Tourism and Hospitality Skills Report

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         Tourism and Hospitality
         Skills Report




           prepared by the:

           Queensland Tourism Industry Council
           September 2009
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High level description of any recent and/or emerging issues impacting
on the skilling needs of the industry (eg major legislation changes,
major technological changes, key projects).

Skill Shortage

The skills shortage has not gone away!

It is the view of the industry that the skill shortages are still very much with us.
Although employers are reporting a higher number of job applicants there is still a
shortage of skilled applicants. To the extent that the higher number of job applicants
is a result of the economic downturn it can be expected that labour shortages will
recur when the economy recovers.

Skills needs across the industry are complex, and can occur for a range of reasons;
specifically skills shortages are identified for Cooks and Chefs and have been for
many years.

Other skill shortage areas include:

Sector              Level 1 Shortage   Level 2 Shortage   Skills          Quality Gap
                                                          Mismatch
Accommodation                          Housekeepers       Chefs / Cooks
(Resorts/Motels)                       Cleaners
                                       F&B Attendants
                                       Wait persons
                                       Porters
                                       Kitchen Steward
Restaurants                            F&B Attendants     Chefs / Cooks   Restaurant
                                       Wait persons                       supervisors
                                       Food Preparation
Tours               Tour Guides with   Tour Guides                        Tour Guides with
                    Languages skills                                      Risk management
                                                                          Tour Guides with
                                                                          MR licenses
Other Tourism                                                             Event
                                                                          Management
Hotels / Pubs /                        Food & Beverage    Chefs / Cooks
Clubs                                  Attendants
                                       Wait persons
Travel                                 Travel Agents                      Agents with e-
                                                                          business



Meanwhile, labour shortages remain evident in some rural and remote tourism areas
for example Longreach through its peak season of April to October. Other regions
facing skills shortages include Whitsunday Coast and Islands, Moreton Island and
Cairns / Townsville regions.



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The tourism and hospitality industry must plan for the future if it is to ensure skill and
labour shortages will not derail projected growth. Demographic (aging population
has not gone away) and economic challenges mean tourism and hospitality business
will be confronted with continuing skill shortage over the next two decades.

Furthermore we are experiencing an increasing demand by the customer who
expects higher service levels, and increasing the productivity of the workforce will
require continued support and funding for training.

Fair Work Act 2009

The Fair Work Act 2009 received Royal Assent on 7 April 2009 with transitional
arrangements put in place. Specific to the tourism and hospitality industry:
Hospitality Award Modernisation
Although the transition arrangements were to begin (?) 1 January 2010 in a response
to industry backlash the date has been pushed out until 1 July 2010.
With regard to the Hospitality Industry General Award (HIGA)

The industry continues to advocate for a separate award for the accommodation
sector or at least for the HIGA to allow for greater flexibility to account for the ‘24/7’
nature of the tourism and hospitality industry.

Key concerns:

        Part-time employment is overregulated as compared to provisions applied
        across Australia. This will deter employers from offering permanent part time
        employment in the industry.

       The ordinary hours of work provide for little flexibility in an industry that is
       forced to operate 24 hours day, 7 days a week, 365 days a year.

       The increase for operators of a Sunday loading in particular in Queensland
       from 150% to 175% which has the potential to force operators to close at
       times of high visitor demand as the costs of operating will be too expensive.

       HIGA extends the coverage of the traditional “late work/early start” allowance
       to casual employees where no previous entitlement was available. This does
       not reflect the flexibility required to work in tourism and hospitality.

       The increase for operators in the Sunday loading for casual employees in
       particular in Queensland to 150% does not take into account the 24/7 nature
       of the industry.

       The increase for operators of a public holiday loading for casual employees in
       particular in Queensland to 250% also does not take into account the 24/7
       nature of the industry.

       The broad definition of “shift worker” in the HIGA will impose the cost of an
       extra weeks’ pay for annual leave on employers. This represents an increase
       of 2% alone.

       The HIGA provides an extra entitlement to employees who do not ordinarily
       work on a day that a public holiday falls. This is an added cost burden to
       operators not previously using the Federal Motels Award (AP787952).


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       Multi-hiring provisions whereby a full-time or part-time employee may be
       separately engaged as a casual employee for duties in a separate section of
       the establishment has not been included in the HIGA.

       Employers will be obligated to pay a percentage of wages to apprentices
       when they are undertaking ‘off the job’ training. This has the potential to
       significantly reduce employers’ willingness to take on apprentices –
       particularly those undertaking a school-based apprenticeship.

The Trade Practices Amendment (Clarity in Pricing) Bill 2008

The Assistant Treasurer has announced that an amendment will be made to the
‘Trade Practices Act 1974’ to clarify the use of ‘component pricing’. Rather than
businesses advertising the price as a sum and then advising consumers of the cost
of additional compulsory extras, the new legislation will enforce that business only
advertise a ‘single price’, which will include any and all compulsory additional
charges.

Registered Training Organisations should update any training and assessment
materials to reflect these changes in the Trade Practices Amendment (Clarity in
Pricing) Bill 2008.

