Social­Emotional­Cognitive Design (SECD) A Hybrid Prototype

Document Sample
Social­Emotional­Cognitive Design (SECD) A Hybrid Prototype Powered By Docstoc
					               Social­Emotional­Cognitive Design (SECD): 
A Hybrid Prototype Model for Adolescent Learning and Instructional Design 
           to Increase Self­Awareness in High School Students 




                              Erin M. Giles 
                 University College University of Denver 
                            Capstone Project 
                              May 4, 2006 




                                     ______________________________ 
                                                          Paul Novak 
                                                     Capstone Advisor 

                                    ______________________________ 
                                                    Denise Pearson, PhD. 
                                 Academic Director of Professional Studies 

                            Upon the Recommendation of the Department: 

                                     ______________________________ 
                                                  James R. Davis, PhD. 
                                                                 Dean
                                                                                   Giles­ii 


                                       Abstract 

The YESS (Youth Empowerment Support Services) Institute is a 501(c)(3) not­for­profit 

located in Denver, Colorado, that specializes in youth, role model, educator and youth 

agency volunteer development.  Through its EmoSmart™ Leadership program, the 

YESS Institute teaches emotional intelligence to at­risk youth, but its self­awareness 

curriculum needs appropriate assessment and re­development.  Furthermore, the 

instructional design methodology for analyzing, designing and implementing emotional 

intelligence training with adolescents is lacking.  Drawing on social­emotional learning 

principles and the cognitive training model, this Capstone Project creates, implements 

and discusses a prototype instructional design and learning model, the Social­ 

Emotional­Cognitive Design (SECD), to increase the self­awareness of adolescents 

participating in the EmoSmart™ Leadership program at a Denver­area high school.
                                                                     Giles­iii 


                            Table of Contents 

Abstract……………………………………………………………………………………………………. ii 
List of Figures…………………………………………………………………………………………… iv 
Introduction……………………………………………………………………………………………… 1 
       Goals and Objectives……………………………………………………………………… 4 
       Benefits…………………………………………………………………………………………… 5 
Literature Review……………………………………………………………………………………… 7 
       The Introduction of Emotional Intelligence…………………………………… 7 
       Social and Emotional Learning………………………………………………………  8 
       Emotional Intelligence and SEL Development:  Fad or Science?..  10 
       Applicable Models for Learning………………………………………………………  10 
       The Cognitive Training Model………………………………………………………… 11 
Design of the Project…………………………………………………………………………………12 
       Assess……………………………………………………………………………………………… 14 
       Build………………………………………………………………………………………………… 18 
       Connect…………………………………………………………………………………………… 20 
       Define……………………………………………………………………………………………… 21 
       Explain with Examples…………………………………………………………………… 21 
       Facilitate a Forum…………………………………………………………………………  22 
       Guided Go………………………………………………………………………………………  22 
       Help…………………………………………………………………………………………………  23 
       Intensification…………………………………………………………………………………  23 
       Justify……………………………………………………………………………………………… 25 
       “Karry” Out……………………………………………………………………………………… 25 
       Learn………………………………………………………………………………………………  25 
Implementation of the Project………………………………………………………………… 26 
Results of the Project………………………………………………………………………………  27 
       Pre­ and Post­Assessment Results………………………………………………… 27 
       Class 1:  Introduction to EmoSmarts……………………………………………  30 
       Class 2:  Self­Awareness Lesson 1………………………………………………… 32 
       Class 3:  Self­Awareness Lesson 2………………………………………………… 34 
       Class 4:  Self­Awareness Lesson 3………………………………………………… 36 
Discussion………………………………………………………………………………………………….36 
References………………………………………………………………………………………………… 72
                                                                   Giles­iv 


                             List of Figures 

Figure 1:  Social­Emotional­Cognitive Design for Adolescents……………… 41 
Figure 2:  Quadrants of Emotional Intelligence Defined by Daniel 
Goleman & Cary Cherniss……………………………………………………………………….. 42 
Figure 3:  Quadrants of Emotional Intelligence Modified for the YESS 
Institute’s Development of Adolescent Role Models………………………………. 43 
Figure 4:  Emotional Intelligence Evaluation…….……………………………………  44 
Figure 5:  Bloom’s Taxonomy…………………………………………………………………. 45 
Figure 6:  Participant Brainstormed Answers During Class 1……………..... 46 
Figure 7:  EmoSmart Leadership Participant Workbook………………………… 47 
Figure 8:  EmoSmart Leadership Self­Awareness Pre­Assessment………. 66 
Figure 9: Multiple Choice Pre­ and Post­Assessment Results………………… 68 
Figure 10:  Ranking EQ Pre­ and Post­Assessment Results…………………… 69 
Figure 11: Free Response Pre­ and Post­Assessment Question Results..70 
Figure 12:  Temperamental Tree Post­Assessment Results………………….. 71
                                                                          Giles­1 

                                 Introduction 

Statement of the Problem 

      As an expanding non­profit dedicated to empowering role models in 

the Denver community, the YESS (Youth Empowerment Support Services) 

Institute has educated hundreds of high school students through its 

EmoSmart Leadership program.  Since the fall of 2001, the YESS Institute 

received its 501(c)(3) not­for­profit status to offer affordable training to 

youth, educators and youth agencies.  The YESS Institute is guided by its 

philosophy that emphasizes the importance of social­emotional intelligence 

as the primary indicator of academic and life fulfillment, and through its 

teachings, works to enhance positive skill, attitudinal and behavioral changes 

among community role models, including Denver high school students. 

      As the YESS Institute works to accomplish its vision, to offer the most 

effective and comprehensive EmoSmart (or emotional intelligence) training 

and education in the United States, it becomes increasingly difficult to 

compete in the heavily saturated Denver non­profit market.  According to 

the Colorado Non­profit Association, there are 15,243 charitable non­profits 

in Colorado, excluding foundations and religious congregations (Doehrman, 

2003).  When the YESS Institute applies for funding to further its outreach of 

the EmoSmart Leadership program, it competes with these other 

organizations, often regardless of the nature of each non­profit’s 

specialization.  Additionally, federal funding for at­risk youth has reduced
                                                                         Giles­2 

substantially over the past several years (Doolittle & Ivry, 2003), which 

indicates that funding is competitive.  The YESS Institute currently operates 

with limited resources, unreliable and limited cash flow and a small, but 

valuable, market presence. Therefore, it is critical that the YESS Institute 

offers and promotes the most refined, comprehensive and innovative 

products and services to continue sustainability by attracting potential 

donors. 

      The YESS Institute recognizes the importance of emotional intelligence 

and a need for social­emotional learning (SEL) for adolescents.  In the 

1990’s, psychologists have been pinpointing emotional intelligence as the 

key indicator to successful and sustained leadership (Cooper, & Sawaf, 

1997; Goleman, 1995, 1997, 1998; Salovey & Mayer, 1990; Weisinger, 

1997).  According to Daniel Goleman, a pioneer in the study of emotional 

intelligence, workplace success is roughly 80% based on emotional 

intelligence and 20% dependent on IQ, or cognitive intelligence (1997).  As 

younger generations mature and become primary decision makers in the 

government, corporations, communities and familial relations, emotional 

intelligence education can help provide a healthy foundation for success. 

      Between 15 and 22 percent of United States youth have social­ 

emotional difficulties (as cited in Elksnin & Elksnin, 2003); other studies 

show as many as half of American youth are increasingly vulnerable to 

health and social risks (as cited in Ross, Powell & Elias, 2002) that can be
                                                                          Giles­3 

prevented by building emotionally intelligent behavior (Elias, Lantieri, Patti, 

Walberg & Zins, 1999).  Self­awareness, one quadrant identified in this 

Capstone as an emotional intelligence component, is the developmental 

foundation for the other three components:  self­management, community 

awareness and interpersonal management (Elias & Weissberg, 2000; Hippe, 

2004). 

      Given the YESS Institute’s need for a competitive EmoSmart 

curriculum, proven emotional intelligence guiding principles for adults in the 

workplace and social­emotional needs in adolescents, role model 

development agencies and school systems, such as the YESS Institute, need 

a methodology that combines social­emotional learning techniques for 

adolescents and superlative adult instructional design techniques that have 

improved emotional intelligence in organizations and can be converted to 

meet the developmental needs of youth. 

      By designing a self­awareness curriculum that combines the cognitive 

training model with social­emotional learning, thus titled the social­ 

emotional­cognitive design (SECD), I contend that Denver high school 

students participating in the YESS Institute’s EmoSmart Leadership program 

will increase their self­confidence, self­assessment and emotional awareness 

and consequently, their overall emotional intelligence quotient.  The YESS 

Institute will increase its sustainability, generated mainly through 

augmented funding, and increase its community leverage among competing
                                                                       Giles­4 

Denver­based non­profits by educating adolescents in this curriculum.  Once 

this curriculum has been proven to be both reliable and valid within Denver 

public schools, the YESS Institute can begin promoting the EmoSmart 

Leadership program at a national level, reaching numerous high school 

students, thereby increasing emotionally intelligent behavior among younger 

generations nationwide. 

Goals and Objectives 

      In this Capstone Project, I will analyze and design a hybrid prototype 

curriculum that combines social­emotional learning principles with the 

cognitive training model, as defined in the book Writing Training Materials 

That Work by Wellesley Foshay, Kenneth Silber and Michael Stelnicki.  This 

curriculum will be composed of three four­hour modules for Denver high 

school mentors.  The objective of the program is “to improve mentoring and 

leadership skills by enhancing emotional intelligence and becoming 

EmoSmart,” the definition of emotional intelligent behavior at the YESS 

Institute. 

