Syllabus - Arkansas State University - Jonesboro

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					           Arkansas State University
             College of Agriculture

             Agriculture Education


                    Course

   AGED-4433, METHODS OF TEACHING
    AGRICULTURAL MECHANIZATION


            Spring Semester, 2010
             Classroom: Agri-102
                Lab: Agri- 134

        Instructor: Dr. Kevin Humphrey
            Office: 220 Agri.Building
             Phone: 870-972-2203
     Office Hours: Posted on Office Door
         Email: jhumphre@astate.edu
Web Site: http://www.clt.astate.edu/khumphrey/




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                                                                                         Undergraduate
                                                                                         Spring, 2010

                                       Arkansas State University
                                 College of Agriculture and Technology


I.     COURSE: AGED-4433, METHODS OF TEACHING AGRICULTURAL MECHANIZATION

       Instructor:     Dr. Kevin Humphrey
       Office:         222 Agri. Building
       Phone:          870-972-2203
       Office Hours:   Posted on office door
       Classroom:      Agri-102
       Days:           Tuesday & Thursday
       Hours:          8:00 a.m. to 9:15 a.m.
       Email:          jhumphre@astate.edu
       WebSite:        http://www.clt.astate.edu/khumphrey/


II.    Required Text and Readings:

       Primary Reading Texts:

       1) Planning, Organizing and Teaching Agricultural Mechanics, #178, Hobar Publications.

       2) Power Tool Safety, Instructor Packet, #273, Hobar Publications.

       3) ASU Teacher Education Handbook – http://www2.astate.edu/a/education/pep/handbooks.dot
                 http://www2.astate.edu/dotAsset/173931.pdf (2009-2010 Teacher Ed Handbook)
                 http://www2.astate.edu/dotAsset/173933.pdf (2009-2011 Teacher Intern Handbook)


       ** Both required texts will be purchased through the book store **
       Additional Required Equipment: Safety Glasses (Required by law while in labs).


III.   PURPOSE OF COURSE:

       The purpose of the course is to provide the emerging professional agriculture educators an
       in-depth study of an efficient agriculture department's agricultural mechanization component
       at the secondary school level and the foundations for methods of teaching agricultural
       mechanization.

       The course will include methods and techniques of organizing the laboratory, classroom
       instruction, demonstration techniques, resource acquisition and teaching agricultural
       mechanics in secondary level agriculture programs.




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V.   MAJOR GOALS:

     A.   Course Goals:

          To provide the emerging professional agriculture educator with an
          understanding of the factors that will influence the development and direction
          of agriculture mechanization.

          To provide the emerging professional agriculture educator information related
          to the major components of a secondary level agricultural mechanization
          program.

          To provide the emerging professional agriculture educator research and
          information related to agricultural mechanization and pedagogical knowledge
          and skills.

          To provide the emerging professional agriculture educator with the knowledge
          and understanding related to effective teaching and learning methods and
          styles for typical and atypical students, multi cultural and diverse classrooms
          and laboratories when planning and executing instruction in agriculture
          mechanization.

          To provide the emerging professional agriculture educator with an
          understanding of instructional material design and the use and application of
          technology in the classroom and laboratory for quality instruction in agriculture
          mechanization.

     B.   Instructional Objectives:

          Upon completion of this course each student will be able to:

          Develop units of instruction containing lesson plans, demonstration plans, and
          transparency masters.

          Conduct proper demonstrations in agriculture mechanics.

          Demonstrate the maintenance and proper operation of a selected power tool to a
          large group and develop a demonstration plan.

          Develop high level problem solving activities in agricultural mechanics.

          Develop and present a plan of instruction in a selected area of agricultural mechanics
          for a small group and a large group setting.

          Develop a list of supplies, materials and equipment necessary to conduct an
          instructional program in agricultural mechanics.

          Prepare and demonstrate a teaching aid to improve students understanding of a topic
          in agricultural mechanics.

          Develop a maintenance program for an agricultural mechanics laboratory.

          Develop a comprehensive safety program for an agricultural mechanics program.

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               Develop an inventory system using microcomputers for an agricultural
               mechanics program.

               Integrate appropriate technology such as microcomputers into teaching agricultural
               mechanics instruction.


V.      COURSE OUTLINE:

January

       Overview of course / Introductions
       Learning/teaching theory and principles as it relates to agricultural mechanics. Types of agricultural
        programs conducted and how LABORATORIES fit within the total program. Issues and Agricultural
        Mechanics program content (General and AR)
       Planning an agricultural mechanics program: community survey, priority setting, sources of
        curriculum materials, advisory committees. Inventory records, contests and awards. Materials,
        grading, housekeeping, and public relations.
       Safety in the laboratory: safety plans, color coding, appropriate clothing, safety equipment, behavior,
        cleanup, testing
       Developing a demonstration plan: Planning, organizing, evaluating small and large group
        demonstrations.
       Computer use in teaching agricultural mechanics
       Managing an agricultural mechanics laboratory. Multi-teacher departments, team teaching.
       Teaching and the exceptional student in the lab

February

       Managing student projects.
       Developing a budget for an agricultural program.
       Program evaluation and maintenance.
       Planning classroom and laboratory facilities.
       Selected Content Area Arkansas Ag Mechanics Student Teaching Demonstrations

March

       FFA Agricultural Mechanics CDE's & Preparation
       Lab Organization and Preparation & Preparation for district contests
       District Agricultural FFA Career Development Events (contests).