Climate Change

The Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority (GBRMPA), the Association of Marine
Park Operators (AMPTO) and QTIC as lead agencies* have jointly launch a Climate
Change Action Strategy for Marine Park Operators. This work has been in progress
for some time and provides practical responses for marine operators faced with a
changing environment.

Link to website to download report:
http://www.gbrmpa.gov.au/onboard/home/high_standards/climate_change_action

*The project was also supported by Tourism Queensland, EcoTourism Australia,
Lady Elliott Island Eco Resort, Quicksilver and Whitsunday Charter Boat Industry
Association.

Registered Training Organisations are encouraged to embed the following into there
training and assessment materials from the Climate Change Action Strategy for
Marine Park Operators:

   Tourism Staff Training Course in all tourism qualifications (Strategy 1.1.4);
   Reef Facts for Tourism Guides (Climate Change Edition) in all guiding
   qualifications (Strategy 1.2.1); and
   Responsible Reed Practices into all tourism qualifications (Strategy 4.1.1)

Tourism Reform in Australia

The Federal Government has released a review of the Australian tourism industry
focusing on the challenges the industry faces to meet the future demands of
travellers and prevent a long-term decline in the industry. The report was compiled
by former Qantas chairman Margaret Jackson and recommends new structures to
improve the links between government and industry groups involved in tourism.
It also contributes to the ongoing development of the National Long-Term Tourism
Strategy to be finalised later this year.

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The report has ten (10) recommendations with recommendation three (3) focusing on
‘people’. Recommendation three (3): “Ensure tourism has equitable and adequate
access to skills programs at national and state level, and focus tourism skills
programs and labour policies in two areas: the recruitment, development and
retention of career tourism employees; and the facilitation of sufficient part-time and
casual employees.”

Link to website to download report:
http://www.ret.gov.au/tourism/policy/national_long_term_tourism_strategy/Pages/Nati
onalLongTermTourismStrategy.aspx

It is recommended that investment in employment, education and training programs
and related investments such as training product, training infrastructure etc recognise
the dual labour market nature of tourism and hospitality. While it is true and
necessary that there is a large part-time and casual workforce, it should also be
recognised that the number of full-time career positions in the industry (around
62,000) is equal to or greater than the number of full-time jobs in various other
priority industries such as Mining (with 45,800 full-time workers).

Queensland Tourism Strategy (QTS)

The Queensland Tourism Strategy (QTS) is in its fourth year, it was published as a
‘Ten Year Plan' with an action agenda covering 3-4 years. The actions have been
monitored quarterly initially and recently on a half yearly basis, most recently in June
2009.

The Department of Employment, Economic Development and Innovation (DEEDI),
TQ and QTIC have all agreed that original QTS Action Plan should be the updated,
as was the original intent.

Theme three (3) is the workforce development theme with approved actions to be
released in the coming months, and will be reported in the March 2010 Industry Skills
Report.

Water Safety Handbook: Best Practice Guidelines for Tourism Operators

QTIC is delighted to announce the release of the Water Safety Handbook. QTIC has
worked closely with Tourism Queensland, Surf Life Saving Queensland and the
Visitor Safety Ambassadors for the past year to provide this resource for operators
with the aim of providing best practice guidelines to assist in keeping Queensland's
visitor safe in all aquatic environments.

Link to website to download handbook:
http://www.qtic.com.au/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=812&Itemid=3
10

Registered Training Organisations need to be aware of this handbook and review all
training and assessment materials to reflect key messages for all Certificate IV or
Diploma courses in hospitality, tourism and business.




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Tourism Experience Pays Awareness Strategy

The Tourism Experience Pays Awareness Strategy (TEPAS) will offer forums and
face to face meetings with employers, employees and key industry stakeholders to
raise awareness of the challenges and opportunities presented by an ageing
workforce, improve attitudes towards older workers (45+) and encourage employers
to adopt age-friendly workplace practices.

Registered Training Organisations need to be aware of the Tourism Experience Pays
Awareness Strategy and enlist QTIC’s support if required.

What industry and government training/skilling responses are required
to address these recent and/or emerging issues (e.g. shift training
investment to upskill existing workers in specified skills).

Identified above as part of discussion of each separate issue.

Key priority industry sub-sectors requiring training over the 2009-10
year, the skills/occupational outcomes to be targeted, and the reason for
this demand.

“Green jobs” or “green-collar jobs”, which contribute to better environmental
outcomes or increased sustainability, are set to boom in the 21st century as we move
towards a global low carbon economy.

The current status of the hospitality and tourism’s green agenda include:

Green Table Australia

The Green Table Australia scheme, created by Restaurant &Catering Australia,
based on the Green Table program in Canada is intended to recognise restaurants
and catering businesses that are doing what they can to reduce their CO2 emission.

The program requires restaurants, cafes and caterers to commit to:

   using natural gas or a minimum of 20% green electricity to power their stoves;
   send their organic waste to compost;
   recycle paper, plastic, glass, metal as much as possible;
   use energy-efficient equipment and lighting;
   use water-saving equipment and fixtures and;
   use recycled, biodegradable and non-toxic supplies.

