Spiritual Well-Being in Individuals With Fibromyalgia Syndrome: Relationships With Symptom Pattern Variability, Uncertainty, and Psychosocial Adaptation by ProQuest

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									 Research and Theory for Nursing Practice: An International Journal, Vol. 23, No. 1, 2009




    Spiritual Well-Being in Individuals
      With Fibromyalgia Syndrome:
      Relationships With Symptom
     Pattern Variability, Uncertainty,
       and Psychosocial Adaptation
                           Cheryl Anema, RN, PhD
                                Purdue University Calumet

                         Mary Johnson, PhD, RN
                    Janice M. Zeller, PhD, RN, FAAN
                             Louis Fogg, PhD
                                     Rush University

                          Joan Zetterlund, PhD, RN
                                  North Park University


    This study examined relationships among symptom pattern variability, uncertainty,
    spiritual well-being, and psychosocial adaptation in individuals with fibromy-
    algia syndrome (FMS). A survey design was used with 58 individuals with FMS.
    The Fibromyalgia Symptom Pattern Questionnaire, Mishel Uncertainty in Illness
    Scale—Community Form, Spiritual Well-Being Scale, and Psychosocial Adjustment
    to Illness Scale—Self Report were used to collect data. Positive relationships were
    found between symptom pattern variability and uncertainty and between uncertainty
    and poor psychosocial adaptation; spiritual well-being moderated the relationship
    between uncertainty and psychosocial adaptation. A positive sense of well-being
    aided adaptation to symptoms and uncertainties of FMS. Spiritual well-being had a
    greater effect on the relationship between symptom pattern variability and uncer-
    tainty than expected.


    Keywords: spiritual well-being; uncertainty; fibromyalgia; adaptation




F
      ibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) affects approximately 1.5% to 4.8% of the gen-
      eral population in nearly every country where it has been studied (Levine &
      Reichling, 2005; Long, 2004; McLean & Clauw, 2005; Schochat & Beckmann,
2003; Shaver, 2004). At diagnosis, most individuals have been experiencing symptoms


8                                                  © 2009 Springer Publishing Company
                                                                 DOI: 10.1891/1541-6577.23.1.8
Spiritual Well-Being                                                                   9

and have been in the health care system for at least 5 to 8 years (Akkasilpa, Goldman,
Magder, & Petri, 2005). FMS is a chronic illness with varying illness trajectories and
intermittent periods of exacerbation and remission. Some individuals experience an
acute exacerbation of symptoms interspersed with periods of minimal symptoms
or remission, others experience a set of ongoing complex symptoms and problems,
and still others may experience only minimal symptoms. Although symptom sever-
ity may worsen for a few months and then stabilize, they usually do not resolve
completely. Uncertainty characterizes the nature of FMS (Cunningham & Jillings,
2006; Johnson, Zautra, & Dav
								
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