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					Lions Clubs International Foundation



     Three Decades of Serving Humanity:
            An Overview of LCIF
            What is LCIF?
• Humanitarian arm of LCI (established1968)
• A nonprofit (501-C3) with tax exempt status
• The only Lions foundation serving the entire
  world and all 1.4 million members
            Primary Service Aims:
           Humanitarian Services
    Eradication of Blindness and Disability
     Disaster Relief and Reconstruction
       Children’s Health and Welfare
 How does LCIF help Lions?

• Helps Lions respond collectively and effectively
  to major global humanitarian concerns
• Enables Lions-to-help-Lions…especially in
  times of calamity and disaster
• Funds projects too big for districts/clubs to do
  on their own
• Develops relevant grant-making initiatives to
  help Lions better serve the world community
• Leverages Lions’ financial support to raise
  funds from a growing number of governments,
  other foundations, and corporations
         LCIF Governance
• LCIF Governance and Advisory Structure:

              Board of Trustees
          LCIF Executive Committee
           LCIF Finance Committee
        SightFirst Advisory Committee
       Lions Quest Advisory Committee

• LCIF earned 4-star rating (highest) from
  Charity Navigator for sound fiscal
  management and very low administrative
  costs
             LCIF has come a long way
                 in three decades
  Five major grant programs
addressing a wide range of                 25
humanitarian challenges                    20

                                           15
                                US $ in
   Grants average $15           Millions
                                           10
million per year, $35 million
with SightFirst included                   5

                                           0
                                                94-95 95-96 96-97 97-98 98-99 99-00 00-01 01-02
   More than 20 million                                          Lionistic Year
people are served annually
                                     Standard        Major/Emergency      Intl Assist   Core Four
           Highlights of 2002-2003
Grants = US$31 million awarded for 504
individual grants
                                         35
Donations = US$18 million
                                         30
                                                          Donations
     ALSO in 2002-03:                    25
                                         20
 Disbursed nearly $2 million for
 Sept.11th victim assistance             15               Grants
 initiatives                             10
 and $3 million to rebuild               5
 earthquake-ravaged areas in
                                         0
 Gujarat, India                               2002-2003

 Initiated two school-rebuilding
 projects in Afghanistan
                      Highlights of 2002-03:
                    Updates on Grant Awards
SightFirst Grants
•   $14.9 million for 53 projects to fight
    avoidable blindness throughout
    developing world
Standard Grants
•   $5.8million for 133 Lions humanitarian
    service projects in 40+ countries
Emergency Grants
•   157 grants for $1.35 million
Core 4 Grants
•   63 grants for $4.7 million
International Assistance Grants
• 38 grants for $0.5 million
                Highlights of 2002-03:
             Key Program Developments
LCIF acquires Lions Quest (LQ)
• New Lions Quest Dept.
• LQ endorsed as a model drug
  prevention program in USA
• International expansion
  continues

Special Olympics-Lions Opening
  Eyes Program extended
• Program will expand to 40 - 50
  countries by 2005
• 40,000 mentally retarded
  persons have benefited
• New training curriculum for
  medical schools will improve
  eye care for mentally retarded
         Highlights of 2002-03:
  Lions Affordable Hearing Aid Initiative


• Hearing impairment affects 250 million people
• Hearing aids too costly for 90% who need them
• LCIF has helped develop world’s most
  affordable hearing aid.
Looking Back, Looking Ahead
• LCIF’s humanitarian impact has grown
  tremendously in last decade
• Partnerships with governments and other
  international funding agencies have created
  new opportunities for LCIF
• Your support of LCIF is critically needed:
  need for support is greater than ever due
  to expanded grant-making role of LCIF
                Standard


 Core 4                         Int’l Assistance
               LCIF Grant
              Opportunities

             Division Manager
SightFirst                        Emergency

                 Major
               Catastrophe
  LCIF Grant Programs -- Overview
       (Non-Disaster Grants)
• Standard Grants: Matching grants of up to
  $75,000 for local humanitarian service
  projects. (2 per district)
• Core 4 Grants: Funds special projects in
  eyesight, disability, health, and youth (1 per
  district). Grants up to $200,000.
• SightFirst Grants: Blindness prevention and
  sight restoration projects in neediest areas
• International Assistance Grants: Supports
  club twinning projects; Up to $30,000 (1 per
  district)
   Standard Grants
         What are Standard Grants?
 Broadest category of LCIF funding
    133 grants in 02-03 for $5.8 million