The program, in Phase I, will require businesses to meet minimum requirements in
the areas of water and energy saving, waste management and supplies. The
program will set these requirements so that as many as possible of the industry’s
small businesses can subscribe to the program. Phase II of the program, which will
be implemented in the following 12-24 months will look at how businesses can further
reduce their omissions and/or purchase offsets.

For more information: http://greentable.com.au




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Research

University of Queensland have been contracted to conduct research into tourism and
hospitality businesses and best practice models for greening. The report will provide
recommendations on - what can be done different or better. The report is due out by
the end of 2009 and relevant information and recommendations will be provided in
the March 2010 Industry Skills Report.

Earthcheck Lite

Earthcheck Lite through EC3 Global, is providing the hotel sector with a clear
pathway and an affordable tool to assess and improve their environmental policies
and practices.

Earthcheck Lite is designed for businesses that want to start addressing
sustainability and climate change. The program provides businesses with an online
user friendly Health Check Framework, it assesses all key environmental
performances areas.

For more information: http://www.ec3global.com/products-
programs/earthcheck/earthcheck-lite

ecoBiz Queensland

Clubs are working with Department of Environment and Resource Management
(DERM) by doing trials of ecoBiz Queensland across the Club sector.

ecoBiz is the DERM's signature partnership program with Queensland business and
industry. ecoBiz assists businesses identify efficiencies in waste, water and energy
for financial and environmental benefits.

For more information:
http://www.epa.qld.gov.au/environmental_management/sustainability/ecobiz_queensl
and/

Ecotourism Australia

The ECO Certification Program is a world first. It has been developed to address the
need to identify genuine nature and ecotourism operators. It is also now being
exported to the rest of the world as the International ECO Certification Program.

The ECO Certification logo is a globally recognized brand which assists travellers to
choose and experience a genuine and authentic tour, attraction, cruise or
accommodation that is environmentally, socially and economically sustainable. The
ECO Certification program assures travellers that certified products are backed by a
strong, well managed commitment to sustainable practices and provides high quality
nature-based tourism experiences.

The 3 levels of ECO Certification are:

Nature Tourism: Tourism in a natural area that leaves minimal impact on the
environment.




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Ecotourism: Tourism in a natural area that offers interesting ways to learn about the
environment with an operator that uses resources wisely, contributes to the
conservation of the environment and helps local communities.

Advance Ecotourism: Australia's leading and most innovative ecotourism products,
providing an opportunity to learn about the environment with an operator who is
committed to achieving best practice when using resources wisely, contributing to the
conservation of the environment and helping local communities.

For more information: http://www.ecotourism.org.au

Key priority qualifications for delivery over the 2009-10 year, the
occupational outcomes being targeted (where more than one outcome
exists), the reason for the demand and the preferred training pathways
(apprenticeship/traineeship vs other training delivery)

Priority qualification for delivery over the next 12 months will include:

   Certificate III Hospitality (Commercial Cookery) through an apprenticeship model
   SIT40207 Certificate IV Tourism for existing workers
   SIT40307 Certificate IV Hospitality for existing workers
   SIT50107 Diploma of Tourism for existing workers
   SIT50307 Diploma of Hospitality for existing workers
   BSB51107 Diploma of Management for existing workers
   TAA40104 Certificate IV in Training and Assessment for existing workers and
   career changers.
   Certificate III, IV and V in Holiday Parks and Resorts (waiting to be endorsed by
   NQC and put into SIT07)

While this is not preferred by industry, it is timely for either the Hospitality Training
Association (the largest private SRTO) and/or the Gold Coast Institute of TAFE (the
lead Institute for tourism) to develop and pilot an institutional hybrid pathway. This
pathway could be considered a pre-requisite for students looking to develop their
skills through an institutional pathway – with students required to undertake a ‘cook
ready’ course prior to their acceptance into the program. This initiative would provide
students with a greater understanding of their industry of choice prior to commencing
their studies.

Key cross-industry qualifications/competencies/skills for delivery in
2009-10 (eg business, management, IT, etc), reasons for this demand,
the specific qualifications/competencies targeted, and preferred training
pathways.

Business management qualifications/competencies are on the increase amongst our
business operators due to the perception of being across industries rather than
boxed into tourism or hospitality management.

Furthermore it is worth noting other skill sets in demand include:

   Marine qualifications for marine tourism operators;
   Outdoor Recreations qualifications for for adventure tourism;
   IT skills for business operators and administration staff; and
   Indigenous arts and culture for Indigenous tourism


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Green Skills

Through SPP funding, a project has commenced that will result in around 400
existing workers being trained in up to five high priority environmental sustainability
competencies. Furthermore as a result of the project the same five competencies
will be available for all current and future SIT students.

   SITXENV001A Participate in environmentally sustainable work practices
   SITXENV002A Implement and monitor environmentally sustainable work
   practices
   SITXENV003A Develop workplace policy and procedures for sustainability
   SITTPPD004A Plan and implement minimal impact operations
   SITTPPD006A Plan and develop ecologically sustainable tourism operations

Key priority cohorts for the coming year – for example, existing workers,
entry level, mature aged, women, etc

Priority cohorts for 2009-2010 will include:

   Existing workers
   Indigenous
   Redundant workers
   Mature Aged (including part-time work as transition to retirement; casual and
   seasonal work as lifestyle option for grey nomads)

The qualifications/competencies industry is looking for in new entrants,
and the preferred training pathways.

