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AP English 12 (AP English Literature and Composition) - PDF by uda13689

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									AP English 12 (AP English Literature and Composition)                     Mr. David E Lyons
Third Trimester lessons                                                   Fourth and Fifth hours

AP Curricular Requirements for the third trimester:
   a. ASW write interpretations of teacher selected pieces from multi genre and from different centuries
       and locales in the world, focusing on stylistic elements, literary devices, and social / historical /
       cultural context.
   b. ASW present argumentative and critical problem / solution ―essay‖ to explain judgments on social
       and cultural values from around the world.
   c. ASW be required to do careful, deliberative reading that yields multiple meanings of teacher-
       selected texts.
   d. ASW confer with instructor to revise writing, including appropriate sentence structure, using
       subordination and coordination.
                                      Week 1
Monday 1 March 2010 ASW inferentially read Donne’s piece.
  1. Tutorial on Donne’s piece (Poetry / Prose Analysis #1 , due at the beginning of
     the hour tomorrow)
  2. Expectations and exhortations for the third trimester: Frame semester’s work,
     including Fridays as work days.
  3. Process and dismissal

Tuesday 2 March 2010 ASW read carefully and deliberatively for multiple meanings of
teacher-selected story.
   1. On laptops, sign on to and register, if you need to, on
      http://www.collegeboard.com/student/testing/ap/english_lit/samp.html?englit
   2. Complete multiple choice test, and grade yourself
   3. Process and dismissal

Wednesday 3 March 2010 ASW read carefully and deliberatively for multiple meanings
of teacher-selected story.
1. Pass out Story-Wallah books. Read critically and carefully Sam Selvon’s ―Cane Is
Bitter‖ (pages 15-28) [Trinidad Hindi Indian, ca. 1978] in Story-Wallah, Short Fiction
from South Asian Writers.
2. Den4 brain break: Flex’m! -- Flexible artwork (abstract representation of the themes
or the character relationships in a text). This can be done either pictorially or
kinesthetically.
3. Process and dismissal

Thursday 4 March 2010 ASW write in timed setting
1. Timed essay # 20 (40 minutes, 4-6 paragraphs, at least 2 big paragraphs) In a well-
organized essay, discuss what commentary Selvon has to make about education’s
effect on oppressed cultures.
2. Plus and wish for self [one sentence about what you think the purpose of planning for
your timed essay is, one sentence about how you are teaching yourself to read more
connotatively]
3. Den4 brain break: It’s a nuSeason, our last together in the nuDen. Father is going
back to olSkool.
4. Process & dismissal


                                                                                                          1
Friday 5 March 2010ASW ASW peer review drafts of portfolio piece
1. Work stations in the Den (during the hour you must get to two of the four stations)
    a. Peer conversations about draft of one of the portfolio pieces
    b. Tutorial about Nadia Tueni’s ―In the Lebanese Mountains‖ (Lebanon, 1980)
    c. Student teacher conferences about writing and critical reading
    d. Independent work on poetry analyses, research presentation, or portfolio pieces

2. By the end of the block, one of the children will stamp your first draft of your portfolio
piece. When you hand in your portfolio on or before Thursday 29 April 2010, you will
design a cover for it. I have extra folders in the classroom; if you need one, just ask.
Consider how you want to represent yourself on the cover.
3. Process and dismissal

                                       Week 2
Monday 8 March 2010 ASW complete a portion of a multiple choice test so we can
reflect on types of questions.
    1. Complete Passage 1 (Cyril and Vivian) of 1999 AP Lit. multiple choice test
    2. Dialogue about types of questions
    3. Process and dismissal

Tuesday 9 March 2010 ASW read carefully and deliberatively for multiple meanings of
teacher-selected story. [I will likely be monitoring the juniors’ MME]
   1. Collect Poetry Analysis # 2 (Tueni) at the beginning of the hour.
   2. On laptops, sign on and complete and grade yourself on multiple choice test on
      http://apcentral.collegeboard.com/apc/members/exam/exam_questions/2002.htm
      l
   3. Process and dismissal

Wednesday 10 March 2010 {I will likely be proctoring the juniors’ MME) ASW read
carefully and deliberatively for multiple meanings of teacher-selected story.
   1. Read critically and carefully Mena Abdullah’s ―The Time of the Peacock‖ (pages
       29-37) [Australia, 1930]] in Story-Wallah, Short Fiction from South Asian Writers.
   2. Den4 brain break: Flex’m! -- Flexible artwork (abstract representation of the
       themes or the character relationships in a text). This can be done either
       pictorially or kinesthetically.
   3. Reading skill: the piling of detail, the parceling of detail [go through text to look
       at syntax’s influence on meaning]
   4. Process and dismissal

Thursday 11 March 2010 ASW write in timed setting.{I will likely be monitoring the
juniors’ MME]
          1. Timed essay # 21 (40 minutes, 4-6 paragraphs, at least two long
              paragraphs)
           In a well-organized essay, analyze how Abdullah uses the peacock to
          characterize the fragmented identity of the narrator.



                                                                                                2
          2. Plus and wish for self
          3. Process and dismissal

Friday 12 March 2010 ASW peer review rough draft of portfolio
1. Work stations in the Den (during the hour you must get to two of the four stations)
    a. Peer conversations about draft of one of the portfolio pieces
    b. Tutorial about Rabindranath Tagore’s ―Lord of My Life‖ (India, 1916)
    c. Student teacher conferences about writing and critical reading
    d. Independent work on prose analyses, research project, or portfolio pieces
2. By the end of the block, one of the children will stamp your first draft of your portfolio
piece.
3. Process and dismissal
                                          Week 3
Monday 15 March 2010 ASW practice multiple choice tests.
    1. Complete Passage 2 (Dickinson’s poem) of 1999 AP Lit. exam
    2. Reflect on types of questions and types of skills
    3. Process and dismissal

Tuesday 16 March 2010 ASW read and discuss interpretations of the story.
   1. Collect Poetry Analysis # 3 (Tagore) at the beginning of the hour.
   2. Sign on and read hints of how to complete multiple choice tests on
      http://teachers.sduhsd.k12.ca.us/sfarris/Files/AP%20Lit%20Files/AP%20Test%2
      0Prep/AP%20MC%20Test%20InfoPDF.pdf
   3. Process and dismissal

Wednesday 17 March 2010 ASW read and discuss interpretations of the story
  1. Read critically and carefully Bharati Mukherjee’s ―The Management of Grief‖
     (pages 91-108) [India, 1940] in Story-Wallah, Short Fiction from South Asian
     Writers.
  2. Den4 brain break: Flex’m! -- Flexible artwork (abstract representation of the
     themes or the character relationships in a text). This can be done either
     pictorially or kinesthetically.
  3. Reading skill: the piling of detail, the parceling of detail [go through text to look
     at syntax’s influence on meaning]
  4. Process and dismissal

Thursday 18 March 2010 {Mr. Lyons is doing district curriculum work].
   1. Timed essay # 22 (40 minutes) In a well-organized essay, analyze how
      Mukherjee creates the theme of the piece through dialogue and scenes.
   2. Plus and wish for course
   3. Process and dismissal

Friday 19 March 2010 ASW peer review rough draft of portfolio.
1. Work stations in the Den (during the hour you must get to two of the four stations)
       a. Peer conversations about draft of one of the portfolio pieces
       b. Tutorial of Nathalie Handal’s ―Bethlehem‖ (Palestine, 2001)



                                                                                                3
       c. Student teacher conferences about writing and critical reading
       d. Independent work on poem and prose analyses, research presentation, or
       portfolio pieces
2. By the end of the block, one of the children will stamp your first draft of your portfolio
piece.
3. Process and dismissal

                                          Week 4
Monday 22 March 2010 ASW peer review rough draft of portfolio.
1. Work stations in the Den (during the hour you must get to two of the four stations)
       a. Peer conversations about draft of one of the portfolio pieces
       b. Tutorial of Wong Phui Nam’s from ―How the Hills Are Distant‖ (Malaysia, 1989)
       c. Student teacher conferences about writing and critical reading
       d. Independent work on poem and prose analyses, research presentation, or
       portfolio pieces
2. By the end of the block, one of the children will stamp your first draft of your portfolio
piece.
3. Process and dismissal

Tuesday 23 March 2010 ASW participate in reading exercise
1. Collect Poetry Analysis # 4 (Handal) at the beginning of the hour
2. Sign on and complete multiple choice test on
http://www.myteacherpages.com/webpages/omalley/files/c392b807627dd074263e290e
ea263f57.PDF
3. Process and dismissal

Wednesday 24 March 2010 ASW participate in reading and interpreting of story
1. Read K. S. Maniam’s ―Haunting the Tiger‖ (pages 109-120) [Malaysia, 1942]
2. Den4 brain break: Flex’m!
3. Process and dismissal

