A1 Teaching Resources in Mathematics by ihd49167

VIEWS: 249 PAGES: 23

									 

 

 




    Nipissing University 



    Measurement 
    A1: Teaching Resources in Mathematics 




     Julia Boschetto, Stephanie Dominelli, Ashley Kendall, Natalie King & Stephanie Ratz   
                                                                Primary Junior Section 2   
                                                                         Dr. Daniel Jarvis   
                                                                      [January 29, 2009]
     
Rationale: 

         Measurement is perhaps one of the most important strands within the mathematics curriculum. 
The National Council of Teachers of Mathematics state that measurement is one of the most 
fundamental of all mathematical processes; permeating all strands of math. Reys, Lindquist, Lambdin, 
Smith and Suydam (2003), suggest that measurement is the topic from the elementary curriculum that 
we use most in our lives. The sheer size of the measurement strand allows us to gain insight into its 
importance throughout the grades. The concepts included in the measurement strand are: area, 
volume, length, time, mass, perimeter, angles and capacity. The importance of measurement is further 
substantiated as it is recognized and “designated as one of the ten standards in the Principles and 
Standards for School Mathematics because of its power to help students see the usefulness of 
mathematics in everyday life” (Reys et al., 2003, p 320). Therefore, it is important that when we are 
teaching measurement to students we use concrete and practical applications that transfer into  
all aspects of their lives.  
         According to Small (2008), measurement is about assigning a numerical value to an attribute of 
an object, relative to another object called a unit. Length, capacity, weight, area, volume, time and 
temperature are the measureable attributes considered. Consistent with the thoughts of Dacey, 
Cavanagh, Findell, Greenes, Jensen Sheffield and Small (2003), young children start their exploration of 
measurable attributes by looking at, touching, and comparing physical things directly. Measurement is a 
natural part of life, one in which individuals of all ages are curious about and eager to explore.  
         The significance of measurement is identified through the continued examination of 
measurement, and the role it plays within the education system. According to Reys et al. (2003), 
measurement is an integral aspect of the mathematics curriculum for several reasons: 
     • It provides many application to everyday life 
     • It can be used to help learn other mathematics 
     • It can be related to other areas of the school curriculum 
     • It involves the students in active learning 
     • It can be approach through problem solving 
To further elaborate, the topic of measurement provides teachers and students alike with an 
opportunity to learn in exciting, unique and integrated ways. As stated by Reys et al. (2003), the 
Principles and Standards for School Mathematics calls for measurement to be a continuing part of the 
mathematics process rather than being shown in a few isolated lessons.  It is a common belief within the 
mathematics and education communities that measurement can be utilized across the math curriculum. 
As educators, we can further expand the topic of measurement as it is useful in other curriculum areas 
as well. For example, teachers can have students think about the ways measurement contributes to art, 
music, science, social studies and language arts. In accordance with the thoughts of Dacey et al. (2003), 
as long as we create curriculum that is coherent, developmental, focussed and well articulated, we as 
educators are able to continually merge and teach concepts in a cross curricular fashion. 
 
 
 
 
Research: 

