Slideshow Presentation Guidelines

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					Instructional Media Lab                                                                                oit

Slideshow Presentation Guidelines
About screen resolutions and data projectors
Data
projectors
have
limited
pixel
resolutions.
If
the
images
in
your
slideshow
presentation

have
a
higher
pixel
resolution
than
your
projector
can
display,
it
will
not
increase
image

quality.

Rather,
image
quality
may
suffer.
And
because
higher
resolution
images
mean

larger
file
sizes,
your
presentation
may
run
slowly,
load
slowly
or
may
not
load
at
all.
If
the

thumbnails
for
your
slides
in
the
Slide
Sorter
view
appear
onscreen
one
at
a
time,
very

slowly,
the
images
are
quite
likely
larger
than
needed.

Newer
UXGA
(Ultra
Extended
Graphics
Array)
projectors
have
a
pixel
resolution
of
1600
x

1200
pixels.

XGA

(Extended
Graphics
Array)
projectors
have
1024
x
1200
pixels
and
are

very
common
on
campus.
Or,
you
may
be
presenting
on
an
older
SVGA
(Super
Video

Graphics
Array)
with
only
800
x
600
pixels.
WUXGA
(Wide
Ultra
Extended
Graphics
Array)

have
1920
x
1080
pixels,
but
are
rare
and
still
very
expensive
as
of
fall
2009.


For
the
sharpest
images,
you
should
resize
graphics
to
fit
within
pixel
dimensions
of
the

projection
system
you
will
be
using.
But
you
don’t
always
know
what
the
projector

resolution
will
be!

Or,
you
may
not
want
to
take
the
time
to
make
multiple
versions
of
your

presentations.
Fortunately,
you
can
get
satisfactory
results
using
the
guidelines
for
UXGA,

regardless
of
the
projection
system.




Resize images before inserting in a presentation
Ideally,
before
you
insert
images
into
a
presentation,
use
image‐editing
software
to
resize

them.
Photoshop,
Apple
iPhoto
and
MS
Picture
Manager
are
common
applications
for

resizing
images,
and
all
provide
commands
for
resizing
a
collection
or
folder
of
images
at

once
(see
Batch
process
images,
below).
With
the
right
software,
you
may
also
be
able
to

compress
an
existing
slideshow
(see
Compress
a
presentation
you
have
already
built,
below).


Whether you use Microsoft PowerPoint, Apple Keynote, Open Office Impress, or Google
Presentations, resize to fit within 10 inches wide by 7.5 inches high and save as JPEGs at highest
quality/lowest compression. Set the resolution as follows:


Projector
Type
      
Pixel
Dimensions
       Dimensions
in
inches
&
Resolution
    File
type


UXGA

               1600
X
1200
             10
x
7.5
inches
at
160
ppi*
          .jpg
at
highest
quality

XGA
                 1024
x
768

 
           10
x
7.5
inches
at
96**

             .jpg
at
highest
quality
 

SVGA

               800
x
600
      
        10
x
7.5
inches
at
72
ppi
            .jpg
at
highest
quality
 



       




*



160
PPI
Images
will
look
ideal
on
UXGA
projectors
and
good
on
a
SVGA
or
XGA
projector.

**

96
dpi
images
may
appear
blurry
on
a
SVGA
projector.







OIT Academic Computing, University of Massachusetts   instruct@oit.umass.edu http://www.oit.umass.edu/academic   091020mt
Slideshow Presentation Guidelines                                                              oit
Batch process images
iPhoto

Create
an
album
containing
the
files
to
resize,
then
go
to
File
>
Export
>
JPEG,
Custom

size
(set
maximum
width
and
height).

The
entire
album
will
be
exported
into
a
specified

folder.
MS
Office
Picture
Manager

Create
a
new
folder
and
put
copies
of
your
images
in
the
folder
(processing
will
overwrite,

so
be
sure
not
to
work
on
your
original
large
files).
Use
Add
Picture
Shortcut
to
locate
the

folder
and
shift­click
to
select
all
the
thumbnails
in
the
image
browser.
In
the
right
panel

choose
Export
Pictures
and
choose
a
preset
size
or
click
the
Resize…
link
for
a
custom

size
(1600
x
1200
is
not
in
the
presets).
Click
OK
and
replace
all.


Photoshop

First
create
a
two‐step
Action
that
resizes
to
1200
px
high
and
saves
as
JPG
at
highest

compression.

Once
you
have
recorded
the
Action,
choose
File
>
Automate
>
Batch...
to

run
the
Action
on
the
target
folder
and
save
the
new
images
into
a
destination
folder.







Compress a presentation you have already built
Microsoft PowerPoint (Windows)
If
you
already
have
a
presentation
made
with
“oversized”
images,
you
can
resize
and

compress
the
entire
presentation
in
PowerPoint
on
Windows
(not
available
in
PowerPoint

for
Mac).

1. Open
your
presentation
in
PowerPoint
and
go
to
File
>
Save
As.
Note:
this
command
is

   permanent!
Rename
the
file
so
you
don’t
overwrite
your
original.


2. At
the
bottom‐left
of
the
Save
As
window,
click
Tools
and
choose
Compress
Pictures.


3. In
the
Compress
Pictures
window,
click
Options.
and
set
the
following
choices:

   •
For
Compression
Options:
Check
delete
cropped
areas.

   •
For
Target
Output:
Choose
Email
(96
ppi),
Screen
(150
ppi)
or
Print
(220
dpi).


   


In
general,
screen
is
the
best
option
for
presentations
you
will
project.

4. Click
OK,
then
OK
again,
and
finally,
Save.


   

Apple Keynote or MS PowerPoint on a Mac
Neither Keynote nor PowerPoint for Mac provides a command for compressing a presentation.
One work-around is to save your presentation as a PDF. You can then run the PDF as a slide
show in Acrobat (Window > Full Screen Mode) or Preview (View > Slideshow).
1. Open your presentation in Keynote or PowerPoint and go to File > Print and choose PDF >
   Save as PDF (bottom left). 

2. Name and Save the PDF file.

3. Open the PDF in Apple Preview and choose Save As.., then from the Quartz filter menu,
   select Reduce File Size. 

As long as the presentation doesn’t include complex animations it should run just as it would in
Keynote or PowerPoint. PowerPoint presentations containing FLV video can be successfully
converted to PDF using Adobe Acrobat Professional 9 (available on OIT computers). 



OIT Academic Computing, University of Massachusetts   http://www.oit.umass.edu/academic   091020mt   2