Thursday 25 March 2010 ASW write in timed setting
1. Timed essay # 23 (40 minutes, 4-6 paragraphs, at least 2 have to be long)
In a well organized essay, consider the narrator’s point of view when characterizing the
―old man.‖
2. Plus and wish for self
3. Den4 brain break: What I am is what I am and what you are is … Edie Brickell and
the New Bohemians, class-ic
4. Process and dismissal
                                         Week 5
Monday 29 March 2010 ASW peer review rough draft of portfolio.
1. Work stations in the Den (during the hour you must get to two of the four stations)
       a. Peer conversations about draft of one of the portfolio pieces
       b. Tutorial of Sharron Hass’ ―How Many Times We Want to Go Home‖ (Israel,
       1988)
       c. Student teacher conferences about writing and critical reading



                                                                                                4
       d. Independent work on poem and prose analyses, research presentation, or
       portfolio pieces
2. By the end of the block, one of the children will stamp your first draft of your portfolio
piece.
3. Process and dismissal

Tuesday 30 March 2010 ASW read for social and historical value
   1. Collect Poetry Analysis # 5 (Phui Nam) at the beginning of the hour.
   2. Go to sparknotes.com and register; then look for AP English Literature practice
      multiple choice test, take it and grade yourself
   3. Process and dismissal

Wednesday 31 March 2010 ASW read and discuss the story
  1. Read Numair Choudhury’s ―Chokra‖ (pages 425-428) [Bangladesh, 1975]
  2. Den4 brain break: Flex’m!
  3. Read story again for foreshadowing
  4. Process and dismissal

Thursday 1 April 2010 {April Fools’ Day] ASW write timed essay
   1. Timed essay # 24 (40 minutes, 4-6 paragraphs, at least 2 must be long)
    Analyze how the narrator’s epiphany affects her outlook on life.
   2. Plus and wish for course
   3. Den4 brain break: living in a box
   4. Process and dismissal

Friday 2 April through Sunday 11 April 2010 Spring break
As you near the end of your senior year, may my love and prayers surround you and
guide you as you grow into young adulthood, especially this Easter. Love, Mr. Lyons

                                      Week 6
Monday 12 April 2010 ASW read carefully and deliberatively for multiple meanings of
teacher-selected poem.
      1. Read and mark the following poem -- ―Ode: Intimations of Immortality‖
          William Wordsworth (England, 1802-1804) [packet 101-103]
      2. Reduction for Wordsworth’s poem in teams of 3-5
      3. Den4 brain break: Down in the valley, or eye 2 eye contact
      4. Process and dismissal (sign up for final exam presentations)

Tuesday 13 April 2010ASW read deliberatively for textual detail
   1. Poetry Analysis # 6 (Hass) due at the beginning of the hour
   2. Go to mel.org and register. Make up a driver’s license number if you do not
      have one. Go to tests, and find AP English Literature, take it and grade yourself.
   3. Process and dismissal




                                                                                                5
Wednesday 14 April 2010 [I will be gone, working with the Honor Society Induction
Ceremony] ASW work on portfolios
   1. Students will have the hour to work on piece # 6 of portfolio, but will peer review
       it tomorrow.
   [Honor Society students will be dismissed at 2: 30 PM to practice in the auditorium.]
   2. Process and dismissal
Thursday 15 April 2010 ASW write timed essay (Mr. Lyons is doing curriculum work for
the district)
   1. Timed essay # 25 [The Last!] (40 minutes, at least 4 paragraphs, 2 long and 2
       medium)
       Read carefully William Wordsworth’s ―Ode: Intimations of Immortality‖: (England,
       1802-1804). Then, in a well-organized essay, discuss how Wordsworth uses
       language to create his attitude toward maturity. In your analysis, you may wish
       to consider such literary elements as syntax, shifts in tone, and point of view.
   2. Plus and wish for the self
   3. Process and dismissal

Friday 16 April 2010 ASW peer review
1. Work stations in the Den (during the hour you must get to two of the four stations)
a. Peer conversations about draft of one of the portfolio piece
b. Tutorial of William Blake’s ―The Couch of Death‖ (England, 1809)
c. Student teacher conferences about writing and critical reading
d. Independent work on poem analyses, research presentation, or portfolio pieces
2. By the end of the block, one of the children will stamp your first draft of your portfolio
piece.
3. Process and dismissal

                                      Week 7
Monday 19 April 2010 ASW participate in student led problem solution presentations.
  1. Work day in the Den: Prepare for A Decent Proposal presentations (2 each hour
     each day)


   2. Audience members: Please note that you are not excused from attending the
      presentations before or after you give your own. Your participation grade for the
      marking period is based upon your attentive listening and your deliberate
      questions and answers in the discussion portion of the presentation. If you are
      excused absent or school-related absent, you will write a page, single space,
      response to the presenters’ topics, addressing your solution to their problem they
      present. If you are suspended or unexcused absent, you will do the same for
      credit, not a grade.
   3. Process and dismissal

Tuesday 20 April 2010 ASW participate in student led problem solution presentations.
   1. Poetry Analysis # 7 (Blake) due at the beginning of the hour
    2. A Decent Proposal presentations (2 each hour each day)



                                                                                                6
   3. Process and dismissal

Wednesday 21 April 2010 ASW participate in student led problem solution
presentations.
   1. A Decent Proposal presentations (2 each hour each day)
   2. Process and dismissal

Thursday 22 April 2010 ASW participate in student led problem solution presentations.
   1. A Decent Proposal presentations (2 each hour each day)
   2. Process and dismissal

Friday 23 April 2010 ASW participate in student led problem solution presentations.
    1. A Decent Proposal presentations (2 each hour each day)
    2. Process and dismissal
                                         Week 8
Monday 26 April 2010 ASW work on portfolios
    1. Work day in the Den! (portfolio pieces, prose analysis or timed essay rewrites)
    2. Process and dismissal

Tuesday 27 April 2010 ASW participate in student led problem solution presentations
1. A Decent Proposal presentations (2 each hour)
2. Process and dismissal

Wednesday 28 April 2010ASW participate in student led problem solution
presentations.
   1. A Decent Proposal presentations (2 each hour each day)
   2. Process and dismissal

Thursday 29 April 2010 ASW participate in presentations.
   1. College Writing Portfolio due at the beginning of the hour. With your
      portfolio, you will include a cover. I have extra folders in the classroom; if
      you need one, just ask. Consider how you want to represent yourself on
      the cover.
   2. A Decent Proposal presentations (2 each hour)
   3. Process and dismissal

Friday 30 April 2010 ASW participate in student led problem solution presentations.
    1. A Decent Proposal presentations (2 each hour)
    2. Process and dismissal

                                     Week 9
Monday 3 May 2010 ASW participate in student led problem solution presentations
  1. A Decent Proposal presentations (2 each hour each day)
  2. Process and dismissal




                                                                                         7
Tuesday 4 May 2010 ASW participate in student led problem solution presentations.
   1. A Decent Proposal presentations (2 each hour each day)
   2. Letter of Farewell to Mr. Lyons and the Den (1 page, single spaced) due at the
      end of the hour
   3. Process and dismissal

Wednesday 5 May 2010 ASW participate in student led problem solution presentations
  1. A Decent Proposal presentations (2 each hour each day)
  2. Process and dismissal

Thursday 6 May 2010 ASW participate in student led problem solution presentations.
AP ENGLISH LITERATURE EXAM 8:00 AM TO NOON
   1. A Decent Proposal presentations (2 each hour each day)
   2. Process and dismissal

Friday 7 May 2010 ASW participate in student led problem solution presentations.
    1. A Decent Proposal presentations (2 each hour each day)
    2. Process and dismissal
                                       Week 10
Monday 10 May 2010 ASW participate in student led problem solution presentations
    1. A Decent Proposal presentations (2 each hour each day)
    2. Process and dismissal

Tuesday 11 May 2010 ASW participate in student led problem solution presentations
   1. A Decent Proposal presentations (2 each hour each day)
   2. Process and dismissal

Wednesday 12 May 2010 ASW participate in student led problem solution presentations
  1. A Decent Proposal presentations (2 each hour each day)
  2Process and dismissal

Thursday 13 May 2010 ASW participate in student led problem solution presentations
   1 A Decent Proposal presentations (2 each hour each day)
   2. Process and dismissal

Friday 14 May 2010 ASW participate in student led problem solution presentations
    1. A Decent Proposal presentations (2 each hour each day)
    2. Process and dismissal

FOR SENIORS WHO ARE GRADUATING, THIS IS THE END OF THE Third Trimester.
ALL REWRITES AND ANY WORK THAT YOU INTEND TO HAVE COUNTED
TOWARD YOUR GRADE FOR THE Third trimester IS DUE BY 3: 30 pm on FRIDAY 14
MAY 2010.