           Within the measurement strand, there are three stages of learning that are often discussed. 
According to Small (2008), the stages of learning that apply to most types of measurement include:  
      • Definition/Comparison – Students begin their learning of measurement as they compare items 
           to assign a measurement, generally using visual and tactile senses (i.e. heavier, taller, farther, 
           etc.). Students apply a process for comparing items with respect towards measurement 
           attributes, without using units.  
      • Nonstandard Units‐ Students continue their learning of measurement concepts as they begin to 
           define measurement and measure things with nonstandard units, such as using bananas to 
           measure the length of a table. Some of the common nonstandard units utilized in classrooms 
           include scoops of water (for capacity) and linking cubes (for length).  
      • Standard Units‐ Students learn to use specific measurement tools and technology for measuring 
           items and represent the objects with the appropriate metric terminology. Considered the more 
           sophisticated technique of measurement, students make use of items such as rulers and 
           measuring cups. It is important to note that students are required to have an abstract 
           understanding of the measurement represented by the tools, such as the marks on a ruler, in 
           order to gain an accurate measurement. 
The majority of research available focuses on what children can do to grasp the different concepts of 
measurement, rather than specifying how a teacher should instruct a lesson. Reys et al. (2003), suggest 
that children should use measurement frequently, preferably on real life problems. Furthermore, 
children should participate in hands on activity centres which encourage discussion of ideas and 
concepts. 
           Due to the fact that there are a number of principles that underlie any type of measurement, 
students gradually learn to recognize them as they continue their education. Teachers should provide 
multiple opportunities for these principles to be discussed in class (Small, 2008). In addition, Dacey et al. 
(2003), suggest that teachers should ensure that students develop strong conceptual foundations before 
moving too quickly to formulas and unit conversions. As educators, we are expected to teach and cover 
all of the expectations laid out within the curriculum. It is important to remember that although there is 
a lot that must be taught to our students, it is only valuable if they can understand, grasp and retain 
these concepts.  
           It has been established that measurement is an important part of the mathematics curriculum, 
so it is interesting to note the findings of the Third International Mathematics and Science Study 
“research from international studies has often shown that measurement and geometry are the two 
topics in which students in the United States perform less well than their counterparts in other 
countries.” (Reys et al., 2003, pg 321). Although this report speaks of students in the United States, it is 
still relevant to Canadian educators as we can question these findings. Since measurement is so useful in 
everyday life, it is necessary to critically analyze our students’ performance on measurement items. It is 
from there that we can help students develop their understanding of measurement and make them 
successful.  Research has shown that there are common errors and misconceptions that students make 
throughout the measurement strand. The following are examples of student struggles and suggested 
strategies: 
•   Length and Perimeter 
       o Measuring curved lengths‐ According to Reys et al. (2003), students may say that a belt 
            is shorter when it is curled up than when it is straight. An excellent teaching strategy is 
            to show students two different sized belts, a curved belt (that is the longer of the two) 
            and a straight belt. Ask the students which belt is longer. Then straighten the curved 
            belt and ask again.  
       o Ruler placement‐ According to Small (2008), students will often use a ruler from the 
            beginning mark of 0cm, instead of the 1cm mark. Students often believe that the end of 
            the ruler is where you need to start your measurement from, this is usually seen when 
            the 0cm end is not labelled.  As a teacher, it is important to explain the set up of a ruler. 
            One strategy for doing so is to line up centimetre cubes along the ruler to show that 1 
            cube reaches from 0cm to 1cm.   
•   Area 
       o Confusing length with area‐ Students tend to focus on the linear dimensions of an object 
            when deciding which shape has a greater area. As suggested by Small (2008), 
            manipulatives are a great tool to help students understand measurement. In the case of 
            area, it is important for students to note that area is the amount of space covered. 
            Pattern blocks can be used to measure area; students cover the object with pattern 
            blocks to see how many units it takes to cover the object.  
       o Not recognizing the need for common units‐ Students will often try to calculate the area 
            of an object based on the numbers they see, however one of the numbers could in 
            centimetres while the other is in metres. Small (2008), suggests that students be 
            reminded about what the measurements mean.  
•   Capacity, Volume and Mass 
       o Assuming that a longer object has more volume‐ It is a common misconception among 
            students that the length of an object is the only way to measure it. When looking at 
            volume, we must explain to students that length is only one factor that determines the 
            volume of a shape. Small (2008), suggests that an emphasis on the fact that volume is 
            the amount of space an object takes up. Students can reconstruct prisms with linking 
            cubes to see which shape uses the most amount of cubes. 
       o Assuming a larger object has more mass‐ Students base their initial assessment on the 
            mass of an object based on its size. Reys et al. (2003), propose that in‐class experiments 
            be performed using a balance scale.  As a class, you can compare a small heavy object 
            (e.g. a rock) with a larger object that is lighter (e.g. a plastic cup).  
•   Time and Temperature 
       o Confusing 12 a.m. and 12 p.m. ‐ According to Small (2008), many people confuse 12 a.m. 
            with 12 p.m., thinking a.m. means the morning, so 12 a.m. must be noon. A suggested 
            teaching strategy is to construct a timeline with the class. This strategy often helps 
            students remember that 12 a.m. represents midnight and 12 p.m. represents noon. 
       o Reading temperatures between scale numbers‐ Generally, students find it easier to read 
            the scale on a thermometer when the temperature falls directly on a labelled 
               temperature such as 20 C or 30 C. Small (2008), suggests that teacher provide their 
               students with blackline masters of thermometers that have every 10 degrees labelled 
               (the way an actual thermometer looks) and have the spaces in between marked with a 
               smaller scale indicating the 1 degree increments.  
When we begin to teach measurement, it is important to remember some of the common errors and 
misconceptions so that we can be ready to help our students succeed. As proposed by Reys et al. (2003), 
teachers should plan their instruction based upon the learning strategies of their students. As research 
has shown, students must use measurement frequently on real problems, participate in activity‐
oriented measurement situations (i.e. experiments), and be transferable through the curriculum.  

