Introduction to Office Information Systems Course Information

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					Introduction to Office Information Systems
Course Information
Organization             Kellogg Community College
Course Number            OIT 100
Credits                  3
Contact Hours            48
Instructor               Ken Weimer
E-mail Address           weimerk@kellogg.edu
Course/Faculty Website   http://bb.kellogg.edu/ / http://academic.kellogg.edu/weimerk/
Office                   OTC 201D
Campus                   Battle Creek
Address                  450 North Avenue
City/State/Zip           Battle Creek, Michigan 49017
Office Hours             See instructor’s schedule at: http://academic.kellogg.edu/weimerk/
Office Phone             269-965-3931 extension 2518
Office Fax               269-966-4087
Beginning Date           01/19/2010
Number of Weeks          15
Meeting Times/Location   See instructor’s schedule at: http://academic.kellogg.edu/weimerk/
Description
The principles of information technology relating to business are covered (including
hardware, software, communications, networks, the Internet, and information systems).
Programming concepts, web page creation, navigation of the World Wide Web, and use of
application software are introduced to assist the student in developing a technology learning
plan. This course presents strategies for purchasing, installing, and maintaining a computer
system. Students will be exposed to career planning and industry standard certifications to
help achieve personal and professional goals involving information technology. Students are
expected to spend time working online with a computer beyond the assigned activities.
Discussions and class activities are designed to assist students with no prior information
technology experience to be successful.

Prerequisites
Before enrolling in this course, the student should be familiar with basic touch-typing
fundamentals.
For Online Sections of OIT 100, students should also have a basic ability to start and work
in a Windows Vista/XP/2000/ environment with a mouse. You will need access to a
computer with Office application software and an Internet Browser. It is also recommended
that a student completes an orientation to online learning by visiting the following Web site:
http://academic.kellogg.edu/online/

Textbooks
Gary Shelly and Misty Vermaat. Discovering Computers 2010 - Complete Edition. Course
Technology. 2010. Pages: 896. ISBN: 0-324-78645-3.
Source: Kellogg Community College Bookstore.
Learner Supplies
USB Flash Drive (at least 256 MB capacity). Quantity: 1. Source: Computer supply outlet.
Core Abilities
 A. Demonstrate critical thinking skills in gathering, analyzing, interpreting facts, and
    problem solving using scientific inquiry.
 B. Demonstrate writing, listening, computer, verbal and non-verbal communication skills.
 C. Distinguish between the positive and negative implications of physical, mental, and
    community health principles on individual and community wellness.
 D. Evaluate knowledge of the implications of being a citizen in a global community.
 E. Demonstrate knowledge of the creative process and the ability to appraise the
    significance of the visual, literary, or performing arts.
Competencies
 1. Develop a personal definition of computing literacy.
 2. Demonstrate the application of information technology to address personal and
     business needs.
 3. Apply personal productivity tools to meet business and personal computing needs.
 4. Identify computer hardware components and understand the personal and business
     application of them.
 5. Demonstrate the development of an information system for a business.
 6. Identify resources that will keep one informed of the technological trends to make
     technology decisions.
 7. Identify the necessary resources to have a stable and secure computing environment.
 8. Create a Web page and demonstrate the importance of the World Wide Web for
     business.

Grading Information
The final grade earned for the course is based on student evaluations, attendance, critical
thinking assignments, course participation, and activities. A point system, based on the above
work, is used to determine the final letter grade. This point system is applied to the student's final
grade, based on the following components:

 1.   Four announced examinations 400 points (40% of the overall grade)
 2.   Sixteen announced quizzes 160 points (16% of the overall grade)
 3.   Home page and Web Page 40 points ( 4 % of the overall grade)
 4.   Portfolio tasks 325 points (32.5% of the overall grade)
 5.   Critical Thinking Issues 75 points ( 7.5% of the overall grade)

There are an additional eighty (82) points earned as extra credit (50 points) and as bonus points
(32 points) built into the exams. A student's final course grade is based on a point potential of
1000 points.

The following scale is used as a guide for grading, however, the instructor must consider the overall
student performance to determine the final grade.
Grading Scale
A          Earning 94% or more of all possible points for assignments and exams.
A-         Earning at least 90% but less than 94% of all possible points.
B+         Earning at least 87% but less than 90% of all possible points.
B          Earning at least 83% but less than 87% of all possible points.
B-         Earning at least 80% but less than 83% of all possible points.
C+         Earning at least 77% but less than 80% of all possible points.
C          Earning at least 73% but less than 77% of all possible points.
C-         Earning at least 70% but less than 73% of all possible points.
D+         Earning at least 67% but less than 70% of all possible points.
D          Earning at least 63% but less than 67% of all possible points.
D-         Earning at least 60% but less than 63% of all possible points.
F          Earning less than 60% of all possible points.
Guidelines for Success
 Tardy Policy (for face-to-face class sections)
 To minimize the disruption caused by persons entering the classroom late, please observe the
 following procedures:
 1. Try to enter the room and use the closest seat as quickly and quietly as possible. It is helpful if
     you would remove your coat, locate your text, have note taking paper and pencil ready before
     you enter the room.

