Derbyshire Times by tar19045

VIEWS: 128 PAGES: 136

									Derbyshire Times.

Saturday 1st. December 1866.

Page 2 Col. 1

Advert - Trade Strikes.
Derbyshire Times.

Saturday 1st. December 1866.

Page 2 Col. 4-5

Leader - An old Fable Applied.

         There is a wise old fable, older than the days of miners' unions, and yet applicable yet,
showing how all the members of the body - the hands, arms, feet, legs, head, tongue, nose,
ears, and eyes - agreed to join in a common strike against that tyrant the belly, to whose
enjoyments they were tired of ministering. The Tongue, able delegate and orator as he was,
roused the rebellion. Every limb found out its peculiar grievance, and all were resolute and
patriotic. Belly must be starved; and in process of starvation Belly was accordingly put. Hands
and feet were idle, and had a merry time of it for a few hours. It was soon found out, however,
that punishing Belly involved the punishment too of all the bodily members. Legs grew shaky,
toes grew cold, eyes weak, hands stiff, and arms palsied. At length, Head, who had more sense
in him than all the others put together, called a second meeting, and counselled that as none of
them had gained, and all had lost by the strike, it was best to return to their usual functions, for
although Belly could exist without some of the number, none of the members could exist without
the aid of Belly. The members, tired of this silly quarrel, gave way to Head, and the body politic.
Belly and all soon gained condition, and have pulled on pretty comfortably ever since.

        Now, when we find in our neighbourhood some hundreds or thousands, as the case may
be, of vigorous, lusty, and generally industrious men "quarrelling with their Bread and Butter",
and combining together against the economy which feeds and sustains them, we cannot help
drawing a practical lesson from the fable of the Belly and the members. What do such men
expect to gain by the course they have taken? If they injure the employers who provide their
wages, they lessen the means of employing them, and consequently the demand for labour.
Wages drop, and the members suffer from a diminished circulation.

         All the grievances must resolve themselves into simple questions of the rate of wages
and the hours of work; because all the other details of dispute expand ultimately into one or
other of these questions. And these questions themselves probably after all roll themselves into
the one which is summed up in the popular phrase "a fair day's wage for a fair day's work". How
one side of the question or the other is to be advanced by a quarrel we cannot understand. The
coal masters say the wages of North Derbyshire are in advance of the wages of South Yorkshire
and elsewhere, and as to the question of time, as the wages for coal getting are paid by weight
and not by day, they can have no peculiar interest in forcing long hours upon the men. All they
can possibly care for on the subject is to have the pits going as long and yielding as much as
practicable, but the men share with the masters in the profits of the increased yield. North
derbyshire has no monopoly of the coal market, and the coal owner here cannot in the long run
afford to pay much higher rates for mining then his neighbours.

         Well, granted these are matters to adjust. There is no dispute without some merits on
either side. the men have their hardships, if not wrongs; some practical, some not so; some
capable of entire, others of partial redress. There are not many instances in which it is either the
interest or the inclination of the employers to perpetuate the evils. Why do not the men confer
with the masters and bring these little questions to settlement? "Oh", they say, "we are unionists,
and the masters won't meet us".

       The masters say: - We have millions of capital invested in our mines. We employ and
feed more than half the population. It is neither just to us nor to our shareholders, or our
customers, or those dependant on us, or the neighbourhood, to place our large and extensive
undertakings in jeopardy, at the mercy of any delegate who may be sent amongst us from a rival
district to sow the seeds of discontent among our labourers. We have bound ourselves to
promote the prosperity of the district in the penalty of all those millions which we have sunk in
the bowels of the earth; - they are the security we have given for our good behaviour, and we
cannot hazard this large stake against the "little game" of an Agitator who has given no security
for his good behaviour. No, we will reason with our men, but "they cannot serve two masters",
and therefore they must choose between us and the delegates. To those who prefer us we are
ready and willing to listen; - those who prefer union and the strike must follow their own leader.
The delegates tell the men that they will have the sympathy of the people round them. Is it
probable? Is it possible? Will the agricultural labourer think them wise for being dissatisfied with
his accustomed wages? Will the small shopkeepers who supply them with food bless them for
having reduced their consumption and their means of payment? Will they have the sympathy of
the farmer, whose poor-rates they will tend to increase? - of the trader, whose business they
diminish? - of the people, or the police, who cannot fail to notice the masses of petty crimes
which follow in the wake of strikes? - of their own women and children, when in the depths of
winter they want food and clothes and fire? In other places where strikes have occurred there
have been multitudes of discontented operatives in various trades, all united in one common
cause, and each ready to assist the others with kindness and cash. Here the only discontent is
among the coal miners, the best paid class of our operatives, and even among them the
discontent is exotic, brought from a distance, and unsuited to this generous soil.

        Happy will be the day when this dispute is at an end. Then may we once more look for
prosperity, and the comforts and happiness which spring from prosperous industry.
Derbyshire Times.

Saturday 1st. December 1866.

Page 2 Col. 6

Alleged Brutal Assault.

         On Tuesday, before the County magistrates, Henry Walters, viewer of the Inkerman
Colliery, was brought up on a warrant charged with a brutal assault on a man named John
Ridgway, a collier. No facts were given, beyond a statement that the defendant kicked Ridgway
so severely that he is most seriously injured. Doctor Robinson was called in to attend Ridgway,
and we understand the result of this examination was that several ribs were broken. The case
was remanded until Dec. 8th, Walters giving bail for his appearance.
Derbyshire Times.

Saturday 1st. December 1866.

Page 2 Col. 7

Staveley - The Miner's Union.
Derbyshire Times.

Saturday 1st. December 1866.

Page 2 Col. 7

Staveley - The Coming Crisis.
Derbyshire Times.

Saturday 1st. December 1866.

Page 2 Col. 7

Clay Cross - Fearful Pit Accident at Clay Cross.
Derbyshire Times.

Saturday 1st. December 1866.

Page 2 Col. 7

Clay Cross - Miners Meeting.
Derbyshire Times.

Saturday 1st. December 1866.

Page 2 Col. 7

Clay Cross - Meeting of Unionists at Clay Cross.

        A very enthusiastic meeting of unionists was held at Clay Cross, on Thursday night, and
great determination was expressed to support the union. We have a report which is left over till
next week.
Derbyshire Times.

Saturday 1st. December 1866.

Page 3 Col. 1

Meeting of Non-Unionists at Seymour Colliery.
Derbyshire Times.

Saturday 1st. December 1866.

Page 3 Col. 1-2

Union Meeting at Seymour Colliery.
Derbyshire Times.

Saturday 1st. December 1866.

Page 3 Col. 4-5

Advert - The Accounts of the Clay Cross Field Club.

Sir,
        As the colliers' delegates have in their speeches to the workmen in this district, and in
their more private lodges made assertions as to the evils and misappropriation by the coal-
masters of the funds collected from the workmen for benevolent purposes, for accidents,
sickness, medical attendance and education, I shall feel obliged by your publishing the following
statement of the Clay Cross Field Club for the last fifteen years, drawn in summary from the
Company's books: -

        The accuracy of these accounts has been verified from time to time by first class
auditors.

         The rule by which the Company and men are bound with relation to the Club is as
follows: - "Every married man is required to give one shilling a fortnight, and every single man
eightpence, and boys earning one shilling per day or less, fivepence, to a fund raised, every pay
day, for the purpose of procuring medical assistance, whenever required, for the men or their
families, and for the education of their children".

        CLAY CROSS COLLIERIES.

        Summary of Receipts and Expenditure of the Clay Cross Field Club and School account
for 15 years ending Dec. 1865.

        Receipts                                                £       s       d

Amount received from contributions
       by workmen                                               17,168 17       5

a) Amount subscribed by the
       Clay Cross Company                                       2,150   0       0

Amount received from the workmen's
       fines and forfeits                                       351     19      11

Amount received from unclaimed wages                            313     12      0

Amount received from members of the
       Public Hall for entrance fees                            39      6       8

Amount received from the public of Clay
       Cross toward providing a clock for
       the tower of the Public Hall                             15      0       0

Amount received from Government for
       capitation grant to schools                              546     1       7
Balance due to the Clay Cross Company.
        Dec. 1865                                                 83      18       6

                                                          Total   20,671 1         7

a) This only includes the Company's subscription to this particular Club, and in addition they light
and warm the schools and Public Hall free of charge.

                Expenditure                                       £       s        d

Balance due to the Clay Cross Company.
        Dec. 31st., 1850                                          179     14       6

Amount paid for sickness, allowance made to
       old workmen, widows, etc.                                  8,516   0        5

a) Amount paid for medical assistance,
       hospital expenses and matron                               6,767   15       7

b) Amount paid for school salaries and
       expenses, books and materials, and
       general educational charges                                5,040   8        3

Amount paid for Tupton Moor
       School Mistress, etc.                                      162     15       10

Amount paid to Public Hall members,
       entrance fees returned                                     4       7        8

                                                          Total   20,671 1         7

a) The medical man has to attend upwards of 4000 persons.

b) 800 children are now being educated at these schools.

        It will be seen by the rule the Company do not bind themselves to do more than provide
medical aid to all the families and education for their children; but any balance which has accrued
from time to time has been devoted to the sick and old, etc., and the amount thus expended is
£8,516-0-5d.

       I may state that if a man has six children and none of them at work the whole are
educated at a cost to him of one penny weekly, until they are twelve or fourteen years old, if he
chooses.

        The medical man is bound to attend upwards of 4,000 persons, to provide them with
medicine free of charge, to employ a competent assistant, with horse and carriage necessary for
his medical visits several miles round Clay Cross.

