and
several exploration pits were observed on the property.

C) Management Units
Five primary management compartments were identified to facilitate management plan
implementation; these units were delineated on the basis of topography, aspect, access, or stand
condition. These large units were subsequently subdivided to create annual work units; treatment
priority is based on wildfire mitigation needs. The five primary management compartments are
described subsequently.




                                  Example Forest Stewardship Plan
                                                 5
Unit 1                          12.7 Acres
Unit 1 lies north and west of the residence;
the northern portion of this unit is north
facing and has gradual slopes that range
between 5 and 15%. Ponderosa pine is the
dominate tree in this area, Douglas-fir and
juniper are also present. Canopy closure is
approximately 50%. Tree density is high,
typical of northern slopes. Few large,
mature trees remain due to logging. Most
trees are less than 12 inches in diameter
and are short.        Dwarf mistletoe is
moderate to severe through this area, and occasionally results in tree mortality. The landowner
seeks to reduce the incidence of mistletoe and stand density in this compartment. 30 to 40%
canopy closure will be a restoration target for this area.

Unit 2                          9.3 Acres
Unit 2 lies on the southern portion of the
property and is adjacent to the Road. This
area is relatively flat and easily accessed
from the driveway via an old skid road.
Large, open grown ponderosa pine trees
form a sparse canopy allowing light to
reach the ground resulting in a productive
understory. Canopy closure in this area is
approximately 30%.        Dwarf mistletoe
needs to be treated by removing infected
trees and increasing tree spacing.
Reductions in stand density were also requested by the landowner who seeks to promote a
grassy meadow interspersed with large trees in this area. An old foundation is directly adjacent
to the eastern property boundary of this unit.




                           Example Forest Stewardship Plan
                                          6
Unit 3                          13.1 Acres
Unit 3 lies between the residence and a
riparian corridor to the east that bisects the
property into eastern and western
components.      This compartment faces
northeast with steep slopes that exceed
30% in many places.             This unit is
extremely dense with excessive small
diameter in growth.        Douglas-fir and
ponderosa pine are present in nearly equal
proportions. The topographic position of
this compartment results in a robust
understory and overstory and based on fuel load, type, and proximity, poses a wildfire hazard to
the residence. This stand also contains a riparian area which supports a diverse community of
grasses, forbs, and sedges further enhancing the habitat value of the property.

Unit 4                          8.5 Acres
Unit 4 lies on the western portion of the
property and faces west. Slope ranges
between 10 and 30% in most places.
Western exposure creates a more arid
condition and as a result, tree density is
slightly lower than on eastern and northern
slopes.      Many large fir trees are
interspersed with the more abundant
ponderosa pine trees. Dwarf mistletoe is
less prevalent here than in other parts of
the landscape; no other diseases or insect
infestations were observed.

Unit 5                         8.8 Acres
Unit 5 lies on the northeastern portion of
the property and is divided into two units,
5A and 5B. Slopes range between 30 and
50% making management difficult.
Subunit 5A is dominated by medium size
Douglas-fir trees that form a closed
canopy. Little light reaches the ground
and few understory plants exist as a result.
This unit also contains several rock
outcrops that further impede access.
Subunit 5B is similar to Unit 2 on the
eastern portion of the property and will most likely be a low treatment priority due to
inaccessibility.




                           Example Forest Stewardship Plan
                                          7
D) Climate
Temperature and precipitation vary with altitude and aspect; higher elevations are typically cooler and
receive more moisture; northern aspects are cooler than southern aspects. The average frost free period
ranges between 90 and 110 days; no temperature data is available. Annual precipitation ranges
between 18 and 24 inches, most of which comes as snow at higher elevations.

E) Land Use History
“The town of XX, Colorado, was founded in January, 18xx. Captain XX traveled by wagon train up
the South Platte River, then up the St. Vrain …... At this site, which they called XX, they made camp
on October 27, 18XX.