Group Member Thoughts/Reflections: 

Natalie King 

         During my research for this presentation, I realized that measurement is a very wide range topic.  
There are so many different strands in this concept, that it is not something you can just teach and be 
done with; it must constantly be reviewed throughout all areas of the curriculum.  From my experience 
working with young children, I have found that measurement is a concept they are familiar with, but are 
not very skilled at.  Students understand that there is such a thing as time and size, but they do not 
understand much more than simple comparisons, such as “He is bigger/smaller than me”.                 
         When teaching measurement, I find it is easiest to start with nonstandard units.  Throughout my 
research, I found that I was even having a difficult time understanding the appropriate terms and 
methods for each measurement concept.  When I started out with standard units, I found that it was 
easier to build off this strategy.  Now that I understand the difficulties and misconceptions regarding 
measurement, I think an appropriate strategy to use when teaching children would be to start them off 
measuring things that matter to them and using objects that are a part of their world.  An example of 
this could be measuring their height and comparing it later in the year to see how much they have 
grown, or to use their hands to measure certain objects.  I feel that if students are interested in the 
outcome, they will be more apt to learn and recall the information at a later time. 
         This presentation has taught me that although there are certain methods of teaching that we 
are familiar with, there are a large number of new methods that involve manipulatives and fun activities 
that will engage students more.  The activities we created, along with many more that we found, are 
great examples of ideas to use to keep students motivated while learning about measurement at the 
same time. 

Stephanie Dominelli 

       As I began to research the topic of measurement, I quickly realized that this particular strand 
was more complex then I originally thought. When you begin to examine the wide range of individual 
concepts that must be covered within the strand, one quickly understands the need to integrate 
measurement throughout the curriculum. As seen through research, children are naturally curious about 
measurement, and to me, that makes it an enjoyable topic to teach. As teachers, we must guide our 
students’ learning to best fit their developmental stage; measurement allows us to do so through the 
three stages of learning: definition/comparison, nonstandard units and standard units. 
        Measurement is the topic in mathematics that we use most in our everyday lives.  It is therefore 
imperative that we ensure our students have a concrete understanding of the different concepts within 
measurement. On my upcoming practicum, I will have the opportunity to teach measurement to a grade 
1/2 class. Although the sheer size of this topic can be a little overwhelming, I am looking forward to 
teaching these various concepts with the use of manipulatives.  Throughout the research, the use of 
manipulatives has shown to be a great tool and aid when examining each concept. Small (2008), 
provides multiple examples and teaching strategies that utilize the great teaching power of 
manipulatives. It is my belief that the best learning occurs when students are engaged in situations and 
experiments rather than passively observing.  

Stephanie Ratz                                                                                                                          
Measurement is versatile! 
          Measurement is a math strand that is very accessible for students because it can be applied to 
daily life situations. For example, “This pencil is longer than that pencil” or “it is 150 Km to my cottage” 
or the recipe calls for 250 ml of milk”. Students perhaps will have more motivation to complete 
mathematics problems in this strand because they can see it being useful to them.  
          Mathematics is a subject that can be used widely across the curriculum. For example, 
mathematics is often used in visual arts. Measurement is an important component in Visual Art (in 
regards to perspective and correct proportions), Science (measuring substances for experiments), 
Geography/History (how far away one city, province, country is from another and time between 
historical events), Music (the amount of time in one bar, beats per minute), just to name a few!  
          If measurement is approached by a teacher with this same engaging attitude, students will be 
motivated to learn about this versatile strand of mathematics! 