The industry is looking for employees with basic employability skills and as a
pathway to industry a Certificate II or III through traineeships.

It is anticipated the caravan park operations from the Caravan Industry Training
Package (THC04) will transition into the Tourism Hospitality and Events (SIT07)
Training package within the next couple of months therefore it would be a
recommendation to declare some funding for traineeships in Holiday Parks and
Resorts.

The qualifications/competencies industry is looking for in existing
workers, and the preferred training pathways.

The industry is looking for existing workers to gain skills/competencies through a
Certificate IV or Diploma qualification through a blended delivery style.

The methodology for the Productivity Places Program (PPP) is through an industry
selected Registered Training Organisation process and has provided the industry
with a great opportunity to ensure timing and delivery methods to be flexible to each
business/regional requirement.

Pre and post trade qualifications in demand (location, qualifications)
Other Certificate IV and above qualifications/competencies in demand.

No others identified.

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The sub-sectors and/or qualifications that are less attractive to the
industry.

It is still the case that there is risk of over-supply of the Diploma in Events
Management, as job roles are limited. An investigation into the TAFE delivery
identified that 99% of TAFE delivery was in hospitality not sport and recreation.
TAFEs are reminded to consider likely job prospects for their graduates.


Significant regional projects and appropriate training responses for the
2009-2010 year.

Regional projects have been identified and may need appropriate training response:

    Outback Tourism SFS
    Outback Training Skills Needs in Regions
    Gladstone Pipeline project, a project to facilitate business development and
    mentoring
    Statewide indigenous employment project
    Tourism SFS Fraser Coast
    Tourism SFS Sunshine Coast

Any regional shifts required in training delivery to address training
shortfalls in specific regions in 2009-2010.

TAFE delivery plans for 2009-10 reflect regional shifts (from SEQ to FNQ and other
regions) as recommended in previous Skills Reports. Allow these planned inter-
regional shifts to consolidate before making any further recommendations re regional
shifts.

Training supply is still lacking in some of our regional areas for example ‘Outback
Queensland. As an example Longreach does not have a training provider within the
region and although the Australian Agricultural College Corporation is a training
provider with scope for tourism it has been a directive by QPI&F that they cannot
service this sector or any other sector.

It is recommended that a strategy be developed and implemented to ensure
provision of tourism and hospitality training (and other relevant non-agricultural
training) in Longreach / Outback through recurrent funding rather than via ad-hoc
project-based funding.

Any required shifts in relation to current VET delivery. Data to be
provided to industry on current delivery (apprenticeships and
traineeships including SATs, TAFE delivery including TAFE training
delivered specifically to school students)

Total School Based Apprenticeships and Traineeships (SAT’s) across tourism and
hospitality is 2856. Current qualifications being offered include:




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Hospitality – total 1355
 SIT20207 Certificate II Hospitality
 SIT20307 Certificate II Hospitality (Kitchen Operations)
 SIT30707 Certificate III Hospitality
 SIT30807 Certificate III Hospitality (Commercial Cookery)
 SIT40307 Certificate IV Hospitality
 THH21802 Certificate II Hospitality (Operations)
 THH22002 Certificate II Hospitality (Kitchen Operations)
 THH31502 Certificate III Hospitality (Commercial Cookery)
 THH33002 Certificate III Hospitality (Operations)
 SIT20207 Certificate II Hospitality
 SIT20307 Certificate II Hospitality (Kitchen Operations)
 SIT30707 Certificate III Hospitality
 SIT30807 Certificate III Hospitality (Commercial Cookery)
 SIT40307 Certificate IV Hospitality
 THH21802 Certificate II Hospitality (Operations)
 THH22002 Certificate II Hospitality (Kitchen Operations)
 THH31502 Certificate III Hospitality (Commercial Cookery)
 THH33002 Certificate III Hospitality (Operations)

The Tourism, Hospitality and Events Training Package (SIT07) were implemented in
January 2009 therefore the THH qualifications will be phased out. It is not favoured
by industry for school students to complete a Certificate III or IV.

Tourism – total 1501
 SIT30107 Certificate III Tourism
 SIT30207 Certificate III Tourism (Retail Travel Sales)
 THT30202 Certificate III Tourism (Retail Travel Sales)
 THT30302 Certificate III Tourism (International Retail Travel Sales)
 THT30702 Certificate III Tourism (Attractions and Theme Parks)
 THT31002 Certificate III Tourism (Operations)

The Tourism, Hospitality and Events Training Package (SIT07) were implemented in
January 2009 therefore the THH qualifications will be phased out. It is not favoured
by industry for school students to do a Certificate III as it disadvantages the student
in gaining a traineeship when they leave school whether it is in the travel sector or
another industry.

Pathways most valued by industry for cookery are the apprenticeships model and
more than one day a week in industry. The favoured pathway for other qualifications
is a traineeship with work experience as a must.