       In its entirety, the EmoSmart Leadership program seeks to enhance 

four primary components, or quadrants, associated with emotional 

intelligence.  These quadrants are loosely based on Goleman’s emotional 

intelligence model (1998) and include self­awareness, self­management, 

interpersonal (i.e. community) awareness and interpersonal management 

(see Figure 2).  For the purpose of this Capstone, the SECD will focus on
                                                                           Giles­5 

developing only one of these social­emotional intelligent behaviors—self­ 

awareness—as a basis of the other three quadrants.  The overall goal of the 

Capstone, then, is to increase self­awareness in Denver high school students 

by designing the SECD model that combines social­emotional learning with 

cognitive training and then applying it to the EmoSmart curriculum that 

improves three behaviors directly related to self­awareness:  self­ 

confidence, self­assessment and emotional awareness.  These behaviors are 

further defined in the EmoSmart Leadership program’s self­awareness 

component.  Specific to the curriculum, at the end of the courses, the 

students will be able to: 

      §    List the four main areas of emotional intelligence 
      §    Define “self­awareness” 
      §    Give an example of a belief 
      §    Identify a belief in your “little red wagon” 
      §    Explain how experiences relate to behavior 
      §    Apply the Temperamental Tree to a real­life situation 
      §    Use all aspects of self­awareness to dissect a real­life situation 

Benefits 

      The advantages of this Capstone are three­fold.  First, by creating a 

curriculum enhanced by the prototypical social­emotional­cognitive design, 

the YESS Institute will have a competitive advantage among other non­ 

profits, especially those also offering youth development services in Denver 

because the model combines both social­emotional learning best practices 

and Foshay et. al’s cognitive training model. After assessing the curriculum, 

the YESS Institute will then be able to defend and promote its program,
                                                                          Giles­6 

which, through grant writing, submission and acceptance, will increase 

program funding, eventually leading to state and national grant exposure. 

With augmented funding, the YESS Institute will be able to reach more high 

school students and begin to offer the program nationwide.  Second, 

students who participate in the EmoSmart Leadership program will benefit 

directly from its teachings, especially with a superior curriculum designed 

using instructional design best practices.  Following the YESS Institute’s 

program model, these high school students will then serve as mentors to at­ 

risk middle school students by meeting with their mentees once a week for a 

semester.  At the highest level of role modeling, conscious unconscious 

competence expounding on W.C. Howell’s Learning Phases model (1982), 

mentors develop their mentees by unknowingly modeling positive EmoSmart 

behaviors that they have learned through the curriculum.  The benefits of 

emotionally intelligent high school students, including the link to academic 

success, are further explored in this Capstone’s literature review. 

      Finally, the community realizes a return on investment when high 

school students become more emotionally intelligent.  According to the 

Teachers College, a division of Columbia University: 

      “America loses hundreds of billions of dollars each year when young 

people fail to graduate from high school, with costs reflected in lost 

productivity and tax revenues, as well as additional burdens to the health
                                                                         Giles­7 

care, public assistance and criminal justice systems” (Columbia University, 

2005, ¶ 1). 

      By addressing the importance of self­awareness, I believe that the 

Denver community can save money related to homelessness, domestic 

violence and other societal risks. 

                              Literature Review 

      To achieve these goals and objectives and fulfill the prospective 

benefits of this Project, I have examined the historical foundations, future 

implications and varying definitions of intelligence, emotional intelligence, 

social­emotional learning and instructional design.  Based on this review, I 

have formulated my own definitions and uses of general intelligence, 

emotional intelligence, social­emotional learning and the cognitive training 

model to create the social­emotional­cognitive design (SECD) to construct 

the YESS Institute’s curriculum. 
                                                                  th 
      The introduction of emotional intelligence.  In the early 20  century, 

psychologists began to question the existence of a type of intelligence 

beyond intellect.  David Wechsler (1943) was the first to refer to a non­ 

cognitive aptitude that is essential to success by contending that “total 

intelligence [includes] some measures of non­intellective factors” (as cited in 

Cherniss, 2000, ¶ 5).  However, until Howard Gardner defined his theory on 

multiple intelligences in his book titled Frames of Mind: The Theory of 

Multiple Intelligences (1983), many psychologists overlooked Wechsler’s
                                                                           Giles­8 

philosophy.  Using Wechsler’s framework, Gardner theorized that, without 

productivity, intelligence (IQ) is inconsequential, so overall intellect must be 

more than just IQ.  This enigma was finally coined emotional intelligence by 

psychologists John D. Mayer and Peter Salovey (1990, 1993, 1995) in a 

series of academic articles focused on social competence.  They defined 

emotional intelligence (often dubbed EQ or EI) as “the ability to monitor 

one’s own and others’ feelings and emotions to discriminate among them, 

and to use this information to guide our thinking and action” (1990, p. 185). 

This significant analysis served as the catapult for Harvard­trained 

psychologist and New York Times writer Daniel Goleman’s first book, 

Emotional Intelligence (1995), which finally popularized the subject. 

However, theorists did not specifically apply emotional intelligence to 

organizational behavior until Goleman’s third book, “Working with Emotional 

Intelligence” (1998).  In this analysis, he defines the competent worker as 

one who is both personally and socially aware:  “Emotional intelligence 

refers to the capacity for recognizing our own feelings and those of others, 

for motivating ourselves, and for managing emotions well in ourselves and in 

our relationships” (Goleman, 1998, p.13).  Goleman also identified sub­ 

competencies such as empathy, self­awareness, and motivation as 

stemming from both personal and social competence. 

      Social and emotional learning.  In conjunction with Goleman’s studies, 

social­emotional learning (often dubbed SEL) is a vehicle for teaching
                                                                            Giles­9 

emotional intelligence, usually in an academic setting (Norris, 2003; CASEL, 

2004) unlike the studies of EQ, which are more often related to 

organizational behavior.  The Center for Social and Emotion Education 

(CASEL) defines SEL as “the process of acquiring the skills to recognize and 

manage emotions, develop caring and concern for others, make responsible 

decisions, establish positive relationships, and handle challenging situations 

effectively” (2006, ¶ 1).  Furthermore, CASEL identifies eight specific skill 

sets as integral to adolescent achievement:  communication, cooperation, 

emotional self­control and expression, empathy, optimism (including self­ 

awareness and strength identification), goal setting, conflict management 

and reflective life­long learning (Elias & Weissberg, 2000).  Similar to 
                                                                        th 
emotional intelligence, SEL was a product of early researchers in the 20 

century studying social competency.  The first social psychology assessment 

for children was administered by Edgar Doll to measure socially intelligent 

behavior (1935). 

      Perhaps one of the most important aspects of social­emotional 

learning integration is prevention.  In Denver, the drop­out rate of at­risk 

students is increasing (Callan, 2005).  Goleman does not attribute academic 

challenges to this trend:  “If you are a kid who wants to avoid depression or 

violence and not drop out, academics will have nothing to do with it” (as 

cited in Ratnesar, 1997, p. 1).
                                                                          Giles­10 

      Emotional intelligence and SEL Development:  Fad or science? 

Generally, publications including further definitions, commentaries, and 

implications of emotional intelligence are endlessly available.  Yet, it is 

important to note that experts including, Goleman, Mayer, and Salovey, 

agree that the EQ field still needs further tangible evidence to prove both 

reliability and validity (Kierstead, 1999; Matthews, Roberts, Zeidner, 2003; 

Mayer & Cobb, 2000; Zeidner, Roberts & Matthews, 2002).  Parents of 

students involved with social­emotional learning have expressed concern 

that it may cross the line and become therapy sessions to which they don’t 

consent (Ratnesar, 1997).  Therefore, the social­emotional­cognitive design 

that I will create in this Capstone by combining social­emotional learning 

with the aforementioned models for learning could meaningfully serve the 

discipline and its stakeholders if its reliability and validity can be proven. 

      Applicable models for learning.  Many learning theories, including 

those behavioral­ or cognitive­based, are available for SEL teachers.  I have 

chosen Foshay, et. al’s (2003) cognitive training model with references to 

Bloom’s taxonomy (1956) to build the social­emotional­cognitive design and 

increase the self­awareness of high school students. 

      Benjamin Bloom developed a model (1956) that has been proven to be 

one of the more enduring models for building retention of information among 

learners.  This taxonomy separates learners’ thought processes into six 

classifications that must be built upon one another for learners to reach the
                                                                       Giles­11 

highest level of understanding, retention and behavioral medication.  These 

categories are represented in Figure 5 and include knowledge, 

comprehension, application, analysis, synthesis and evaluation with 

knowledge being the basis of the taxonomy and evaluation being the 

pinnacle.  “Brain scans show that different parts of the brain are involved as 

the problem­solving task becomes more complicated” (p. 246, Sousa), 

therefore engaging learners to a higher degree compared to skill acquisition. 

Sousa elaborates: 

      “…students are not thinking critically (because educators) have not 

      exposed them consistently to models or situations in school that 

      require them to do so.  Schooling, for the most part, demands little 

      more than convergent thinking.  Its practices and testing focus on 

      content acquisition through role rehearsal, rather than the processes 

      of thinking for analysis and synthesis” (p. 249). 

Thus, applying all levels of Bloom’s Taxonomy is critical when creating and 

facilitating curriculum centered on task­orientation and behavioral change. 

      The cognitive training model.  Because I assert that retention is the 

key to successful instructional design, I have chosen the cognitive training 

model (Foshay, Silber & Stelnicki, 2003) to enhance the principles that 

support social­emotional learning, and thus, this self­awareness curriculum. 

The cognitive training model is based on cognitive psychology that asserts 

that perception, short­term and long­term memory are critical to the
                                                                       Giles­12 

learning process.  According to this methodology, the first task of the 

learners is to select the information they need.  Foshay, et. al, recommend 

that the design process include appropriate attention getters; relevancy, or 

“what’s in it for me,” statements; and confidence, or “you can do it,” 

boosters during the first phase of the learning.  Subsequently, Foshay, et. al. 

recommend helping the learners “relate” and “recall” how the information 

fits into the lives and mind­sets of the participants and then organizing the 

data through chunking, text layouts or illustrations to build retention. 

Finally, the learned material needs to be assimilated to previous knowledge 

and then strengthened through “practice, feedback, summary, test (and/or) 

on­the­job application” (p. 27). 

      The primary application of Bloom’s Taxonomy for designing a 

curriculum for high school students is that it provides an overall structure to 

create behavioral change from cognitive understanding.  On the contrast, 

the Foshay model focuses only on the cognitive development.  Therefore, 

blending these models in conjunction with social­emotional learning criteria 

fills instructional design gaps by creating a hybrid model that combines 

cognitive theory, emotional intelligence competencies and scaffolding for 

behavioral change. 