Julia Boschetto 

         Measurement concepts and skills are a very important part of the mathematics curriculum. One 
might argue that measurement concepts are the most important part, because the concepts and skills 
that students will learn in the measurement strand are “directly applicable to the world in which 
students live” (The Ontario Curriculum Grades 1‐8: Mathematics, p.8).   
         Measurement is a strand which will spark an interest with your students.  Without even realizing 
it they are “naturally curious about measurement” (p.364, Small, 2008), they are always asking question 
about time, height, weight etc.  As teachers we begin to provide them with the knowledge and 
understanding to begin to answer their own questions.  Without the knowledge and understanding that 
we are able to provide our students throughout the measurement strand, simple things that we as adult 
take for granted such as being able to read time on and analog and digital clock become very difficult if 
not impossible tasks.  Students must be given ample opportunities in order to be successful in 
measurement.  As teacher we must encourage the use of manipulative and ensure that our students are 
exposed to hands on experience. Students should be given the opportunity to solve problems 
independently by using the tools and strategies they have been taught and are in the process of 
learning.  
        Many of the concepts that are covered in measurement are “also developed in other subjects 
areas, such as science, social studies, and physical education” (The Ontario Curriculum Grades 1‐8: 
Mathematics, p.8).  Therefore if our students are provided with the basic understand of the skills and 
concepts that can be found throughout the measurement strand we are not only setting them up for 
success in other subject areas but most importantly in life.  Measurement is a fascinating topic that will 
only aid our students in their future years to come.  Therefore as teacher I believe that we owe it to our 
students to take the time to thoroughly understand measurement and make sure that when we are 
teaching our students that no topic goes untouched.   
 
Ashley Kendall 

         Personally, I believe that measurement is an extremely essential and beneficial concept of 
mathematics education. It can be practically applied to a number of situations that are presented on a 
day‐to‐day basis in the lives of many students. Children are constantly asking measurement related 
questions such as how tall, how big, how heavy and how much longer. (p. 364, Small, 2008) Through 
learning about measurement, children learn to answer their own questions and approach measurement 
problems effectively through a series of strategies they develop as a result of the continuing practice of 
measurement concepts. Through teaching‐learning experiences, hands on activities and effective 
instruction on the part of the teacher, children can learn to value measurement and come to 
comprehend how measurement is present in their lives both within the school setting as a curricular 
concept and beyond the school in their play activities, recreational sports and perhaps even in cooking 
meals with their parents. The study of measurement allows student to gain an understanding of a 
number of concepts (linear measurement, area, volume and mass) that they encounter on an everyday 
basis and does so in a manner that introduces them to basic concepts and increases the complexities of 
the strand as the student progresses through school. For example, students begin to understand the 
concept of area in kindergarten through the use of non‐standard measurement tools and items such as 
pattern blocks and will naturally progress to the use of standardized measurement equipment such as a 
ruler or a tape measure in a later grade. It is the responsibility of the teacher to ensure that students are 
given ample opportunity to work with manipulatives and measurement tools at tasks that will allow 
them to successfully comprehend and apply measurement concepts they have learned to situations they 
can relate to.  
         Measurement transcends the Mathematics Curriculum and can be applied to other curricular 
areas including science, social studies and physical education. It encourages children to take notice of 
concepts that may be taken for granted as they get older including the ability to tell time on an analogue 
clock or the ability to read a mercury thermometer. It also encourages students to learn to estimate 
based on previous knowledge which is often ignored in favour of accuracies and actualities. 
Measurement, then, it can be said, is a particularly useful mathematics concept that is often 
undervalued. Its practicality cannot be denied and it is in that practicality that students may find 
measurement of benefit to them and of interest to them. Students can often relate to concepts they 
find practical and can extend beyond the mathematics classroom. As such, measurement should 
continue to be a focus of mathematics curriculums and programs and will continue to be a concept used 
to actively engage children within my own classroom. 
Developmental Analysis:  

        Before we begin to teach any lesson in mathematics, it is important that we examine the 
expectations and guidelines for the grade level prior to and after the current grade level we are 
teaching.   

