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Raw material sources for the long-chain omega-3 market: Trends and sustainability. Part I by ProQuest

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The effect of all these headlines is to create not only misconceptions in the marketplace but also concerns among consumers about the availability of fishmeal and fish oil. Since the aquaculture market consumes a major portion of the world's production of fish oil and half of the world's production of fishmeal, their concerns are routinely addressed with industry publications and at conferences.

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									                                                                                                             178            inform March 2009, Vol. 20 (3)




       Raw material sources for the
       long-chain omega-3 market:
       Trends and sustainability. Part 1.
       Anthony P. Bimbo                                                                     ceptions in the marketplace but also concerns among consumers
                                                                                            about the availability of fishmeal and fish oil. Since the aquaculture
       Editor’s note: This paper is an update of a presentation delivered                   market consumes a major portion of the world’s production of fish
       at the 99th AOCS Annual Meeting & Expo in Seattle, Washington,                       oil and half of the world’s production of fishmeal, their concerns
       USA, May 19, 2008.                                                                   are routinely addressed with industry publications and at confer-
                                                                                            ences. But what about the nutraceutical or omega-3 market? Will
       The scientific and popular press is awash in headlines and arti-                     there be enough fish oil to meet their current and future needs? The
       cles depicting the impending collapse of the global wild fisheries.                  purpose of this paper is to alleviate those fears or at least put the
       Headlines such as “Oceans in Peril,” “Ocean Life Fading, What                        situation into perspective.
       Can Be Done?” “The Fishing Catastrophe and What We Can Do
       About It,” “SOS for Fading Ocean Life,” “Tuvalu About to Disap-                                  GlObal FISHERIES INFORMaTION
       pear into the Ocean,” “SOS for Fading Ocean Life,” and “Ocean                                    Between 1950 and 1970 global landings of fish and crustaceans
       Time Bomb” are just a few examples. In more recent times, atten-                                 grew at about 12% per year. Between 1970 and 1990 global land-
       tion is being paid to the pelagic fisheries with such headlines as                               ings increased about 2% per year. Between 1990 and 2006, the
       “Eating Smelly Fish Could Save Endangered Species,” “Most Fish most current available data, global landings increased about 0.78%
       Goes into Animal Feed,” “Our Oceans Overfished to Feed Pigs,”                                    per year. Actually, since about 1990, the global landings of fish and
       and “Pets Eating into Fish Stocks.” One report has indicated that                                crustaceans have been flat. Aquaculture production was relatively
       the oceans will be empty by 2048.                                                                flat over the period 1950–1980, but between 1980 and 2006, it
             The common link in all these headlines is the notion that the                              increased about 13.5% per year. However, even the growth in aqua-
       ocean fish stocks are being depleted owing to overfishing. When the                              culture seems to have slowed to 7.1% between 1995 and 2005 and
       industry and responsible govern-                           GLOBAL FISHERIES CAPTURE VS. AQUACULTURE PRODUCTION
       ment entities responded, saying
       that the “industrial fish species”     160

       are not being overfished and are               M illio n M e tric T o n s, F ish a n d C ru sta ce a n s O n ly
       useful in feeding animals and          140

       farmed fish that are consumed
                                              120
       in the human diet, the emphasis
       moved to the concept that these
                                              100
       fish are being wasted on animals
       when they could be used for
                                               80
       human consumption. The fact is
       that these industrial fish are classi-  60
       fied as industrial because they are
       small, oily, and very bony. These       40
       characteristics make it technologi-
       cally very difficult (but not impos-    20
       sible) to convert them to food use.
       It becomes an issue of economics,        0
       because once the oil and bones are         1950            1960                1970              1980           1990       2000    2010              2020 2030 2040
       removed,
								
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