Continuous decompression using a cannulated ceramic pin for simple bone cysts by ProQuest

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									Journal of Orthopaedic Surgery 2009;17(1):62-6




Continuous decompression using a cannulated
ceramic pin for simple bone cysts
T Morii, K Mochizuki, K Satomi
Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Kyorin University, Tokyo, Japan




                                                                ceramic pin for SBCs is minimally invasive, highly
                                                                osteoconductive, and does not require bone grafting
ABSTRACT                                                        or a second operation to remove the device.

Purpose. To report the outcomes of continuous                   Key words: bone cysts; bone neoplasms; catheterization;
decompression using a cannulated ceramic pin for                surgery
simple bone cysts (SBCs).
Methods. Seven boys and 3 girls aged 7 to 16 (mean, 11)
years with SBCs underwent curettage and continuous              IntRoduCtIon
decompression using a cannulated ceramic pin. The
pin was made of hydroxyapatite and tricalcium                   Surgical interventions for simple bone cysts (SBCs)
phosphate. The clinical course, radiological findings,          may relieve pain and prevent restriction of activity,
and complications were retrospectively assessed.                pathological fracture, growth arrest, and deformity.1–3
Results. The mean follow-up duration was 41 (range,             The pathogenic mechanisms responsible for SBCs
12–84) months. Five patients were evaluated as                  involve venous congestion, loss of osteoblast activity,
‘healed’, 2 as ‘healing with defect’, one as ‘persistent        elevation of the internal cyst pressure, and production
cyst’, and 2 as ‘recurrent cysts’. No peri-operative            of interstitial fluid with bone-resorption activity.1,3–7
complications were encountered. One patient had a               Treatment options for SBCs include curettage
postoperative fracture at the pin insertion site. Seven         with bone graft,2 intralesional steroid injection,3,8
patients had pain relief and good outcomes; 2 had a             percutaneous        bone     marrow      injection,1,3,5,8–10
thin cortical rim and complained of occasional pain             intramedullary nailing,    11–15
                                                                                                  and insertion of a
and their sports activities were restricted.                    cannulated screw.2,16–18 Bone cyst activity varies in
Conclusion. Decompression using a cannulated                    relation to patient age, its site and distance from the




Address correspondence and reprint requests to: Dr Takeshi Morii, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Kyorin University, 6-20-
2 Shinkawa Mitaka Tokyo, 181-8611, Japan. E-mail: t-morii@gb3.so-net.ne.jp
Vol. 17 No. 1, April 2009           Continuous decompression using a cannulated ceramic pin for simple bone cysts   63


physeal plate. Evaluation methods also differ in each
study. The variable treatment results may be due
to heterogeneity of the samples and the variety of
evaluation methods. Nevertheless, decompression
techniques are reportedly superior to bone grafting
or steroid injection.2 A cannulated ceramic pin made
of hydroxyapatite and t
								
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