Area 
         Due to the fact that the area activity for the purposes of the measurement seminar is 
designated at Kindergarten or Grade 1 level, there are no concrete expectations to come before the 
expectation presented in the activity. It would be beneficial if the student were able to compare and 
order two or more objects according to the appropriate measure (eg, area) and use measurement terms 
to describe mathematical relationships. As well, it would be beneficial if students had had previous 
experience in demonstrating through investigating a beginning understanding of the use of non‐
standard units of the same size (ie. paperclips) 
         In the years to come, students will continue to investigate non‐standard units of measurement. 
In particular, students will be encouraged to estimate, measure and record area through investigation 
using a variety of non‐standard units (ie. determine the number of yellow pattern blocks it takes to 
cover an outlined shape.) This will continue to help students develop measurement skills that do not 
depend on precise mathematical measurements using standard measurement tools. 

Time 
          In Grade 2 students are expected to, tell and write time to the quarter hour using 
demonstration digital and analogue clocks.  As a teacher review and emphasize the importance of the 
minute and hour hand on analogue clocks, and the different meanings for the different hands.  Model 
this by using a large clock and move the minute and the hour hands, or have your students make and 
label their own analogue clock for future activities and reference.   Although the expectation calls for 
both digital and analogue clock to me used this might not be the case.   
          In Grade 3 students are expected to read time using analogue nearest five minutes, and using 
digital clocks, and represent time in 12 hour notation.   Before looking at this expectation, a review on 
the difference between analogue and digital clocks will aid your students.  Students need to work with 
both analogue and digital clocks to help develop the full understanding of reading and telling time.  Do 
not limit your student to just one type of clock.   Students are expected to represent time in 12‐hour 
notation, which should be introduced in a way that allows student to make a personal connection, they 
need to fully understand that  there is 60 minutes n an hour and that 12‐hour notation goes from 1 a.m. 
to 12 noon, and 1 p.m. to 12 midnight.  This concept can be very confusing for students therefore you 
should emphasize the use of a.m. and p.m.  to specify whether they mean morning or night.       
          In Grade 4 students are expected to, estimate, measure (i.e., using analogue clock), and 
represent time intervals to the nearet minute.  If you are using a analogue clock to teach student how to 
tell time to the nearest minute, if there is a second hand that can be very confusing for students.  It is up 
to the teacher when they want to introduce the second hand.   Measuring and estimating time are first 
introduced in this grade, therefore going over the appropriate tools to use e.g. stopwatch, arm watch 
etc. should be introduce before the number for different approaches to measuring time.  
Measurement 

        The “Bean Flick” activity is applied to this grade four Ontario Mathematics Curriculum specific 
expectation: 
‐Estimate, measure, and record length, height, and distance, using standard units (i.e. millimetre, 
centimetre, metre, kilometre)  

NOTE: Grade three has exactly the same expectation as grade four 

          The mathematical learning that takes place in grade two, the learning students must grasp 
before tackling grade four expectations, comes from this specific expectation: 
‐Choose benchmarks‐ in this case, personal referents‐ for a centimetre and a metre (e.g.. “My little finger 
is about as wide as one centimetre. A really big step is about one metre.”) to help them perform 
measurement tasks 
          The grade five mathematics learning (the learning students will have to grasp after this grade 
four expectation) comes from this specific expectation:‐select and justify the most appropriate standard 
unit (i.e. millimetre, centimetre, decimetre, metre, kilometre) to measure length, height, width, and 
distance, and to measure the perimeter of various polygons 