        If the Clay Cross Field Club is one of the grievances of the colliers it may be removed at
the desire of the majority at the shortest possible notice.
        One of my objects in publishing this account is to show the guardians of the poor how
materially such clubs assist them; and I hope it may be the means of inducing them to be
somewhat more liberal in districts where these clubs exist.

        Your obedient servant,
        Charles Binns.

Clay Cross, Nov. 28, 1866.
Derbyshire Times.

Saturday 1st. December 1866.

Page 3 Col. 4

Letter - Checkweighmen at Clay Cross.

Sir,
        There has been a great deal said of late about the Miners and their Union. I was reading
an account of a meeting held at Clay Cross on Friday, the 23rd. inst., when I was struck to see in
Mr. Brown's speech, where he said something about us not having check- weighmen at Clay
Cross, and not having facility given us to know how many cwt. we get to the ton; whether 25,
28, or 30 cwt. are reckoned to the ton. Now, Sir, let me tell Mr. Brown, if he does not know, that
we have check-weighmen, and every facility given us to know how many cwt. we get to the ton.
The check-weighmen, where the men like to have one, is at the machine at the same time as the
Company's weighman, and can see every skip weighed if he likes, and even weigh sometimes
himself. If he thinks the machine is not right, he has the privilege of balancing it, or reporting it
to the proper quarters, where it is properly adjusted on the first opportunity.

          And, Sir, let me tell Mr. Brown that to the best of my knowledge there has not been a
single case where the check-weighman's account and the office account has differed, if he has
gone to the office with a straight-forward tale, where he has not got his weight made right, that
is the same as the check-weighman's account. I ought to have said that the check-weighman
makes a ticket of the stall weight out on the Thursday and the office makes another out on the
Friday, so there is time, if a man's weight is wrong, for him to see about it before he goes for his
cash. So if Mr. Brown can suggest better arrangements than these where the men can know
what they get, I shall be glad to hear from him next week, as I am always willing to learn. True,
Mr. Brown, 20 cwt. do make a ton, but I think 2-6d. for 25 cwt. is equal to 2-0d. for 20 cwt.; and
besides, I don't think that there is a ton of coals sent away from Clay Cross with only 20 cwt. to
it. I think if Mr. Brown would try to unite the men with their masters he would do a great deal of
good, but on the contrary is causing a deal of evil. What is the real cause of these 27,000 ship-
builders being thrown out of employment on the Thames? Why it is a strike, not of just now, but
some six months since, when the masters gave in to them, but only while they finished large
contracts they had on hand. The ale traffic in Clay Cross is doing more injury to the miner than
his working about 11 or 12 hours per day - only think there are twenty-three public houses in the
midst of Clay Cross, besides outskirts, where the men often go, especially on a Sunday, when
they ought to be at some place of worship. So there is no wonder at the publicans joining the
Union, for if they did not perhaps the Union men would not go to their houses.

        Sir, I have seen men go to work time to time drunk, and if you were to visit the public
houses in Clay Cross you would bear me out in what I say about the evil the ale traffic causes.
Only see the number of cases that come to Chesterfield county court from Clay Cross, many of
which arise from drunkenness, the same as the cases that have to go to Alfreton Police Court.

        Hoping you will publish this in your valuable paper on Saturday.

        I remain, Dear Sir,
        Your obedient Servant,
        A Non-Unionist.
Derbyshire Times.

Saturday 1st. December 1866.

Page 3 Col. 4

Letter - An Old Pitman's Letter.

Sir,
         Hoping that you will again find me a small space in your next issue, to have a few more
lines to the Old Pitman. For I begin to think that he reckons himself a very knowing fellow, he will
perhaps remember what he states in one letter in reference to men working 10 or 12 hours. And
then he states in another that none do work 12 hours, neither men nor lads. He will very likely
want to shuffle out by saying they leave off work at a quarter to 6 o'clock at night. Allow me to
tell the Old Pitman that there are some in the workings at the same time that do not leave off
just at that time, which makes it a deal oftener after 6 than before that time. But thou, Old
Pitman, art very likely such a nigger-driver that thou wilt not allow dinner time, so that thou wilt
want to bring that as an argument. But if that is what thou hast been taught at the school of
selfishness, allow me to tell thee thy schoolmaster was or ought to have been called Falsehood
from the town of Bad Practice. And I am very glads thou hast made it out that I have not been
taught at the same school as thyself or else I should be ashamed of the order. Thou wilt perhaps
remember what thou didst say about the day sheet, and also about thy self-conceitedness, and
also about thy self-esteem. Thou mayest think that thou art so esteemed by thy employers for
carrying that feather that thou canst do as thou likes with the pay sheets; if it is, thou wilt
perhaps bring them to one of the miner's meetings. Thou canst tell thy employers that thou art
able and self-sufficient to take care of them; for I believe thou'd be listened to by a number of
those that believe that union is strength without doing thee or thy pay sheet any harm. Be sure
to state in thy next letter which meeting of miners thou wilt attend, unless thou does so, we as
miners shall set it down for granted that thou canst not prove what thou says, and we shall
believe thou art no miner unless thou art seeking for leather caps and a yardstick.

        I remain,
        Yours respectfully,
        A Reader.

Clay Cross, Nov. 22, 1866.
Derbyshire Times.

Saturday 1st. December 1866.

Page 3 Col. 5

Larceny.

       William Beacham, labourer, Clay Cross, was brought up in custody under a warrant,
charged by George Parker, of Clay Cross, collier, with stealing on the 20th. ult. two
hundredweight of coals. The prisoner was remanded until petty sessions, the 7th. December.

         Charles Springthorpe, collier, Clay Cross, was charged by Charles Turner, clerk to the
Clay Cross Company with stealing in the month of September last, from the Clay Cross offices,
the sum of £6-18-0d., the monies of the Clay Cross Company. The prisoner was also charged on
a warrant by Peter Robinson, agent to the Clay Cross Company, with absenting his services
without giving one months notice of his intention to do so. From the evidence against the
prisoner it appeared that he went to the company's offices in the month of September last to get
his fortnights pay, the amount of money he stands charged with stealing was laid on the counter
along with the prisoners money, which only amounted to about 30-0d., the prisoner took the
whole amount and went away, at the same time absconding from Clay Cross. He was not to be
found until Thursday, the 22nd. of November, when he was apprehended by Inspector Fern, at
Ibstock, in Leicestershire, the prisoner was remanded until the petty sessions, Dec. 7th.
Derbyshire Times.

Saturday 1st. December 1866.

Page 3 Col. 5

No Headline.

        John Caste Collin was brought up in custody under a warrant, charged by William Parker,
agent to Clay Cross Company, with leaving his work without notice, on the 12th. July last. The
complainant said the prisoner with a number of others was engaged in Warwickshire in July last,
to work for the Clay Cross Company, they paid the railway fare for him. The prisoner only worked
one day, and then absconded. - He was ordered to pay £1-7-8d. expenses and return to his
work, the magistrates informing him if he came again he would be committed to gaol.
Derbyshire Times.

Saturday 1st. December 1866.

Page 3 Col. 6

Miner's Meeting at Chesterfield.

        On Thursday evening week, a meeting of miners was held at the Corn Exchange,
Chesterfield, which was very numerously attended. Mr. Brown, of Hunslet, occupied the chair and
opened the proceedings by calling upon the meeting to sing one of the miner's hymns.

          The chairman, then addressed the assembly at considerable length. He defended the
miner's union as a good cause, with pure motives to support it, and he was sorry for the
obscurity which appeared to overwhelm the minds of the public of Chesterfield on this point. It
they could have the scales removed from their eyes they would see that the miner's association
was not one which had for its objects the destruction of anything. It meant well to the men and
no harm to the master. They wished to raise the miner a little higher and not let the masters be
lowered. He denied that the Derbyshire Miners' Association had anything to do with the South
Yorkshire Association, and he explained his own and Normansell's visits to the district as being
caused by the Derbyshire men wishing some one to put them in the way of working these
unions. With regard to the effect of the union, he said that not one man now out at Staveley had
struck work: the masters had locked them out simply because they had joined the union, and yet
their very name of "Staveley Company" signified a union of their own. The men wanted a union
because they had not a fair chance singly to stand up and have grievances redressed. Because
the men had got a union they were wrong, but they had never been right before. The masters
said there had been peace between them and their men for 25 years, but he contended that the
men had not realised their position. Twelve hours work might be all very well, but he wanted
them to try ten or eight and see which they liked best. The mill operatives were opposed when
they tried to get the "ten hours bill" passed, but when it did pass it was found to be better for all
parties. He urged them to try the eight hours system. - (Applause). It would do away with the
collier's Monday. It would no longer be very little work on Monday and Tuesday and Wednesday,
and then all hands to the pump on Thursday and Friday. The speaker then touched on the
weighing question. He did not care about the number of cwts. to a ton, because if the miner liked
to get 20 or 50 they did not care for that, but when he had made his agreement they wanted a
man to see it was carried out. They did not find fault with the 28 cwt. to the ton, but they
wanted a checkweighman. Mr. Brown then pointed out the advantages of the union as a benefit
fund in case of sickness or death, and stated they were paying £40 or £50 a week for accidents.
He denied the union had any wish to injure the employer, and urged that so far from it, it would
benefit him. - Mr. Brown's speech was repeatedly and warmly applauded.

        Mr. Lee, a miner locked out at Staveley, followed in a warm address in which he urged
the men to stick to the union, and proposed that if they did, so the miner's cause must ultimately
triumph.