                           Design of the Project 

      Using the social­emotional learning needs, the cognitive training model 

and Bloom’s Taxonomy as my guides, I created the social­emotional­
                                                                         Giles­13 

cognitive design to enhance emotional intelligence in adolescents. 

Additionally, principles within Davis & Davis’ “Effective Training Strategies” 

inspired me to create a model that combines different types of learners with 

a sequential process for supporting these learners’ needs: 

      “A carefully worked out training program will probably call for many 

      kinds of learning.  The challenge is to define each type of learning and 

      then select and manage exactly the right progression of strategies to 

      meet the goals of the training in order to maximize learning” (p. 407). 

      As instructional designers and performance improvement experts 

attest (Davis & Davis, 1998), successful learning and training, are not one­ 

time events.  The SECD manifests this belief by cycling through each phase 

and connecting back at the beginning rather than allowing a “start” and 

“stop” to the process.  Additionally, the design uses the scaffolding 

technique to support the learning process, where each component is built on 

the previous (Elias & Weissberg, 2000).  The SECD is congruent to Davis & 

Davis’ (1998) training design recommendations in that it considers the 

learners, including their cognitive development, their motivation and the 

different learning styles, according to Kolb (1984), which will be further 

explored. 

      The SECD model is built around a critical component of instructional 

design:  retention.  Foshay suggests chunking to help enable retention 

(2003).  I applied this philosophy to the SECD model by categorizing each
                                                                         Giles­14 

phase of the process in an alphabetical progression.  Thus, the structure of 

the social­emotional­cognitive design is as follows:  Assess, Build, Connect, 

Define, Explain with Examples, Facilitate a Forum, Guided “Go,” Help, 

Intensification, Justify, Karry Out, Learn. 

      Assess.  To begin SECD, the environment and the participants need to 

be assessed by identifying the following four gaps:  skill, behavioral, 

attitudinal and cultural.  Elias & Weissberg (2000) from the Collaborative to 

Advance Social and Emotional Learning agree:  “It is essential that the 

broader context of peer relationships, the classroom, the school, the family, 

and the community be considered when designing the SEL program” (p 

186).” First, instructional designers and facilitators can directly link accurate 

skill gap measurement to the learning objectives of the course.  The most 

effective and efficient method for identifying these gaps is through pre­and 

post­assessments that support the two lower levels of Bloom’s Taxonomy: 

knowledge and comprehension.  The designer should create questions that 

support the measurable learning objectives.  For example, a learning 

objective for the self­awareness curriculum is to list the four main areas of 

emotional intelligence.  The corresponding pre­assessment (and post­ 

assessment, once the training reaches the “Learn” stage) would ask the 

participants to list, identify, label or recall these four components, which 

directly supports the knowledge competency in Bloom’s Taxonomy.  The
                                                                       Giles­15 

participant assessment for the self­awareness component of the EmoSmart 

Leadership Program is attached in Figure 8. 

      To identify behavioral gaps in adolescents, I recommend using a one­ 

page competency evaluation as demonstrated in Figure 4.  Participants can 

complete self­evaluations, and then facilitators can interview each 

participant one­on­one to expand on the information.  Key social­emotional 

questions can include:

         ·   Tell me about a time you handled a difficult situation.

         ·   Who is your biggest support system?

         ·   What do you want to do after high school?  Why?

         ·   What helps you do well in school? 

Often, participants reveal this important information midway or toward the 

end of the training, and the instructor then does not have adequate time to 

meet participant expectations or to adjust the training to develop EQ 

opportunity areas.  Early pre­assessments, as outlined in the SECD, help 

alleviate this problem. 

      Bar­On’s Emotional Intelligence Inventory:  Youth Version (EQi:  YV) is 

another proven tool that divides emotional intelligence into five components: 

intrapersonal, interpersonal, adaptability, stress management and general 

mood.  This assessment would clearly identify the current emotional 

intelligence strengths and weaknesses of a participant to both the participant 

and the instructor.
                                                                         Giles­16 

      During the behavioral gap evaluation, it is helpful to receive feedback 

from others involved in the lives of participants.  This is especially true for 

adolescents who may not have the abilities to identify their own strengths 

and weaknesses.  For the EmoSmart Leadership program at West High 

School, we distributed the same competency evaluations to teachers, and it 

would be even more advantageous to involve the parents of the students in 

the behavioral assessment process. 

      Attitudinal evaluation is very similar to behavioral evaluation; however 

it specifically determines the potential mind­sets that participants may have 

about the training content.  The designer and/or facilitator should consider 

the following questions when conducting an attitudinal evaluation:

         ·   How is the content different from what the participants already 

             know?

         ·   How is the content similar to what the participants already 

             know?

         ·   What are the potential barriers that could inhibit the learning 

             process? 

      Potential barriers could include the expertise or appearance of the 

facilitator, the training environment or time, the existing beliefs of the 

participants or the conditions that influence each participant’s involvement 

with the training.  Each of these barriers are obstacles to the SECD, to the 

facilitator and to the learner that need to be overcome through careful
                                                                            Giles­17 

questioning techniques, ice breakers or, simply, acknowledgment.  Because 

the SECD will not be complete without overcoming these obstacles, the next 

stage of the SECD, Build, will openly address them. 

      Finally, the SECD Assess stage requires an cultural assessment.  This 

is one of the more complicated assessments to conduct because participants’ 

school and home environments are complex and difficult to define.  To 

uncover school bureaucracy and participants’ family lives requires 

trustworthy probing, which is challenging at the beginning stages of the 

SECD.  Therefore, it is imperative to conduct this analysis informally by 

observing the school culture and working with, developing relationships with 

and getting immediate feedback from the faculty.  Furthermore, through the 

behavioral assessment the designer, with permission from the participant, 

can ask questions about his or her support system or role models.  Based on 

the responses, the designer can deduce if future learned behavior could be 

positively or negatively reinforced by family members, teachers or peers. 

It’s important to note that designers cannot control or change environmental 

conditioning but can merely acknowledge what currently exists in each 

participant’s life.  Again, at this stage in the process, it is beneficial to get 

behavioral feedback from parents and teachers, not just to further 

understand the participant’s emotional intelligence but to also understand 

his or her environment and get buy­in from those that could potentially 

inhibit or support the development process outside of the classroom.
                                                                        Giles­18 

      Assessment is critical to measuring the end result of the learning 

process by not only beginning the SECD cycle but also completing it.  At the 

end of the workshop, the same measures should be taken by the designer to 

compare skill, behavioral, attitudinal and environmental gaps with the 

previous measurement.  Not only does this appraisal encompass 

Kirkpatrick’s Level 1, attitudinal; Level 2, skill; and Level 3, behavioral and 

environmental evaluation, but it sets the foundation for the most important 

(and difficult) measurement in training evaluation:  Level 4, or return on 

training investment.  By quantitatively and qualitatively assessing all four of 

these areas, the designer can gather all of the information needed to make 

the design successful. 

      In my experience, if the facilitator does not conduct a thorough, 

accurate and timely assessment prior to a training, then the learning 

objectives do not always support participants’ needs and will result in last­ 

minute modifications and an unstructured workshop.  Thus, assessment is 

the foundation of all trainings, and the social­emotional­cognitive design 

cannot successfully continue without it. 

      Build.  After the designer actively assesses, then he or she can begin 

the building process.  Building combines two critical components that occur 

outside and inside the classroom.  First, the designer must build, or design 

and develop, the curriculum to fit the assessed needs of the participants. 

Then, the facilitator must build a safe, effective learning environment inside
                                                                           Giles­19 

the classroom.  Foshay, et. al. (2003), comprehensively describe the 

building process in their cognitive training model by addressing three major 

elements:  attention, “What’s in It for Me” (WIIFM) and “You Can Do It” 

(YCDI).  First, the facilitator must get the audience’s attention and set the 

tone of the workshop.  Designers should write attention getters into the 

curriculum so the facilitator can choose the most appropriate for the 

audience.  I believe it is imperative to capture all four types of Kolb’s 

learners (1984) within the first five minutes of the workshop by addressing 

primary needs that affect each learner.  Kolb identifies these learners on an 

axis of feeling versus thinking and watching versus doing.  Facilitators can 

first get the attention of Accommodating, or Type 4, Learners by starting the 

workshop with a “what if” question.  For example, I start all EmoSmart 

Leadership trainings with the question, “What if I told you that during this 

training I’m going to reveal to you the key to success in life?”  After 

elaborating, I engage the Type 1 Learners by asking the audience to 

informally brainstorm qualities that lead to success in life.  Then, to involve 

the Assimilating Learners (Type 2), I relate the brainstormed answers to 

statistics that support the content.  Finally the Converging Learners, or Type 

3, want to know how the content is practical, so I provide a brief, personal 

(or participant) example of what emotional intelligence looks like in daily life. 

This example must be applicable to high school students’ lives in order for it 

to have maximum impact as an attention­getter.
                                                                       Giles­20 

      Connect. Once the facilitator has captured the audience’s attention, 

the SECD model contends that the facilitator then must get buy­in that the 

content is relevant to the participants needs and meet these needs based on 

the participants’ previous experiences. 

      I considered the importance of constructivism in adolescent learning or 

cognitive and social psychologists’ perspective that learners create new 

information, knowledge and abilities from previous constructs rather than 

the peripheral environment, when creating the Connect phase.  Huitt (2003) 

explains: 

      “Advocates of a constructivistic approach suggest that educators first 

consider the knowledge and experiences students bring with them to the 

learning task. The school curriculum should then be built so that students 

can expand and develop this knowledge and experience by connecting them 

to new learning.” ¶ 6 

      “Connect” follows the cognitive training model’s assertion to design 

training tactics so students can recall past knowledge and relate it to future 

knowledge.  Facilitators can do this by using metaphors to introduce 

complex, conceptual information.  Furthermore, designers can connect 

knowledge to past schemas by uncovering the existing relationships that the 

students have with the previous knowledge.  This is similar to unveiling the 

participant mind­sets about a body of information, which adult learning 

theorists believe to be approximately 50% of adult learning (Gordon, 2002).
                                                                          Giles­21 

      Define.  After the facilitator builds a safe learning environment and the 

participants link the overall learning objective with previous knowledge, then 

the instructor can specifically define the key concepts. 