Any other significant issues that should inform training delivery plans
for 2009-2010.

H1N1 – Swine Flu

Figures released by Australian Bureau of Statistics show a 13 per cent decline in
international visitors to Australia during July 2009 compared to the same month last
year. A combination of factors has contributed to the result for July 2009 compared to
July 2008 including global economic conditions and the spike in visitors in July last
year for World Youth Day.

While travel to Australia has been affected this year by global economic factors and

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more recently H1N1, there are indications that tourism to Australia is holding up
reasonably well overall, with arrivals for the first seven months of 2009 falling by just
3 per cent compared to the same period last year.

Detailed ABS employment data for August 2009, for Accommodation & Food
Services in Queensland the total level of employment is holding up well.

However, note relative changes full-time and part-time. On the down side it is an
indicator that business is down - total hours worked are down. On the up side it is an
indicator that businesses are trying to hold onto staff by reducing hours while they
ride out the global financial crisis and swine flu.

Employed persons, Accommodation & Food Services, Queensland

                 Full time:     Part-time:
Aug-2007         75.5            77.5
Nov-2007         74.9            82.0
Feb-2008         79.4            78.7
May-2008         65.9            85.5
Aug-2008         76.4            85.0
Nov-2008         76.3            84.3
Feb-2009         66.9            87.2
May-2009         70.2            91.1
Aug-2009         61.9            96.2

Furthermore, with the introduction in July 2010 of the proposed Hospitality Industry
General Award it will be a requirement for employers to pay for off-the-job training
which may cause employers to not take on school-based apprentices or trainees.

Key Performance Indicators February 09 to 30 September 09:

Provide advice to the Queensland Government on industry training and skill requirements.

Skills Alliance operations reflect this contract   •   Ongoing as stated in contract
with the Queensland Government and
stated criteria in this Schedule.
Extent of advice on workplace reform and           •   Ongoing as stated in contract
the change drivers affecting the industry.
Representative network established and             •   Skills Link Council have met and all
reflects identified criteria for membership.           criteria have been met:
                                                            o 14 May 09
                                                            o 13 August 09
3 year Industry Skills Plan produced from       •      Completed and on time
wide ranging industry consultation and
research and received by the Agency prior
to 31 May 2007.
Twice yearly industry reports received and      • Up to date and on time
address stated criteria in this Schedule
(second and third year of operation and in
any contract extension period).
Undertake strategic activities to support and deliver outcomes identified in Criteria 2 of this
Schedule

Advice relevant to the industry is provided to     •   Face to face meetings on a regular basis
the Industry Portfolio Manager as evidenced        •   Verbal communication (phone) on a needs
by regular communication.                              basis


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                                                    •   Email contact at least weekly
Active participation in industry promotion          •   Participant of Skilling Bayside South group
evidenced by attendance at industry-school          •   Participate in Tranzitions@Work LCP
links meetings; attendance at school career         •   Over 30,000 at Try’a Trade in May 09 with
nights; attendance at careers expos;                    QTIC taking 400 square metres
regional visits. Participation to be reported       •   Member of Worklinks LCP committee
in twice-yearly reports.                            •   Attendance at Worklinks breakfast
                                                        meetings
                                                    •   Wynnum Nth SHS Career Day – August
                                                    •   Townsville Try’a Trade
                                                    •   Mackay visit
                                                    •   Salute to Excellence Awards
                                                    •   Striving for Excellence Conference
                                                    •   Former Origin Greats Career Expo for
                                                        indigenous. Rockhampton, Mt Isa,
                                                        Townsville, Cairns
                                                    •   Industry straw poll conducted – appendix
                                                        1
At least 2 industry forums conducted and            •   Bundaberg in March
reported on with at least one forum                 •   Gladstone/Rockhampton in May
conducted in a regional centre.                     •   Scenic Rim in August

Skills alliance actively participates in training   •   Working closely with Service Skills
package review process by ensuring wide-                Australia regarding continuous
ranging industry feedback is received during            improvement of SIT07
continuous improvement process.                     • Meeting with Kit McMahon acting CEO –
                                                        September
                                                    • Network meeting with SSA and other
                                                        states – June
                                                    • Meeting with Peter Collins – Training
                                                        Package Manager – April / September
Any skills formation strategy identified for        Assistance provided in developing SFS
the industry is developed and managed as            proposals for:
required.                                           • Caravan sector (unsuccessful)
                                                    • Gladstone/Rockhampton (unsuccessful)
                                                    • Scenic Rim (to be submitted next round)

                                                    Skills Alliance is working with the Caravan
                                                    sector to develop and implement a Training
                                                    Strategy as alternative to SFS.

                                                    Ongoing support for the Outback Tourism
                                                    SFS.
Conduct of the Contractor

Act in a manner designed to maintain the            •   Ongoing as stated in contract
respect of the industry Sector and listed sub-
sectors

Notify the Agency immediately in writing in         •   Ongoing as stated in contract
the event that any provision of their 'Conflict
of Interest and Fair Dealing' schedule
response becomes incorrect.