Like many places along the Front Range of Colorado, XX and the surrounding areas probably
experienced extensive timber cutting for mine props, railroad ties and fuel wood. Meadows and forests
were also likely to have been used for grazing. Subsequent fire suppression led to the overstocked
forest condition present today.

F) Public Issues: Impacts of forest management activities on neighbors and the community
Public issues as related to natural resources include management actions that are likely to affect the
health, productivity or character of adjacent properties and the surrounding community. It is
anticipated that some neighbors may express concern about forestry operations and their visual
impacts. Management actions at the XX property will address wildfire mitigation, forest health, and
habitat preservation; therefore, impacts to adjacent properties will be positive.

G) Social, Economic, and Market Conditions
These proposed management prescriptions are based on restoration goals, forest conditions, landowner
objectives and market conditions. Timber resources in the Front Range of Colorado have little
economic value due to several factors including: small average tree diameter, underdeveloped or non-
existent markets, and terrain inaccessibility.


                                         III. INVENTORY


A) Type of Cruise and Accuracy
The property was cruised with randomized variable point samples. A total of 13 points were sampled
throughout the property which included height estimations and diameter at breast height
measurements. Summary data and cruise accuracy are presented below. The site index for this area is
low, approximately 40. The site index is a measure of site productivity that typically ranges between
20 and 70 for the Front Range of Colorado. This number is the average height of a 100 year old
dominant tree. Measurements made on the property indicate that this forest has low productivity, few
large trees, and excessive stocking in small diameter (<12”) size classes. Cruise data was analyzed
with BIOCRUZ, a program developed by the USDA Rocky Mountain Forest and Range Experiment
Station. See Appendix A for this data.




                                   Example Forest Stewardship Plan
                                                  8
B) Forest Insect and Disease Infestations
Dwarf mistletoe (Arceuthobium vaginatum) is moderate to severe in many places, and in conjunction
with drought, has resulted in some tree mortality; no mountain pine beetle infestations were found.

C) Fire Hazard Analysis
Fire is a natural part of ponderosa pine ecosystems. Historically, fires regulated tree density and
species composition, reduced the amount of dead biomass, maintained clearings, and promoted
nutrient cycling (Covington and Sackett 1988). Fire suppression has changed the spatial pattern and
ecological process of these ecosystems. As a result, recent fire behavior in the central Rocky
Mountains has been outside the historical range of variability both in terms of fire size and intensity.
Consequently, forest fuels and structure must be managed to reduce the risk of catastrophic wildfire
and to return these ecosystems to an ecologically sustainable condition.

Fire simulation models can be used to predict fire behavior and prioritize management treatments.

This property is typical of Front Range
fuel models. There are overgrown “dog
hair” stands of ponderosa pine on east
and south facing slopes and mixed or
pure stands of Douglas-fir on north
facing slopes. The fire behavior would
increase on steeper slopes and denser
stands. The property has a driveway
that serves as a good fuel break with
adequate turnarounds for emergency
equipment. There are also several other
trails that could be cleared to allow
some emergency vehicles better access
to the property. Roads would also be
used for thinning operations.         The
propane tanks are buried and there are
two 2,500 gallon cisterns that could be
used to draft. The cisterns are located in
the garage approximately 100 meters up
the driveway from the house. These
should be clearly labeled.




                                    Example Forest Stewardship Plan
                                                   9
       Units 1 and 3 pose the greatest wildfire hazard to the residence. These units are on steep
       slopes that range between 5 and 35% and contain dense stands of mixed conifer trees (fuel
       model 10). A surface fire could quickly transition to a crown fire because of abundant ladder
       fuels, and dead and down material on steep slopes. These units have been sub-divided and
       identified in the prescriptions as a top priority. Thinning should be heaviest on the top of the
       slopes nearest the home; all slash should be removed from the site and residual trees should be
       limbed to a height of 6 feet.