                                                                                       8
                                    Week 11
                                 Seniors’ Exams
Monday 17 May 2010 ASW participate in student led problem solution presentations.
  1. A Decent Proposal presentations (2 presentations)
  2. Process and dismissal

Tuesday 18 May 2010 ASW who do not earn an A for the third trimester will give an oral
reflection on the skills and the ideas they have learned in AP English)
    1. All students who do not earn an A for third trimester will give a 90 second
        reflection on what skills and ideas they will take with them from AP English.
    2. The Benediction to my Fourteenth-Born: Souls Never Hide Light
    3. Process and dismissal

As of this writing, the district has not selected exam dates for the seniors. In the case
that the district selects dates after those above, the lessons for Tuesday 18 May 2010
will be moved to the exam dates. In the meantime, we will read and discuss Nelson
Mandela’s A Long Walk to Freedom (South Africa, 1992).

Senior Honors Awards is scheduled for Wednesday 26 May 2010 at 7: 00 PM on the
Creston Auditorium. Please arrive with your cap and gown, and with honor society
memorabilia, by 6: 30 PM to line up outside the cafeteria.

Graduation is scheduled for 7: 30 PM on Saturday 5 June 2010 at Houseman Field. In
case of rain, it will be held in the Creston gymnasium.



                           Seven Poetry / Prose Analyses
                          AP English 12     Third trimester

For each of the seven pieces below, write a response that analyzes and surmises the
points of these authors from around the world. When the AP examiners ask you to write
a thorough and apt fifth level analysis of the piece, they are asking you to write between
four and seven paragraphs, with at least two of them being long, at least two of them
being medium length. You must include direct quotes in each analysis. The AP English
Literature exam is Thursday 6 May 2010 in the morning.

     1. from John Donne’s Devotions upon Emergent Occasions (England, 1624)
   Atque annuit Ille,
   Qui, per eos, clamat, Linquas
    jam, Lazare, lectum.

   {God prospers their practise,
   and he, by them, calls
   Lazarus out of his tombe, mee
   out of my bed.}



                                                                                            9
                                     XXI. MEDITATION
IF MAN had beene left alone in this world, at first, shall I thinke, that he would not
have fallen? If there had beene no Woman, would not man have served, to have
beene his own Tempter? When I see him now, subject to infinite weaknesses, fall
into infinite sinne, without any forraine tentations, shall I thinke, hee would have had
none, if hee had beene alone? God saw that Man needed a Helper, if hee should
bee well; but to make Woman ill, the Devill saw, that there needed no third. When
God, and wee were alone, in Adam, that was not enough; when the Devill and wee
were alone, in Eve, it was enough. O what a Giant is Man, when he fights against
himselfe, and what a Dwarfe when hee needs, or exercises his owne assistance for
himselfel I cannot rise out of my bed, till the Physitian enable mee, nay I cannot tel,
that I am able to rise, till hee tell me so. I doe nothing, I know nothing of myselfe:
how little, and how impotent a peece of the world, is any Man alone! and how much
lesse a peece of himselfe is that Man! So little, as that when it falls out, (as it falls out
in some cases) that more misery, and more oppression, would be an ease to a man,
he cannot give himselfe that miserable addition, of more misery; a man that is
pressed to death, and might be eased by more weights, cannot lay those more
weights upon himselfe: Hee can sinne alone, and suffer alone, but not repent, not
bee absolved, without another. Another tels mee, I may rise; and I doe so. But is
every raising a preferment? or is every present Preferment a station? I am readier to
fall to the Earth, now I am up, than I was when I lay in the bed: O perverse way,
irregular motion of Man; even rising it selfe is the way to Ruine. How many men are
raised, and then doe not fill the place they are raised to? No corner of any place can
bee empty; there can be no vacuity; If that Man doe not fill the place, other men will;
complaints of his insufficiency will fill it; Nay, such an abhorring is there in Nature, of
vacuity, that if there be but an imagination of not filling, in any man, that which is but
imagination neither, will fill it, that is rumor and voice, and it will be given out, (upon
no ground, but Imagination, and no man knowes whose imagination) that hee is
corrupt in his place, or insufficient in his place, and another prepared to succeed him
in his place. A man rises, sometimes, and stands not, because hee doth not, or is
not beleeved to fill his place; and sometimes he stands not, because hee overfills his
place: Hee may bring so much vertue, so much Justice, so much integrity to the
place, as shall spoile the place, burthen the place; his integrity may bee a Libell
upon his Predecessor, and cast an infamy upon him, and a burthen upon his
successor, to proceede by example, and to bring the place itselfe to an under-value,
and the market to an uncertainty. I am up, and I seeme to stand, and I goe round;
and I am a new Argument of the new Philosophie, That the Earth moves round; why
may I not beleeve, that the whole earth moves in a round motion, though that seeme
to mee to stand, when as I seeme to stand to my Company, and yet am carried, in a
giddy, and circular motion, as I stand? Man hath no center but misery; there and
onely there, hee is fixt, and sure to finde himselfe. How little soever hee bee raised,
he moves, and moves in a circle, giddily; and as in the Heavens, there are but a few
Circles, that goe about the whole world, but many Epicircles, and other lesser
Circles, but yet Circles, so of those men, which are raised, and put into Circles, few
of them move from place to place, and passe through many and beneficiall places,
but fall into little Circles, and, within a step or two, are at their end, and not so well,



                                                                                          10
   as they were in the Center, from which they were raised. Every thing serves to
   exemplifies to illustrate mans misery. But I need goe no farther, than my selfe: for a
   long time, I was not able to rise; At last, I must bee raised by others; and now I am
   up, I am ready to sinke lower than before.

     2. Nadia Tueni’s ―In the Lebanese Mountains‖ (Lebanon, 1980)

   Blossoms and patterns grow here.
   Words have the scent of roses.
   At the touch of a hand some secrets escape,
   and the wind in the cypresses remembers a lost love.
   From the wiles of its passageways,
   Beit-Eddine spies on its valley.
   Its walls have wept colors,
   and its ceilings sway like fountaining water.
   Mornings and ruthless moonlight sleep here.
   When something swarms in a courtyard's nook,
   it seems like an arcade in shadow
   or a flight of birds forgotten by light in the gardens.

     3. Rabindranath Tagore’s ―Lord of My Life‖ (India, 1916)

   Thou who art the innermost Spirit of my being,
   art thou pleased, Lord of my Life?
   For I give to thee my cup filled with all
   the pain and delight that the crushed
   grapes of my heart had surrendered,
   I wove with rhythm of colors and song cover for thy bed,
   And with the molten gold of my desires
   I fashioned playthings for thy passing hours.
   I know not why thou chosest me for thy partner,
   Lord of my life.

Didst thou store my days and nights,
my deeds and dreams for the alchemy of thy art,
and string in the chain of thy music my songs of autumn and spring,
and gather the flowers from my mature moments for thy crown?

I see thine eyes gazing at the dark of my heart,
Lord of my life,
I wonder if my failure and wrongs are forgiven.
For many were my days without service
and nights of forgetfulness; futile were the flowers
that faded in the shade not offered to thee.




                                                                                        11
Often the tied strings of my lute slackened
at the strains of thy tunes.
And often at the ruin of wasted hours
my desolate evenings were filled with tears.

But have my days come to their end at last,
Lord of my life, while my arms round thee
grow limp, my kisses losing their truth?
Then break up the meeting of this languid day!*
Renew the old in me in fresh forms of delight;
and let the wedding come once again in
a new ceremony of life.

      4. Nathalie Handal’s ―Bethlehem‖ (Palestine, 2001)

     Secrets live in the space between our footsteps.
     The words of my grandfather echo in my dream,
     as the years keep his beads and town.
     I see Bethlehem, all in dust, empty
     a torn piece of newspaper lost in its narrow streets.
     Where is everyone? Graffiti and stones answer.
     Where is the real Bethlehem—the one my grandfather came from?
     Handkerchiefs dry the pain from my hands.
     Olive trees and tears continue to remember.
     I walk until I reach an old Arab man dressed in a white robe.
     Aren't you the man I saw in my grandfather's stories?
     He looks at me and leaves. I follow—ask him why he is going? He continues.
     I stop, turn around, realize, he has left me secrets between his footsteps.

