SUBMISSION TEMPLATE Plenary Session Proposal SFRBM Meeting Submitted by

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SUBMISSION TEMPLATE Plenary Session Proposal SFRBM Meeting Submitted by Powered By Docstoc
					                               SUBMISSION TEMPLATE

                               Plenary Session Proposal
                                 SFRBM 2009 Meeting

Submitted by:         Lori Pearson
                      8365 Keystone Crossing, Suite 107
                      Indianapolis, IN 46240

                      Email: lpearson@hp-assoc.com
                      Phone: (317) 205-9482
                      Fax: (317) 205-9481

Date:                 December 15, 2008

Chairs: Valerie B. O’Donnell and Ginger Lohr Milne

Topic/Title: Formation, Metabolism and Novel Signaling Pathways of Leukotrienes and
Prostanoids

Topic Background: Lipid oxidation is often thought of as an unregulated free radical-
mediated process resulting in generation of a complex mixture of non-
stereo/regiospecific products that are reactive and undesirable. However, this is a
misconception since many lipid oxidation products generated in plant or mammalian
systems are in fact synthesized intentionally through the co-ordinated action of a series
of enzymes, including cyclooxygenases, lipoxygenases and cytochrome P450s. The
importance of the field was recognised a number of years ago with the awarding of the
1982 Nobel Prize for Medicine to John Vane, Bengt Samuelsson and Sune Bergstrom
for their discoveries concerning prostaglandins and related biologically active
substances.

Enzymatically generated oxidized lipids are critically required for virtually all cellular
processes and diseases, both in plants and mammalian systems. For example, in
humans, cyclooxygenase (COX) isoforms play essential roles in vascular biology, renal
physiology, cancer and gut physiology, while lipoxygenases (LOX) regulate innate
immune responses, atherogenesis, diabetes and hypertension. Synthesis and
metabolism of eicosanoids is tightly controlled at both transcriptional and post-
transcriptional levels, with acute generation of products requiring the triggering of
specific intracellular signaling pathways, including calcium mobilization, tyrosine kinases
and phospholipases. Recent work in the field has identified novel signaling pathways for
eicosanoids including resolution of inflammation by lipoxins, and the ability of esterified
eicosanoids to mediate more potent signaling actions than their unesterified counterparts
(e.g. prostaglandin E2 glyceryl ester).

As far as we know, SFRBM Annual Meeting has never hosted a session on this topic.
Given the importance of prostanoid and leukotriene signaling to virtually all cellular
processes, and the current high interest in their roles in cellular signaling processes we
propose to hold a session on this topic as follows.

Speakers: We propose a session on Formation, Metabolism and Novel Signaling
Pathways of Leukotrienes and Prostanoids including four speakers that are currently the
international leaders in this field.

1. Charles N. Serhan, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston
Title: Lipoxins and DHA-derived Docosanoids: Mapping Resolutions

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Contact: *Contact information to include: name, affiliation, mailing address, email
address, phone and fax numbers.
Dr. Serhan's research focuses on acute inflammation and on the structural elucidation of
pathways and compounds with protective mechanisms operating in humans that prevent
injury of the body’s own tissue. Seminal observations from his laboratory point to the
importance of aspirin-triggered and lipoxygenase-derived lipoxins as mediators of
inflammation resolution. This work has been published in high profile including Nature
Med, Proc Natl Acad Sci USA and J. Exp. Med. Dr Serhan is the Director of the Center
for Experimental Therapeutics and Reperfusion Injury at Brigham and Women's Hospital
and Harvard Medical School, Boston.

2. Hartmut Kuhn, Humboldt University, Berlin
Title: The 12/15-lipoxygenase Family: Structure, Function and Biological Implication in
Inflammation and Atherogenesis
Contact: *Contact information to include: name, affiliation, mailing address, email
address, phone and fax numbers.
Dr Kuhn is Professor of Biochemistry and Head of the Lipoxygenase Group, at the
Humboldt University Berlin. He heads the group that discovered the reticulocyte 15-
lipoxygenase, and its role in mitochondrial degradation, and has many major
publications on a variety of aspects of this pathway, including translational and post-
translational regulation of 15-LOX and its role in atherosclerosis and vascular disease.
Recent interests include characterising the membrane-binding determinants of 15-LOX
and elucidating its role in immune regulation by macrophages. His work is published in
Proc Natl Acad Sci USA, J. Biol. Chem, Blood and Nature Neuroscience.

3. Robert C Murphy, University of Colorado Medical School, Denver
Title: Leukotriene A4: The Chemically Unstable Intermediate in Leukotrienes
Biosynthesis That Won’t Go Away
Contact: *Contact information to include: name, affiliation, mailing address, email
address, phone and fax numbers.
Dr. Murphy is Professor of Pharmacology at University of Colorado. He has pioneered
an understanding of novel pathways in the formation of leukotrienes and other
prostanoids. Most recently he has explored factors involved in leukotriene A4
metabolism and bioactivity. His work has utilized novel mass spectrometric approaches
to characterize unique lipid mediators. He is the author of over 300 papers and is
regarded as a leader in the field of enzymatic and non-enzymatic lipid peroxidation.

4. Lawrence J Marnett, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville
Title: Consequences of COX-2 selectivity toward Substrates and Inhibitors
Contact: *Contact information to include: name, affiliation, mailing address, email
address, phone and fax numbers.
Dr. Marnett is Professor of Biochemistry and Chemistry at Vanderbilt University. His
primary research interests relate to understanding basic mechanisms involved in the
formation of prostaglandins by the cyclooxygenase enzymes. Over the past decade, he
has defined various aspects of cyclooxygenase-induced oxidation of arachidonate and
has more recently shown that the inducible cyclooxygenase, COX-2, utilizes glyceryl
arachidonate to generate a series of novel bioactive eicosanoids termed glyceryl
prostaglandins. The role of these compounds in inflammatory processes is an area of
ongoing investigation. His work has been published in Science, PNAS, and J. Biol.
Chem.




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