D) Soil Types
Soil is a dynamic natural body composed of mineral and organic materials and organisms in which
plants grow (Brady 1984). The chemical, physical and biological properties of soil determine its
suitability for various uses. Two soil types occur on the XX Property: the Fern Cliff-Allens Park-Rock
Outcrop Complex, and the Peyton-Juget Series.

       Fern Cliff-Allens Park-Rock Outcrop Complex (FcF)
       This complex is made up of about 30 percent Fern Cliff stony sandy loam, about 30 percent
       Allens Park graveled, sandy loam, and about 20 percent rock outcrop. This complex is in the
       western part of the area.
       Fern Cliff soils are mountain side slopes and short fans. Allens Park soils are on ridges and
       side slopes, and on saddles between the ridges. Rock outcrop is throughout the area, but
       mainly on ridges.

       Peyton-Juget Series (PgE)
       This complex is on the uplands in the western part of the area. These are open park-like areas
       mainly more than 20 acres in size. This complex consists of about 65 percent Peyton very
       gravely loamy sand and about 20 percent Juget very gravely loamy sand.
       Runoff is slow to medium on this complex. The erosion hazard is moderate to high. Tillage of
       most areas is limited by the amount of gravel.
       All the acreage of this complex is used for pasture, recreation, and wildlife habitat. Some areas
       are used for home sites. (Capability unit VIIs, non-irrigated; tree suitability group 2)

E) Access, Roads, and Trails
The XX property can be accessed by XX Canyon Road.
Several old skid trail roads exist in the southwestern and
northwestern portions of the property and are indicated in
orange on the adjacent map. These roads can be improved to
access Units 1, 2, and 3. Unit 4 will require only limited access
that can be developed by extending the western portion of the
logging road in Unit 3.



F) Aquatic, Riparian, or Wetland Features on the Property

                                    Example Forest Stewardship Plan
                                                  10
The property abuts the XX Creek to the north and contains one drainage in the center of the property
(running north/south) that may carry surface water in the spring as snow melts. These corridors
support a robust understory of grasses, forbs, sedges, and shrubs that provide habitat and forage for
many wildlife species. The XX Creek is indicated in blue on the adjacent map. No other aquatic or
riparian resources are present.

G) Landmarks and Cultural Features
Cultural features on the property include one house and three out buildings that are visible on the
Property Map above. The property also contains several mining exploration pits; an old house
foundation is located directly adjacent to the XX property, on the southeast property border.

H) Noxious Weeds
Noxious weeds are plants that are not native to the ecosystem where they are
found.

Cheatgrass was the only noxious weed observed on the property. It is broadly
distributed in the southern and northwestern portions of the property. Additional
information about this plant and its control is provided in the Appendix B.
Additional sources of information for the management of noxious weeds are also
provided.

I) Wildlife Species
The montane ponderosa pine zone contains several diverse wildlife habitats including sparsely forested
savannas, dense secondary growth thickets, aspen stands, and grassy meadows (Benyus 1989). While
no wildlife species were directly observed on site, there are a host of mammal, bird, reptile and
amphibian species that may utilize this area. The impact forest management activities will have on
these animals will vary on a case by case basis. A list of all species and their habitat preference is
provided in the Appendix C.

J) Threatened and Endangered Species
While no special status species (Federal or State threatened and endangered) are known to exist on site,
the area does fall within the range of 19 listed animals. A list of these species is provided in Appendix
D with their probability of occurrence.

K) Recreational, Scenic and Aesthetic Resources
There are no established recreational uses on this property; however the area affords many picturesque
views of meadows and mountain landscapes.

L) Archeological Sites
No archeological sites or resources are known to exist on the property.




        IV. MANAGEMENT PRESCRIPTIONS, IMPLEMENTATION SCHEDULE, AND

                                   Example Forest Stewardship Plan
                                                 11
                                   IMPLEMENTATION RECORD


Forest management prescription actions are designed to direct a forest towards a desired future
condition. Management prescriptions are developed by identifying current conditions and comparing
them with desired future conditions.