        Mr. W. Pickard, treasurer to the Wigan district of the National Association was next called
upon and delivered a very lengthy and eloquent speech. He stated that although he was now
independent he had once been a collier and for 16 years earned his bread in the bowels of the
earth. He then traced the rise and progress of the National Miner's Association, which was started
in 1862, and had for its objects the amelioration of the conditions of 282,000 miners. It was not
aimed against either capital or labour, but intended to benefit both. By what right did the master
say the men should not have a union? He contended the men had a right to one, and the council
at Nottingham had decided to support the miners of Derbyshire in obtaining one by levies
throughout the whole of England. In 186? the masters in the Wigan district wished to reduce the
wages by 10 per cent, but the men resisted it, and in consequence (without a strike) the masters
put 10d. per ton on the coal, gave the men the 10 per cent, which amounted to about
threepence halfpenny, and kept the rest for themselves and that was done in the midst of the
cotton famine. The iron trade was busy, and coal was wanted in all parts of the country. In 1861
they asked for another 10 per cent, and the masters said they could not give it. He (the speaker)
went to manchester and inquired into the price of coal, and as a result he told the men to wait a
while before they pressed their claim. The masters saw the reasonableness of the men, and in
1865 they gave them the 10 per cent without asking. His strongest enemies had given the men
credit for their conduct, and the "Colliery Guardian" admitted that his (Mr. Pickard's) influence
had produced greater sobriety among the men. At the end of '65 the men asked for another 10
per cent, and on the masters refusing it, restricted their labour without striking, and the masters
gave them the advance last week. They allowed the men 9s. per week if out of work. They had
spent £10,000 in the defence of the men, and had succeeded in preventing reductions in the
wages. They opposed strikes, unless they were forced into them by the masters, as the men
were in this district. He urged the men not to give up the Union, but to carry it out. Why should
the masters object to it? Because they did not wish the men to better themselves. Capital had its
extinguisher on the men, and wished to keep it on them, and to say that they were paid to work,
and not to think. How was the miner to be answerable to God for his acts, when he spent his
whole waking hours in the mine, and had no time to think. The men died on the average at the
age of ?7 years, and one of the objects of the association was to endeavour to reduce the rates
of mortality and fatality, and to raise the miner in the moral and intellectual scale. He contended
that the union would be better for the masters, and quoted the opinion of some Wigan
coalmasters in support of this argument. He urged the men to habits of sobriety, and cautioned
them against doing any illegal acts at the present juncture. If they were peaceable and quiet,
society would be in their favour. He asked the Staveley coal-masters, who objected to South
Yorkshire procedures, what had the miners of South Yorkshire got which they ought not to have?
They worked 8 hours a day, and they had 42 checkweighmen on the pit banks, and, as
coalmaster said, there was no other honest way of doing. In conclusion, he told the men that if
they needed help he was sent down by the National Association to find it them. Levies would be
made in every recognised district for the men, and he was about to purchase timber, etc., for the
erection of huts at Staveley, for the ejected men: and, in addition, they would take all the empty
houses in the neighbourhood. He warned the men to be prepared to meet hardships, and again
cautioned them against any outbreaks, and concluded amid loud cheers.

        The meeting shortly afterwards broke up.
Derbyshire Times.

Saturday 1st. December 1866.

Page 3 Col. 7

Clay Cross - Important Meeting of Non-Unionists.

        On Thursday night an important meeting of non-unionists was held in the Public Hall,
Clay Cross. The attendance was not very large.

          Mr. Thelwall was called to the chair, and opened the meeting by expressing his regret at
the necessity of any such meeting. It was said to be a non-union meeting, but it was a union
meeting in the sense of being a meeting for the purpose of promoting union between masters
and men. The interests of the two could not be separated - they were identical. The master could
not oppress the men without injuring himself, and the men could not proceed, as it was evident
they were proceeding now, without ultimately injuring both themselves and the masters. He was
much surprised at some of the statements made by the men who were going about agitating and
setting one class against another. By these statements it was evident that they were anxious to
set class against class, for they never gave the masters credit for anything good. He spoke highly
in favour of the Clay Cross Company, and expressed his opinion that the proprietors of the
company, from the days of George Stephenson to the present time, had ever been friends of the
collier. He referred to Sir Joshua Walmsley's charitable labours among the poor and wretched at
Liverpool and asked his audience where they would find masters more anxious for their moral
and intellectual welfare than at Clay Cross. Referring to a speech made at Whittington on the
miners' question, in which a person from Lancashire said his sympathies were with the colliers of
Derbyshire, he said that the speaker had better reserve his sympathies for Lancashire, as they
were much more needed there. He had been in Lancashire, and knew that the condition of the
miner was much worse there than in Derbyshire, and he spoke from an experience of 70 years.
He had mixed among colliers for 70 years, and therefore knew their position. The first resolution
would be - "That it was desirable to form a society for the protection of miners and others being
non- unionists"; and he was convinced it was necessary, for a short time ago he was in a shop
when some men came in and asked the person who kept it to join the union. He objected, and
said he had a perfect right to please himself whether he joined or not, upon which they said
they should take care no unionists patronised his shop. The speaker concluded amid applause.

       Mr. John Walters, engine wright, moved the first resolution as given above, which was
seconded by Mr. Reuben Bannister, and carried almost unanimously.

        Mr. R. Bannister moved a second resolution inviting all persons interested in the welfare
of Clay Cross to become members of this society, which was seconded by Mr. Walters, and
carried by a considerable majority.

        Mr. Johnson moved the appointment of a committee, two members of which however
objected to their names amid applause from a number of union men who had just come in.

        Mr. Denton (surgeon) asked a question which he said was of great importance, viz.
whether a member who had paid into the field club for a number of years would continue to
receive the benefits, because Dr. Wilson -

        Mr. Walters interrupting said the meeting had nothing to do with that matter.
        Mr. Denton: You sit down. I speak for the sake of the poor. - (Cheers from the unionists
and disapprobation from the non- unionists).

         Mr. Howe: You have no right to break in upon this meeting, and if you don't sit down
quietly I will put you out.

       Mr. Denton: I address the chairman (great uproar in which Mr. Howe got up and went
towards the speaker). At your peril put me out!!!

        Mr. Howe: Then sit down - Mr. Denton then sat down and the meeting proceeded.

        Mr. Dickenson proposed that the committee be empowered to appoint a secretary, etc.

       Mr. John Walters seconded the resolution and in doing so remarked that it was in the
power of any unionist to throw ten or twelve other men out of work, and what were those men
to do?

        A Voice: Join the union. - (Cheers and laughter).

        Mr. Walters continued by saying he did join the union once in 1844 and had resolved
never to join another, but to be a free man. - (Mr. Denton: Are you free when you are under a
tyrant?). There was a strike in Clay Cross in 1844, and they had then the same promises of
assistance the men had now. But did it come? No, the men only received 1-6d. each. Begging
parties were sent out to Chesterfield and other towns, and he met one and having a sovereign in
his pocket he spent it treating the poor fellows. At Barnsley, the very sink of unionism, he went in
1832. What had they got by it? - ("Eight hours") yes, they got eight hours and 20 cwt. to the ton,
but they also got this restriction, that no man should get more than 4-6d. a day, and when he
had got so much he must stay in the pit until his mates had got the same. Did they think a
working collier could do with being limited to 4-6d. per day - (A voice: He has to do with much
less sometimes). He was sure if they had families they could not pay their way. From his own
experience of strikes, the misery was very great. Homes were broken up and thousands of
people rendered homeless and destitute. One man who was out on strike in 1844, was so
reduced that although he could get 14 tubs a day before, he could only get 5 tubs afterwards.

         Mr. Howe proposed the next resolution in a lengthy speech. He did not know that he had
any right to take part in the proceedings except that in a certain sense he was a working man
himself, and he thought that if a strike or lock-out did take place it would be very serious for him
and for many others. He could tell the men that if the Clay Cross Company were to accede to
their demands now that they might as well close all the pits at once for they would be no profit
to them, and it was not likely they would carry them on without. He thought the men had a
perfect right to join the union if they thought proper - (unionist cheers). He had been in one, and
had seen many men ruined by it. Twenty-seven years ago he had paid 3-6d. a week for twelve
months to the union to support a lot of mechanics at Leeds who had struck for ten minutes a
day. They had been getting their 27-0d. and 28-0d. per week, and afterwards were compelled to
accept work at £1 and £1-1-0d a week. Men had no right if they joined a union to intimidate
others and compel them to join. Mr. Howe then proceeded to say that many of the statements
made by the delegates were false, and the men who listened to them knew they were so. He
instanced the statement that the men's checkweighmen at Clay Cross were no use, and showed
that they took a fair weight, and if there was any dispute between them and the company's
weighman it was adjusted the same night, and very often the men's weighman was the only man
on the bank for a time. To listen to such statements was for the men to deceive themselves. He
also referred to the 25 cwt. to the ton, and stated that there were men present who could
remember when 20 cwt. was got to the ton and a certain allowance was deducted for dirt and
waste. What better were they then than now. Every man present knew perfectly well he agreed
to get 25 cwt. to the ton, and was paid at that rate, and if the ton was made 20 cwt. he would
only get paid at a proportionate rate. This question was perfectly well understood by the men,
and for them to listen to the statements of the delegates upon, it was to deceive themselves. Mr.
Howe then referred to a recent accident at one of the pits, and defended the banksman from the
charges made against him. He also reminded the men of the advantages their children were
reaping from the company's schools, and asked them if they would lose these advantages, break
up their homes, and enter upon a course which would be the ruin of one-half of the people of
Clay Cross, for they knew that the money that the company paid in wages was the source of
almost all the trade in Clay Cross. The union had never done any one any good, and the colliers
in Yorkshire and Lancashire were much worse off than the Derbyshire men. He then referred to
Mr. Denton's interruption. He was sorry Mr. Denton should interfere in the matter. It looked
selfish of him to talk about Dr. Wilson. Dr. Denton was not the man to take the lead in the Field
Club at Clay Cross. He believed his abilities were good, but he gave way to his present state of
intoxication, and no one would trust him. (Several voices, "I would" and applause).