2.    If the instructor has handed out material, wait until after class or an appropriate break to ask for
     a copy.

3. Report to the instructor after class, so that you can be counted as attending for the day.

     If your tardiness becomes excessive or is a disruptive influence in the class, the instructor will
     give you a verbal warning. If you continue to be late or disruptive, a written notice will be given
     stating that future late arrivals will lead to possible withdrawal from class.

Timeliness Policy
"Timeliness" is a valuable asset to take to the job marketplace. The Office Information Technology
program has an on-time participation, on-time assignment completion, and on-time make-up as
priority items in the development of course requirements and evaluations. In this course these issues
of "timeliness" are addressed in the class policies listed above.

Use of Cell Phones and Other Electronic Equipment (for face-to-face class sections)
Cell phones and pagers must be on mute during class. If you must take or return an emergency call,
please go out in the hall to do so.
E-Mail Communications
Kellogg Community College provides an e-mail account for each student. As a means to ensure that
all students have a reliable means for e-mail communications, all students are expected to use their
KCC provided e-mail account for correspondence between the student and the instructor. When
sending an e-mail message you must include a subject line and sign the message with your name.
Unsigned messages or messages with no subject are not read and deleted.

Class Conduct and Participation
Class participation is encouraged. We will follow the College policies regarding conduct. I expect
students to create a learning atmosphere of respect. No name calling, interrupting, or foul language is
allowed. Be respectful and strive to embrace an understanding of diversity in other people. Come
prepared with an open attitude that is professional and shows that you are ready to learn.

Child Care Statement (for face-to-face class sections)
Children cannot attend class. If you need assistance with child care refer to the following site:
http://www.kellogg.edu/studserv/childcare.html

Food Statement (for face-to-face class sections)
Drinks and snacks, not complete meals, may be brought into the classroom. Please show respect for
your classmates when it is necessary to eat during class time. Care should be taken to not leave a
residue on the desktops and computer equipment. Any spills or messes should be cleaned up by the
student.
Kellogg Community College Academic Integrity Statement
The Kellogg Community College policy on Academic Integrity is spelled out in the student
handbook. If it is suspected that you are cheating, fabricating, facilitating academic dishonesty, or
plagiarizing, there may be serious consequences. The incident will be documented and may be
reported to the academic chair and/or program director for possible disciplinary actions up to and
including course, program, or college expulsion.
Kellogg Community College Americans with Disabilities Act and Section 504 Statement
Kellogg Community College does not discriminate in the admission or treatment of students on the
basis of disability. KCC is committed to compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act and
Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act.
Instructor Syllabus Rights Statement
Information contained in this syllabus was to the best knowledge of the instructor considered correct
and complete when distributed for use at the beginning of the semester. However, this syllabus should
not be considered a contract with Kellogg Community College and any student, nor between the
instructor and any student. The instructor reserves the right, acting within the policies and procedures
of Kellogg Community College, to make changes in the course content or instructional techniques
without notice or obligation.
Schedule
Session    Target Competencies                            Notes
Week 1     Develop a personal definition of computing     Chapter 1 - Introduction to Computers
           literacy.
Week 2     The application of information technology to   Chapter 2 - The Internet and the World Wide
           address personal and business needs.           Web
Week 3     Identify the necessary resources to have a     Chapter 8 - Operating Systems and Utility
           stable and secure computing environment.       Programs
Week 4     Apply personal productivity tools to meet      Chapter 3 - Application Software
           business and personal computing needs.
Week 5     Identify computer hardware components and      Exam 1 - Chapters 1, 2, 8, and 3
           understand the personal and business           Appendix C - Coding Schemes and Number
           application of them.                           Systems, page APP 17
Week 6     Identify computer hardware components and      Chapter 4 - The Components of the System
           understand the personal and business           Unit
           application of them.
Week 7     Create a Web page. Demonstrate the             Chapter 5 - Input
           importance of the World Wide Web for           Chapter 6 - Output
           business.
Week 8     Identify computer hardware components and      Chapter 7 - Storage
           understand the personal and business
           application of them.
Week 9     Identify resources to be informed of the       Exam 2 - Covering Chapters 4, 5, 6, 7, and
           technological trends to make technology        Appendix C
           decisions.                                     Chapter 9 - Communications and Networks
           Identify resources to have a stable and secure
           computing environment.
Week 10    Apply personal productivity tools to meet      Chapter 10 - Database Management
           business and personal computing needs.
Week 11    Identify the necessary resources to have a     Chapter 11 - Computer Security, Ethics, and
           stable and secure computing environment.       Privacy
Week 12    Develop a personal definition of computing     Chapter 12 - Information System
           literacy.                                      Development
Week 13    Demonstrate the development of an              Exam 3 - Covering Chapters 9, 10, 11, and 12
           information system for a business.             Complete Portfolio Tasks
Week 14    Demonstrate the development of an              Chapter 13 - Programming Languages and
           information system for a business.             Program Development
           Demonstrate the development of an              Chapter 14 - Enterprise Computing
           information system for a business.             Chapter 15 - Computer Careers &
                                                          Certification
Week 15    Identify resources that will keep one informed Complete Portfolio Tasks
           of the technological trends to make technology Exam 4 - Covering Chapters 13, 14, and 15
           decisions.

				
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