      5. Wong Phui Nam’s from ―How the Hills Are Distant‖ (Malaysia, 1989)
ix

Broken off from their daily pre-occupations,
the streets on Sunday settle into their presences of stone.
Houses under a manic sun put up their distressed faces,
and trees along the edges of a public lot
die quietly into themselves. The city, white with dust,
has lain too long in the sun of its own inconsequence.
It is withered of saving dreams, its places
of our local habitation lie exposed,
unprotected by the blessings of spirits
from malevolent presences that lurk
under the gloom of trees in neglected gardens,
by old houses, and at odd corners of the town’s back streets.
That saving dreams should die, withered
from the places where we would walk,



                                                                                   12
the buildings carry symptoms of our particular hell.
We are a people grown querulous of good news,
while no good news can come of this ill season.
You who would yet be prophets, who look for signs
and starve in a wilderness of stone, there are only boulders
drowning in pits here of worked out mining leases.
From the main street of the town,
see how the hills are distant, locked in their silences.

x

Too long about this neighbourhood has palled
the mind to reaches of the suburban rail track
bearing trains to nearby and expected places.
In this climate of our beliefs, the landscape settles
into a featureless grey and rust of blukar and laterite
that see no flowering even under mild rain.
Once, coming to these suburbs by night, the heart
was crowded as all the public houses in the town,
the streets uneasy at the coming of a strange birth.
Terror then was real as the helter-skelter in the streets
and the uproar in resisting the king’s soldiery at the door.
The weather out here has drained all passions
that move upheavals preceding promise, preceding redemption.
After the violence, one becomes merely fretful
and eyes the neighbour’s wife. On a clear night,
the houses show up homely behind their hedges.
Driving on the roads that aimlessly lead
from one to another, there is with me the strange beast,
somnolent and indifferent to the stars that ignite
heart’s phosphorus, disintegrating towards the west.

xi

I watched the dawn flowering out of a long wound
in the sky’s side. Across the anguish of rooftops,
a few trees lighten from shadow into the hardness of day,
their branches and their leaves metal against my heart
still raw from dream. At my window, I watched
a scattering of swifts spiral, tugging against tentacles
in the streaks of cloud, and I too was unwilling for the dawn –
when I must feel discovered like the city, its fastnesses, drains
open, delineated like veins. In the blood of the people’s sleep,
the beast turned over on its side and groaned.

As the hour struggled towards fruition in the sun,



                                                                    13
buildings grew tall with my oppression, and I thought
of the many recalled, the broken and the poor in spirit
scoured from the yielding womb of darkness.
I knew there was weeping, secret by the cataracts of the heart,
that has nothing of the sadness of rivers and small rain,
mist making lyric all the low trees in the field,
the heart admitting only a purgatory paved of our familiar streets,
columns and walls of buildings lit, harsh in the devouring sun.

     6. Sharron Hass’ ―How Many Times We Want to Go Home‖ (Israel, 1988)
How many times during the voyage
do we want to go home?
Slowly the gates of night open
the gate of the sleeping animals that gallop in their dream
and the gate of the mirror where the eye sees the back
and the mouth turns to stone.

Slowly a ship goes out into the night
strewn with light and pearls through
our manifest lives of profit and loss it carries
some sad splendor of a promise impossible to keep.

Were we to gaze fearlessly at the radiant eye
were we to kiss without betraying the longing mouth
perhaps we could rest like a leaf in its green border
Something mighty that has no place or time

has broken off from within us and hovers now
in a mirage of light that turns to pearl
and motion
everything we offered that was not taken
and what was offered that we flinched from touching
is held in the ship that glides
on the web where sky meets sea.

How many times during the voyage do we want to go home!
To reinhabit the reflection we left in the armchair
to give it the pearl that turns into light
and the passion that neither seeks repose nor draws
from the black blood proofs of loneliness, but leaves it to flow
like the gold, that once gushed free of greed, in the rivers.

     7. William Blake’s ―The Couch of Death‖ (England, 1809)
   The veiled Evening walked solitary down the western hills, and Silence reposed in
   the valley; the birds of day were heard in their nests, rustling in brakes and thickets;
   and the owl and bat flew round the darkening trees: all is silent when Nature takes



                                                                                          14
her repose. -- In former times, on such an evening, when the cold clay breathed with
life, and our ancestors, who now sleep in their graves, walked on the steadfast
globe, the remains of a family of the tribes of Earth, a mother and a sister, were
gathered to the sick bed of a youth. Sorrow linked them together; leaning on one
another's necks alternately 1000 -- like lilies dropping tears in each other's bosom --
they stood by the bed like reeds bending over a lake, when the evening drops trickle
down. His voice was low as the whisperings of the woods when the wind is asleep,
and the visions of Heaven unfold their visitation. `Parting is hard and death is
terrible; I seem to walk through a deep valley, far from the light of day, alone and
comfortless! The damps of death fall thick upon me! Horrors stare me in the face! I
look behind, there is no returning; Death follows after me; I walk in regions of Death,
where no tree is, without a lantern to direct my steps, without a staff to support me.'
Thus he laments through the still evening, till the curtains of darkness were drawn.
Like the sound of a broken pipe, the aged woman raised her voice. `O my son, my
son, I know but little of the path thou goest! But lo! there is a God, who made the
world; stretch out thy hand to Him.' The youth replied, like a voice heard from a
sepulchre, `My hand is feeble, how should I stretch it out? My ways are sinful, how
should I raise mine eyes? My voice hath used deceit, how should I call on Him who
is Truth? My breath is loathsome, how should He not be offended? If I lay my face in
the dust, the grave opens its mouth for me; if I lift up my head, sin covers me as a
cloak. O my dear friends, pray ye for me! Stretch forth your hands that my Helper
may come! Through the void space I walk, between the sinful world and eternity!
Beneath me burns eternal fire! O for a hand to pluck me forth!' As the voice of an
omen heard in the silent valley, when the few inhabitants cling trembling together; as
the voice of the Angel of Death, when the thin beams of the moon give a faint light,
such was this young man's voice to his friends. Like the bubbling waters of the brook
in the dead of night, the aged woman raised her cry, and said, `O Voice, that
dwellest in my breast, can I not cry, and lift my eyes to Heaven? Thinking of this, my
spirit is turned within me into confusion! O my child, my child, is thy breath infected?
so is mine. As the deer wounded, by the brooks of water, so the arrows of sin stick in
my flesh; the poison hath entered into my marrow.' Like rolling waves upon a desert
shore, sighs succeeded sighs; they covered their faces and wept. The youth lay
silent, his mother's arm was under his head; he was like a cloud tossed by the
winds, till the sun shine, and the drops of rain glisten, the yellow harvest breathes,
and the thankful eyes of the villagers are turned up in smiles. The traveller, that hath
taken shelter under an oak, eyes the distant country with joy. Such smiles were seen
upon the face of the youth: a visionary hand wiped away his tears, and a ray of light
beamed around his head. All was still. The moon hung not out her lamp, and the
stars faintly glimmered in the summer sky; the breath of night slept among the
leaves of the forest; the bosom of the lofty hill drank in the silent dew, while on his
majestic brow the voice of Angels is heard, and stringed sounds ride upon the wings
of night. The sorrowful pair lift up their heads, hovering Angels are around them,
voices of comfort are heard over the Couch of Death, and the youth breathes out his
soul with joy into eternity.




                                                                                     15
   The following eight pieces are the pieces you will include in
 the College Writing Portfolio, due at the beginning of the hour
                    on Thursday, 29 April 2010.

                The World According to a Graduating Polar Bear:
             Ruminations on the Meaning of Life – a piece for your portfolio

ASSIGNMENT: For as familiar as you are with John Irving’s Garp or Monty Python’s
The Meaning of Life or famous Lyonsisms, such as ―If you can fling it, don’t sing it‖ and
―Sometimes the peanuts don’t crunch in crunchy peanut butter. Life be like that,
y’know,‖ this personal essay is not a clichéd view of others’ views on the world, on the
meaning of existence. It is your rumination on how you have come to view your world
as you do. Furthermore, it invites you to envision how you are going to enable change
in this world.

PURPOSE: As one of the graduating tenets in the GRPS vision statement, its
education is supposed to mold you to be thoughtful and benefiting members of the
world society. The simultaneously philosophical and personal meditation on the state of
your current views of the world at large and in microcosm articulates the ideal of its
purpose.

WRITER‖S ROLE: It is a personal reflective essay, not a narrative reflective essay.
Even though you will anchor your opinions with memories, with readings, with sidebar
conversations you have had at lunch, your opinion is distinct. In narrative-reflective
writing, you overlook your opinion for the sake of the story.

AUDIENCE: For every single piece in your portfolio, you are writing to a distinct and
different audience, written on the final draft of each piece. For this one, you may wish to
choose a political or religious world leader.

FORM: The final draft (5-7 pages, APA formatting and pagination) must be typed or
word-processed in Times New Roman, Courier New or similar font, 12 font size, with 1
― margins. The rough draft may be typed or handwritten (3-5 pages). If you do not
show revision between drafts, you lose one point on your score. Since this is a
personal essay, you may use dead words.