        Mr. Denton: Having heard your remarks on my "in statu quo", I say I think you are
rather more under the influence of liquor than I am - (Applause and hisses). You have the
presumption to talk to me as if you were my equal. The fact is, I have had better men to clean
my boots. - (great uproar, laughter, and applause). I shall not be bullied down, but do my duty in
the state of life to which it has pleased God to call me. - (Hear, hear, hisses, and uproar).

        Mr. Howe: Then sit down. It is not a man like Mr. Denton that will intimidate me: I have
got too manly a frame for that - (Cheers, laughter, and general uproar). If he has better men
than me to clean his boots, why does he not keep them? - (Hear, hear, and laughter). Mr. Howe
then proceeded with the resolution, which was to the effect that the names of members of the
non-union society be taken in a book and the heading be as follows. - "We, the undersigned non-
unionists, wishing to maintain the right to judge for ourselves, hereby undertake to protect each
other; and in case of intimidation, undertake to prosecute all transgressors against the law".

        The resolution was then passed, and

        Mr. Walters stated that a number of men had sent in their names, but did not wish to
attend the meeting.

        The usual compliment to the Chairman closed the proceedings.
Derbyshire Times.

Saturday 1st. December 1866.

Page 4 Col. 1

Letter - The Untruthful Report against the two Haywoods.

Sir,
         Being a constant reader of your paper, and seeing in your issue of Nov. 17, a suspected
trade outrage in Speedwell Pit, by Haywood senior, and Haywood junior, I therefore take it upon
me to draw the attention of the public to this supposed outrage. I see Mr. Editor, that John
Hazlehurst has got over a serious injury with little or no expense; this is a fact. Now, Mr. Editor,
had the above person being so abused as reported, we wonder very much at him that he did not
bring them before a court of justice and make them pay the penalty of the law, knowing that the
law is to defend the innocent and punish the guilty in all offensive cases. I am very much
astonished at him acting so foolishly as he has hitherto done. Now, Mr. Editor, I will just give him
a word of advice, and it is this: He must first learn to speak the truth before he goes to church
any more, for its nothing but a pack of lies that he has reported about being ill-used by this aged
father and son, viz. the Haywoods, for I can clearly testify to the world that it is all a false report
about them spitting in his face and knocking him down, or dragging him by the hair of the head,
or using him in any ill way whatever. Hazlehurst used abusive language, and challenging them
out to fight, they told him they would not disgrace themselves in such a manner, but ordered him
to go up the pit, and he did so, in a most ambitious manner, and tried to disgrace the old man
and his son. No such thing was ever known to be done by him since employed as an overman,
now standing 35 years good.

         Now, Mr. Editor, I hope that these things will soon die out, as the mist before the sun. I
trust that Hazlehurst will be more sensible in future, or otherwise I think he will not be able to
stand the winter out, for it is getting very cold. What I mean by this is he should not act as
stated above, for no plaster has yet been seen on him at all. But I will not bear too long of this
point, for I fear I am trespassing on your space already. Hoping you will give this a place in your
next edition.

        I remain, Yours truly,
        Jerry Gee.

Speedwell Blocks, Nov. 21st.
Derbyshire Times.

Saturday 1st. December 1866.

Page 4 Col. 1

Letter - Tinkering Colliers.
Derbyshire Times.

Saturday 1st. December 1866.

Page 4 Col. 2

Letter - Mr. Brown and What he is Doing.

Sir,
        Will you permit me to say a few words in your valuable paper?

          I perceive "Mr. Brown" and several more names I could mention, are agitating the
colliers in the surrounding villages to join the Union, to go against the masters. They think that a
Union and a strike will in the end get more money and less hours, and 20 cwt. to the ton instead
of 28 cwt. I cannot see what they have to complain of. They get 28 cwt. to the ton, but if they
do they are paid in the same proportion as 20 cwt. The men began to grumble against so much
dross being taken out of the coal waggons they send up. The Company said, "You may engage
any man you like, and we will pay him his wages". I think that a fair thing, but now the men
grumble at their own choice. What is the reason? Why Brown and a few others are backing them
up, and saying to the men "We will make the masters yield"; what to, I should like to know.

         Mr. Brown may well back them up, because he is receiving his 7-6d. per day. What does
he do? He calls a meeting, and shews them that he has the gift for "gab", he leaves them, and
goes with the delegates to eating-houses, and has the best of everything, and the delegates
have the "scraps"; and when the paying time comes, he says, "You may pay who like, I shall not
pay". It is no good him denying this fact, because he cannot. He knows that it is too true. I have
no faith in such a man as this, and hope that he will let the peaceful inhabitants be quiet, or else
he will bring desolation on the whole neighbourhood. If he will make his exit into South
Yorkshire, and work himself, he will do more good. Wishing every colliery prosperity.

        I remain, Yours faithfully,
        Adviser.
Derbyshire Times.

Saturday 1st. December 1866.

Page 4 Col. 2

Letter - The Results of the Union.

Sir,
        Already the genuine results of the Union at Staveley are beginning to show themselves,
in the form of gaunt hunger and starvation in the families of our mining population. Cases, sir,
have come under my observation of families being without food for two days, and yet this may
be but the beginning of the end.

         What the distress and wretchedness may be to many should a portion of our colliers
persist in their blind a stupid reliance on the leadership of the shallow, selfish delegates who
"keep the word of promise to their ear, and break it to their hope"; it is fearful to contemplate.
What can the already impoverished funds of the union do for the men in the pitiless severity of
the winter; - at the very commencement, when so few are out "on strike"? We have families
starving in our midst, depend upon it, sir, but for these delegates, these calumniators of
gentlemen, "the latches of whose shoes they are not worthy to stoop and unloose". A day of
retribution is even now dawning, in which the miseries they are sewing broadcast amongst us will
recoil in a hundredfold upon their own heads. Some of the men at Staveley, and their wives too,
are cursing the day they allowed themselves to be lured into joining the Union, and by so doing
placing themselves in antagonism with their best friends, - their employers. It will not be long
before the name of Brown will be hated here as it is in Methley and in other districts, where, like
a pestilence, he carried, poverty, hunger, and squalid misery into the homes of hundreds. In
spite of the calumnies and the most barefaced and impudent misrepresentations I fearlessly
assert that good wages are realised by the colliers at Staveley, for the very hours advocated by
Unionists, and even-handed justice is dealt out to them. each fortnight they have wages accounts
delivered to them, along with their money, containing full particulars of their work, to enable
them to ascertain for themselves whether they are paid correctly or not, and each man has
sufficient time given to count his money before he leaves the pay-board. I am well aware Brown
says contrary to this; but in doing so he naturally and easily deviates from the truth, acting
simply from necessity, as "the truth is not in him". "A corrupt tree cannot bring forth good fruit".

         I tell this man and his ignorant satellites that do what they can, the Union in Derbyshire
will be trampled out. The good sense of all the old Staveley hands is beginning to manifest itself,
and stalls left by Unionists are being filled up gladly by non-unionists and seceders from the
Union ranks, and hundreds more whose faith in Brown is fast oozing out at their finger ends, are
waiting, watching, longing for that indefinite "something" to turn up as a reasonable excuse for
kicking the Union and its leaders overboard, and returning to their work.

        These are facts well known to Brown and all the smaller fry, who like tadpoles, dance
attendance and wriggle their tails with so much delight around him as their fully-developed Head
Centre.

         We are a funny people at Staveley, rather eccentric in the bent of our genius; and as
there are yet lovers of high art, cunning workers in strange devices in tar and feathers, whose
latent talent has but to be touched through a certain spring, for "up goes the donkey" to be the
result; and as sudden and unaccountable impulses are at times given to fine wits and men of
genius, it would not be amiss to hint in the most remote and delusive manner possible, that it
would be quite as well if we were left to manage our own business in our own way; and that
certain obtrusive and officious troublers, for the comfort of their own delicate organisation, had
better make themselves what is most commonly but expressively designated "scarce".

         To the colliers of Staveley, - you who know the old place well, and love it too, and who
do not wish to leave, to you I say, make a stand at once, - pay not another penny into the
bottomless pockets of the delegates, who only care for you so far and as long as you can feed
them. Tell them to be off, that they are of neither "use nor ornament" to you. Having done this,
settle down to work, show your employers you have once more confidence in them; and having
re-established the only and the best bond of union that can exist, - one of confidence between
masters and men, - then, and not till then, seek to redress the grievances you may conceive you
have, and depend upon it you realise that benefit you now vainly seek through and by the
medium of foreign intervention.

        I am, Mr. Editor,
        Yours very truly,
        Staveley.

Nov. 19th., 1866.
Derbyshire Times.

Saturday 1st. December 1866.

Page 4 Col. 2

Letter - Dick Wass and the Union.


       Another e.e. cummings letter in dialect.
Derbyshire Times.

Saturday 1st. December 1866.

Page 4 Col. 3

Letter - The Miners at Staveley.