 Matching funds up to US$75,000
 Supports larger-scale Lions projects
 Bottom Up: Lions identify/develop projects
     Typical Standard Grant
             Projects
•Mobile Health Units
•Hospices, Nursing Homes
•Street Children’s Homes
•Medical Units
•Blind and Disabled Welfare
Centers
•Eye Clinics and Research
Centers
•Schools in Developing
Countries
 Standard Grants: Key Criteria
  Funding parameters                    Key Rules:
• Primarily capital funding
                              • Several clubs need to be
only (bricks and mortar)
                              involved (min 2-3)
• Funding is for specific
projects (not general         • Local Lions must raise at
operating support)            least ½ of required local
• Must address important      matching funds
humanitarian need             •Application must be
• Serves a large population   endorsed by district cabinet
• Cost must be beyond local   • Project must have a strong
fundraising capabilities      Lions identity and Lions
• Cost-effectiveness imp.     volunteer involvement
  Standard Grant Project Budgets
   Budget Parameters       • Income
                           •   15 clubs (collected) $12,000
• must show income and     •   District (pledged)         2,000
  expense                  •   Community (collected)        500
                           •                (anticipated) 1,500
• need balanced budget     •   LCIF request              14,000
                           • TOTAL                   28,000
• Lions funding should
  be itemized (# clubs?)   • Expense
                           •   2 vision testers   $11,000
• show status of each      •   1 hearing machine    8,000
  funding source           •   Refurbish exam room 9,000
                           • TOTAL                   28,000
Standard Grant Review and Approval


• Applications due 60 days before board mtg;
  those received early have a faster review
• Staff pre-reviews applications; clarifications
  and changes may be requested
• LCIF Exec. Committee reviews applications
  that meet all preliminary requirements.
• Applications are either approved (sometimes
  with conditions), tabled (pending further
  information) or denied
• LCIF Grant money is not disbursed until local
  funds are collected
                Core 4 Grants
• Narrower focus than Standard grants
• Supports special initiatives under the four
  primary service commitments of Lions:

         Preserving Sight Promoting Health
        Serving Youth Combating Disability

• 1 to 2 funding priorities adopted under each
  of the 4 areas on a rotating basis
• Grants are given on a 3-to-1 matching basis
  in most instances (25% local funding)
          How does Core 4 work?

• Grants can only be awarded to the board-
  designated Core 4 Funding Priorities
• Partnerships often play a key role (e.g.,
  Special Olympics, Habitat, etc)
• Separate grants forms exist for each funding
  priority (Contact LCIF or go to www.lcif.org)
• Some funding priorities are limited to multiple
  and single districts
• Unlike Standard grants, Core 4 can fund
  some project operating expenses; also local
  monies can be raised over life of project
Current Core 4 Funding Priorities
• Preserving Sight
   Low Vision Projects
   Children’s Eye Photoscreening
• Combating Disability
   Partnership with Habitat for Humanity
   Partnership with Special Olympics “Opening Eyes”
• Promoting Health
   Diabetes Prevention and Treatment
• Serving Youth
   Expansion of Lions-Quest Program
International Assistance Grants (IAG)
 What is an IAG?
 • Smaller grants to support international
   twinning-type projects
 • Need Lions club in at least 2 countries to
   partner (a sponsor and host club)
 • Sponsor club/district raises some funding and
   applies for grant; host club helps implement
 • Grants are between $5,000 and $30,000;
   grants $10,000 and under reviewed
   continually
Typical IAG Projects

      • Eyeglass and medical missions
      • Clean water and wells
      • Equipment for Blind and
      Disability Rehab Centers
      • Environmental Protection
      • Rural Development
             Emergency Grants

• LCIF’s first-line response to
disaster situations
• $10,000 available to districts
affected by natural disasters
• Lions purchase supplies to
meet immediate needs:
      food, water
      clothing, bedding
      medicines
      hygiene products
       Regulations for Emergency
                 Grants
•    Disaster must be large in
    scope, displacing or
    affecting many people (50
    or more)
•    LCIF funds Lions-led
    relief activities
•    Grant must be requested
    within days of disaster
•    Funds must be spent
    within 30 days
•   One grant per disaster
Update on SightFirst Program



            SightFirst:
    Making the world free from
            darkness
            Why SightFirst?:
           Burden of Blindness
• 45 million blind, 135 million with visual
  impairment
• 80% preventable or curable
• 90% occurs in developing countries
• Main causes:
   • Cataract
   • Trachoma
   • Onchocerciasis/river blindness
   • Glaucoma, diabetic retinopathy & macular degeneration
            What is SightFirst?