      Robert Pike, a renowned training expert, proposes an important 

principle that supports the “Define” stage in his book “Creative Training 

Techniques Handbook” (1994).  He contends that participants “don’t argue 

with their own data,” (p. 3) meaning that if individuals create their own 

definitions of a concept, then they buy into the information more easily than 

agreeing with an instructor’s definition. 

      Explain with Examples.  After the concepts are defined, the facilitator 

should give several examples to support the definitions.  Examples are a 

higher level of Bloom’s Taxonomy that transitions the learner to the 

behavioral change stages. 

      There are several different kinds of examples that a designer and 

facilitator could use to illustrate the main points.  First, the instructor can 

start by using a basic, neutral example that is applicable to all aspects of the 

definition.  Emphasizing this example is important to building retention 

around the concept.  Then, the instructor can give a personal example that 

relates to the learning objective.  With soft skill trainings, these personal 

examples suggest an acceptance for sharing information and anecdotes in 

the classroom, which once again, builds the safe learning environment. 

They also reveal how the instructor has used the information in his or her
                                                                          Giles­22 

personal or professional life, which builds credibility to the facilitator and the 

training and creates buy­in.  Finally, after the instructor has shared a 

personal example, then he or she can ask the audience how they have used 

the concept in their lives.  This leads to the next stage of the SECD model. 

      Facilitate a Forum.  Next, given the personal and class examples of the 

training point, allow the class to discuss the advantages and disadvantages 

or positive and negative aspects of the concept as well as outline a personal 

example that a participant gives to support an objective.  The facilitator’s job 

during this stage is to guide the discussion by probing further into insights 

that the class makes and to connect different participant points to each 

other. 

      Guided “Go.”  During the “Guided Go” phase of the SECD, the designer 

structures the curriculum so the participants can practice the skill in a safe 

learning environment.  Elias & Weissberg agree:  “Provide students with 

activities for practice…” (2000, p. 4). 

      The most useful form of the “Guided Go” is through role play  and 

observation(Elias & Weissberg, 2000).  During a role play, learners are given 

artificial circumstances, such as a scenario, where they can implement a 

communication technique or other skill with another person or group.  The 

class can observe the role play and then discuss what worked and didn’t 

work in the next stages of the SECD.  Role playing gives participants the 

opportunity to implement the skills and safely make mistakes.
                                                                          Giles­23 

      Although it’s important to implement the Guided Go stage when the 

participants have the support of a work group, it’s also important that the 

designer creates tactics for the facilitator to guide each participant 

individually as well.  Sometimes, this is in the form of asking participants to 

complete exercises, questions or readings by themselves before discussing 

their results with a group.  This allows all of Kolb’s learners, both those who 

learn from observation and those who learn from doing, to practice the skill 

using a method that works for them. 

      Help.  Positive reinforcement is critical for participants to transfer 

learned skills into the real world.  However, in the classroom, the facilitator 

can use the class’ feedback during the “Help” stage to correct or reinforce 

behavior.  Elias & Weissberg (2000) suggest “(establishing) prompts and 

cues that can help students use the skills outside the instructional setting” 

(p. 4).  By emphasizing peer­centered feedback in the classroom, the 

attitude is more likely to transfer into the school culture, thereby 

encouraging communicative behavior. 

      Intensification.  “Intensification” is the final stage that occurs inside 

the classroom.  The remaining stages manifest cognitively and behaviorally 

after classroom instruction.  Intensification involves questioning the concepts 

using the highest levels of Bloom’s Taxonomy, synthesis and evaluation.  At 

this point, the participants are expected to evaluate the feasibility of the 

training while still in the classroom.  The facilitator can guide the
                                                                         Giles­24 

intensification by asking the participants to compare the training to other 

key concepts and then probe the participant explanations by asking them to 

assess their arguments. 

       During the Intensification stage, the facilitator should also uncover the 

participants’ perceptions on the barriers that they will uncover when using 

this information in their environment.  Then, the facilitator can guide the 

participants to solutions for implementation as well as support the 

participants by giving them confidence. 

       Additionally, the facilitator needs to clarify any remaining confusion 

around the learning objectives.  Often, he or she can alleviate 

misunderstood concepts during Facilitate a Forum, but the Intensification 

stage can also be used to simplify and refine the explanations. 

       At the end of the Intensification stage, the facilitator should conclude 

the training session with two training techniques to thoroughly intensify 

what the participants learned.  First, the designer should include exercises or 

activities to review the definitions.  Although reviewing is critical throughout 

the SECD, it is still important to end the training by streamlining the key 

concepts for retention.  Second, the facilitator should challenge the 

participants to commit to implementing the learning into their lives.  This 

technique holds the participants accountable to the learning and the 

facilitator.
                                                                         Giles­25 

      Justify.  During “Justify,” the participant looks for cognitive clues in the 

world around him or her to support the emotional intelligence concepts that 

the design addressed.  In other words, the student is consciously or 

unconsciously processing the learning and determining whether behavior 

should be changed as a result.  Thus, given the opportunity to apply what 

was learned in the classroom, they begin to assess the value of the trained 

concepts.  Hence, participants engage in the highest level of Bloom’s 

Taxonomy:  Evaluation. 

      Karry Out.  If participants cognitively justify the trained concepts, then 

they have altered their mind­sets to allow for the next phase:  behavioral 

change.  Using Howell’s Learning Phases Model (1982) as a reference, the 

“Karry Out” stage very specifically supports the transition from conscious 

negative behavior to conscious positive behavior.  Here, the participant 

agrees to behave differently based on the learning objectives of the course. 

The most critical aspect for the “Karry Out” stage to succeed is that positive 

reinforcement and behavior modeling by adults or peers must take place to 

support the changed behaviors (Elias, Weissberg, 2000; Hippe, 2004; 

Lavoie, 2003). 

      Learn.  The final phase of the SECD contends that both cognitive and 

behavior change must take place before learning can occur.  Bob Pike 

(1994) agrees and includes this theory as a law for training:  “Learning has 

not taken place until behavior has changed” (p. 5).  Participants in this stage
                                                                       Giles­26 

will have moved from Howell’s (1982) unconscious negative to conscious 

positive, unconscious positive or, at best, conscious unconscious positive 

when they are mentoring, or teaching, the behavior to others.  Furthermore, 

as the learning continues, the participant will move back to the first stage of 

the SECD model where he or she is assessing if the learning is still relevant 

and valuable to their lives. 

                       Implementation of the Project 

Following the hybrid model described above, I designed the self­awareness 

curriculum prior to the implementation at West High School.  The length of 

each class was approximately 40 minutes during the students’ lunch period 

on Wednesdays.  The agenda was as follows: 

    §    Class 1, Wednesday, January 25:  Introduction to EmoSmarts 

    §    Class 2, Wednesday, February 1:  Self­Awareness Lesson 1 

    §    Class 3, Wednesday, February 8:  Self­Awareness Lesson 2 

    §    Class 4, Wednesday, February 15:  Self­Awareness Lesson 3 

The YESS Institute heavily marketed the program prior to its 

commencement and 25 students attended the first session.  These students 

included 11 freshmen, 4 sophomores, 2 juniors and 8 seniors.  The ethnicity 

of this population was 16% white, 56% latino, 20% black and 8% asian. 

The final population included 18 students composed of 5 freshmen, 3 

sophomores, 1 junior and 9 seniors.  The ethnic breakdown was 11% white, 

50% latino, 28% black and 11% asian.
                                                                       Giles­27 

                             Results of the Project 

Pre­ and Post­Assessment Results.  I administered the self­awareness pre­ 

assessment (Figure 8) prior to the first self­awareness course.  I constructed 

these pre­assessment questions using social­emotional learning 

competencies, including the three components of self­awareness and how 

the curriculum will support these components.  However, after the students’ 

responses and the implementation of the curriculum, I changed the post­ 

assessment questions to reflect what the students learned during the course 

compared to what I originally intended the students to learn before 

uncovering their needs.  Some knowledge measurement questions remained 

as well as the section where students ranked their level of agreement with 

the following statements: 

    §    I can name the emotion that I’m feeling. 

    §    I know why I’m feeling that emotion. 

    §    I am comfortable with my anger. 

    §    I am comfortable with other peoples’ anger. 

    §    I am confident in my abilities. 

    §    I know what stresses me out. 

    §    I know what my friends would say is my biggest weakness. 

22 students responded to the pre­assessment evaluations which included 

multiple choice, free response and ranking questions.  12 students 

responded to the post­assessment evaluation.
                                                                        Giles­28 

      The pre­assessment results (Figures 9­11) indicate that the 

participants perceived themselves as being very self­aware and emotionally 

intelligent but were unable to correctly answer specific, lower level Bloom’s 

Taxonomy questions such as the definition of self­awareness.  Accordingly, 

on the pre­assessment 51% of students strongly agreed or agreed with the 

questions listed above.  22% of students did not agree or disagree and 11% 

of students either disagreed or strongly disagreed in the pre­assessment.  Of 

these questions, the greatest positive response was 77.3% of participants 

strongly agreeing or agreeing that they are confident in their abilities. 

Based on this response, I was able to omit a majority of the training tactics 

to support self­confidence, an element of self­awareness.  On the other 

hand, the questions that generated the most negative responses were 27% 

of participants disagreeing or strongly disagreeing that they are comfortable 

with other peoples’ anger and 27% of students disagreeing or strongly 

disagreeing that their friends are able to name the participant’s biggest 

weakness.  Additionally, about a fourth of participants’ responses were 

neutral to all of these questions.  This may indicate that they are not aware, 

in general, as to their thoughts, feelings, attitudes and behaviors toward 

emotional intelligence.  If this postulation is accurate, then I could contend 

that 75% of self­awareness is lacking among participants. 

      In general, the post­assessment results reveal that the students’ 

attitudes and perceptions towards emotional intelligence did not change.
                                                                           Giles­29 

25% of participants were once again neutral to agreeing or disagreeing with 

behavioral self­awareness statements (Figure 10).  Furthermore, about the 

same amount of participants (53%) strongly agreed and agreed with the 

statements.  Because this figure is similar to the pre­assessment results, I 

believe it to be an accurate depiction of students’ perception.  However, it 

does indicate that, overall, behaviors did not change after curriculum 

implementation.  This could be because of several evaluation challenges. 