Sir,
        As a subscriber to your widely circulated paper, I hope you will insert in your next edition
a few remarks I wish to make on the union or rather discord among the miners of Staveley.

         The miners at Staveley are I believe on the whole as good if not a better class of men as
any that constitute the mining population of England. They are shrewd thinking, and able to
judge for themselves without the aid of a second party, tho' I believe in the present crisis they
are not trusting in their own common sense and judgement in being led by the nose by a
stranger, sent by persons in the coal trade, to try to injure the men employed at these works. It
is well known that the Yorkshire masters lost the greater part of their trade thro' a union of
miners in South Yorkshire, and the steady and regular supply of coal from Staveley enabled the
company to get the lion's share of the coal trade and they want to get it bank, and to obtain that
end, sent Mr. W. Brown, of Hunslet, to agitate and set the miners at Staveley at loggerheads
with themselves and masters to cause a lock-out. He comes and tells them they are illused (they
did not know it before) and wants them to master the "Tyrants" so called, who are the means of
giving the bread to thousands in this and other places. In one of his speeches he tells them they
shall have eight hours and 21 cwt. to the ton, and help from the National Association in case of a
strike, in another he advises them to take ten hours "if their graces will allow" (this looks like
being crestfallen). I see in "Sheffield Telegraph" a letter of Mr. B. in which he speaks of the
wages of miners here. Now, Mr. Editor, I know for a fact that the miners of Staveley average
from 5-6d. to 11s. and 12s. per day of eight hours, men who will work will always obtain more
money than the three "friends" he is proposing to hold up as examples of the rate of wages; but
I am told by old hands that they are a poor sample of workmen who can't earn more than 4-2d.
per day, (not poor wage either) men I should think from the Barnsley district, who like Mr. B. to
get plenty of money for a little work. If the men employed at the Staveley collieries had such
monstrous grievances as Brown states why did they not go like men and tell the masters of their
wrongs and I am persuaded from the speech I read in your paper of Mr. Markham, the managing
director, in reply to a deputation from the Workman's Hall, that he would have remedied them
without union.

         If the miners would only think for themselves they would plainly see the utter
uselessness of trying to dictate to masters by unions. What wretched families they have ever
caused, destruction alike to life and property, narrow faces and decrepid and attenuated forms,
besides causing breaches between friends which no time can efface. Take the unions at
Sheffield, the Hereford Street outrage as an example, and see around us at the before quiet
village of Staveley, the extra staff of police to keep the police, threatened by this union, all of
which will prove that agitating by unions are and ever will be a curse to this land and will I hope
ere long have the attention of the legislature.

        Old and steady workmen of from 20 and 30 years standing will testify that they have
never had better work, more money and regular employment than now, both summer and
winter, not three days a week like the union country where they are stacking coals at this season
of the year thro' their friends, Mr. Brown and company, who have ever sown discord, to live in
indolence, and who gulls them by taking their money and promising help in their day of trial. Mr.
Brown tells them that their money they pay as subscriptions or levy's cannot be taken out of the
bank without the consent of the National Council a council composed of men of Brown's class.
What guarantee have you for the safety of the deposits? Are the miners National Council bound
in a bond? And if so who are their bond-men? You have no legal claim on them for your money,
and I for one would not trust any of them with a fraction of money without a sufficient
guarantee. I hope as an inhabitant of Staveley that before long, the eyes of the men will be
opened.

                I am, Dear Sir, Yours faithfully,
                       Nat Wragg

Staveley, Nov. 8th., 1866.
Derbyshire Times.

Saturday 1st. December 1866.

Page 4 Col. 3

Letter - Dick Wass of Clay Cross to Dick Wass of Staley.


        Yet another e.e. cummings letter in dialect.
Derbyshire Times.

Saturday 1st. December 1866.

Page 4 Col. 4

Letter - Meeting of Non-Unionists at Seymour Colliery.
Derbyshire Times.

Saturday 1st. December 1866.

Page 4 Col. 5

Meeting at Clay Cross.
Derbyshire Times.

Saturday 8th. December 1866.

Page 2 Col. 4-5

Leader - The Strike and it's Approaching End.

         We have always devoted ourselves to the best interests of the working classes; and in
their cause, however unpalatable may be the truth we have often been obliged to write, we have
written them boldly and honestly. If we have had occasion to speak of the oppression of the rich
we have spoken out clearly and without reserve, if we have had reason to point out the snares
laid in the path of the poor, we have pointed them plainly out and our sincerity has always been
warmly acknowledged by those we have warned when the passing delusion has gone by. In the
same kindly but independent spirit, our duty leads us to speak of the miner's strike.


         We are told that a few hundred men left their work at one of the neighbouring coal
mines on Monday last according to notices which they had previously delivered to the
proprietors. Of the notice given some repented before the time arrived; others left their tools in
the pit as some earnest that they did not intend to stay out long; the majority went away, tools
and all. The consequence is that during the week, knots of men and boys have been seen in the
neighbourhood lounging through the day and looking as if life was uncomfortable. The women
and children, we are sorry to learn are beginning to feel the evils and deprivations of this
senseless strike; and some classes, usually industrious and prosperous, are becoming the victims
of sloth and poverty.

         The secession of so may men from their daily occupations, has not, however, stopped a
single pit, and although the yield of the district may, and probably will be diminished by the
defection of the miners, the question, take it at it's worst, is one of quantity only; not absolute
paralysis, and of a temporary and not a permanent nature.

        What do the crowds of unhappy men expect? who, to cure their grievances, have thrown
themselves and their families on the tender mercies of the world. They will not dig, to beg they
are ashamed - and yet the receipt of the union pittance, whether it come from the parish or the
miner's fund, is beggary and degradation for an able-bodied man. No food is so sweet as that
earned by the sweat of one's brow, and none so bitter as that doled out by parsimonious and
reluctant charity. We don't know whether or not there are districts ready to absorb the
neighbouring population who have left their work, but the men in common prudence, should
have solved that problem before they struck. Possibly there are places where they can go, and
then they will be able to contrast the comforts and wages of North derbyshire life at which they
rebelled, with the actual advantages of their new "location".

        We shall probably have many unionists lingering for a considerable time in the
neighbourhood, and shall have to witness much distress, not only among them, but amongst the
small shop- keepers and artisans whose welfare depends on the activity of the mining population.
Their hand-to-mouth existence will be rendered harder than ever. The credit and the tally system
has received a shake, and even the remedy of the county court will be worthless against a
homeless and empty-pocketed miner on strike.

        A bad winter will add to the bitter sufferings of all. yet why should we complain? The
miners had a right to be deluded, and they were deluded by the first agitation. They had a right
to be discontented and they became so. It was of their lawful privileges, that they might band
themselves against their masters, and they banded accordingly. They had the power to strike,
and they struck. But although we do not complain, we should like to know who is or can possibly
be one whit the better for this violent exercise of the liberty of dis-union? The knots of men of
whom we have spoken could scarcely give a satisfactory answer. Neither would the master, or
the shopkeeper, or the constable.

          No doubt a comparatively small amount of disaffection will leaven a large mass, and a
little mischief will work out a great inconvenience. But there are some very healthy signs which
tend to show that the reign of discord among our miners is approaching its close. There is
nothing like free discussion. If Tories, Whigs and Radicals could not speak out in the political
world, we should make little progress in the rational conduct of public affairs. Discussion may be
carried on with very fervid heat and very heavy blows, but they tend to hammer out truth into its
proper development at last, and so unionist meetings have led to non-unionist, and the latter
gatherings have been increasing in frequency and in the number of their attendants. The miners
have begun to find that a better class of their fellow workmen flock to the latter assemblies -
men with families, sober, long-headed, experienced, able workmen, who have gone through the
trials of adversity as well as prosperity, and who know what they have to lose - men who have,
perhaps, been "blown about by vain blasts of idle doctrine" in their youth, and have been
seasoned into steadiness by misfortune. These men speak with a weight of experience, which is
worth more than all the idle speculations and delusions of the mere grievance-mongers. They
know that this is not the first time that delegates who fasten upon the discussions of the poor,
have come to stir up strife in an industrious community. Perhaps some have joined in a strike
themselves and like other "burnt children, dread the fire". They know they have been well cared
for by their masters, that their wages have been liberal, their rules of service not unduly
burdensome, their cottages comfortable, the provisions for their sickness and the schooling of
their children ample and generous. If they have grievances, they are grievances which they have
borne in common with the whole race of coal-miners, and have seldom cared to express, and
which, if they have expressed, have been listened to and remedied.

        Such men have risen to protest against the conduct of the unionists, and already they
are converting hundreds by the soundness of their common sense.

         If we are asked how long the threatened strike is likely to last, we answer, "Not many
weeks". There are already strong symptoms of the end of the approaching struggle. There are at
this moment many hundreds thrown upon the resources of the Union Fund. This is hard for those
who work and contribute; it is harder still for those who remain idle and receive. There is no part
of the population which sympathises with those men who have voluntarily given up their means
of subsistence. Even on the merits of the questions which by the unionists are thought to justify
their strike, public opinion is against them. The great majority of people believe, as a rule, that
the coal-owners were considerate and even liberal masters, that the miners received large wages
for their labour; thus the points in dispute between master and man are too small to excuse the
miners rebellion, and that the unionists, being in the wrong must ultimately yield. the sooner the
better for them and all concerned.
Derbyshire Times.

Saturday 8th. December 1866.

Page 2 Col. 6

Accident.

        On Monday last, a man employed at Ludlam's pit, Brampton, met with a rather severe
accident. A quantity of bind fell upon him and it was found he had sustained a severe compound
fracture of one leg. Under the care of Dr. Robinson, he is progressing favourably.
Derbyshire Times.