April

       Selected Content Area Arkansas Ag Mechanics Student Teaching Demonstrations

May

       ** FINAL EXAM **




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VI.   COURSE REQUIREMENTS AND EVALUATION PROCEDURES:

      A.   Course Requirements

           As a student in this program attendance, participation and input in class is valued and an
           important part of the teaching-learning environment of the course. If absent from class it is
           the student's responsibility to acquire the notes and materials that were missed.

           1.     Workload:

                  Success in this course depends on a number of issues. One very important issue is
                  the amount of time spent in preparation and study. It is recommended that for every
                  one hour in class, a minimum of two hours should be set aside for study, preparation
                  and planning. With this minimum time frame in mind for your studies, you should do
                  well.

           2.     Make-up Policy:

                  If absent from class you must schedule a time with the instructor in which the missed
                  materials can be acquired. An excused absence is required for any missed tests. It is
                  recommended that when possible, make prior arrangements. All assignments are
                  due on their deadlines. Late submissions will result in a reduction of points.

           Academic Integrity Expectations:

           According to the ASU Student Handbook, ASU enthusiastically promotes integrity and
           professional ethics among all members of the ASU academic community. Violations
           of this policy are considered as serious misconduct and may result in disciplinary
           action and severe penalties. Plagiarism and cheating will not be tolerated. A grade of
           "F" will be given for either.

           3.     Assignments

                  Assignment point values:                              Possible Points

                  Rotation Area Demonstrations (3 @ 100)                       300
                  Complete Lesson Plans (3 @ 75)                               225
                  Assistance at District FFA CDE’s                             200
                  AR. Ag. Mechanics I&II Instructional Rotation Plan           200
                  Lab Organization Plan                                        100
                  Final Examination                                            100
                  TOTAL POSSIBLE POINTS                                       1125




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       B.      Evaluation Procedures
               Final grades will be assigned on the basis of percentage of total points earned as
               follows:

                       A = 92% to 100%
                       B = 85% to 91%
                       C = 76% to 84%
                       D = 68% to 75%
                       F = 67% less

       C.      Instructional Methodology

               The method of instructional delivery for this class will vary. Lecture, active student
               participation, discussion, debate, individual and team presentations, off campus mentor
               relationships and assignments and relevant activities will be used to enforce and enhance the
               instructional intent.

               1.      Computers are available on campus and in the College of Agriculture=s teaching lab.
                       Each student is required to have an electronic mail account. These accounts are at
                       no charge to the student and offered through the University=s computer services.
                       Assignments, general communications and important announcements will be shared
                       via this technology. It is recommended that students check their e-mail weekly, daily
                       is recommended.

       D.      Flexibility Clause

               Circumstances may arise which prevent us from fulfilling each and every component of this
               syllabus. Therefore, the syllabus is subject to change. In this case, you will be notified of any
               change that occurs prior to any due dates.

VII.   CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK: Teaching to Learn, Learning to Teach
       (2009-2010 Teacher Ed Handbook, page 2).

       1. PROFESSIONALISM: The teacher candidate behaves in a professional, ethical, and legal manner.

       2. DIVERSITY: The teacher candidate develops a positive teaching-learning environment where all
       students are encouraged to achieve their highest potential.

       3. COMMUNICATION SKILLS: The teacher candidate demonstrates effective communication skills.

       4. CURRICULUM: The teacher candidate plans and implements curriculum appropriate to the students,
       grade level, content, and course objectives.

       5. SUBJECT MATTER: The teacher candidate understands the central concepts, tools of inquiry, and
       structures of the discipline(s) he or she teaches and can create learning experiences that make these
       aspects of subject matter meaningful for students.

       6. TEACHING MODELS: The teacher candidate implements a variety of teaching models.

       7. CLASSROOM MANAGEMENT: The teacher candidate utilizes appropriate classroom management
       strategies.



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        8. ASSESSMENT: The teacher candidate utilizes a variety of assessment strategies to monitor student
        learning and to determine adjustment in learning activities.

        9. REFLECTIVE TEACHING: The teacher candidate reflects on teaching and learning.
        Descriptors of each outcome are delineated in Appendix A on pages 26-28.


VIII.   SPECIAL CONSIDERATIONS/FEATURES OR TECHNOLOGY OF THE COURSE:

        A.     Students are strongly encouraged to submit their papers and/or assignments from word
               processing.
        B.     Presentations are required.
        C.     The employment of Multi-Media technology is encouraged during student presentations.
        D.     The use of electronic information retrieval through Internet is employed.
        E.     The use of computerized educational software programs is a part of the course.