Volume 
 
         Prior to the Grade 4 Curriculum, volume is not introduced as a measurement concept. 
Therefore, it would be beneficial for the teacher to take the time to introduce the concept of volume 
and how volume is determined. It is important to ensure that students understand that the term volume 
refers to the amount of space occupied by a substance or object. Introduce the concept as volume as 
unit cubed. That is to say, it looks at the amount of space occupied by the area (unit squared) and the 
units in the middle of a specific space (the third unit; three units equals a unit cubed.) Therefore, volume 
will need to be introduced in the grade 4 year. 
         In grade 5, students will be asked to begin to examine and comprehend the varying formulas 
that allow the volume of an object to relate to its area, perimeter and capacity.  Specifically, students 
are asked to determine, through investigation, the relationship between capacity (i.e., the amount a 
container can hold) and volume (i.e., the amount of space taken up by an object), by comparing the 
volume of an object with the amount of liquid it can contain or displace (e.g., a bottle has a volume, the 
space it takes up, and a capacity, the amount of liquid it can hold.) In addition, students are also asked 
to determine, through investigation using stacked congruent rectangular layers of concrete materials, 
the relationship between the height, the area of the base, and the volume of a rectangular prism, and 
generalize to develop the formula (i.e., Volume = area of base x height) Therefore, it would be beneficial 
for teachers to develop the practice of recapitulating concepts as they apply to or relate to other 
important measurement concepts. None of the concepts required to address volume within the grade 5 
curriculum should be new to the students, but the students would benefit from exercises that could act 
as a review and recapitulation of the area and capacity. Students would also benefit from exercises 
designed to allow them to practice the skills required to meet the volume expectations of the grade 5 
curriculum. 
Handout: 

                                                   Area 

Grade Level: Kindergarden to Grade 1. 

Curriculum Expectation: 1m33  Grade 1 SQC2005 Mathematics  Measurement Attributes, Units, and 
Measurement Sense   

    •   estimate, measure (i.e., by minimizing overlaps and gaps), and describe area, through 
        investigation using non‐standard units (e.g., "It took about 15 index cards to cover my desk, with 
        only a little bit of space left over."); 

Materials: 

Blackline Master Included (2) – Please see Appendices A and B 
Pattern blocks. 

Before:  
You want to make sure that the students understand the concept of measurement. Due to the fact that 
this is a kindergarten activity, you will want to take the time to go over what area is. You will know your 
students learning styles best and will be able to make a sound judgement based upon their earlier 
mathematical understanding. Ensure that your students understand that the area of a given figure is 
“the amount of surface covered.” Ensure that the students understand that when measuring the area of 
a figure, the entire surface must be covered without any spaces showing and without the measuring 
tools overlapping. When beginning to teach measurement in kindergarten, it is important to allow 
students a number of opportunities to use non‐standard units such as pattern blocks. This is important 
through most of the primary grades as the concept of area using standard units of measurement is still a 
little too complex. 

Activity: 
Present students with the sheets containing figures that can be made using pattern blocks.  Have the 
students cover the design using pattern blocks. They are to record the specific number of pattern blocks 
they have used to cover the diagram. (For example, beside the picture of the triangle, students will 
count the number of triangles they used in the diagram and write that number in the empty space 
provided.) Point out students that shapes cannot overlap (that is they cannot be placed over the edge of 
the figure) and that there can be no space between the shapes (ie. no white space in between two 
pattern blocks being used to complete a specific shape/part of the figure.) Encourage the students to try 
using as many different pattern blocks as they can. 

For children who are more advanced, provide them with the sheets that do not have lines outlining 
varying shapes to be used and have children problem solving using the pattern blocks or by colouring in 
the shapes with pencil crayons and using a different colour for each different shape. 

Website: http://www.apples4theteacher.com/measure.html
                                           Always On Time! 
 
Grade Level: 3 
 
Strand: Measurement  
 
Specific Expectations:  
     • Read time using analogue clocks, to the nearest five minutes, and using digital clocks (e.g., 1:23 
         means twenty‐three minutes after one o’clock), and represent time in 12‐hour notation; 
 
 Instructional materials: 
     • Time on my Hands Board with Clock Faces – Please see Appendix C 
     • 2 Cubes  ‐ Please see Appendix D 
            o Label the first cube with the following faces: 
                   Hour       Hour       Hour        Hour       Hour        Hour 
                   1:00       2:00       3:00        4:00       5:00        6:00 


         
            o    Label the second cube with the following faces 
                     Mins.       Mins.      Mins.       Mins.          Mins.       Mins. 
                       :00        :10        :20         :30            :40         :50 