Saturday 8th. December 1866.

Page 2 Col. 6

No Headline.

        The Derbyshire coalowners have received a circular from the railway companies
informing them that, on and after the 1st. of December, the rates for coalowners' waggons to all
the London and North Western, North London, Midland, Great Western, Great Northern, and
Great Eastern railway stations would be advanced 6d. per ton. This is understood to be but the
precursor of a general advance of the rates of heavy traffic.
Derbyshire Times.

Saturday 8th. December 1866.

Page 2 Col. 7

Letter - Dick Wass of Clay Cross.

Mr. Editor,
                  In amusing myself with your journal of the 1st. inst., I saw that we got a Dick
Wass at Clay Cross, and he says that Mr. Brown is getting weaker in the knees, and the pick is
too sharp for him, but I should like to know where our Dick's sharpness is picking at, and where
the stall is that he sends his coal out of. If he has plenty ready, as I have not much to do I will
either load or put for him; but, sir, I think he never got any coal here, or else he would know
what sort of life they lead.

        Dick said they were going to have a non-union meeting. Why, Dick, there was one, and
who was there? There were some tailors and drapers, mechanics, cobblers, and bakers, who
spoke at some length on the working man; but Dick never got any coal, and the bread which we
buy from his shop does not do us any good.

        I remain, yours till next time,
        A Man Looking round the Corner.
Derbyshire Times.

Saturday 8th. December 1866.

Page 2 Col. 7

Letter - The Union and Cornish Miners.

Letter from Mr. Brown.

        Mr. Brown has addressed the following letter to one of the Union Agents in Derbyshire.: -

                                                Liskeard, Dec. 1st., 1866.

My dear Friend,
        Knowing, as I do, you are interested in our cause, Philip Casey and myself held a
meeting last Friday evening in the Temperance Hall, Liskeard, and I am most happy to inform
you we had one of the Cornish captains in the Chair. The hall was crowded in every part and you
will be rather taken by surprise when I tell you that one of the agents, sent by the Staveley
Company, was present at the meeting. He told the audience he had been employed at Staveley
about fifteen years. The agent from Staveley is here for the purpose of engaging men to come
and work at Staveley, but I do not think he will be able to do much business. He has found
himself in a very curious position, and I have not the least doubt but he wishes himself nicely at
home again. I can assure you the masters are not leaving a stone unturned; and we shall do all
in our power to prevent them from getting men to come into Derbyshire. The Cornish men are
not as easily caught as the masters thought they would be. The Derbyshire miners have nothing
to fear. the Cornish miners are not to be gulled by the agents from Derbyshire. some of the
masters agents have told the men here that there are no lockouts - no grievances whatever, but
we have told them a very different story.

        Yours Truly,
        Wm. Brown.


Masters and Men. (From the "Western Daily Mercury" of Dec. 5th.).

          "This meeting is convinced that the agitation of Brown and other delegates is promoted
for selfish purposes, and for the benefit of the employers of South Yorkshire; and as the
movement is calculated to take away the steady trade we have had so many years, we pledge
ourselves to resist the attempt to bring present and future misery on ourselves and our families".
Such was one of the resolutions that were carried with "great enthusiasm" at a meeting of non-
union colliers held at Staveley, Derbyshire, on Friday last. Now, we understand that a meeting of
miners is announced to be held this evening at Bodmin, at which Mr. McDonald, the president of
the Miners' Association, and Mr. Wm. Brown, the agent of the Yorkshire and Derbyshire Miners,
are expected to be present. The object of these men is to induce the miners of Cornwall to
remain at home and starve rather than by emigrating to places where work is to be obtained for
the asking, or to interfere with the schemes of the National Association. The position of the
Staveley miners is somewhat analogous to that of the Cornishmen, and from the tone of the
resolution we have printed above they will see what the Derbyshire colliers think of the union
tactics.: - "When Derbyshire men went to Yorkshire," said one of the speakers, "unionists told
them to stay at home, which showed how much the boasted sympathy of William Brown's friends
was worth". Another speaker, Vardy by name, stated that he had been nearly starved during the
strike if 1864(?), and that in 1850 he and his wife and children were nearly "clammed". But the
best speech delivered on the occasion was by Mr. Benjamin Rodgers, a pitman, and the following
sentences are singularly relevant at present: - "Why," he enquired, "had Staveley increased so in
population? Because colliers flocked there to get the good wages and constant work. Mr. Brown
was not so much a favourite in South Yorkshire as some people led them to believe, for at Earl
FitzWilliams' Colliery they would whip him off the place if he went there". Other addresses were
made with the object of exposing the pernicious dog-in-the-manger policy of the unionists, who
would neither work themselves nor allow others to work, and eventually the men passed a
resolution pledging the meeting to act independently, despite Brown and his colleagues, and to
endeavour to restore good will between master and men. We would wish the men of Cornwall to
ponder these things before pledging themselves to any obstructive policy. Let them give the
deputation a fair hearing and their arguments due consideration, and each man think for himself.
If Messrs. McDonald and Brown can show them how to fill their mouths with bread, they ought to
deserve the gratitude of the miners, and that is the point to aim at, for if their nostrums only
tend to promote the prosperity of the men of Glasgow and Yorkshire, their mission to Cornwall is
not likely to prove very satisfactory.
Derbyshire Times.

Saturday 8th. December 1866.

Page 3 Col. 1-3

Great Meeting of Non-Unionists at Staveley.
Derbyshire Times.

Saturday 8th. December 1866.

Page 3 Col. 3

Meeting of Non-Unionists at Staveley.
Derbyshire Times.

Saturday 8th. December 1866.

Page 3 Col. 4-6

Trade Unions and Strikes.
Derbyshire Times.

Saturday 8th. December 1866.

Page 3 Col. 6

Union Meeting at Low Gate.
Derbyshire Times.

Saturday 8th. December 1866.

Page 4 Col. 2

Letter - The Miner's Union.
Derbyshire Times.

Saturday 8th. December 1866.

Page 4 Col. 2

Letter - How to Prevent the Impending Storm.
Derbyshire Times.

Saturday 8th. December 1866.

Page 4 Col. 2

Letter - The Miner's Union at Staveley.
Derbyshire Times.

Saturday 8th. December 1866.

Page 4 Col. 3

Letter - A Fair Day's Wage for a Fair Day's Work.
Derbyshire Times.

Saturday 8th. December 1866.

Page 4 Col. 3

Letter - The Cornish Miner's Application to the Magistrates at Chesterfield.
Derbyshire Times.

Saturday 8th. December 1866.

Page 4 Col. 3

Letter - The Union at Lings.
Derbyshire Times.

Saturday 8th. December 1866.

Page 4 Col. 3

Letter - Friendly Societies at Staveley.
Derbyshire Times.

Saturday 8th. December 1866.

Page 4 Col. 4

Letter - The Miner's Union.
Derbyshire Times.

Saturday 8th. December 1866.

Page 4 Col. 4

Letter - Dick Wass of Speedwell Terrace, Staveley to Dick Wass of Clay Cross.
Derbyshire Times.

Saturday 8th. December 1866.

Page 5 Col. 2

Non-Union Meeting at Barrow Hill.
Derbyshire Times.

Saturday 8th. December 1866.

Page 5 Col. 2-3

Great Non-Unionist Demonstration at Staveley.
Derbyshire Times.

Saturday 8th. December 1866.

Page 5 Col. 4

Application by Colliers for Magisterial Advice.
Derbyshire Times.

Saturday 8th. December 1866.

Page 6 Col. 1

Union Meeting at Clay Cross.
Derbyshire Times.

Saturday 8th. December 1866.

Page 6 Col. 2

Breach of the Colliery Regulations.
Derbyshire Times.

Saturday 8th. December 1866.

Page 6 Col. 3

New Whittington - Cholera.
Derbyshire Times.

Saturday 15th. December 1866.

Page 2 Col. 4-5

Leader - The Miner's Union and Trades Unions Generally.
Derbyshire Times.

Saturday 15th. December 1866.

Page 3 Col. 2

Mosboro' - Colliery Accident.
Derbyshire Times.

Saturday 15th. December 1866.

Page 3 Col. 2

Clay Cross - Meeting of Non-Unionists.
Derbyshire Times.

Saturday 15th. December 1866.

Page 3 Col. 2

Clay Cross - Accidents.
Derbyshire Times.

Saturday 15th. December 1866.

Page 3 Col. 2

Clay Cross - Death of a Horse.
Derbyshire Times.

Saturday 15th. December 1866.

Page 3 Col. 2

Clay Cross - Non-Union Meeting - Lively Scene.
Derbyshire Times.

Saturday 15th. December 1866.

Page 3 Col. 4

A Night with the Cornish Miners at Staveley.
Derbyshire Times.

Saturday 15th. December 1866.

Page 3 Col. 4

Miscellaneous Matters.
Derbyshire Times.

Saturday 15th. December 1866.

Page 3 Col. 5

Terrible Colliery Explosion.
Derbyshire Times.

Saturday 15th. December 1866.

Page 3 Col. 5-6

Two Other Terrific Explosions.
Derbyshire Times.

Saturday 15th. December 1866.

Page 3 Col. 6

The Second Explosion.
Derbyshire Times.

Saturday 15th. December 1866.

Page 3 Col. 6

A Third Explosion.
Derbyshire Times.

Saturday 15th. December 1866.

Page 3 Col. 6

Another Fearful Colliery Explosion.
Derbyshire Times.

