Technology review: simulation by any other name . .

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Technology review: simulation by any other name . . Powered By Docstoc
					          Technology review:
            simulation by any
              other name . . .



                       W
Mark Harris                  hether    it is called “gaming,” “case studies,”
                             “scenario-based learning” or any of perhaps a
Mr. Harris is a
professor of English   dozen	other	names,	the	use	of	simulation	in	teach-
at Schoolcraft         ing, training, and learning is continuing to expand.
College in Livonia,
Michigan.                 Simulation has a long and storied history. Some
                       experts point to military training as far back as the
                       Roman Empire to find the prototypes for mod-
                       ern simulation, where various types of technol-
                       ogy — from barrels with sticks protruding that were
                       twirled to help train swordsmen, to virtual patients
                       in hands-on medical simulators that used haptics
                       to respond to trainees’ interventions — are used to
                       provide practice without real consequences.
                           In the twentieth century, simulators have been
                       used extensively in the same tradition for aviation
                       and marine pilots. Edwin Link patented the first
                       flight simulator (dubbed “The Pilot Maker”) in
                       1929, and his AN-T-18 Basic Instrument Trainer
                       was	standard	equipment	at	every	US	and	Allied	Air	
                       Training school during WWII where it trained per-
                       haps as many as 500,000 airmen (Ennis 1981).
                           The computer revolution has transformed sim-
                        ulations a
				
DOCUMENT INFO
Description: Some experts point to military training as far back as the Roman Empire to find the prototypes for modern simulation, where various types of technology-from barrels with sticks protruding that were twirled to help train swordsmen, to virtual patients in hands-on medical simulators that used haptics to respond to trainees' interventions- are used to provide practice without real consequences. According to Michael Bean (2008), staff writer for For io Corporation, designer and distributor of business simulations, simulations have three core characteristics.
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