• Global blindness prevention
program launched in 1990
• Goal: significantly reduce
preventable and curable blindness
through sustainable and long-term
programs
• $200 million has been raised for
SightFirst, including $144 million
donated by Lions during Campaign
SightFirst
SightFirst has responded in 3
        primary ways:
• Controlling Blinding Diseases
   Hundreds of SightFirst projects are against Cataract,
    River Blindness, Trachoma, Diabetic Retinopathy

• Training Desperately Needed Manpower
   Regional training centers have been developed or
   expanded in S. Asia, Africa, SE Asia and E. Europe

• Strengthening Eye Care Infrastructures
   improving eye care delivery systems in 79 countries
        Overview of SightFirst
           Achievements

• $148 million approved for 625 projects in 79
  countries
• Restored sight to 3,401,000 million cataract blind
• Treat 10 million people/yr for river blindness
• Built/expanded 154 eye hospitals
• Upgraded with new equipment and training 296
  eye units
• Trained more than 13,886 eye care workers
• Expanded 5 regional training centers
        SightFirst Highlights:
  Crusade Against Blinding Cataract
SighFirst has made significant
  progress by:
• Organizing mass surgical
  camp campaigns
• Increasing surgical output
  at 250+ eye units
  worldwide
• Training manpower in
  Africa, Asia, Pacific
• Mobilizing Lions in 30+
  nations
• Reducing costs for cataract
  surgery – now as low as
  $20
       SightFirst Highlights:
     Combating River Blindness
Problem:
• 17 million infected
• 250 million at risk and needing
  treatment
Before SightFirst:
• Treatment in 13 countries
• Only 10 million people treated

After SightFirst:
• 11 more countries with
   treatment programs
• 28-30 million treatments yearly
• SF makes possible 1/3 of all
   treatments worldwide
                SightFirst Highlights:
                Combating Trachoma
Problem:
•   Bacterial infection linked to poverty
    and poor sanitation
•   6-9 million blind, mostly affecting
    mothers and children
Response of SightFirst:
• Large-scale SF projects underway
  in Ethiopia & Sudan treating
  hundreds of thousands.
• SF projects in Mauritania, Senegal
  and Mali are building capacity for
  surgical treatment of trachoma
• Lions are also conducting health
  education, clean water, and
  sanitation initiatives
              SightFirst Highlights:
            New Childhood Blindness Project
• 1.5 million children needlessly
  blind - One goes blind every
  minute!
• SightFirst approved a US$3.75
  million childhood blindness
  initiative with WHO
        • Project Goals:
• Establish 30 pediatric eye care
  centers worldwide
• Improved treatment for cataract
  and retinal diseases in children
• Train 6000 eye health workers in
  25+ countries in primary eye care
 SightFirst Future Challenges
• Diabetic retinopathy now a major problem
  worldwide – SF has pilot projects under way
  in 5 countries
• More initiatives against trachoma are needed
• River blindness treatment programs need to
  continue for possibly another 10 years
• Rising life expectancy is increasing rate of
  blindness in many regions
• Still many under-served regions – e.g.,
  Central Asia, Iraq, Afghanistan
    “We Serve” So Others May See
SightFirst Partnering
Organizations:
World Health Organization
The Carter Center
IAPB-Vision 2020
Merck and Co.
Pfizer   Eli Lilly
International Trachoma
Initiative (ITI)
Governments and Ministries
of Health
Numerous NGOs
Your Role as a Lion



  What Can You Do
  To Support LCIF?
LCIF Strives For Financial Efficiency

How are Lions donations used?
• 100% of donations are used to fund grants – 75% of
  donations from each year are used for grants the
  next year; the 25% balance is placed in short-term
  reserve to fund grants in years when donations are
  below $10 million or investment returns are negative.