First, I administered the post­assessment 30 days after the training.  This 

may have not been enough time to allow for behavioral change to take place 

(Kirkpatrick, 1998).  Second, as with any learning evaluation, the training 

needs to be supported by the participants’ environment, including home, 

school and peer relationships.  Finally, and most importantly, about six of 

the participants who completed the post­assessment did not regularly attend 

the first four classes of the EmoSmart Leadership program, which included 

the self­awareness training. 

      Although behavior and attitudes remained consistent, skill gaps firmly 

closed because of the self­awareness curriculum.  Pre­assessment multiple 

choice and free response questions were not accurately answered.  47.06% 

of students were able to identify the definition of a value in the pre­ 

assessment compared to 100% of participants during the post­assessment. 

Qualitative responses indicated that 0% of participants accurately named the 

four parts of emotional intelligence in the pre­assessment while 83.3% of
                                                                         Giles­30 

students correctly stated all four answers.  Furthermore, 20.45% of students 

described self­awareness accurately during the pre­assessment while 

70.83% of students correctly defined self­awareness on the post­ 

assessment.  Finally, 18.18% gave an acceptable example of a belief 

statement on the pre­assessment compared to the 83.33% on the post­ 

assessment.  Consequently, given these statistics, skill gaps closed by 

70.4% after the self­awareness curriculum was implemented. 

Class 1:  Introduction to EmoSmarts.  The first EmoSmart class 

implementing the SECD was effective but time­pressed.  Students spent a 

third of the class completing the pre­assessment, which is vital to the SECD 

but detracts from the rest of the model.  However, once they began to feel 

comfortable that the assessment was anonymous and was not going to be 

graded, the process quickened.  The “Build” phase was probably most 

successful, and the most critical, during the first class.  I included the 

WIIFM, attention­getters and YCDI and the audience was thoroughly 

engaged.  The ice breaker also worked, and one group emerged immediately 

as having the healthiest dynamic, thus successfully completing their puzzle 

in the least amount of time with ample communication with other groups.  I 

am considering putting these participants together as an EmoTeam, and I 

observed the groups that did not have dynamics that worked.  One group 

was compromised of all females with similar personality traits and three 

participants within this group did not engage in the activity.  As a result, this
                                                                        Giles­31 

group performed the most poorly during the ice­breaker and needed 

diversification for future classes. 

      Most notably, as the class brainstormed the four components of 

emotional intelligence, an interesting trend emerged.  The group focused 

solely on the “self” quadrants of the EQ grid (see Figure 4:  Participant­ 

Brainstormed Answers during Class 1).  Based on their answers, I deduce 

that the participants already have the basic levels of knowledge and 

comprehension on Bloom’s Taxonomy and future developmental focus needs 

to be on application and analysis of self­awareness and self­management. 

Contrarily, community awareness and interpersonal management 

development require a primitive learning structure where the concentration 

adheres to the three lower levels of Bloom’s Taxonomy.  Additionally, the 

“self­focused” responses clarify the theme that adolescents regard their 

internal locus of control as critical at this phase in their development since 

these reactions were derived from their perception of what it means to be 

successful in life. 

      The results from this class indicate the specific levels of understanding 

that these adolescents have about emotional intelligence, which is further 

reinforcement from our one­on­one interviews.  However, it is especially 

clear that these participants have a strong sense of self and need 

developmental training tactics at the analysis, synthesis and evaluation
                                                                       Giles­32 

levels of Bloom’s Taxonomy to support positive self­awareness and self­ 

management cognition and behaviors. 

Class 2:  Self­Awareness Lesson 1.  The first lesson to self­awareness began 

with an ice­breaker designed to allow the participants to get to know one 

another but also begin expressing personal interests and feelings within the 

classroom, a critical attribute of the “Build” phase.  Each participant was 

asked to state his or her name and then identify one hobby.  Then, the next 

participant will state the previous participant’s name and hobby until each 

participant is naming each individual’s hobbies. 

      The ice­breaker was time­consuming but the students enjoyed it, 

especially since many of them already know each other from their school 

program.  However, I had to improvise toward the end since we didn’t have 

time to get to each student. 

      The purpose of the activity was two­fold:  First, we were beginning to 

build the safe, learning environment.  Second, I used the exercise to 

introduce the concept of self­awareness by debriefing with hierarchical 

Bloom’s questions such as “What were you feeling when you were asked to 

name your previous classmates’ names and hobbies?”  “Were you scared or 

anxious?”  “Were you confident?”  “Do you even know what you were 

feeling…are you able to name your emotion?”  One student who successfully 

named everyone in the class and their hobbies shared that she was very 

confident in her ability.  I used her response to discuss self­confidence and
                                                                         Giles­33 

how it fits into the concept of self­awareness.  Then, I led the class in 

creating their own definition of self­awareness:  “Knowing yourself and how 

you fit into the world around you.”  This definition became a learning 

objective that the students continually repeated and applied to different 

situations throughout the self­awareness curriculum. 

      To “Explain with Examples” I designed a story for Lesson 1 about a 

fictitious high school character that encounters a difficult situation (Figure 

7).  Students were chosen to read each character of the story and then we 

debriefed (“Facilitate a Forum”) as an introduction to the “temperamental 

tree,” which also became a key learning objective of self­awareness. 

      Given our limited timeframe due to the icebreaker during Class 2, I 

only introduced the temperamental tree by defining each part of it and using 

the character’s experiences in the story as simple, supporting examples. 

Thus, I established the concept but was unable to “Facilitate a Forum” and 

get buy­in. 

      Class 2 made me aware that the design of the self­awareness 

curriculum was strong but given the short class period and the attention 

span of the students, I would need to streamline the exercises and key 

concepts for the implementation to be successful.  At this point, I redesigned 

the self­awareness curriculum to meet these needs (see Discussion for 

further elaboration).
                                                                         Giles­34 

Class 3:  Self­Awareness Lesson 2.  Class 3 began with several 

housekeeping agenda items that took a majority of the class time away from 

the actual self­awareness curriculum.  During this class, we began to cement 

the group of students that were committed to the EmoSmart Leadership 

Program.  The attendance had dropped dramatically, as anticipated, from 

the original information sessions, but the students who remained by Class 3 

were mostly those who committed to the program. 

      Prior to Class 3, I redesigned the curriculum to include the logistical 

information at the beginning of the class as a way to “Build” and “Connect” 

the students with the program.  Notably, students defined ground rules for 

the remainder of the classes and discussed consequences if these rules were 

broken.  This process was especially important to the “Build” SECD phase 

since it created relationships between the students as peers, learners and 

mentors.  Additionally, this exercise allowed me to define my role as not the 

disciplinary teacher but rather the facilitator guiding the learning process, 

again a significant element to building a safe, learning environment. 

      After the housekeeping items, I asked the students to name each part 

of the temperamental tree to test for retention.  I was surprised at how 

much the group remembered and realized that the tree metaphor was the 

foundation for the “Connect” SECD phase therefore allowing the group to 

sequentially and innately name each item in the cycle:  experiences lead to 

values, which lead to beliefs, which lead to thoughts and feelings, which lead
                                                                         Giles­35 

to behavior, which lead to consequences, which lead to new experiences. 

Therefore, the “knowledge” level of Bloom’s was surprisingly solid but the 

“comprehension” still needed work.  So, to explore elements of the tree 

thoroughly, I had each student complete belief system statements 

individually in his or her workbook.  These statements included phrases such 

as “At home, I am…” “At school, I am…” and “I should be more like.”  Then, 

I asked the participants to discuss the statements in their groups or 

“Facilitate a Forum.”  The purpose of the activity was to explore if a belief is 

“right” or “wrong” and then trace individual beliefs back to the value that 

supports it.  Participants very successfully mapped beliefs to values and 

began to understand that belief systems are subjective, as are our 

temperamental trees. 

      During the last part of the class, my co­facilitator trained the concept 

of the “little red wagon” using “Connect” (metaphorical representation of our 

values and belief systems), “Define” and “Explain with Examples.”  His 

examples led to “Facilitate a Forum,” where the class discussed the core 

belief and red wagon of the situation.  We then adjourned and asked the 

class to come prepared next week with an example of their own red wagon 

that they will map out with their EmoSmart group (“Guided Go”) on a flip 

chart. 

      During the third class, the group began to share and relate to others 

more, indicating that we were accomplishing the “Build” phase.  Two
                                                                       Giles­36 

metaphors were helping the class “Connect” to the learning objectives and 

the class was beginning to “Define” key concepts.  In congruence with the 

SECD, the class and facilitators had shared many examples of self­ 

awareness and, although there was still room for growth, the group candidly 

discussed the ideas.  Therefore, the SECD allowed me to successfully set the 

learners’ stage to apply the concepts in the last week of the self­awareness 

curriculum. 

Class 4:  Self­Awareness Lesson 3.  I devoted the final class to the “Guided 

Go,” “Help,” and “Intensify” stages of the SECD model.  After reviewing the 

definitions of the temperamental tree, one member of each Emo Team 

shared his or her red wagon example.  Then, with the “Help” of their groups, 

they mapped out their experiences on flip chart paper outlining their beliefs, 

values, thoughts and feelings, behavior and consequences of the behavior. 

As co­facilitators, we coached the groups individually to help them link each 

part of the temperamental tree to their real­life situation.  Then, one group 

shared their experience with the large group, and we debriefed their 

experiences mapped on the flip chart together. 

                                 Discussion 

      The SECD model proved useful and efficient as a framework for 

creating soft skill instructional design.  However, when implemented, it was 

difficult to include all aspects to enhance adolescent learning in each 

module.  Given our limited timeframe with the students, I found that the
                                                                        Giles­37 

curriculum needed heavy adjustment to meet the learners’ pace.  Thus, 

many of the activities I had planned to include were often pushed to the 

following week or omitted altogether if I found that the class grasped the 

concept and didn’t need further exploration.  I made these adjustments by 

modifying the curriculum based on the pre­assessment results.  These 

changes were key to meeting the most critical learning objectives. 