EVALUATION: Please consult the holistic scoring rubric below.
  9 The essays that earn the score of 9 do so because of their overall effect. They
     highlight the hallmarks of secure writing: fluency, insight, and examples all
     enhance the meaning of the whole.
  8 The essays that earn the score of 8 do so because of their overall effect. In
     recognition that writers make choices in detail and in form to create a tone of an
     essay, these essays follow the protocol of personal reflective essays, but use
     detail and form to create a deliberate tone and message. The opinion, stated
     implicitly somewhere in the essay, is distinctly insightful about the contradictory
     rationale for holding it. These essays’ anchored and apt examples (7 or more)


                                                                                         16
     illuminate the writer’s purpose for ruminating on the what has brought the writer
     to this point of view about the world at large and the world in microcosm (usually
     in own life); Rather than listing an implausible plan as to how this writer will
     enable change in the world, these essays analyze the subtext of the problems
     (the unspoken parts of the problems), do not blame or shame, but reclaim and
     empower. The use of standard personal American English embellishes the piece
     as a whole.
   7 The essays that earn the score of 7 do so because of their overall effect. Sevens
     skim the subtext of the problems, and tend to list pedestrial reasons for making a
     change. By relying on cliché, they disable a true rumination on the purpose for
     life. They will include 5 or more anchored and apt examples, but they do not
     infer from the examples to articulate the contradictory rationale for the opinion
     they have formed. Surely, the opinion is present, explicitly stated in a single
     sentence that looks like a thesis in a formal essay. Because this essay is
     personal and philosophical, reflective by nature, it requires more subtlety. The
     use of personal standard American English enriches the essay.
   6 The essays that earn the score of 6 do so because of their overall effect. Sixes
     do not push forth the main point. The opinion is present and the examples are
     present, but they do not dig into the inferential subtext of the examples. The use
     of personal standard American English does not distract from the essay as a
     whole.
   5 The essays that earn a score of 5 do so because of their overall effect. Fives
     read like middle school reports on the something in life. The vocabulary is not
     mature, the examples hang in the paragraphs with no real dissection of thought,
     and the opinion is overtly cliché and common.

PROCEDURE: The following steps serve as a guide:
  1. Percolating: You are taking your view of the world and making a reduction just
     as you did for the novels last fall.
  2. Drafting: Experiment and explore form and content. Every paragraph does not
     have to have 10 sentences. What if your opinion is implicitly stated in an
     anecdote from your life near the end of the essay? What if the examples come
     from (re-spectful) thoughts you have had in your head for many years? What if
     you begin with a poem you wrote in seventh grade?
  3. Peer conversation (3 signatures and date of review): Your peers are going to
     assist you in creating a personal reflective essay that represents you. If you
     draw a picture or import a picture, it does count toward the page-length, but it
     may fit.
  4. Re-drafting: The essay must show revision as part of your grade. Move ideas
     around. Try different beginnings and endings.
  5. On the day the portfolio is due, you must hand in 2 drafts & 3 peer signatures.




                                                                                    17
                               The Pathos of Epiphany
                          A portfolio piece for third trimester

ASSIGNMENT: As you enter young adulthood, you have lived long enough to have
experienced a single situation, or a chain of events, that changed the way you looked
at the world, as a whole, or changed the way you perceive yourself, as a part of it.
Blake would refer to it as the pathos in losing Innocence, but his Innocence
complemented his Knowledge. Wordsworth would see it as the hope of retrieving a
lost part of you. In Hebrew thinking, it would be the step before the return into
Eden. In Eastern philosophy, it would be the step before transcendentalism. In all
cases, the epiphany is the awareness of the moment of change, either at the time or
some time after, and the pathos is the realization that the event or situation has
changed who you are --- it has defined who you are and who you will be – because of
the reaction you take.

WRITER’S ROLE: This is level five analysis of you. In this narrative or personal
reflective essay, you use form and syntax to examine how you behave. You can be
nothing less than flinchingly honest with yourself, or you have defeated the purpose
of the essay.

PURPOSE: Because you have taken AP both years, you have noticed, time and time
again, in its selections in the curriculum pieces like this: AP writing requires this kind
of personal analysis.

AUDIENCE: For each piece in the portfolio, you have selected a distinct audience.
Look at yourself and see what part of you needs this response.

FORM: The final draft (5-7 pages, APA formatting and pagination) must be typed or
word-processed in Times New Roman, Courier New or similar font, 12 or 14 font size,
with 1 “ margins. The rough draft may be typed or handwritten (3-5 pages). If you
do not show revision between drafts, you lose one point on your score. Since this is a
personal essay, you may use dead words.

EVALUATION: Please consult the holistic scoring guide below.
9-8 These essays offer a well-focused and persuasive analysis of how the essayist’s
    situation or event affects the essayists’ actions, attitudes and values. Using
    appropriate and specific anecdotal support, scenes that represent metaphorically
    the insight into self, these essays fully explore the relationship between the
    event or situation and the effects it has had on the self and demonstrate what it
    contributes to the meaning of the whole essay. Although not without flaws,
    these essays make a strong case for their interpretation and make a strong case
    for the discussion of the self with significant insight and understanding.
    Generally, essays scored at 9 reveal more sophisticated analysis and more
    effective control of language than do essays scored an 8.
7-6 These essays offer a reasonable analysis of how a past event or situation affects
    the essayists’ actions, attitudes or values. The essays explore the relationship


                                                                                        18
    and what effect it has on the essay as a whole. These works have insight and
    understanding, but the analysis is less thorough and less perceptive, than that of
    the 9-8 essays. Generally, the essays scored at 7 present better-developed
    analysis and more consistent command of effective composition than those
    scored 6.
   5 These essays respond to the assigned task with a plausible recognition of the
       event, but they tend to be superficial or underdeveloped in analysis of the self.
       They often rely on plot summary, a telling of the event rather than showing it.
       Although the students attempt to analyze the past’s effect on actions,
       attitudes, or values, they demonstrate a rather simplistic understanding.
       Typically, these essays reveal unsophisticated thinking and / or immature
       writing. The essays demonstrate ineffective organization and may be marred
       by surface errors.
   4-3 These lower-half essays offer less than thorough understanding of the task and
       less than adequate meaning of it. They reflect an incomplete or inappropriate
       treatment of the effect of the event on how the self sees the situation. They
       often rely on plot summary alone. Often wordy, elliptical, or repetitious,
       these essays may lack control over the elements of college-level composition.
       Essays scored a 3 may contain significant surface errors.

PROCEDURE: Please use the steps below to guide you.
  1. Percolating: Because you are finding the paradox in your own behavior that
     allows you to feel the pathos of this particular situation or event, as you
     develop your percolation, you may wish to draw a ladder with the steps,
     beginning on the bottom with the event and ending with the paradox in your
     behavior.
  2. Drafting: Since three of your peers are going to read each of these portfolio
     pieces, you will include details in the first drafts that you are comfortable
     sharing. As you revise and work on second drafts, then you add in detail to
     help us see how you are thinking about yourself. For this piece in your
     portfolio, you have a number of choices: since you are experimenting with
     form and syntax, you may wish to parcel out the actual story with reflective
     detail, or you may wish to share the story, and then reflect on it. You may
     wish to tell the story chronologically backward, or you may wish to tell the
     whole story in dialogue.
  3. Peer conversations: Three will listen to or look over your first draft and
     respond to you, giving you insight into your paradox – be it implicit or explicit,
     it needs to be there in nearly every paragraph.
  4. Revising and redrafting: The word epiphany means “light” – the pathos means
     the awareness that the reality and perception of the situation differ. Keep in
     mind as you choose details.
  5. Editing: Proofread your essays for surface errors.




                                                                                      19
                                            Patterns
                                    A piece for your portfolio

ASSIGNMENT: As you have grown from child to young adult, you have noted patterns in your
behaviors, both good and bad, both ones that have helped you succeed and ones that have
hindered your growth. This personal essay asks you to root out the sources of the patterns of
your behavior.

PURPOSE: The college writing portfolio allows you to empathize with the self you are
becoming. This particular piece explores some of the reasons why you choose the behaviors you
do.

WRITER’S ROLE: You are seeking self-understanding through your writing of these pieces for
your portfolio.

AUDIENCE: A different one from your other pieces, but this one could be your spiritual self

FORM: 5-7 pages, typed in Times New Roman 12 font, APA style

EVALUATION:: Please consult the holistic scoring guide below.
  9, 8 Exemplary
           Insight: Addresses paradoxes in the self – not necessarily reconciled, but
             analyzed to depth of understanding that allows for awareness of the
             contradictions– Sees patterns in the life of the self, and roots out multiple
             sources of the patterns
           Details: Anchors multiple, generalized and specific, illustrative details within
             single paragraphs that focus on the sources of the behaviors within the self –
             Internal thoughts’ complexity assessed in contradictory details in same paragraph
           Fluency – No run-on’s nor fragments, unless for deliberate effect –
             contextualizes details from base source and tie into this essay – after quotes,
             these essays include careful analysis of the language / the biases / the nuances in
             the quote themselves


       7   Sufficient
                Insight: Addresses paradoxes in the self – not necessarily reconciled in self – Sees
                   patterns in the life of the self, and roots out the sources of the patterns
                Details: Anchors multiple, generalized and specific, illustrative details within
                   single paragraphs that focus on the sources of the behaviors within the self –
                   Internal thoughts’ complexity analyzed in contradictory quotes in same
                   paragraph
                Fluency: No run-on’s nor fragments, unless for deliberate effect – contextualizes
                   quotes from base source and tie into this essay –-- editing of surface errors
                   apparent