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Summary of Recommendations:

1. Registered Training Organisations should update any training and assessment
   materials to reflect these changes in the Trade Practices Amendment (Clarity in
   Pricing) Bill 2008.

2. Registered Training Organisations are encouraged to embed the following into
   their training and assessment materials from the Climate Change Action Strategy
   for Marine Park Operators:

               Tourism Staff Training Course in all tourism qualifications (Strategy 1.1.4);
               Reef Facts for Tourism Guides (Climate Change Edition) in all guiding
               qualifications (Strategy 1.2.1); and
               Responsible Reed Practices into all tourism qualifications (Strategy 4.1.1)

3. It is recommended that investment in employment, education and training
   programs and related investments such as training product, training infrastructure
   etc recognise the dual labour market nature of tourism and hospitality. While it is
   true and necessary that there is a large part-time and casual workforce, it should
   also be recognised that the number of full-time career positions in the industry
   (around 62,000) is equal to or greater than the number of full-time jobs in various
   other priority industries such as Mining (with 45,800 full-time workers).

4. Registered Training Organisations need to be aware of the Water Safety
   Handbook and review all training and assessment materials to reflect key
   messages for all Certificate IV or Diploma courses in hospitality, tourism and
   business.

5. Registered Training Organisations need to be aware of the Tourism Experience
   Pays Awareness Strategy and enlist QTIC’s support if required.

6. A strategy be developed and implemented to ensure provision of tourism and
   hospitality training (and other relevant non-agricultural training) in Longreach /
   Outback through recurrent funding rather than via ad-hoc project-based funding.




Any questions please contact:

Robyn Keenan
QTIC Skills Link Manager
07) 3207 6340
0418 777 209
robyn.keenan@qtic.com.au




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Appendix One (1)

                    RESPONSES TO QTIC’S MEMBER SURVEY

                                Tourism Priority Actions

                        Investment in Marketing and Promotion

     •   More advertising domestically
     •   Relentless marketing and promotions
     •   Funding for tourism marketing - supporting the industry through dollar for
         dollar campaigns
     •   More funding for interstate promotions
     •   Additional funding levels for marketing
     •   Destination marketing of other lesser known tourism regions to ensure
         smaller tourism operators "survive" the downturn
     •   Greater support for QLD Events
     •   Regional brand marketing that encompasses the whole of region and not just
         some of it.
     •   Improve coordination of regional marketing strategies
     •   Marketing our uniqueness and diversity i.e. from the reef to the outback
     •   Industry to support the global brand review for TQ and its cooperative
         programs
     •   Increase funding to Tourism Australia
     •   Encourage Australians to holiday in Australia
     •   Economic (low cost) co-operative marketing initiatives with smaller tourism
         operators for domestic target markets
     •   More funding for regional marketing initiatives
     •   Better cooperative marketing with smaller operators
     •   Extend focus beyond traditional markets
     •   Increase in tactical driven marketing activity
     •   Destination marketing has to remain a priority or momentum will be lost
         altogether.
     •   More funding to RTO's
     •   Online product distribution
     •   Strong and united approach to business events
     •   Larger focus on the online environment and training for operators


    Investment in infrastructure, tourism product development and natural assets

     •   Invest in infrastructure for tourism that improves presentation of our natural
         areas
     •   Restore TQ with responsibilities to address supply side issues.
     •   Ensure public transport services and infrastructure are continually improved
     •   Refresh/ refurbishment of tourism inventory - including accommodation
         establishments to position QLD in a "refreshed" style post GFC. Could be
         achieved through employing local tradesman and suppliers, with tax
         incentive
     •   Targeted investment in product - existing and new

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     •   Tourism development (new product)
     •   Work on improving quality of products and services standards
     •   Continue to invest in road access improvements and the Bruce Highway
         upgrade
     •   Support and work more on QLD's natural tourism attractions, supporting pro-
         active nature or eco-tourism businesses
     •   Product development in remote regions
     •   Destination management - especially product development and
         infrastructure
     •   speed approvals on developments
     •   QLD's tourism industry is competing with cheaper destinations and a
         perception of more exotic, less developed attractions - for example the
         Pacific Islands and Thailand. Be mindful of the balance between keeping
         the tropical coastline natural, unspoiled and accessible and safe.


                      Investment in regional access and capacity

     •   Expanded international air services – especially to key emerging markets
     •   Assist new airline entrants ( like Victoria Govt with Air Macau ) in Far North
         Queensland
     •   Improve international air access into Cairns Airport. This will assist the
         Cairns region as well as other areas of Queensland. It is not attractive to
         have to fly into southern cities and then board another flight to access the
         Great Barrier Reef.
     •   International airline route development funding
     •   Encourage international airlines to fly direct into and/or out of Cairns.
     •   More funding for regional tourism initiatives
     •   TQ to promote all forms of transport – incl. Rail + Bus
     •   Product development in remote regions
     •   Support driving holidays
     •   Open up the airport traffic - we are tired of being held to ransom by having
         load capacity cut especially after we have worked hard to cultivate a market.
     •   More funding to RTO's
     •   Skills development in remote regions
     •   Continue to invest in road access improvements and the Bruce Highway
         upgrade