    •   Bag of Skittles, 10 skittles for each player  
            o Player 1= 10 red skittles, Player 2=10 green skittles etc. 
            o (Note to teachers: The skittles can be replaced by markers, linking cubes ,etc.) 
     •  1 Die 
 
Object of the Activity: 
To be the first player to get three of the coloured skittles in a row, vertically, horizontally or diagonally  
 
To Start: 
Chose the starting player by having each player roll the die.  The player with the highest number goes 
first.  The rotation will continue clockwise. 
 
Rules: 
     • The starting player rolls both cubes to determine the time on the cube faces.  The player then 
          takes one of the skittles and covers the clock face on the board with that time.  
     • Players continue to roll the cubes and cover the clock faces rotating in a clockwise manner. 
     • If a clock face is already covered, the player who rolled loses their turn; they do not continue to 
          roll the cubes. 
     • The first player to get three of the same coloured skittles in a row wins. 
           
 
 
 
Accommodations: 
The instructional materials and activities allow access for students of varying language levels (ESL 
learners and learning abilities as follows:  
 
To increase the difficulty, you may include a third cube and label it with the following faces: 
 
                      Hour         Hour        Hour       Hour        Hour        Hour 
                       1:00        2:00        3:00       4:00        5:00         6:00 


 
This would force student to add the digital hours together e.g. 2:00+2:00=4:00.  By adding another cube 
it is allows students to practice their addition skills, and learn how to tell time beyond 6:00 on an analog 
clock.  
 
To allow your students to practice different intervals of minutes you may alternate between the cube 
used during the game and the follow cubes:  
 
                       Mins.       Mins.       Mins.        Mins.      Mins.        Mins. 
                        :00         :15         :25           :35        :45         :55 


                                                        
                      Mins.       Mins.       Mins.        Mins.      Mins.       Mins. 
                       :00         :10         :20          :30        :40         :50 


 
This game could be played similar to Bingo.  The teacher could be the one calling out the time and each 
student would have a different game card with analog clock faces on them.  The students would then 
have to locate the appropriate clock face, that match the time the teacher calls out.  Once the teacher 
has modeled the role of being the caller, he/she may wish to call upon individual students to roll the 
cube and call out the time for his/her peers to locate on their game board.   
 
Furthermore to make it more competitive, rather than having student form lines, the teacher may want 
his/her students to form certain shapes (e.g. squares, triangle etc.).  The first student to have a vertical, 
horizontal or diagonal line of three skittles, or a shape wins the game. 
 
Websites used to reinforce learning for time/measurement: 
    • The World of Measurement:  
            o http://oncampus.richmond.edu/academics/education/projects/webunits/measurement
                 /index.htm 
    • Time, Money and Measurement: 
            o http://doe.sd.gov/octa/ddn4learning/themeunits/math/time.htm 
    • AAA Math:  
            o http://www.aaaknow.com/mea.html 
 
                                                         
                                        Measurement –Bean Flick 

Curriculum Expectation: 

4m38  Grade 4 SQC2005            Mathematics  Measurement  Overall Expectations              

• estimate, measure, and record length, perimeter, area, mass, capacity, volume, and elapsed time, 
using a variety of strategies; 

How the activity works:  In this lesson, students use beans and/or bean bags to practice their estimation 
and measurement skills. 

Each student will be given a log to record their estimations and their actual records.  – Please see 
Appendix E 

Each student will flick their bean on their desk.  Once they have flicked it, they estimate how far the 
bean went (in centimeters). Next, the students use a ruler to measure how far the bean actually went. 
Lastly, the students calculate the difference between their estimation and the actual results. (Estimate‐
Actual=distance) Each student repeats this ten times. 

