Academic Pathways and Partnerships: Transition through Collaborative Programming

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Current Lit Abstracts
Academic Pathways and Partnerships: Transition
through Collaborative Programming
Eddy A. Ruiz

The following citations for research and resource materials focus on K-16 academic pathways and partnerships.



Introduction                                                            Venezia, A., Kirst, M.W., & Antonio, A.L. (2003). Betray-
                                                                            ing the college dream: How disconnected K-12 and
       Over the years, the American education system has                    postsecondary systems undermine student aspirations.
undergone constant transformation. Connections between                      Stanford, CA: Stanford Institute for Higher Education
secondary and post-secondary institutions have remained                     Research.
at times loosely coupled or nearly nonexistent as commu-                      America’s high school students have greater educa-
nity colleges separated from high schools to establish their            tional aspirations than ever before. Eighty-eight percent of
niche in higher education while four-year colleges and                  8th graders expect to participate in some form of
universities maintained their ivory tower status. Since                 postsecondary education, and approximately 70% of high
the mid 1980s, this separation has steadily been viewed                 school graduates actually do go to college within two years
as increasingly problematic as policymakers and corpo-                  of graduating. These educational aspirations cut across
rations have sought to increase efficiency and specializa-              racial and ethnic lines; as with the national sample cited
tion. Both internal and external forces have begun to push              above, 88% of all students surveyed for Stanford
for system-wide collaboration and quality education that                University’s Bridge Project, a six-year national study, in-
meets the needs and aspirations of students and the na-                 tend to attend some form of post-secondary education in-
tion. The research presented provides insight into ob-                  stitution. In each of the six states studied—California,
stacles that can hinder the creation of a seamless K-16                 Georgia, Illinois, Maryland, Oregon, and Texas—for this
education system and ways in which some institutions                    report, over 80% of African-American and Latino students
and states have sought to overcome barriers to collabora-               surveyed plan to pursue some form of postsecondary edu-
tion. This bibliography offers both qualitative case stud-              cation. But states have created unnecessary and detrimen-
ies and quantitative national data sets to address pre- and             tal barriers between high school and college, barriers that
post-secondary academic pathways and partnerships.                      are undermining these student aspirations. The current
The findings have broad implications for local, state, and              fractured systems send students, their parents, and K-12
federal programs and policies designed to enhance insti-                educators conflicting and vague messages about what stu-
tutional collaboration and college access.                              dents need to know and be able to do to enter and succeed
       ERIC documents (references with “ED” numbers)                    in college. High school assessments often stress different
may be read on microfiche at approximately 900 libraries                knowledge and skills than do college entrance and place-
worldwide. In addition, the full text of many documents is              ment requirements. The coursework between high school
available online at http://www.eric.ed.gov. Journal ar-                 and college is not connected; students graduate from high
ticles may be acquired through regular library channels,                school under one set of standards, and three months later
fr
				
DOCUMENT INFO
Description: Connections between secondary and post-secondary institutions have remained at times loosely coupled or nearly nonexistent as community colleges separated from high schools to establish their niche in higher education while four-year colleges and universities maintained their ivory tower status. Since the mid 1980s, this separation has steadily been viewed as increasingly problematic as policymakers and corporations have sought to increase efficiency and specialization. Based on hundreds of interviews with teachers and counselors, thousands of surveys with students and parents, and a thorough examination of the policies and practices in California, Georgia, Illinois, Maryland, Oregon, and Texas, this book offers recommendations for bridging the gap between high school and college and for improving college admission and graduation rates.
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