      Furthermore, as the classes progressed I found that during the design 

process I had cluttered the curriculum with concepts and objectives rather 

than focusing on the key points of self­awareness.  Again, both the stiff 

timeframe and the rate of participant retention and application alerted me to 

this pitfall.  Therefore, I dropped two training points after the second self­ 

awareness lesson to allow the participants to focus on the temperamental 

tree (e.g. experiences, values, beliefs, thoughts & feelings, behavior) and its 

application to everyday life.  I believe that this strategy was key to the 

learners’ retention and supports the essence of the SECD, although it was 

not my original intention.  During the last self­awareness class, it was clear 

that the participants had absorbed the information and were mostly able to 

independently implement the learning into the “Guided Go” phase of the 

SECD with little “Help” from the class or the facilitators. 

      As a reminder, designers and facilitators need to streamline learning 

objectives down to their simplest form for successful implementation, as I 

did when executing the SECD.  Furthermore, it is clear now that rather than
                                                                        Giles­38 

teaching one objective thoroughly through each phase of the design during 

one class, it is even more acceptable to design a curriculum in a way that 

allows the same key SECD points to be taught over several class periods. 

Still, designers need to continually include “Build” and “Connect” at the 

commencement of every class period, regardless of the last SECD phase. 

More importantly, after “Build” and “Connect” it is critical to include a review 

phase to determine where to jump (or rather, where the class will allow the 

facilitator to jump) on the SECD model:  “Define,” “Explain with Examples,” 

“Facilitate a Forum,” or “Guided Go.”  After utilizing the SECD model in this 

way, I believe that this process determines the ultimate potential for each 

participant to successfully follow the remainder of the model, or “Justify,” 

“Karry Out,” and “Learn.” 

      Additionally, many opportunity areas exist for the Youth Mentor 

Leadership Program and need to be explored for the program to become 

more successful.  However, the purpose of this Capstone is to explore the 

Social­Emotional­Cognitive Design’s feasibility, including advantages and 

disadvantages when applied to adolescents exploring self­awareness.  Given 

the tenuous structure of the Youth Mentor Leadership Program at CIS, 

mostly the limited time with the students and the mind­set distractions 

during the lunch period, it is important to note that the SECD needs 

adequate implementation time to resonate with the students and create 

behavioral change.  This design only included emotional awareness and self­
                                                                        Giles­39 

assessment, rather than thoroughly exploring another major component of 

self­awareness, self­confidence.  Therefore, future studies can further 

examine the SECD’s impact on enhancing self­confidence. 

      As with corporate training, the SECD model will only work in an 

environment that promotes emotionally intelligent behaviors and teachings. 

This means that peers, educators, and even parents need to positively 

reinforce the curriculum to continue the positive behavioral changes in the 

students (Norris, 2003).  This could be a primary reason substantial 

behavioral change did not take place, as indicated in the pre­ and post­ 

assessment results. 

      The SECD model needs to be assessed heavily for future studies.  Skill 

gaps and behavioral gaps can be checked after 90 days, six months and one 

year to uncover which training objectives were retained the most by 

participants.  Then, return on community investment can be tracked after 

several implementations of the curriculum. 

      Furthermore, assessing the effectiveness of the model after other 

negative factors of the Youth Mentor Leadership Program are edified would 

be useful.  For example, I believe the limited 40­minute sessions during 

students’ lunch period greatly limited the impact of the curriculum.  Applying 

the model to longer training sessions may increase its sustainability. 

      The SECD model should also be implemented with different 

demographics to isolate its effectiveness and relation to adolescents.  The
                                                                      Giles­40 

results of this study lead me to believe that the design of the model could be 

applicable to adults in a corporate training environment as well.  The more 

the model is implemented, the more it can be modified to increase self­ 

awareness and other types of emotional intelligence.
                                                                        Giles­41 




            Assess              Build          Connect




Learn                                                      Define 




“Karry”                                                    Explain 
  Out                         Retention                     with 
                                                          Examples 




                                                          Facilitate 
Justify                                                   a Forum 



           Intensification       Help      Guided “Go” 
                                                              Giles­42 

                            Figure 2: 
                Quadrants of Emotional Intelligence 
         Defined by Daniel Goleman & Cary Cherniss (Eds.) 
           The Emotionally Intelligent Workplace (2001) 




       Self­Awareness                    Social Awareness

·   Emotional self­awareness       ·   Empathy
·   Accurate self­assessment       ·   Service Orientation
·   Self­confidence                ·   Organizational Awareness 




      Self­Management              Interpersonal Management

·   Emotional self­control         ·   Developing Others
·   Trustworthiness                ·   Influence
·   Conscientiousness              ·   Communication
·   Adaptability                   ·   Conflict Management
·   Achievement Drive              ·   Visionary Leadership
·   Initiative                     ·   Catalyzing Change
                                   ·   Building Bonds
                                   ·   Teamwork and Collaboration
                                                                 Giles­43 

                                Figure 3: 
                   Quadrants of Emotional Intelligence 
Modified for the YESS Institute’s Development of Adolescent Role Models 




          Self­Awareness                  Community Awareness

   ·   Emotional awareness            ·   Kindness
   ·   Accurate self­assessment       ·   Empathy
   ·   Self­confidence                ·   Community Involvement 




         Self­Management              Interpersonal Management

   ·   Emotional self­control         ·   Mentoring/Leadership
   ·   Trustworthiness                ·   Influence
   ·   Conscientiousness              ·   Communication
   ·   Stress Management              ·   Conflict Management
   ·   Achievement Drive              ·   Creating Change
   ·   Study Skills                   ·   Teamwork
   ·   Initiative 
                                                                                              Giles­44 

                                              Figure 4 
                                   Emotional Intelligence Evaluation 


General Information 
Name:                                                            Date: 

Interviewer: 



Candidate Evaluation 
                                     1=Poor         2=Fair          3=Good    4=Excellent       0=Unsure 


Self­Confidence 

Accurate Self­Assessment 

Emotional Self­Control 

Achievement Drive 

Service Orientation 

Leadership Ability 

Communication/Listening Skills 

Stress Management 

Study Skills 

Interest in Program 


                                                                                     Total:
Strengths: 




Weaknesses: 




Additional Comments: 



                                               Recommendation 
                            Yes                                               No 
                                                                 Giles­45 

                              Figure 5: 
                          Bloom’s Taxonomy 



Level                              Demonstration of Learning 
                           Decide, assess value, make choices, criticize, 
6          Evaluation 
                           justify 
                           What if, design, predict, combine, invent, 
5          Synthesis 
                           use old ideas to create new ones 
                           Compare, outline, break into parts, clarify, 
4           Analysis 
                           see patterns 
                           Show me by example that…,compute, use, 
3         Application 
                           state a fact and support it 
                           Summarize, give examples, describe, 
2        Comprehension 
                           paraphrase 
1          Knowledge       Tell, write, list, define, name
                                                                  Giles­46 

                               Figure 6: 
           Participant­Brainstormed Answers during Class 1 




      (Self­Awareness)                   (Community Awareness)

·   Values                           ·   Kindness 
·   Knows what they want
·   Believes in themselves
·   Good perception
·   Self­awareness 




    (Self­Management)                (Interpersonal Management)

·   Rich                             ·   Being aggressive
·   Positive attitude                ·   Influential/Motivation/Inspiration
·   Nice Car
·   Creative
·   Responsible
·   Street Smart
·   Book Smart
·   Control
·   Common Sense
·   Achievement drive 
                                                      Giles­47 

 Figure 7:  EmoSmart Leadership Participant Workbook 




    EmoSmart Leadership™ for Youth and Role Models 



Youth Mentor Leadership Program 


              This workbook belongs to:
                                                                               Giles­48 

                    Putting the Pieces Together:  Becoming EmoSmart 




CIS:  What You Do                               CIS:  What You’ll Get
   ·  Commit your time, energy and                 ·  A safe, supportive environment 
      focus to becoming EmoSmart                       to discuss WHATEVER
   ·  Share your beliefs, attitudes,               ·  An EmoTeam to support you in 
      experiences and feelings                         WHATEVER
   ·  Respect others’ beliefs, attitudes,          ·  A better understanding of 
      experiences and feelings                         yourself
   ·  Help your EmoTeam                            ·  A better understanding of others
   ·  Serve your community                         ·  Skills to make you successful in 
                                                       LIFE




The YESS Institute:  What We Do                 The YESS Institute:  What We Get
   ·  Use YOU as the experts                       ·  To hang out with YOU! 
   ·  Treat you as adults
   ·  Build trust
   ·  Help you succeed
   ·  Teach LIFE­LONG skills
   ·  Make this FUN! 
                                                                      Giles­49 


What does it mean to be EmoSmart? 

Each day, we are confronted with challenges and opportunities 
where we can use our EmoSmarts.  It is emotional intelligence (EQ) 
that enables us to embrace positive opportunities and rise above 
life’s challenges. 

What do you think it means to be EmoSmart? 

______________________________________________________________________________ 

______________________________________________________________________________ 

Your Map to Being EmoSmart:  What’s Your EmoQ?
                                                            Giles­50 



Try It Again:  The Four Components of EmoSmart Leadership
                                              Giles­51 




  EmoSmart Leadership™ for Youth and Role Models 



Youth Mentor Leadership Program 

    Component I:  Self­Awareness 

                   Lesson 1 


            This workbook belongs to:
                                                                                    Giles­52 



Objective 
                         To improve mentoring and leadership skills 
                     by enhancing emotional intelligence and EmoSmarts 

Outcomes 
    At the end of this module, you will be able to: 
    q    List the four main areas of emotional intelligence 
    q    Define “self­awareness” 
    q    Give an example of a belief 
    q    Apply the Temperamental Tree to a real­life situation 
    q    Identify “hot buttons,” “emotional dwarves” and each of their corresponding reactions 
    q    Recognize the emotional dwarf that you most relate with in difficult situations 
    q    Use all aspects of Component 1 to dissect a real­life situation




Ground Rules 
__________________________________________________________ 
__________________________________________________________ 
__________________________________________________________ 
__________________________________________________________ 
__________________________________________________________ 
                                                 Giles­53




¨  Exercise:  The Name Game 
¨  Review:  What Does it Mean to be EmoSmart? 
¨  What is Self­Awareness 
¨  Nightmare on Emo Street:  Chapter 1 
¨  The Temperamental Tree 
¨  Lesson 1 Review 
¨  EmoSmart Leadership Agenda
                                                                                       Giles­54 


Your Map to Being EmoSmart 




Self­Awareness:  Who Am I? 