Landowner goals for forest management of this property are in line with forest restoration and wildfire
mitigation goals for Front Range ponderosa pine forests.
    1) XXX
    2) XXX
    3) XXX

Based on current stocking levels, approximately XX cubic feet of wood per acre needs to be removed
from this forest. The amount removed from each unit will vary, with the most dramatic reductions in
density occurring on the southern portion of the property. The thinning activities prescribed in this
plan will promote the healthy growth of larger trees that may be subsequently marked for saw logs or
dimension lumber.

To facilitate program implementation, management prescriptions, the implementation schedule, and
the implementation record have been combined into one page summaries that are displayed as annual
work plans.       Suggested performance standards for forest operations including equipment
specifications, operational restrictions, road specifications, erosion, and slash treatment options are
provided in the Appendix E.




                                   Example Forest Stewardship Plan
                                                 12
             ANNUAL WORK PLAN: 2004                                               IMPLEMENTATION RECORD: 2004
MANAGEMENT UNIT: 3A                                        2.9 ACRES
                                                                           ESTIMATED HARVEST VOLUME       ACTUAL HARVEST VOLUME
STAND PRESCRIPTION:
                                                                             X Ac. X X cuft/Ac. =X cuft
This unit presents the greatest fire danger to the XX residence and is
therefore the highest priority.
       1) Thin from below by removing saplings and small trees less
            than 12” DBH                                                 DATE OF COMPLETION:______________________________________
       2) Sanitation cut: remove diseased, damaged, and suppressed
            trees
       3) Thin to a target basal area of 60 sq.ft./ac.                   COMMENTS: _______________________________________________
       4) XXX                                                            _________________________________________
                                                                         _________________________________________
                                                                         _________________________________________
                                                                         _________________________________________
                                                                         _________________________________________
                                                                         _________________________________________
                                                                         _________________________________________
                                                                         _________________________________________
                                                                         _________________________________________
                                                                         _________________________________________
                                                                         _________________________________________
                                                                         _________________________________________
                                                                         _________________________________________
                                                                         _________________________________________
                                                                         _________________________________________

                                                        Example Forest Stewardship Plan
                                                                      13
            ANNUAL WORK PLAN: 2005                                             IMPLEMENTATION RECORD: 2005
MANAGEMENT UNIT: 1A                                     2.9 ACRES
                                                                        ESTIMATED HARVEST VOLUME        ACTUAL HARVEST VOLUME
STAND PRESCRIPTION:
                                                                          X Ac. X X cuft/Ac. = X cuft
This unit is adjacent to the XX residence and is in Zone 2 of the
properties defensible space.
       5) Thin from below by removing saplings and small trees less
           than 12” DBH                                               DATE OF COMPLETION:______________________________________
       6) Sanitation cut: remove diseased, damaged, and suppressed
           trees
       7) XXXX                                                        COMMENTS: _______________________________________________
       8) XXXX                                                        _________________________________________
                                                                      _________________________________________
                                                                      _________________________________________
                                                                      _________________________________________
                                                                      _________________________________________
                                                                      _________________________________________
                                                                      _________________________________________
                                                                      _________________________________________
                                                                      _________________________________________
                                                                      _________________________________________
                                                                      _________________________________________
                                                                      _________________________________________
                                                                      _________________________________________
                                                                      _________________________________________
                                                                      _________________________________________

                                                     Example Forest Stewardship Plan
                                                                   14
                                EXAMPLE LITERATURE CITED

Armstrong, D.M. 1972. Distribution of mammals in Colorado. University of Kansas Museum of
      Natural History Monograph 3:1-415.

Covington, W.W., and S.S. Sackett. 1988. Fire effects on ponderosa pine soils and their management
      implications. Pages 105-111. in J.S. Krammes (technical coordinator) Effects of Fire
      Management of Southwestern Natural Resources. USDA Forest Service, Rocky Mountain
      Forest and Range Experiment Station, Ft. Collins, CO. General Technical Report RM-191.