Saturday 15th. December 1866.

Page 3 Col. 6

New Whittington Union Meeting.
Derbyshire Times.

Saturday 15th. December 1866.

Page 3 Col. 6

The Miner's Union and the Oaks Explosion.
Derbyshire Times.

Saturday 15th. December 1866.

Page 3 Col. 6

Non-Union Meeting at Speedwell.
Derbyshire Times.

Saturday 15th. December 1866.

Page 3 Col. 7

Letter - Mr. Denton and the Field Club at Clay Cross.
Derbyshire Times.

Saturday 15th. December 1866.

Page 4 Col. 1

Letter - The Miner's Union.
Derbyshire Times.

Saturday 15th. December 1866.

Page 4 Col. 1

Letter - Clay Cross to Dick Wass.
Derbyshire Times.

Saturday 15th. December 1866.

Page 4 Col. 2

Letter - The Miner's Union.
Derbyshire Times.

Saturday 15th. December 1866.

Page 4 Col. 2

Letter - To Gentleman Joseph Plummer and the Spiritual-Minded Non-Unionists at Staveley.
Derbyshire Times.

Saturday 15th. December 1866.

Page 4 Col. 2

Letter - Dick Wass of Clay Cross.
Derbyshire Times.

Saturday 15th. December 1866.

Page 4 Col. 3

Letter - A Man Looking Round the Corner at Clay Cross.
Derbyshire Times.

Saturday 15th. December 1866.

Page 4 Col. 3

Letter - A Voice from Stone Broom.
Derbyshire Times.

Saturday 15th. December 1866.

Page 4 Col. 3

Letter - A Derbyshire Lock-Out.
Derbyshire Times.

Saturday 15th. December 1866.

Page 4 Col. 4

Letter - The Union for Men and for Masters.
Derbyshire Times.

Saturday 22nd. December 1866.

Page 2 Col. 1

Advert - Brimington Moor Iron Works, near Chesterfield.
Derbyshire Times.

Saturday 22nd. December 1866.

Page 2 Col. 5

Advert - The Oaks Pit Colliery Explosion.
Derbyshire Times.

Saturday 22nd. December 1866.

Page 2 Col. 6

Leader - Miner's Meetings at Clay Cross and Staveley.
Derbyshire Times.

Saturday 22nd. December 1866.

Page 2 Col. 7

Local News - The Oaks Explosion.
Derbyshire Times.

Saturday 22nd. December 1866.

Page 2 Col. 7

Local News - The Oaks Colliery Accident.
Derbyshire Times.

Saturday 22nd. December 1866.

Page 2 Col. 7

Meeting of Non-Unionists at Spital.
Derbyshire Times.

Saturday 22nd. December 1866.

Page 2 Col. 7

Clay Cross - No Headline.
Derbyshire Times.

Saturday 22nd. December 1866.

Page 3 Col. 1-4

Meeting of Union and Non-Union Men at Clay Cross.
Derbyshire Times.

Saturday 22nd. December 1866.

Page 3 Col. 5-7

Great Non-Union Demonstration at Staveley.
Derbyshire Times.

Saturday 22nd. December 1866.

Page 4 Col. 1

Colliery Case - Alleged Disobedience of Order.
Derbyshire Times.

Saturday 22nd. December 1866.

Page 4 Col. 2

Letter - An Old Standard Again.
Derbyshire Times.

Saturday 22nd. December 1866.

Page 4 Col. 2

Letter - Non-Unionists, as Illustrated by Pilgrims Progress.
Derbyshire Times.

Saturday 22nd. December 1866.

Page 4 Col. 2-3

Letter - Mr. Holmes and the Lecture on Trade Unions.
Derbyshire Times.

Saturday 22nd. December 1866.

Page 4 Col. 3

Miners Meeting at Clay Cross.
Derbyshire Times.

Saturday 22nd. December 1866.

Page 4 Col. 3

Non-Union Meeting at Staveley.
Derbyshire Times.

Saturday 22nd. December 1866.

Page 4 Col. 3

Staveley - Meeting of the Union Men near Springwell Pit.
Derbyshire Times.

Saturday 22nd. December 1866.

Page 4 Col. 3

Staveley - Springwell Pit.
Derbyshire Times.

Saturday 22nd. December 1866.

Page 4 Col. 3

Staveley - Springwell Pit.
Derbyshire Times.

Saturday 22nd. December 1866.

Page 4 Col. 3

Staveley - A Shabby Act.
Derbyshire Times.

Saturday 22nd. December 1866.

Page 4 Col. 3

How Colliery Explosions are Caused.
Derbyshire Times.

Saturday 22nd. December 1866.

Page 5 Col. 2

Letter - The Miner's Union.
Derbyshire Times.

Saturday 22nd. December 1866.

Page 5 Col. 2

Letter - Miner's Union at Staveley.
Derbyshire Times.

Saturday 22nd. December 1866.

Page 5 Col. 2

Letter - The Wages at Clay Cross.
Derbyshire Times.

Saturday 22nd. December 1866.

Page 5 Col. 3-4

Sheffield Trades Societies, the Staveley Dispute and the Oaks Colliery Explosions.
Derbyshire Times.

Saturday 22nd. December 1866.

Page 6 Col. 1-2

The "Times" on the Non-Union Meeting at Staveley.
Derbyshire Times.

Saturday 22nd. December 1866.

Page 6 Col. 2

Miner's Meeting at Clay Cross.
Derbyshire Times.

Saturday 22nd. December 1866.

Page 6 Col. 2

Meeting of Union Men near Springwell Pit.
Derbyshire Times.

Saturday 22nd. December 1866.

Page 6 Col. 3

New Whittington - Miner's Meeting.
Derbyshire Times.

Saturday 29th. December 1866.

Page 2 Col. 7

Outrage on a Non-Unionist at Staveley.

         William Webster and Matthew Hall, two unionists from Staveley, were charged with
aiding and abetting a man named Hankerson (Not in Custody) in a violent assault on a non-
unionist named John Hammond, deputy overman at the Springwell Colliery, on Monday last. Mr.
Busby prosecuted, and in his opening remarks stated that the men were charged with aiding and
abetting a person not in custody, but against whom several warrants were out for assaulting
Hammond, and throwing him into the canal at Staveley. After some further remarks he called
John Hammond, who deposed; I am a deputy overman at Springwell Pit. On Monday night last,
the 24th. of December, I was in the Canal Tavern at Staveley in company with Joseph Bayley.
The Canal Tavern is within three yards of the canal and adjoining the footpath. A person named
Hankerson was there, and the two prisoners, Webster and Hall. There were about 20 other
people. Hankerson came to Bayley in the presence of the prisoners, who must have heard what
he said, "Do you work at Springwell?". He said "Yes, he was night gaffer". Hankerson said, "You
will have to go in the canal". I said, "If he goes in, I shall have to go in". When we got outside
Hankerson came to me and repeated what I said "That I shall have to go in the canal, if Bayley
did". I said, "Yes; I said so in joke". Webster then said, "Knock the b----- in". Hankerson, and
another man that I cannot speak to' then struck me and sent me backwards into the canal under
water. Both Webster and Hall were present, and saw and heard everything, as I was trying to get
out Hall said, "D---- his eyes, don't let the b------- get out alive", and Hankerson kicked me under
the eye and sent me into the canal again. Both prisoners were close behind him. I have known
Hall twelve years. After I got out of the water Hankerson said "Are you union now?". I said, "No"
upon which he hit me with his fist in the mouth. The two prisoners were present all the time.

        Webster; I was not within 20 yards of the place when it was done.

       Joseph Bayley, night overman at Springwell, corroborated. It was about a quarter to
eleven o'clock when they turned out of the Canal Tavern. There was about twenty or thirty
persons present. Hankerson said to witness, "You work at Springwell and are night overman," to
which he replied in the affirmative. Hankerson then said "You will have to go in the cut (canal)
before you go home." Hammond said that if he (witness) had, he should have to go too.
Hankerson said that he (witness) was a "black-leg" and "knob-stick" and then he went out of the
room. The prisoner followed him. When they (witness and Hammond) got outside the prisoners
and Hankerson were standing together. Hankerson then repeated what Hammond had said, and
Hammond said that if he did say so, he said it in joke. Webster said "Knock the b------- in."
Hankerson and another man then hit Hammond and knocked him into the canal. They came
towards witness next, but he got away and made his escape.

       Webster; I was one of the last who came out. When I came out a man was in the canal.
He went to ask what was the matter and they told him that a man had been in the canal.

        Hall said that he was not there all the time.

        In defence James Higginbottom was called. He said that he was a collier living in Canal
Row. He was at Williamson's public house with Webster on Monday night. They went out
together amongst the last on the side of the canal. While there they heard a noise up the side of
the canal, and heard "something splash into the cut." They went together in that direction and
met a man named Bagshaw who was complaining that someone had hit him in the mouth.
Witness then went home. Cross-Examination; I don't know Hankerson. I don't know Hammond or
Bayley. I work at Do-Well Pit. I went into the Canal Tavern at nine o'clock and stayed there
drinking till eleven o'clock; had two pints of beer. Heard no communication about throwing
anyone into the cut. I don't know the prisoner Hall. I'm a union man.