• All LCIF administrative expenses are paid from
  interest income or reserves. Administration costs are
  kept very low – a 10.7 percent average over the last
  10 years

• LCIF reserve funds are prudently invested to allow for
  increased future grant making.
        LCIF Strives for Program
             Effectiveness
• Grant applications are reviewed by
  technically trained staff and advisors
• Technical partnerships with WHO and others
  provide quality
• LCIF staff and trustee members inspect and
  follow-up on many projects
• Grant initiatives and programs are developed
  with a goal of maximizing Lions’ humanitarian
  impact
• LCIF grants are often leveraged against local
  funding and other funding sources to ensure
  sustainability of projects
            Did you know?
  Facts About LCIF Donations Sources
• 95 percent of LCIF donations come
  voluntarily from Lions – either from
  individuals, clubs or districts.
• But there are surprisingly some clubs that
  have never supported LCIF
• LCIF receives only about 2% of Lions’ global
  donations in a given year (based upon A1
  form)
• LCIF has been working hard to raise
  donations from corporations, foundations,
  and governments
   Why increased donations are needed?

45,000,000
40,000,000
35,000,000
30,000,000
25,000,000
                                                  Grants
20,000,000
                                                  Donations
15,000,000
10,000,000
 5,000,000
         0
          1995/96   1997/98   1999/00   2001/02



      Grants awards and demand for LCIF funding
          now exceeding donations received
 Impact of a donation to LCIF
• A donation to LCIF can:
  US$20 - provide for a cataract surgery in
   Africa & South Asia
  US$50 - support diabetic retinopathy eye
   exam in developing countries
  US$100 - provide low vision eye exam &
   glasses in the industrialized world
  US$1,000 - treat 1,000 individuals in Africa
   for river blindness
  LCIF Donor Recognition
        Programs

      Melvin Jones Fellowship
Initial and Progressive US$1000
              or higher
  • Contributing Membership (3
     levels) US$20, $50, $100
      • LCIF Legacy Program
  Donation to LCIF through gift
 annuities, stocks and bequests
    Melvin Jones Fellowships
         What to know?
• MJF Donations support Grant Programs
• 70% of all LCIF donations
• MJF Donations cannot be restricted unless Board
  authorized
• Recipient can be named later
• Partial payments possible - $100 min.
• Memorial MJFs
• 100% MJF Club Banner when all
members become MJF
       Contributing Memberships
            What to know?
• Annual Program
• New pin each year
• 3 Levels of Support for LCIF
   Basic - US$20
   Silver - US$50
   Gold - US$100


• Entire clubs can easily become LCIF
  Contributing Members – cost of a dinner out
• 100% clubs receive club banner patch for that
  year
 New Way To Support Your Foundation:
  LCIF LEGACY PROGRAM
• LEGACY PROGRAM offers new “Planned
  Giving” options that allow you to support LCIF
  through estate plans and annuities…often
  with tax benefits.
• LCIF Charitable Gift Annuities give a
  guaranteed investment return for life, with the
  principle coming to LCIF upon death
• Information on Legacy program at LCIF
  exhibit booth
  How to Track Donation Activities?
  Donation Reports Issued by LCIF
• Each quarter, LCIF issues reports to
  each District Governor and District LCIF
  Chairman showing:
  Donations processed during the past
   quarter from district
  Clubs in a district with available donations
   towards future Melvin Jones Fellows
  List of all Melvin Jones Fellows in district
Promoting LCIF During Club Meetings

• Preparation:
    Check club’s donation history and any current balances
     towards next MJF and un-named MJFs
    Check web site for a story or program update about LCIF to
     share with club
• Ideas to promote LCIF donation and pride in club
    Encourage a tradition of honoring outgoing president with
     MJF or honor an important public figure
    For clubs with limited resources, challenge them to become
     a 100% contributing member club
    Educate the club about LCIF: Show the new LCIF video or
     use materials from new LCIF 2003-04 CD Rom
             Need more info?
  Publications, Presentations & Reports
 Visit www.lionsclubs.org and
  www.lcif.org for grant
  publications and other brochures;
  program updates
 Other videos available for order
 Brochures in all official languages
 Email: lcif@lionsclubs.org for
  reports on donations and grants
  by district
 Provide your email address to
  receive Chairperson’s new
  electronic newsletter

				
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posted:3/24/2008
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