                           Investment in people and training

     •   Work conditions for backpackers
     •   Service delivery of a quality experience in all aspects – ensure services and
         products meet/beat expectations
     •   Financial assistance for employing casual or part time guides or other staff -
         maybe as apprentices
     •   Greater skills training in remote regions
     •   Well trained, multicultural and responsive employees
     •   Work on improving quality of product and services standards
     •   Training for service related businesses is a priority in tertiary education and
         even in secondary schools
     •   Establish industry links with schools delivering Cert II Tourism
     •   Education and training in Schools

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     •   Employment of customer service focused staff
     •   Spread best practice through conferences and workshops




                            Investment in business capacity

     •   Protection of rate - too many hotels are dropping their rate and they will
         never be able to increase it
     •   Remove payroll tax
     •   Reduce red tape which increases costs and reduces efficiencies and
         flexibility
     •   Reduce non productive taxes- payroll/land
     •   Wages initiatives - we are a 7 day a week 24 hour a day industry. Often
         seasonal and must have the flexibility of casual hours and low penalties for
         us to survive.
     •   Development of fuel rebates
     •   There needs to be controls on the unfettered cost increases brought about
         by government charges or policies. No other industry in Australia can force
         their prices up as the power industry is presently doing.
     •   Grants for expansion of small businesses that are not incorporated
     •   Ensure high standards within our industry both operationally and ethically
         (truth in advertising) via appropriate accreditation or product rating programs.
     •   Reduction in business regulation/compliance
     •   Tax concessions
     •   Support employers against unproductive action from the LHMU
     •   Minimise red tape
     •   Encourage flexible employment agreements and make submissions to the
         AIRC, the Fair Pay Commission and the QLD IRC consistent with the flexible
         needs for employers in the tourism industry which need 7 day a week roster
         without penalties
     •   Clear guidelines for public liability when taking guests onto private lands -
         e.g. forest owned by local farmer who is not running a tourism business.
         Advice from brokers is ambiguous and conflicting
     •   Address depreciation allowances on tourism infrastructure and other
         investment incentives
     •   Dedicated resources to assist SMEs understand and respond to issues
         impacting them (government regulations, swine flu)
     •   Cut the red tape and onerous compliance issues - let us get on with running
         our businesses
     •   Recognition of tourism in government - through GST regulations etc
     •   Funding initiatives & partnerships for small project business ventures.


                              Investment in sustainability

     •   QLD's tourism industry is competing with cheaper destinations and a
         perception of more exotic, less developed attractions - for example the
         Pacific Islands and Thailand. Be mindful of the balance between keeping
         the tropical coastline natural, unspoiled, accessible and safe.


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     •   Government to mandate "green credentials" as part of the industry business
         and sustainability planning. This should ultimately be recognised as a
         standalone item at the Tourism Awards.


                               Investment in Partnerships

     •   Unity/ common goals/government proactive support
     •   Integrated tourism packages
     •   Encourage regional/local governments to levy businesses which do well out
         of tourism to contribute to the marketing of the regions and not just ride on
         the sheep’s back
     •   Collaboration between regions - to on sells rather than compete
     •   Strong united approach to business events
     •   Funding initiatives & partnerships for small project business ventures.
     •   Networking Industry events



                          Investment in Planning and Research

     •   Establishment of an industry-focused research facility
     •   Analysis of competition and development of counteractive strategies and
         campaigns
     •   A broad strategic plan
     •   Update the Queensland Tourism Strategy following consultation across the
         state from all stakeholders



               Actions for industry and government to increase employment


                          Government Incentives for employers

     • Incentives for employers to expand and update facilities
     • Financial assistance for employing staff (casual, part-or full time fixed term)
        would certainly help.
     • Acknowledgement by state government of importance of industry both
        regionally and locally
     • Consideration of a stimulus package for small business to invest in their
        business, staff and infrastructure. This would ensure business sustainability
        instead of business closure and a loss of staff hours & unemployed
     • Continue to commit funding for growth strategies and entrepreneurship
     • Encourage more industry to regional areas, including decentralizing
        government away from Brisbane, and also improve business linkages with
        nearby pacific and Asian countries.



                                  Invest in Business Capacity

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    •   Remove unwarranted taxes, fees and compliance costs
    •   No payroll tax
    •   Expand 2nd year visas to internationals working in tourism/hospitality in
        regional and remote areas (post code listing).
    •   Attractive tax benefits and a removal of payroll tax
    •   Remove weekend penalty rates for tourism/hospitality operators
    •   Remove leave loadings.
    •   When you offer employment initiatives do so for part time and casual
        employees as well instead of just full timers.
    •   Reduce red tape
    •   Reduce costs and increase the flexibility of the terms of engagement.
    •   Ensure full support to businesses by reducing outflow of cash in fees charges
        and business costs
    •   Some tax concessions for retention of existing older staff who have
        experience but are in their 50’s.