6       Satisfactory


                                                                                                  20
           Insight: Addresses paradoxes in the self – not necessarily reconciled in self – Sees
              patterns in the life of the self, and roots out the sources of the patterns; unlike higher
              scored essays, these don’t synthesize the roots of the patterns; they merely announce
              them
           Details: Anchors multiple, generalized and specific, illustrative details within single
              paragraphs that focus on the sources of the behaviors within the self – Internal
              thoughts’ complexity analyzed in complementary quotes in same paragraph
           Fluency: Under five run-on’s nor fragments, unless for deliberate effect –
              contextualizes quotes from base source and tie into this essay –-- editing of surface
              errors apparent
       5 Acceptable
           Insight: Sees contradictions in behavior, but does not use the essay to explore the
              reasons why it occurs – Remarks on patterns in life, but does not complete the
              critical thinking and analysis of the self
           Details: One generalized or specific, illustrative detail in each paragraph, anchored
              into the paragraph, but not fully developed
           Fluency: Under 10 run-on’s or fragments, editing surface errors slightly apparent
   4,3 Unsatisfactory
           Insight:: Announces the problems with the essayist’s behavior, without any focus on
              positive traits,.
           Details: One detail per paragraph, but not anchored into it
           Fluency: 10+ run-on’s or fragments, editing of surface errors unapparent

PROCEDURE: The following steps serve as a guide to creating this essay.
   1. Percolating: Chart out habits of yours:
Habitual behavior            Benefits to the self       Reasons for continuing behavior
overeating                   False sense of fullness    Avoid conflict, give into
                                                        emotional blackmail



   2. Drafting: The stories of your childhood hold metaphorical benefit in your life, as it
       shapes into young adulthood. Tell us the stories, and analyze what you are thinking and
       feeling at the time of the story. Write them down.
   3. Peer review: 3 students will assess your essay based on the holistic scoring guide above
   4. Re-drafting: Synthesize the stories of your childhood into patterns of behavior, both those
       that enable you to grow and those that hinder you.
   5. Edit: You see in the holistic scoring guide the importance of no surface errors.
Revision: Show changes from rough to final drafts. Hand in peer comments.




                                                                                                     21
                                   Crawling into Yourself
                         One of the portfolio pieces Third trimester

ASSIGNMENT: In his liner notes for his 2008 opus, Home before Dark, Neil Diamond
describes the writing process, his creative process which he has used for most of his forty-year
career. He says, ―[T]he experience of creation has yet to become easy. In truth, I am as hungry
as I ever was: the ’emptiness deep inside me’ aches even more … The songs come straight from
my heart like they’ve always been there, yet nothing about the process is simple or
straightforward.‖ Throughout the two years we have been together in AP English, we have asked
the same philosophical question: does our nature prone us to certain experiences, or do our
experiences shape our nature? This piece in the portfolio explores that question.

PURPOSE: Personal reflective writing, such as you will do in freshmen level college English
courses, births out of our philosophical desire for self-knowledge.

WRITER’S ROLE: Honest reflection of truths you hold in yourself

AUDIENCE: Different one for each piece in portfolio – a songwriter, an actor, a painter you
admire, perhaps for this one

FORM: 5-7 pages, typed APA format
[Rough draft may be handwritten 3-5 pages]

EVALUATION:
9-8 Effective: They take the prompt implicitly and use metaphorical parables with insightful
     reflection to tell the chosen audience what it knows about the relationship between human
     nature and experiences, deeply embedded in personal musings and stories.
7-6 Sufficient: They take the prompt explicitly and use metaphorical parables with jaunted
    reflection to tell the chosen audience what it knows about the relationship between human
    nature and experiences, embedded in personal musings more than stories.
    5        Middle of the road: They take the prompt and respond only philosophically, not
             using musings nor stories to tell what they know about the relationship between
             human nature and experiences in how they shape the self.
    4-3 Minimal: They take the prompt and respond to it with a minor understanding that there
         is a relationship between human nature and experiences. The surface errors destroy any
         fluency.

   PROCEDURE:
   1. Percolating: Throughout the portfolio process, experiment with shape, size, font, color,
   columns, multiple columns—let the form reflect your thoughts [too much blank space does
   not work, honeys]. Which came first: who you are or what you did? Answer it.
   2. Drafting: Implicit writing often begins with a scene, with a parable from your life. When
       you are drafting memories from your life that need to reveal insight into how you feel
       experiences have shaped who you are or if you feel who you are is a result of what you
       have lived, you choose details in the stories that help us see your rationale for it.




                                                                                              22
  3. Writing group / peer review: They are going to read the series of scenes and the
     moments of philosophical, personal reflection and tell you what they reveal about you.
  4. Redrafting: Listening to them, and again reflecting on your own life, what do you need
     to reshape? What do you need to rewrite?
  5. When the portfolio is due, you turn in two drafts and 3 peer signatures.



                             Emotional Closure
                     A portfolio piece Third trimester

ASSIGNMENT: In AP English 11, you studied external influences
in your life, be them healing or harmful. This personal
reflective essay asks you to consider how you internalize those
influences. In essence, how do you feel about yourself? How do
you behave outwardly and inwardly to balance your feelings about
yourself? Emotional closure comes from harmonizing yourself and
from finding new behaviors. For any one of us, at its best, it
is difficult.
     This essay asks you to share your internal thoughts /
internal dialogue you have with yourself. With each scene you
describe, you analyze your own behaviors.

PURPOSE: Emotional Closure asks you what you are going to do
with your self-knowledge to enact whom you intend to be. Do the
behaviors become a part of how you define yourself, or do you
discard them?

WRITER’S ROLE:       You need to examine the roots of your behaviors.

AUDIENCE:     Private part of yourself

FORM: 5-7 pages, word-processed or typed, APA formatting [rough
draft may be handwritten or typed, 3-5 pages]. You must show
revision between the two drafts.
EVALUATION: Please consult the holistic scoring guide below.
9-8 Exemplary
These essays articulate through a series of scenes, anchored in
extensive analysis of dichotomy of thought and action, the bare
essence of finding resolution in the self. They experiment with
paragraph formation and often include multi-genre responses such
as self-written poetry or self-written dialogue to punctuate the
grappling with identity that is birthed out of such
psychologically deep self- analysis. The predetermined order of
the ideas implicitly builds toward resolution. The use of
language matches the intent precisely.
7-6 Satisfactory
These essays understand the protocol of scenes to create a
coherent theme. The series of scenes, which may include a self-
written poem or self-written dialogue, explicitly build toward
resolution. The use of language intends for multiple
interpretations.


                                                                                              23
   5 Static
These essays pile unanalyzed ideas together, in an attempt to
define self identity. The self-scripting, per se, does not
produce the organizational intent of the higher scored essays.
4-3 Minimal
These essays adhere to the guidelines of the assignment guide
without any further exploration of the self. They read
pedestrially.

PROCEDURE:
   1. Percolating: Consider how you deal with conflict, or with
       self-anger / self-disappointment. Draw it.
   2. Drafting: Construct scenes. Describe them as they
       happened. Then, write down what you were thinking on the
       inside when it happened. Then, write down what you did
       about it.
   3. Peer review: Do not share anymore with peers than you are
       comfortable. That is essential for us as we build trust.
       They will be responding to the order of your ideas more
       than the ideas themselves.
   4. Redrafting: Consider the emotional effect you want to
       have. Choose words and ideas that enrich those ideas.
   5. Edit for grammatical errors.
   6. On the day the portfolio is due, you must turn in 2 drafts
       and 3 peer signatures. If there is no visible revision
       between drafts, you lose a point.



                                     Two Views to View
                                      A portfolio piece

ASSIGNMENT: In this essay, you will look at an event or a situation from two points of view.
For example, Love looks a lot different to the recently heartbroken than the recently engaged.
The Detroit Tigers, without Granderson and Jackson, look different than the Tigers with highly
paid Ordonez and Verlander. ―Empire State of Mind (Part II) Broken Down‖ by Alicia Keys
needs ―Empire State of Mind‖ by Jay-Z and Alicia Keys to make sense of the paralleled syntax.

PURPOSE: You are analyzing the world around you, from your point of view.

WRITER’S ROLE: Select something that interests you personally, and be ready to analyze it
from two points of view.

AUDIENCE: As in all pieces in your portfolio, you are choosing a different audience. For this
one, you may be Jim Leyland, or Beyonce, or your best friends.

FORM: 5-7 pages, APA format, typed or word-processed [rough draft 3-5 pages handwritten or
typed]. You must show revision between drafts.




                                                                                             24
EVALUATION: The following rubric serves as a holistic guide to see what traits your essay
includes:
9-8      Exemplary: Conscious of the differences in the two points of view, they implicitly
support one over the other. They do so by selecting anchored and specifically insightful details,
facts, etc. so that the opinion of the analysis of the situation or of the event is secured in them.
They compare and contrast the details in such a way that the order of them becomes significant
in understanding the value of the writers’ point of view. The thesis comes at the end of the essay,
and they talk about both points of view in all body paragraphs, often analyzing multiple
examples, facts, details, etc, in the same body paragraphs. The use of standard American written
English enables the piece to shine as a whole.