Kaufmann, M.R., P.J. Fornwalt, L. Huckaby. 2003. Ponderosa pine/Douglas-fir classifications for
      South Platte and similar areas. USDA Rocky Mountain Forest and Range Experiment Station.
      Unpublished Data.

Stebbins, R.C. 1985. Western reptiles and amphibians. Second edition. The Easton Press. Norwalk.
       Conn. 336pp.
Steel, E.D. 1960? Rare Keepsakes: History and Laws of Gold Hill, Edward Dunsha Steel 1829-1865.
        Boulder, CO
USDA Soil Conservation Service. 1975. Boulder County Area, Colorado. USDA Soil Conservation
     Service in cooperation with the Colorado Agricultural Experiment Station.




                                  Example Forest Stewardship Plan
                                                15
                                       APPENDIX A

                                XXX Forest Inventory
                              Per Acre Summary for all Species

                                     HEIGHT CLASS
     DBH     10    20   30      40      50    60     70     80      90   100   110 TOTAL
STEMS 4     112     0    0       0       0     0      0      0       0     0     0   112
CUVOL 4      11     0    0       0       0     0      0      0       0     0     0    11
SCRIB 4       0     0    0       0       0     0      0      0       0     0     0     0

STEMS   6   83     14    0       0      0      0      0         0   0     0     0    98
CUVOL   6   57     16    0       0      0      0      0         0   0     0     0    73
SCRIB   6    0      0    0       0      0      0      0         0   0     0     0     0

STEMS   8   25     91    0       0      0      0      0         0   0     0     0   116
CUVOL   8   38    257    0       0      0      0      0         0   0     0     0   295
SCRIB   8   19    366    0       0      0      0      0         0   0     0     0   385

STEMS 10     6     52    5       0      0      0      0         0   0     0     0    63
CUVOL 10    14    228   30       0      0      0      0         0   0     0     0   272
SCRIB 10    48    311    0       0      0      0      0         0   0     0     0   359

STEMS 12     0      4    9       0      0      0      0         0   0     0     0    13
CUVOL 12     0     23   79       0      0      0      0         0   0     0     0   102
SCRIB 12     0     22   25       0      0      0      0         0   0     0     0    46

STEMS 14     0      1    3       1      0      0      0         0   0     0     0     4
CUVOL 14     0      8   30      12      0      0      0         0   0     0     0    51
SCRIB 14     0     22   78      38      0      0      0         0   0     0     0   138

STEMS 16     0      1     3      2      0      0      0         0   0     0     0     6
CUVOL 16     0      7    40     56      0      0      0         0   0     0     0   103
SCRIB 16     0     17   125    218      0      0      0         0   0     0     0   361

STEMS 18     0     0     0       0      0      0      0         0   0     0     0     0
CUVOL 18     0     0     0      14      0      0      0         0   0     0     0    14
SCRIB 18     0     0     0      61      0      0      0         0   0     0     0    61

STEMS 22     0     0     0       0      0      0      0         0   0     0     0     0
CUVOL 22     0     0     0      13      0      0      0         0   0     0     0    13
SCRIB 22     0     0     0      51      0      0      0         0   0     0     0    51

TOTAL---------------------------------------------------------------------------
STEMS 0    226   162    19     4     0     0     0     0     0     0     0   412
CUVOL 0    121   539   179    95     0     0     0     0     0     0     0   934
SCRIB 0     66   738   228   368     0     0     0     0     0     0     0 1401

PER ACRE SUMMARY
 STEMS    BA DBH   HT           LIMIT OF ERROR AT 1 STANDARD DEVIATION = 8%
    412   96 6.5   25           BAF USED= 10      POINTS = 13    AVG. TREES/PT.= 9.6




                              Example Forest Stewardship Plan
                                            16

								
To top