         John Bagshaw, a miner, living at Barrow Hill, deposed that he was at the Canal Tavern
on Monday night. He left after the others and kept away as he saw that they were quarrelling. He
saw someone "punch" with his foot at the complainant when in the canal but could not say how
it was. Someone then came and hit him (witness) in the mouth, and he got hold of him and said
"You young d----l, what are you doing, I suppose you think you are not a union man". While he
was talking to this man, Webster and another man came up the canal side from the Tavern. Mr.
Lucas; When that man hit you in the mouth did you not hit him back?. Witness; No. Mr. Lucas;
Then you ought to have done. Witness; He had done wrong, and said "Hit me in the mouth" -
(Laughter). I said; "No lad, not thee".

        Cross-examined; I was in the Tavern two hours. I did not hear any conversation. The
witness Bayley and me were dancing together. This was the case and the Bench having
consulted, Mr. Heathcote said the prisoners would each be committed to Derby for one month
hard labour.
Derbyshire Times.

Saturday 29th. December 1866.

Page 3 Col. 1

Colliers leaving their Work.

         Francis Smith, collier, Clay Cross, was charged by John Smith, Agent to the Clay Cross
Company, with disobeying the colliery rules of the Company. William Brown and Joseph Mycock,
also colliers, of Clay Cross, were summoned by John Wild, another of the Clay Cross Company
Agents, for a similar reason. Mr. Smith of Derby appeared for the Company, and Mr. Shipton of
Chesterfield, for the defendants. Mr. Smith intimated that the defendants had consented to
return to their work, and to give a month's notice before they left it again. For that reason he
was happy to withdraw the summons, as the hearing of them would have occupied a
considerable time.
Derbyshire Times.

Saturday 29th. December 1866.

Page 3 Col. 2

Eckington - Serious Accident at the Park Pit.

        An young lad named Henry Storey, miner, of Mosbro', was badly hurt about his head
whilst at work in the pit belonging to Messrs. J. and G. Wells. It appears that the injured man
was engaged in drawing a punch in the pit, when a quantity of bind in the roof fell upon him,
cutting his head open, both before and behind. He was taken home promptly and attended too.
Derbyshire Times.

Saturday 29th. December 1866.

Page 3 Col. 2

Eckington - Fatal Accident from a Flywheel.

         On Friday, the 21st. instant, an inquest was held before Mr. Coroner Busby, at the house
of George Stainforth, the FitzWilliam Arms, Mosbro', on the body of William Grant, who met with
his death under the following circumstances: John Grant, of Mosbro', mason, deposed that the
body viewed by the Jury as that of my late father, William Grant, of Mosbro', stone- mason, who
died on Wednesday the 19th. of December, aged 55 years. On Wednesday deceased, Joshua
Slater, Edwin Fox, and a man from Sheffield, and myself were working at Mr. Wells' colliery, Moor
Hall, we were getting the flywheel, ten feet in diameter, three tons in weight, off an engine
house. We had taken it down, and brought it from the inside to the outside of the building, we
place the wheel standing up edgeways against the engine house, we were rolling it a little further
against the engine house end, and brought it to a standstill, when the wheel capsized and fell
over. The Sheffield man and myself prised the wheel outwards before it fell. There was a
movable crab ten yards from the engine house by which the wheel was pulled out of the engine
house in a slanting direction. There were no rollers. The wheel was brought nearly perpendicular.
The wheel was again attached by a rope to the crab, after it had been raised from the engine
house wall. I don't know whether the man at the crab tightened the rope so as to make the
wheel fall. The rope was attached to the rim. Tightening the rope would pull the lower part of the
wheel outwards. The wheel fell on my father, who was helping get it to the engine, and my
father was beside the wheel; it fell upon his head and neck, and killed him on the spot. The rope
didn't break. Joshua Slater was master of the work. Joshua Slater, Lowell Street, Attercliffe Road,
Sheffield, engineer, said the wheel got over-balanced, and we were trying to rear it a bit
straighter. We fastened the rope to the rim to make the bottom of the wheel roll nearer to the
wall, so that the wheel could be more perpendicular. We were rolling it a little further when it
overbalanced. Deceased and I were pushing it on the right-hand side of the wheel at the same
time. It stopped a moment and then fell over. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death".
Derbyshire Times.

Saturday 29th. December 1866.

Page 3 Col. 2

Whittington - Important Union Meeting at the Springwell Colliery.
Derbyshire Times.

Saturday 29th. December 1866.

Page 3 Col. 3

Shirland - Fatal Colliery Accident.

        On Monday last, Mr. Coroner Busby held an inquest at the Red Lion Inn, Shirland, on the
body of John Thorpe, aged 25, who was killed under the following circumstances; He was
engaged with a man named Isaiah Fenn, engineer, in examining some pumps in a pit belonging
to Messrs. Bayley, and had been to the bottom of the shaft, a distance of nearly a hundred yards,
in a tube. They found about 52 yards of water in the shaft and deceased entered the tube to
ascend to the top. He shouted "All right" and had proceeded about three feet when he fell out
into the water. The accident happened about 3 o'clock a.m., and his body was recovered with
drags about 6 o'clock. There were no bruises on the body, and there seemed to be no way to
account for the accident, as the tube did not shake, and was going steadily up the shaft. The
Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death".
Derbyshire Times.

Saturday 29th. December 1866.

Page 3 Col. 3

Staveley - Outrages at Staveley.
Derbyshire Times.

Saturday 29th. December 1866.

Page 3 Col. 4

Letter - A Voice from Stone Broom.
Derbyshire Times.

Saturday 29th. December 1866.

Page 3 Col. 4

Letter - Dick Wass again.
Derbyshire Times.

Saturday 29th. December 1866.

Page 3 Col. 4

Letter - The Union.
Derbyshire Times.

Saturday 29th. December 1866.

Page 3 Col. 4-5

Letter - Toleration and the Colliers Advocates.
Derbyshire Times.

Saturday 29th. December 1866.

Page 3 Col. 5-6

The Colliers Dispute at Staveley - Meeting of Union Men at Staveley.
Derbyshire Times.

Saturday 29th. December 1866.

Page 3 Col. 6

Union Demonstration at New Whittington.
Derbyshire Times.

Saturday 29th. December 1866.

Page 3 Col. 6

Riot amongst Colliers at North Staveley.
Derbyshire Times.

Saturday 29th. December 1866.

Page 3 Col. 7

Bullock Roasting at Staveley.

         On Monday last, Staveley was all bustle and activity, the occasion being the roasting of
an ox whole. The non-unionists had some days previously waited upon Mr. Markham, soliciting a
Christmas present, and accompanying response to this appeal gave them an ox and fourteen
barrels of beer, together with a large quantity of bread and cheese. A procession of the non-
unionist employees was arranged and the men and boys from the various pits, headed by the
Staveley Works Band, under the leadership of Mr. Toplis, met at Troughbrook, and walked from
thence along Barrow Hill, to the cricket field, where the festivities were appointed to be held. The
ox, a very fine animal, had been roasted, and owing to the excellence of the arrangements for
cooking, every part of the beast was served up perfectly cooked; and in a short time the whole of
it was consumed. John Barrow Esq., C. Markham Esq. and family, W. Fowler Esq., arrived on the
grounds during the proceedings and cordially cheered. There being plenty of provisions and to
spare, Mr. Markham observing the number of persons outside the barriers and looking on,
ordered them to be taken up so that all might be supplied, whether unionists or not, and this act
of generosity, was warmly cheered. Mr. Campbell, Mr. Howe, Mr. Knighton and others were very
industrious in the distribution of oranges and nuts; so that with the enlivening strains of the
band, and the romping of the lads, everybody appeared to enjoy themselves. The proceedings
closed in the afternoon.
Derbyshire Times.

Saturday 29th. December 1866.

Page 3 Col. 7

The Late Colliery Explosions.

        We have pleasure in appraising our readers that an impressive sermon preached last
Sabbath evening, by the Revd. T.H. Walker, in the Salter-Gate Chapel, for the religious
improvement of these calamitous events, is now published, and that the entire profits will be
given to the trust for the relief of the widows and orphans. We trust that the sale will be
promoted by the public generally.
Derbyshire Times.

Saturday 29th. December 1866.

Page 3 Col. 7

Mr. Parkin Jeffcock.

         A Correspondent communicates to the "Derby Mercury" some pleasant reminiscences of
Mr. Parkin Jeffcock, who was killed in the Oaks Colliery whilst trying to rescue the men. He had
been a resident of Duffield, near Derby, for nearly seven years, and was very highly esteemed.
He was a man of strong religious views, and a very strict observer of the Sunday. Two or three
years ago he was professionally engaged in inspecting mines in Prussia, several distinguished
foreign engineers decided upon holding a conference in one of the mines on the Sunday; he
objected to this decision on religious grounds, and the proposed conference was never held. Mr.
Jeffcock usually spent the Sunday afternoon instructing a class of boys, and later in the day he
taught an adult class. During the International Exhibition of 1862, he sent over to Paris all the
Sunday School boys who were old enough to undertake the journey, and he defrayed the whole
of their expenses. Mr. Jeffcock took great interest in every scheme of usefulness; and the
establishment of an annual flower show, and the recent lighting of the village with gas, was
mainly owing to his exertions. Mr. Jeffcock was very well known in Chesterfield.
Derbyshire Times.

Saturday 29th. December 1866.

Page 4 Col. 1-2

Grassmoor - Colliers leaving Work.
Derbyshire Times.

Saturday 29th. December 1866.

Page 4 Col. 2

The Detection of Foul Air in Coal Pits.
Derbyshire Times.

Saturday 29th. December 1866.

Page 4 Col. 4

Combinations, Strikes and the Rate of Wages.
Derbyshire Times.

Saturday 29th. December 1866.

Page 4 Col. 4

The Miners Dispute in Derbyshire - Non-Union Meeting at Clay Cross.

								
To top