Accommodations: 
         An accommodation for this activity for higher grades or gifted students would be to make it a 
competition. The student who has the smallest difference between estimates and actual results wins a 
prize.  
         Students who are struggling might use non‐standard units to measure the distance of their bean 
flick (such as the length of their pencil, the lengths of their hands). For students with special needs, you 
might not use the recording page and simply flick the bean, then flick another bean and ask the student 
which one went farther.  
         An accommodation for an ESL learner would be to simply model the activity without much 
language. For example, instead of explaining that students estimate, just flick the bean and point finger 
on temple and look like you are thinking. Point with your finger the distance between the bean and you 
and say “hmmm” then write down an estimate. Show the ESL learner the ruler and count the number of 
centimetres on the ruler with them. Record the actual distance.  Show the ESL learner the math behind 
finding the difference and record the distance. 

Website: www.eduref.org/printlessons.cgi/Virtual/Lessons/Mathematics/Measurement/MEA0205.html

                                                       

                                                       

                                                       

                                                       

                                                       
                                                 Volume 

Grade Level: 4. 

Curriculum Expectation: 4m47  Grade 4 SQC2005 Mathematics  Measurement  Attributes, Units, and 
Measurement Sense   

    •   estimate, measure using concrete materials, and record volume, and relate volume to the space 
        taken up by an object (e.g., use centimetre cubes to demonstrate how much space a rectangular 
        prism takes up) (Sample problem: Build a rectangular prism using connecting cubes. Describe 
        the volume of the prism using the number of connecting cubes). 

Materials: 
Blackline Masters Included (2) See Appendices F and G 
2‐cm cubes 
Cubic centimetres 

Before:  
         You want to ensure that students understand that volume is the amount of space displaced or 
occupied. That is to say, volume is how much stuff can go into something.  It is not the ability of a 
container the hold a certain amount of something; that refers to capacity. 
         Volume is not introduced prior to the grade 4 curriculum. Therefore, it would be very important 
for the teacher to distinguish the difference between area and capacity early on and design activities 
involving area that will allow for a clearer understanding of the differences between volume and 
capacity. 

Activity: 
        Present students with a number of boxes in different sizes. Have students select two boxes and 
predict which one will hold more cubes and which will hold less cubes. Have the students estimate how 
many cubes each box will hold and have them record that number. Have them fill the containers using 
the cubes to check their prediction. Record the number of cubes.  

Alternative:  
          Have students choose a box. Then, have the students build their own boxes out of grid paper; 
making one that will hold more cubes than their first selected box and one that holds less cubes than 
their first selected box. Arrange the boxes in correct order of increasing volume.  
          For more advanced students, have students create boxes of different shapes and estimate the 
number of cubes used to fill the boxes. Alternatively, students will have to select a specific number of 
cubes and construct a box that they believe will hold their selected number of cubes.  

         

         

         
                                               References 
National Council of Teachers of Mathematics. Dacey L., Cavanagh M., Findell, C.R., Greene, C. E., Jensen                                
Sheffield, L., and Small, M. (2005). Navigating through measurement in Prekindergarten to grade 2.  
Reston, VA: Author.    
Ontario Ministry of Education. (2005). The Ontario curriculum, grades 1‐8: Mathematics (Revised). 
Toronto, ON: 

Reys, R., Linquist, M., Lambdin, D., Smith, N., & Suydam, M. (2003). Helping children learn mathematics 
(7th ed.). Hoboken, NJ: Wiley. 

Small, M. (2008). Making math meaningful to Canadian students, K‐8. Toronto, ON: Nelson. 
Queen's Printer for Ontario. 

Tuck, B. (2005). Measurement.  North Bay:  Near North Educational Services. 

                                                           
                                                           
                                                           
                                                           
                                                           
                                                           
                                                           
                                                           
                                                           
                                                           
                                                           
                                                           
                                                           
                                                           
                                                           
                                                           
                                                           
                                                           
                                                           
                                                           
                                                           
              
              
              
              
              
              
              
              
              
             
             
        Appendices 
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

              
 

     
Appendix A 




               
Appendix B 




               
  Appendix C 


        

Always on Time! 

        

        

        

        

        

        

        

        

        

        

        

        

        

        

        

        

        

        

        

        

        

        

        
Appendix D 


      

      
Appendix E 




               

      

      

      

      

      
Appendix F 


      

      




               

      

      

      

      
Appendix G 




               

								
To top