Before you can begin to be a leader and work well with others, you need to first understand who 
YOU are.  Self­awareness is _____________________________________________. 

It’s important to be aware of who you are because it helps identify why people respect you as a 
leader.  This contributes to your self­worth.  It’s also equally important to understand what 
qualities you need to improve upon so you are careful not to role model these actions to others.
                                                                                            Giles­55 


Nightmare on Emo Street:  Chapter 1 
To help us understand self­awareness a little better, we’re going to take a trip to a street not so 
far away… 

                                                                   Chapter 1 

                                                        “Julia, get down here right this 
                                                       minute!” Julia’s mother shouted 
                                                        up the stairs of their apartment 
                                                       one Monday morning.  “The bus 
                                                                    is here!”


Julia, a 16­year­old year old native of Denver, annoyingly rolled her eyes at her mother’s voice. 

“It’s 6:30 in the morning,” she thought grimacing, “and my mom is already ordering me around.” 

Ever since Julia missed the bus two months ago, Julie thought that her mother was too uptight 
about Julia getting to school in time.  Julia quickly scanned her messy bedroom she shared with 
her younger sister, Sasha, looking for any remaining school books.  When she came across an 
open science book on her bed, she felt her heart skip a beat. 

“Science test,” she remembered fearfully.  “If only I hadn’t stayed out so late last night,” she 
worried barely remembering falling asleep with the open book. 

“Julia!  NOW!” her mother shrieked as she pounded on Julia’s bedroom door.  Julia quickly 
threw the book in her bag and flung the door open, scared of the look on her mother’s face. 

“Mom, you don’t have to yell!  You know that really bugs me in the morning.  The bus comes 
everyday at the same time, ya know,” Julia replied racing past her mother and then down the 
stairs. 

                       “Don’t smart­mouth me, young lady,” Julia’s mom retorted back, 
                       following her down the stairs.  “And I’m glad you’ve decided to be 
                       responsible today, since you couldn’t be last night,” her mother called 
                       sarcastically after her as Julia headed out the front door. 

                       “Whatever, mom,” Julia mumbled, her heart sinking a little.  Julia didn’t 
                       like thinking that her mother thought she was irresponsible.  She just 
                       wished her mom understood how important hanging out with her friends 
                       was to her. 

“Julia!” her mother shouted back, standing in her bathrobe in front of the bus stop, “I said don’t 
smart­mouth me!”  Julia saw the bus driver snicker out of the corner of her eye.  Julia quickly 
turned around to face her 
                                                                                        Giles­56 

mother. 

“Mom,” Julia murmured, her blood beginning to boil, “You are 
embarrassing me!” 

“Well, that is just too bad Julia Sanchez!  Now, I want you back here 
right after school, no exceptions, do you understand me?” 

“But you know I have practice after school on Mondays!”  Julia snapped, 
referring to her position on the track team. 

“Well, maybe you should have thought about that before missing your curfew last night,” her 
mother replied, turning her back and walking up to the apartment. 

“Let’s go, girl,” the bus driver bellowed down the bus stairs. “Now or never.” 

Julie felt her eyes well up with tears, “Sometimes…I…I just hate you, mama!”  Julia shouted 
before heading up the stairs and flashing her pass to the driver. 

“I’ll show her,” Julia thought angrily, feeling her face turn different shades of red as she found 
her seat among the amused bus passengers.  As Julia looked out the window at the fall trees 
blowing swiftly in the wind, she realized that she didn’t know what she was going to do today— 
but she WASN’T going to school.
                                                                     Giles­57 


It All Starts with an Acorn:  Our Temperamental Trees 




                                                         _________________




                                                         _________________ 
                                                                 & 
                                                         _________________ 




_________________                                        _________________ 




                                                         _________________ 




                                                         _________________ 
                                                                                           Giles­58 


Your Temperamental Tree 

In your table group, label each part of the tree using someone’s personal example.  Notice that 
you may not be able to label each part of the tree if the difficult situation hasn’t resulted in an 
outcome yet. 




                                                                             _________________




                                                                             _________________ 
                                                                                     & 
                                                                             _________________ 




 _________________                                                           _________________ 




                                                                             _________________ 




                                                                             _________________ 
                                                    Giles­59 




  EmoSmart Leadership™ for Youth and Role Models 



Youth Mentor Leadership Program 

    Component I:  Self­Awareness 

                   Lesson 2 


            This workbook belongs to:
                                                                           Giles­60 



Objective 
                         To improve mentoring and leadership skills 
                     by enhancing emotional intelligence and EmoSmarts 

Outcomes 
    At the end of this module, you will be able to: 
    q    List the four main areas of emotional intelligence 
    q    Define “self­awareness” 
    q    Give an example of a belief 
    q    Apply the Temperamental Tree to a real­life situation 
    q    Use all aspects of Component 1 to dissect a real­life situation




Ground Rules 
__________________________________________________________ 
__________________________________________________________ 
__________________________________________________________ 
__________________________________________________________ 
__________________________________________________________ 
                                                Giles­61




¨  Housekeeping 
    o  YMLP Guidelines 
    o  Your EmoTeam 
    o  Community Service Project 
    o  Ground Rules 
¨  Review:  Your Map to Being EmoSmart 
¨  What is Self­Awareness? 
    o  The Little Red Wagon 
¨  Mapping Self­Awareness 
¨  Your Temperamental Tree (time permitting) 
¨  Lesson  Review 
¨  EmoSmart Leadership Agenda
                             Giles­62 


Your Map to Being EmoSmart
                                                                                     Giles­63 


What is Self­Awareness? 

Before you can begin to be a leader and work well with others, you need to first understand who 
YOU are.  Self­awareness is _____________________________________________.  Complete 
the following statements: 

______________  ____________  __________________                   Complete answers here: 
                              The best type of music 
                              is… 
                              When my best friend is 
                              mad at me, I… 
                              It’s so annoying when 
                              my parents… 
                                    My teachers should… 
                                    Everyone needs to be 
                                    careful when they… 
                                    People are crazy for… 

                                    I should be more like… 
                                    Before moving to 
                                    Baker next year, CIS 
                                    needs to… 
                                    At home, I am… 

                                    At school, I am… 
                                    With my friends, I 
                                    am… 
                                    I am EmoSmart when 
                                    I… 




                                               _____________________________ 
                                               _____________________________ 
                                               _____________________________
                                                                                                    Giles­64 


Mapping Self­Awareness 
Situation:  You are driving with your friends when suddenly a car whips in front of you, 
narrowly missing the side of your car.  What do you do first: 
        A:  Honk 
        B:  Ride up next to them and flip them off 
        C:  Wonder if they didn’t see you 
        D:  Laugh at them with your friends 

                                                            Behavior:




                                                                        Thoughts and Feelings: 




                                                                                    Belief: 




                                                                                    Value: 




                                                                                     Experience: 
                                                                                          Giles­65 


Your Temperamental Tree 

In your group, label each part of the tree using someone’s personal example.  Notice that you 
may not be able to label each part of the tree if the difficult situation hasn’t resulted in an 
outcome yet. 




                                                                           Behavior:




                                                                           Thoughts and Feelings: 




      Consequences:                                                        Belief: 




                                                                           Value: 




                                                                           Experience: 
                                                                                  Giles­66 

   Figure 8:  EmoSmart Leadership Self­Awareness Pre­Assessment 

1)  Name the four main areas of emotional intelligence: 

       A)  __________________________________ 
       B)  __________________________________ 
       C)  __________________________________ 
       D)  __________________________________ 

2)  Describe self­awareness: 
______________________________________________________________________________ 
________________________________________________________________________ 



3)  Things that are important to us are called: 

       A)  Thoughts 
       B)  Feelings 
       C)  Values 
       D)  Beliefs 


4)  All of the following are “emotional dwarves” EXCEPT: 

       A)  Vengy 
       B)  Crabby 
       C)  Stuffy 
       D)  Gossipy 
5)  In order to be a positive role model, what must FIRST be established? 

       A)  Openness 
       B)  Safety and trust 
       C)  Admiration 
       D)  Acceptance 

6)  Which of the following hot buttons leads to being afraid to make decisions?
                                                                                       Giles­67 



       A)  Failure 
       B)  Not Liked/Unlovable 
       C)  Unimportant 
       D)  Disrespected 


7)  A coping behavior for the hot button “disregarded” is: 

       A)  Taking no responsibility 
       B)  Being  out­of­control on the inside 
       C)  Not setting boundaries 
       D)  Always striving for attention 


8)  The following statement is an example of what kind of agreement? 
   “I have been making the coffee for the past couple of weeks, but would you all like to set a 
   weekly schedule so we can all share the load?” 