IX.     PROCEDURES TO ACCOMMODATE STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES:

Disability Services:

“Students who require academic adjustments in the classroom or modifications in course requirements due
to a disability must first register with ASU Disability Services. Following registration and within the first two
weeks of class, please contact me to discuss appropriate academic accommodations. Appropriate
arrangements can be made to ensure equal access to this course.”


X.      REFERENCES:

        Books:

        Planning, Organizing and Teaching Agricultural Mechanics, #178, Hobar Publications.

        Power Tool Safety, Instructor Packet, #273, Hobar Publications.

        Journals: (all issues)

        Journal of Agriculture Education. American Association of Agricultural Educators, AAAE
        Journal of Agricultural Mechanization, JAM
        National Association of Colleges and Teachers of Agriculture, NACTA

        Magazines: (all issues)

        The Agricultural Education Magazine
        Making A difference. An FFA publication
        FFA New Horizons. Official Magazine of the National FFA Organization

        Professional Newsletters/Publications: (all issues)

        News & Views - National Vocational Agriculture Teachers Association, NVATA
        Arkansas Agriculture Teachers Association, AVATA
        FFA Advisors: Making A Difference, Teaching - Leading - Learning




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Web Sites:

State Web Site for Arkansas Curriculum Frameworks:
http://dwe.arkansas.gov/CurriculumFrameworks/CGAgri.htm


Arkansas State University, Professional Education Program Website
http://www2.astate.edu/a/education/pep/index.dot




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                   AGED-4433, METHODS OF TEACHING AGRICULTURAL MECHANIZATION
                                  SPRING 2010 TENTATIVE CLASS SCHEDULE

Date                            Topic

January

12     Overview of course / Introductions, Learning/teaching theory and principles as it relates to agricultural
       mechanics. Types of agricultural programs conducted and how LABORATORIES fit within the total
       program. Issues and Agricultural Mechanics program content (General and AR)

14     Learning/teaching theory and principles as it relates to agricultural mechanics. Types of agricultural
       programs conducted and how LABORATORIES fit within the total program. Issues and Agricultural
       Mechanics program content (General and AR)

18     MLK Day – No Classes

19     Learning/teaching theory and principles as it relates to agricultural mechanics. Types of agricultural
       programs conducted and how LABORATORIES fit within the total program. Issues and Agricultural
       Mechanics program content (General and AR

21     Planning an agricultural mechanics program: community survey, priority setting, sources of curriculum
       materials, advisory committees. Discussion on inventory records, contests and awards, materials,
       grading, housekeeping, and public relations.

26     Safety in the laboratory: safety plans, color-coding, appropriate clothing, safety equipment, behavior,
       cleanup, testing. Developing a demonstration plan: Planning, organizing, and evaluating small and
       large group demonstrations, Computer use in teaching agricultural mechanics, Teaching and the
       exceptional student in the lab

28     Safety in the laboratory: safety plans, color-coding, appropriate clothing, safety equipment, behavior,
       cleanup, testing. Developing a demonstration plan: Planning, organizing, and evaluating small and
       large group demonstrations, Computer use in teaching agricultural mechanics, Teaching and the
       exceptional student in the lab


February

02     Developing a demonstration plan: Planning, organizing, and evaluating small and large group
       demonstrations. Developing a budget for an agricultural mechanics program. Program evaluation and
       maintenance. Managing an agricultural mechanics laboratory. Multi-teacher departments, team
       teaching, and managing student projects.

04     Developing a demonstration plan: Planning, organizing, and evaluating small and large group
       demonstrations. Developing a budget for an agricultural mechanics program. Program evaluation and
       maintenance. Managing an agricultural mechanics laboratory. Multi-teacher departments, team
       teaching, and managing student projects.

09     Program Promotion and Marketing

11     Preparation for individual Ag-Mechanics Area Teaching #1

16     Individual Ag-Mechanics Area Teaching Demonstrations #1

18     Individual Ag-Mechanics Area Teaching Demonstrations #1

23     Individual Ag-Mechanics Area Teaching Demonstrations #1



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25      Program evaluation and maintenance.

March

02      Preparation for the FFA Agricultural Mechanics CDE’s

04      Preparation for the FFA Agricultural Mechanics CDE’s

09      Preparation for the FFA Agricultural Mechanics CDE’s

11      Preparation for the FFA Agricultural Mechanics CDE’s

16      DISTRICT FFA AGRICULTURAL MECHANICS & ELECTRICITY EVENTS (Tuesday)

18      Re-Organization

22-27   Spring Break- No class (March 22 – 28)

30      Preparation for individual Ag-Mechanics Area Teaching #2

April

06      Individual Ag-Mechanics Area Teaching Demonstrations #2

08      Individual Ag-Mechanics Area Teaching Demonstrations #2

13      Individual Ag-Mechanics Area Teaching Demonstrations #2

15      Preparation for individual Ag-Mechanics Area Teaching #3

20      Individual Ag-Mechanics Area Teaching Demonstrations #3

22      Individual Ag-Mechanics Area Teaching Demonstrations #3
        AR Ag-Mechanics I & II Rotation Plan Due

27      STUDY DAY

29      Final Exam (According to ASU Schedule) 8:00 a.m. to 10:00 a.m. Room Agri-102 or 134




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