SPATIAL BEHAVIOUR, CARE AND WELL BEING OF THE ELDERLY IN DEVELOPING COUNTRY - NIGERIA by ProQuest

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									SPATIAL BEHAVIOUR, CARE AND WELL BEING OF THE ELDERLY
           IN DEVELOPING COUNTRY – NIGERIA



                       Abidemi R. Asiyanbola
         Department of Geography and Regional Planning,
                    Faculty of the Social Sciences,
                     Olabisi Onabanjo University,
                       Ago-Iwoye, Ogun State,
                                Nigeria
       E-mail: siyraimi@yahoo.com or demisyra@hotmail.com




Abstract:
      The elderly constitute an increasing proportion of Nigeria’s
population, and yet the concerns and needs of the elderly are yet to
feature prominently in major policy debates. In this contribution I
examine spatial behaviour, care, and well-being of the elderly (age >
60 years) (n = 107) in Nigeria. The data used is from a larger
household survey carried out by the author in Ibadan, Nigeria. Simple
frequency analysis and correlation statistical techniques were used to
analyze the data. Analysis of the daily activities of the elderly revealed
that they are generally more involved in service to others, followed by
household maintenance, domestic chores and social activities. Also,
about 50% of the elderly sphere of activities is within 1Km from their
house location. Result of the correlation analysis indicates a negative
relationship between (i) psychological distress and household income
and education level of the elderly and (ii) care of the elderly and their
intra-urban travel. It also indicates a positive relationship between
psychological distress and intra-urban travel of the elderly.
Implications as it relates to the empowerment and enhancing the
contributions of older persons to the development of culture, economic,
and social activities are discussed in the paper.

Introduction
    Population ageing is conventionally defined as the increase in the
proportion of elderly in the population. Although, being old can occur
at different chronological ages, determined by the prevalent socio-
cultural milieu, or even the specific context of sub-groups within




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Ife PsychologIA


society, the more frequently used in defining the elderly is cut-off age
of 60 years and above (WHO, 2001; Hunter and May, 2003). I
								
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