       A)  Revisiting an agreement 
       B)  Confronting a perceived broken agreement 
       C)  Breaking an agreement 
       D)  Confronting an unspoken agreement
                                                                                          Giles­68 

Figure 9: Multiple Choice Pre­ and Post­Assessment Results 

                          Pre­Assessment Question Results 

Question                              A     B     C     D     Blank          % Correct 

Things that are important to us 
are called:                            6     6    16     5        1    34     47.06% 
In order to be a positive role 
model, what must FIRST be 
established:                           5    14     1     5        1    26     53.85% 
Which of the following hot buttons 
leads to being afraid to make 
decisions?                            14     4     5     7        1    31     45.16% 
The top of the Pyramid of Needs 
is called:                             2     1     4    11        4    22     4.55% 

                          Post­Assessment Question Results 

Question                              A     B     C     D     Blank          % Correct 

Things that are important to us 
are called:                            0     0    11    0         0    11    100.00%
                                                                                                                               Giles­69 

                           Figure 10:  Ranking EQ Pre­ and Post­Assessment Results 

                                                       Pre­Assessment Results 
                                                                        Strongly                                   Strongly 
                                                                                    Agree     Neutral  Disagree              Blank 
                                                                         Agree                                     Disagree 
Pre­Assessment 
I can name the emotion that I'm feeling.                                       2        13          5                     1        1 
I know why I'm feeling that emotion.                                           1        14          7 
I am comfortable with my 
anger.                                                                         2        10          4         5                    1 
I am comfortable with other people's 
anger.                                                                         1         8          7         3           3 
I am confident in my abilities.                                                4        13          3         1                    1 
I know what stresses me out.                                                   3         9          7         1                    2 
I know what my friends would say is my biggest weakness.                       1         9          6         4           2 
                                                            Total 
                                                            Number            14        76         39        14          6         5 
                                                            Percentage       8%       43%        22%        8%          3%        3% 

                                                      Post­Assessment Results 
                                                                       Strongly                                    Strongly 
                                                                                    Agree     Neutral  Disagree              Blank 
                                                                        Agree                                      Disagree 
Pre­Assessment 
I can name the emotion that I'm feeling.                                       4         5          4 
I know why I'm feeling that emotion.                                           4         5          4 
I am comfortable with my 
anger.                                                                         5         4          4 
I am comfortable with other people's 
anger.                                                                         2         6          3         2 
I am confident in my abilities.                                                3         4          6 
I know what stresses me out.                                                   7         1          4         1 
I know what my friends would say is my biggest weakness.                       1         4          1         6           1 
                                                            Total 
                                                            Number            26        29         26        9           1         0 
                                                            Percentage      25%       28%        25%        9%          1%        0%
                                                                                       Giles­70 

             Figure 11: Free Response Pre­ and Post­Assessment Question Results 

Question                                          Pre­Assessment    Post­Assessment 
                                                     % Correct         % Correct 
Name the four areas of emotional intelligence.          0%               83.33% 
Describe self­awareness.                              20.45%             70.83% 
Give an example of a belief statement.                18.18%             83.33%
                                                                             Giles­71 

Figure 12:  Temperamental Tree Post­Assessment Results 

                                                                    % 
                                       Answers:         Tree      Correct 
   Post­Assessment 
   What we do in life.                    F        Behavior       91.67% 
   Emotions we have.                      E        Feelings       91.67% 
   What is important to us in life.       B        Values         83.33% 
   Ideas that run through our 
   heads.                                 D        Thoughts       100.00% 
   What happens to us in life.            A        Experiences     91.67% 
   What we think and feel to be 
   true.                                  C        Belief         83.33% 
   Acorn                                  A        Experiences    33.33% 
   Roots                                  B        Values         50.00% 
   Trunk                                  C        Belief         33.33% 
   Branches                               D        Thoughts       91.67% 
                                          E        Feelings       83.33% 
   Leaves                                 F        Behavior       66.67% 
                                                                  75.00%
                                                                        Giles­72 

                                  References 

Bloom, B., Englehart, M. Furst,E., Hill, W., & Krathwohl, D. (1956). 

      Taxonomy of educational objectives: The classification of educational 

      goals. Handbook I: Cognitive domain. New York, Toronto: Longmans, 

      Green. 

Callan, P. (November 27, 2005).  State’s future at risk.  The Denver Post. 

      Section E:  Perspective. 

The Collaborative for Academic, Social and Emotional Learning. (2006). 

      Introduction to SEL:  What is SEL?  Retrieved January 10, 2006, from 

      http://www.casel.org/about_sel/WhatisSEL.php. 

Columbia University. (November 7, 2005).  The Price of Inequity.  Retrieved 

      January 10, 2006, from 

      http://www.tc.columbia.edu/news/article.htm?id=5350. 

Cooper, R. K., & Sawaf, A. (1997). Executive EQ: Emotional intelligence in 

      leadership and organization. New York: Grosset­Putnam. 

Conlon, T. J. (2004).  A review of informal learning literature, theory and 

      implications for practice in developing global professional competence. 

      Journal of European Industrial Training, 28(2, 3, 4), 283­295. 

Cherniss, C. (April 15, 2000).  Emotional intelligence:  What it is and why it 

      matters.  Paper presented at the meeting of the Society of Industrial 

      and Organizational Psychology, New Orleans, LA.
                                                                       Giles­73 

Day, N.  (June 1998).  Informal learning.  Workforce, 77(6), 5.  Retrieved 

      September 30, 2004, from Business Source Premier. 

Dearborn, K. (Winter 2002).  Studies in emotional intelligence redefine our 

      approach to leadership development.  Public Personnel Management, 

      31(4), 523­528.  Retrieved September 30, 2004, from Business 

      Source Premier. 

Doehrman, M. (December 12, 2003).  Colorado non­profits get help from 

      area foundation.  Colorado Springs Business Journal.  Retrieved 

      January 10, 2006, from 

      http://www.findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_qn4190/is_20031212/ai_n1 

      0044801. 

Doll, E. A. (1935). A generic scale of social maturity. American Journal of 

      Orthopsychiatry, 5, 180­188. 

Doolittle, F. & Ivry, R.  (April 2003).  Improving the economic and life 

      outcomes of at­risk youth.  MDRC.  Retrieved January 10, 2006, from 

      http://www.mdrc.org/publications/361/concept.html. 

Elias, M. J., Weissberg, R. P. (May 2000).  Primary prevention:  Educational 

      approaches to enhance social and emotional learning.  Journal of 

      School Health, 70(5), 186­190. 

Enos, M. D., Kehrhahn, M. T., & Bell, A. (Dec. 2003).  Informal learning and 

      the transfer of learning:  How managers develop proficiency.  Human 

      Resource Development Quarterly, 14(4), 369­387.  Retrieved
                                                                      Giles­74 

      September 20, 2004, from 

      http://media.wiley.com/assets/199/00/jrnls_HRDQ_JB_Enos1404.pdf. 

Gardner, H. (1983). Frames of mind: The theory of multiple intelligences. 

      New York: Basic Books. 

Goleman, D. (1995).  Emotional intelligence.  New York:  Bantam. 

Goleman, D. (1997). Emotional intelligence: Why it can matter more than 

      IQ. New York: Bantam. 

Goleman, D. (1998).  Working with emotional intelligence.  New York: 

      Bantam. 

Howell, R. (2003) [review of the book Skill wars:  Winning the battle for 

      productivity and profit] Journal of Industrial Teach Education, 40(2). 

      Retrieved on October 2, 2004, from 

      http://scholar.lib.vt.edu/ejournals/JITE/v40n2/howell.html 

Howell, W. C. (1982).  The four phases of learning:  Information processing 

      and decision making.  Human Performance and Productivity.  Retrieved 

      February 24, 2006, from 

      http://www.erinhoops.ca/ArticlesFolder/4_phases_of_learning.htm. 

Huitt, W. (2003). Constructivism. Educational Psychology Interactive. 

      Valdosta, GA: Valdosta State University. Retrieved January 18, 2006, 

      from http://chiron.valdosta.edu/whuitt/col/cogsys/construct.html. 

Kierstead, J. (1999).  Human resource management trends and issues: 

      Emotional intelligence (EI) in the workplace.  Research Directorate for
                                                                       Giles­75 

      the Policy, Research and Communications Branch:  Public Service 

      Commission of Canada. 

Kirkpatrick, D. L. (1998).  Evaluating training programs. (2nd Ed.).  San 

      Francisco:  Berrett­Koehler Publishers, Inc. 

Knowles, M. (1950).  Informal adult education.  New York:  Association 

      Press. 

Kolb, D. (1984).  Experiential learning:  Experience as the source of learning 

      and development.  Englewood Cliffs, NJ:  Prentice­Hall. 

Lee, W. (n.d.) [review of the book Future training: A roadmap for 

      restructuring the training function] Performance Improvement 

      Quarterly, 9(3), pp. 80­82.  Retrieved on October 2, 2004, from 

      http://www.pepitone.com/content/serv­prin­ft­review.pdf 

Livson, N. & Leino, V. (1985).  Adolescent personality antecedents of adult 

      cigarette smoking:  A longitudinal study.  Journal of Genetic 

      Psychology 146(3) 343­355. 

Matthews, G., Roberts, R.D. & Zeidner M. (2003) Development of emotional 

      intelligence:  A skeptical—but not dismissive—perspective.  Human 

      Development, 46, 109­114. 

Marsick V., & Volpe M. (Eds.). (1999). Informal learning on the job.  Baton 

      Rouge, LA: AHRD. 

Marsick, V., & Watkins, K. (1999). Facilitating learning organizations: Making 

      learning count. Aldershot: Gower Press.
                                                                       Giles­76 

Mayer, J.D. & Cobb, C.D. (2000).  Educational policy on emotional 

      intelligence:  Does it make sense?  Educational Psychology Review, 12, 

      163­183. 

Mayer, J. D., & Salovey, P. (1995). Emotional intelligence and the 

      construction and regulation of feelings. Applied & Preventive 

      Psychology, 4 (3), 197­208. 

Mayer, J. D., & Salovey, P. (1993). The intelligence of emotional intelligence. 

      Intelligence, 17 (4), 433­442. 

Mosher, B. (July 2004).  The power of informal learning.  Chief Learning 

      Officer, 3(7), 20­21.  Retrieved on September 30, 2004, from Business 

      Source Premier. 

Pike, R. (1994).  Creative Training Techniques Handbook, Second Edition. 

      Minneapolis:  Lakewood Books. 

Salovey, P., & Mayer, J. (1990).  Emotional intelligence:  Imagination, 

      cognition, and personality, 9(3), 185­211.  Retrieved September 30, 

      2004, from Business Source Premier. 

Weisinger, H. (1997). Emotional intelligence at work: The untapped edge for 

      success. New York: Jossey­Bass. 

Yang, B., & Lu, D. (2001).  Predicting academic performance in management 

      education:  An empirical investigation of MBA success.  Journal of 

      Education for Business, 77(1), 15­20.
                                                                      Giles­77 

Zeidner, M., Roberts, R.D. & Matthews, G. (2002).  Can emotional 

     intelligence be schooled:  A critical review.  Educational Psychologist, 

     37, 215­231.

				
DOCUMENT INFO
Shared By:
Stats:
views:91
posted:6/8/2010
language:English
pages:81