                                       Greater Training

    •   Give the industry status and reward highly trained people - bring back
        professional trainers.
    •   Support for apprentice training schemes.
    •   Encourage legislation to improve flexibility in the workplace
    •   Increase training and education opportunities through TAFE, Universities and
        schools.
    •   School training should incorporate greater tourism, geography and hospitality
        in schools.
    •   We should be trying to up skill all our front line people so that they provide
        exceptional service - not just having RSA
    •   Training assistance - hospitality and sectors of the tourism industry are very
        transient. Government assistance could provide customer service/food
        hygiene/RSA/silver service/coffee making/wine appreciation training, etc that
        employees can then take with them to each position.



                        Industry promotion and incentives for workers

    •   Portable benefits, facilitate seasonal passports (snow 2 surf), tax
        cuts/incentives for shift/flexible workers
    •   Provide incentives for students to do tourism at university and easy access to
        the business through internships/work experience
    •   Encourage youth traineeships
    •   Higher salary opportunities - reward higher qualified personnel
    •   Offering incentives to bring in chefs from overseas perhaps as well as
        attracting young people to join the workforce and appreciate hospitality as a
        career
    •   Better pay and conditions.

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    •   Developing salary sacrifice, similar to other industries.
    •   Promote career paths that exist within the industry similar to defence
    •   Supply of a skilled work force, which takes pride in the career choice they
        have made. Change the perception that "blue collar" workers are in the
        hospitality industry
    •   Provide assistance with attraction, housing, transport to regional/remote
        areas.


                           Greater investment in marketing

    •   Generate more visitors to Queensland and the regions.
    •   Develop strategies that will grow visitor numbers requiring more personnel to
        service them


                   What skills will your business need for the future

    •   We need to be seen as an Industry Leader
    •   Have already initiated a green product
    •   To demonstrate a commitment to saving resources and to reduce operating
        costs



        Tourism and hospitality industry as a more attractive career path option


                        Government recognition and promotion

    •   Government and policy makers should treat the industry as a serious player
        in the economy like the car, mining and other industries
    •   Govt to take tourism seriously and frame their policies to promote the sector -
        as opposed to letting tourism be consumed inside transport, small business,
        regional etc
    •   A political shift so that its a senior portfolio and senior status - given the
        earnings and jobs it creates
    •   More Government financial assistance to key industry organisations
    •   Recognition from the Queensland Government that reflects its importance to
        the QLD economy



                                    Training opportunities

    •   Portability of apprenticeships
    •   Cert III scholarships available to casual staff who work less than 20 hours per
        week



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    •   Innovative training programs that blend serious study with job-ready
        vocational skills and licences
    •   Unity between secondary, tertiary and training providers
    •   Focus on tourism training rather than just hospitality
    •   A return to excellence. Trainers must really know the industry and have a
        training degree and years of recent industry experience, both here and
        overseas. I taught at TAFE and watched the standard of training plummet in
        my regional area.




                             Promotion of Industry and pathways

    •   Guaranteed Jobs for graduates, assistance with part-time jobs throughout
        their training.
    •   Probably better income levels but also attaching a greater sense of prestige
        to having a career in hospitality.
    •   Less bad press about working conditions in hospitality
    •   Developing at school levels with opportunities for GM's to visit TAFE's and or
        schools.
    •   Show and describe career paths and show actual case studies. For example,
        Kevin Carton, the first man to bring Sheraton to Australia started as a sales
        rep for Qantas.
    •   Currently a great deal of our support staff in the hospitality industry are
        casuals, if we could generate a state government incentive to have
        permanent staff employed together with a mapped career path deployed, this
        would go a long way to encouraging young people into the industry. We
        should also look at running educational programs into senior schools for
        students who may not be able to attend a university course but who could
        step into other areas of hospitality that do not require a degree, or many years
        study. As an example, free courses for basic service skills - similar to a
        trades skills course could be set up.
    •   Network of employers that facilitate movement and career development
    •   Higher recognition of the lower level jobs to encourage people into the
        industry in the first place
    •   Improving the image of tourism and hospitality for students
    •   It’s not a big earning job but improve people's prospects with better promotion
        of the benefits that come with working in tourism industry
    •   Link career diversity opportunities to financial opportunities. It is an industry
        where the are plenty of low paying jobs but also where there are senior roles
        in fantastic locations. We need better coverage to right the balance in the
        media that we are low paid industry of part time or seasonal roles




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    •   At school level our industry needs to be promoted and not seen as an option
        for students that do not succeed in "conventional" academic areas - we are
        seen as what the "dumb" students do.
    •   Visibility of successful industry operators so that new entrants clearly see a
        pathway ahead, rather than just a short term stint in the service sector until a
        better opportunity comes along
    •   Salary benchmarking to other professional industries. More woman promoted
        into senior decision making



                                     Employee Incentives

    •   Better pay. We seem to justify low paying positions with the experience of
        being in the industry. No other industry does this.
    •   Better pay rates for apprentice chefs
    •   Better pay, respect from employers and government agencies and more
        transparent accountability
    •   Provide greater flexible in working hours
    •   Increased professional development opportunities, flexible working
        arrangements, additional study options and opportunities (e.g. through
        funding support and through time allowances to attend lectures etc).




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