7-6 Sufficient: Conscious of the differences in the two points of view, they explicitly support
one over the other. They do so by selecting anchored and specifically insightful details, facts,
etc. so that the opinion of the analysis of the situation or of the event is secured in them. They
compare and contrast the details in such a way that the order of them becomes significant in
understanding the value of the writers’ point of view. The thesis comes at the beginning of the
essay, and they talk about both points of view in all body paragraphs, often analyzing multiple
examples, facts, details, etc, in the same body paragraphs. The use of standard American written
English enables the piece to shine as a whole.

5 Minimal: Recognizing the differences in the two points of view, they do not select one over
the other. As part of higher level writing, for this purpose, they must. They tend to use vague
examples, details, etc. as opposed to anchored and specific ones of the higher scored essays. The
use of standard American written English begins to hinder the reading of the whole piece.
4-3 Insufficient: Recognizing the differences in the two points of view, they do not select one
over the other. As part of higher level writing, for this purpose, they must. They tend to use
vague examples, details, etc. as opposed to anchored and specific ones of the higher scored
essays. The use of standard American written English distracts the reading of the whole piece.
.
PROCEDURE: The following steps serve as a guide to help you plan traits in your essays.
    1. Percolating: You may try Venn diagrams, T-charts, or something along this line. We can
        begin there, but this paper asks you to look at the implicit ties between points of view of
        same object.
    2. Drafting: The higher scored essays talk about both points of view in the same paragraph.
    3. Peer review: Your peers are going to comment on your ability to form paragraphs that
        allow us to see your point of view and allow us to see how you have studied both points
        of view.

I notice                                       I wonder why
I would like to know more about                Have you considered ….
    4. Redrafting: Look at your peers’ comments, and see how you can better clarify ideas.
    5. Editing: Correct your grammatical and spelling errors. The textbook for the course has a
        marvelous section on this.
    6. On the day that your portfolio is due, you must also hand in both drafts and 3 peer
        reviews.




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                     The Nature of Art, the Art of Your Nature:
                   a creative response to your soul’s yearnings
                                 a portfolio piece

ASSIGNMENT:          Focusing on a meaningful place or event on your life, in this
piece, you describe the place / event to someone who has never been there.
Remembering the sights and smells, tastes and sounds, you in”words” paint a
picture of it. Although you only allude to its importance (as in Wordsworth's "Tintern
Abbey"), your audience sees how this place (be it literal or figurative) reveals your
soul’s yearnings. Inherent in your selection and presentation of details, your word
choice, and sentence structure, you detail the influence this place / event has on
your psyche and heart.

PURPOSE: This kind of college writing invites you to examine the influence of
voice on your own personal style of writing; in fact, it expects you to search yourself
for the value of this place / event.

WRITER'S ROLE: As with all college writing, you always examine your mind and
heart to determine how writing serves as a catharsis and as a healer.

AUDIENCE: Your choice, but remember to put it on the final draft

FORM:          The final draft needs to be typed or word-processed if you are choosing
a response that requires it, such a poem (25 or more lines, rhymed or unrhymed) or
fictional or factual prose (5 -7 paragraphs, double-spaced).
Mr. Lyons may approve any other creative response, realizing that in all cases, your
choices must adhere to the guidelines for appropriateness set forth in the Board of
Education’s Student Handbook.

EVALUATION: Please consult the holistic scoring rubric below:
    9 The creative responses that earn the score of 9 do so because of their
       overall effect. In these, the pieces use concrete details (such as form,
       color, shape, font size, etc.) to reveal insight into the soul’s yearning.
    8 The creative responses that earn the score of 8 do so because of their
       overall effect. Because they will include insight into the condition of the
       soul, they will base their imagery and uses of language around a distinct
       element in it, and will select and present details in a pronounced way to
       affect an emotional response from their intended, distinct audience. The
       careful choice of details will account for complexities and paradoxes in a
       single view of the world. They will fluently articulate the rationale for the
       choices of the writer without obvious or pedestrial, stereotypical images or
       words. They will control the conventions of form for effect and with clarity.
    7 The creative responses that earn the score of 7 do so because of their
       overall effect. Since they clarify some notion of the soul, they will present
       their ideas in a manner which assists the intended audience to predict a



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        rationale, but the presentation and selection of details need to affect an
        emotional response. The details may focus on an element of the human
        condition, but stereotype. The use of words or images does not control the
        conventions of form as effectively as those with higher scores.
      6 The creative responses that earn the score of 6 do so because of their
        overall effect. They tend to present a view of the soul’s condition riddled
        with illogical choices in form and manner of presentation. They cliché the
        values of a culture or nation without reason. The words or images chosen
        detract from the intended message.
      5 The creative responses that earn the score of 5 do so because of their
        overall effect. They tend to present a view of the soul’s condition which
        lacks a drafting process. These assignments often include thoughtless
        choices in form or in manner of presentation.

PROCEDURE:        The following steps serve as a guide
    1. Percolating: To begin drafting this type of assignment, the idea you begin
       with is more valuable than the form it takes in the end. You need to choose
       a deliberately complex and paradoxical view of an element of the human
       condition, as lived through you. Write down an outline, perhaps, or a
       sketch.
    2. Drafting: You are looking at how you can best represent that part of
       yourself that questions, that ponders, that reflects. It can take the shape of
       an original song, a poem, a story, a liturgical dance … let your heart be
       open.
    3. Peer conversation (3 signatures and dates): The peers are going to look for
       complexities in your piece; they are going to look for a distinct personal
       world view. You may blend word and picture. Revise based on peers'
       comments.
    4. Re-drafting: Utilize your peers' comments to advance your idea to its
       fullest realization. Your choice of audience is crucial here.
    5. On day the portfolio is due, hand in 2 drafts and 3 peer signatures. All
       pieces in your portfolio must show revision between first and second
       drafts.



                              Pieces of April (ala Three Dog Night)
                               Processing of the portfolio project

The College Writing Portfolio is due at the beginning of the hour on Thursday 29 April
2010, regardless if you are present, absent, tardy, excused, unexcused, school-related,
waivered, in or out of school suspended. If you or someone calls in to excuse you, and
this is not on time, you will be marked late (down two grades on each piece in the
portfolio). When you have two full months to work on this project, there is no excuse for
it being late.




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ASSIGNMENT: For your reflection on the process of creating your college writing portfolio, you
will create a single-draft response, in which you highlight the internal process of creating the
portfolio. This may come in a number of forms, or multi-genre, but it must focus on your
individual process of writing.
This is the criteria it must include:
     a. A specific reference or quote from each of the seven pieces in the portfolio
     b. A focus on process rather than product
     c. A focus on internal decisions rather than external ones
     d. An understanding of connotative uses of words or images to embellish the meaning of a
        whole piece in your portfolio
     e. A consideration of how writers make choices to affect response from a self-selected
        audience

PURPOSE: As in nearly any beginning college writing course, the focus of its intent lies in
reflection on the process of writing, on personalizing the process of writing.

WRITER’S ROLE: You are in a reflective mode, self-assessing your writing process.

AUDIENCE: the voice inside your head that allows you to create

FORM: Single-draft

EVALUATION: Please consult the holistic scoring guide below.
  9 The reflections earning a score of 9 have met all of the criteria of the 8 essays, yet
     include deeper insight into the self and more acute reflection on how the self creates.
  8 The reflections earning a score of 8 respond intrapersonally to all of the criteria in the
     prompt. They use the prompt to focus further and in more anchored and concrete,
     specific detail the rationale for writing about the given details of the student’s life. By
     quoting or specifically referring to from all five pieces, they show their versatility in using
     language to affect their chosen audiences. They also criticize their uses of language so
     as to support how they could improve their writing as they continue in their lives
     (academic and personal). Because they use the prompt to analyze their writing skills,
     they provide the audience with insight into how they feel about the writing process, how
     they have personalized the writing process. The form which they choose most accurately
     reflects their personalizing of the process.
  7 The reflections earning a score of 7 have all of the criteria of 6 essays, but do so with
     greater effect.
  6 The reflections earning the score of 6 have all of the criteria of the prompt. They tend to
     focus more on the areas of growth than the areas of strength; whereas the higher scored
     essays balance this better. By quoting from or referring to all five pieces, they accurately
     reflect their diversity in using language to affect their chosen audiences. They anchor
     and analyze details from their different pieces, but do not provide the amount of insight
     into their feelings of themselves as writers as the higher scored reflections do. These
     reflections use the prompt to assess their growth as writers, but do not imply how they
     will use writing in their future academic and personal lives. Nevertheless, the form which
     they choose most accurately reflects their personalizing of the process.
  5 The reflections earning a score of 5 have all of the criteria of the prompt. They include
     quotes or references from all five pieces, but tend to include broad details, not anchored
     and not particularly analyzed. These reflections begin by responding to the prompt, but
     veer into unfocused discussion of own writing process.



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   4   The reflections earning a score of 4 tend to less successfully respond to the criteria of
       the prompt. They will tend to rely on summarizing or paraphrasing of the pieces rather
       than choosing details to analyze connotative purpose for uses of language for effect.
       The form does reflect a personalizing of the process, but the higher scored reflections
       choose for intent, implicitly.

PROCEDURE: The following steps serve as a guide to you.
  1. Percolating: Since you have control of form to represent your personal process of
     writing the pieces, you may wish to consider a multi-genre response, such as you did
     last year with your science articles. You may also wish to use more than one genre,
     such as PowerPoint presentation with slideshow, or pod cast of reading of portions of
     pieces, as if you were interviewed about them by someone famous, or home-baked
     apple pie with recipes of how to write pieces so they gel. When you enter college in the
     fall, you will be amazed at how the professors and other students use technology in their
     courses. You need to practice when you are still with me, beloved.
  2. Drafting: Since you are turning in a single draft, you will have no peer review of this
     piece. I am deliberate in this choice, but you may wish to talk over with your peers how
     they are representing this final piece of their portfolios.
  3. This piece needs to have a separate audience from your other six pieces in the portfolio.
  4. Please note the following for your entire portfolio:
  a. The first seven pieces must show revision between the first and
     second drafts
  b. When you are placing your eight pieces in the portfolio, the order of
     them is your choice. But you must have the seven first drafts
     (stamped) and peer signatures in order to earn that part of the grade
     for them.
  c. Your cover for the portfolio is a way for you to represent yourself. But
     all portfolios are turned in to college professors with some kind of
     cover, even if all of your pieces do not readily fit into that format.
  d. Make sure the final draft of all eight pieces distinctly mentions the
     audience. You may wish to use sticky notes on pieces that are not
     readily useful to have it written on them.

                                   A Decent Proposal
                         AP English 12          Third trimester
Regardless of absence or presence, school-related, suspended, waiver-excused,
excused or unexcused, you will present on the day you sign up.

ASSIGNMENT: As a follow-up to your formal research report, you will use a few of
the same sources to create and to write a proposal. Using formal language in your
proposal, you will include a distinct thesis (explicit at the beginning or implicit near the
end) that presents a problem and a solution to any self-chosen issue in the world, at
least five (5) direct quotes to offer insight into the problem-solution, and a distinct,
feasible solution, one that can be enacted. You will read the proposal to the class, and
then ask the class at least three (3) probing questions to invite the students to argue
with you.


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PURPOSE: As an argumentative essay, this presentation fulfills the graduation
requirement to share research aloud.

SPEAKER’S ROLE: This presentation displays your ability to present an argument
with outside sources.

AUDIENCE: Obviously, your classmates and Mr. Lyons, but consider who else would
benefit from hearing your point of view

FORM: 20-25 minutes, allotting time to read proposal to the class, and then to ask
and to answer classmates’ questions

EVLAUATION: Please consult the holistic scoring guide below.
  9 The proposals earning a score of 9 do so because of their overall effect. They
     anchor the details and quotes, using them for intellectual and emotional effect.
     The solution, presented first, builds back to its support in an implicit, but
     deepening way.
  8 The proposals earning a score of 8 do so because of their overall effect. These
     ones introduce the solution creatively and subtly, so that they hook the audience
     into seeing how it is possible through multiple sources (7 +) (aural, visual, and
     tactile), highlighting the sources with thorough analysis of each, cognizant of the
     order of the sources so that they add depth and breadth to the implicit thesis
     that articulates the problem and the solution as the student prepares to open up
     the argument with her or his peers. The chosen quotes (at least 5) anchor and
     elaborate the paradox in the ethical dilemma the student is sharing. Moreover,
     they express the reality of the situation, taking into context the ethical and moral
     dilemma involved. With heightened awareness of the opposing points of view
     and deliberate awareness of the complexities of the issue involved, these
     proposals attack the other points of view and the contradictions involved with
     absolute authority. They offer a solution that takes into account the
     psychological human dimension (humans’ fear of change and fear of growth).
     Even so, they advocate the change in human behavior/ human actions. The use
     of standard spoken American English only continues to enhance the entire
     proposal.
  7 The proposals earning a score of 7 meet all of the criteria of those earning a 6,
     but do so with finer tuning of details into credible supportive analysis.
  6 The proposals earning a score of 6 tend to begin with metaphorical anecdotal
     evidence of the problem and the solution. These state the thesis explicitly, but
     clearly. The chosen quotes (5+) elaborate the argument, but are piled together
     in the argument so that each one does not receive equal consideration for its
     insight into the argument. They take into account the paradoxical dilemma in
     the ethical and moral subplots, but don’t readily attack the opposing points of
     view. They offer a solution that takes into account the psychological human


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     dimension (humans’ fear of change and fear of growth), but do not transcend
     the humanity to advocate for changes in human behavior / human action. These
     proposals are more cerebral and philosophical than the higher scored ones that
     enact change. The use of spoken American English enhances the entire
     proposal.
   5 The proposals earning a score of 5 do present a problem and a solution in their
     thesis sentences, but do not offer enough support from outside sources to
     enhance the vision of the explicit thesis. They tend to offer clichéd arguments
     that summarize or paraphrase more than analyze the issue. They offer a
     solution that takes into account the psychological human dimension of fear of
     growth and of change, but do not push forth their arguments to examine the
     underlying factors that the higher scored proposals do. They slip into non-
     standard spoken American English with detrimental effects to their arguments.
   4 The proposals earning a score of 4 offer a weakened thesis with little to no
     support. They present a solution that superficially looks at the problem. The
     use of non-standard English injures the proposal.


PROCEDURE: Please use the following steps as a guide to complete this proposal.
  1. Introduction: Although it is not required that you have a visual, aural, or tactile
     aid, how might you use one to introduce your slant on the topic? In any case,
     you want to have some beginning that captures the audience’s attention --- a
     series of rhetorical questions, a startling fact or statistic, or an emotional
     anecdote all work (for those of you who are using deductive reasoning and an
     explicit thesis) For those of you who are using inductive reasoning and an
     implicit thesis, you are beginning with the solution without telling your peers it is
     the solution, so you need to consider how you are going to grab their attention
     and reel the students into your thought process and your line of reasoning. For
     example, if I were looking at the availability of clean water in nations around the
     world, I may begin my proposal by offering classmate bottled water. You can
     see the ludicrously in capitalist societies making money off of selling natural
     products when many around the world crave the bare minimum.
  2. Thesis: For those of you who are using deductive reasoning and an explicit
     thesis, usually an “Although ….” Or an “Even though …” works best. For
     example, although contraception has become available to those on public
     assistance, the increase in welfare- funded births demonstrates a decrease in
     understanding the morals of poverty. Or, Even though performance-enhancing
     drugs increases health risks in athletes, the MLB association’s ignorance has
     allowed greater revenue for the suspected ball teams. Both of these examples
     look at the paradox in the ethical dilemma as the higher scored proposals are
     going to do, but they would state it at the beginning or near the beginning of the
     presentation, and your peers will be looking for how you prove it. For those of
     you who are using inductive reasoning and an implicit thesis, you can select the




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   same topics, use a similar thesis that explores the paradox in the ethical
   dilemma, but you will make it your closer before you go to the class discussion.
3. Quotes and details: Remember that the topic sentence for each of the body
   paragraphs is an opinion that you use the quote to support. After the quote, you
   paraphrase it then offer your insight into the solution. For example, the
   recording industry has long ignored the importance of the pre-teen buyers.
   Thus, the revelation of Disney’s High School the Musical and Jack Johnson’s
   Curious George soundtrack has placed notice on a forgotten market. In the
   February 22, 2006 Billboard magazine, staff writer, Bruce Greene notes, “The
   parents of children ages 7 to 14 are a high end market for this industry. Parents
   are more apt to allow their children to download songs onto their iPods from
   movies they have seen with their children” (26). In this article, although the
   focus remains on ways of deriving revenue from record sales, the author realizes
   the importance of the connection between visual media and downloads. In fact,
   nine of the songs of the High School soundtrack debuted on the Billboard Hot
   100 the week after the second showing of the movie on Disney Channel. …
4. Solution: The solution to the problem must not be a puffed-up dream. It has to
   take into account the human factor. For you to decide that all families do not
   need a gun in their house to protect them, this does not take into account the
   families that have had loved ones murdered on their front porches. Although
   you are offering a general solution, your proposal must factor in the complexities
   of the situation you choose.
5. The probing questions you prepare take into account the paradox of the ethical
   dilemma always. Be prepared to continue to support your point of view, and not
   let your classmates overtake the conversation. You are presenting, and you
   must maintain decorum.




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