Summer Reading Assignment Annotation 12th Grade English Frankenstein by lee92256

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									                      Summer Reading Assignment: Annotation
                               12th Grade English
                                  Frankenstein

      Annotation: Quiz grade—Due August 25/26
      Reading Check Quiz: Quiz grade—August 25/26

1. Make brief notes at the top of the page or on sticky notes to mark important plot
   events.

2. Circle or highlight words that are unfamiliar or unusual. Word that you do not know
   should be highlighted, and you need to look up the meaning of the word. Write a
   brief definition in the margin of the page containing the word. You will be held
   responsible for vocabulary words on reading quizzes.

3. When new characters are introduced, highlight phrases that describe them and write
   CD (character description) of ________ (character’s name) in the margin.

4. Highlight words, images, and details that seem to form a pattern throughout the text.
   For example, if a large clock appears in the first chapter, and then you notice the
   author using the words, “timely” or “ticking” in the text, and then an incident occurs
   in which a character breaks a watch or is late for an appointment, you may have
   uncovered a pattern of imagery that will lead the close reader to discover a theme.
   Highlight these related words or phrases and observe the rest of the text closely to
   see if the author uses other linked words, image or details.

5. Highlight passages you think might be symbolic.

6. Mark key ideas and note briefly your thoughts about them in the margin or on a
   sticky note attached to the page or end of that particular chapter.

7. Highlight passages in which figurative language appears. Be careful about this –
   there is plenty of figurative language so highlight what you believe to be the most
   significant figurative language. (ex: metaphors, similes, personification, allusions,
   symbols, etc.)

8. If you have a question about something in the book, write it on the page when it first
   occurs to you. Google it to try and find an answer. When you get an idea while
   reading the text, note it in a brief form in the margin. You may never think of this
   idea again unless you write it down.

9. Use brackets, checks, stars, bullets, or asterisks to mark very important items or
   detail you want to return to later. Then in the front of the book record the
   symbol you used and write the page numbers that have that symbol.

10. Don’t mark too much. If you mark everything, nothing will stand out!!!
                          Summer Reading Assignment – Part II: Dialectical Journal
                                       12th Grade Honors English
                                              Frankenstein

 Annotation – Quiz Grade: Due August 25/26                                                               To
 Reading Check Quiz – Quiz Grade: September 9/10

create your dialectical journal for Frankenstein, you are to do the following:

1.    Title the journal (include the title of the work).
2.    Give the chapter number that goes with each entry.
3.    Divide your paper vertically into two halves.
4.    The left side should contain meaningful quotations from the text.
5.    Use quotation marks and document correctly (according to MLA citation).
6.    Indicate the speaker of direct quotations.
7.    The right side should include your response to the quotation – in responding you should make
      comments, ask questions, record observations, draw inferences, connect to other readings, etc.
8.    Number all entries consecutively.
9.    Skip a line between each entry.
10.   Make sure that entries and responses parallel each other.
11.   Do not write on the back of your paper.
12.   Type your journal.

Very important: All of the entries in your journal must focus on the one of the topics listed below. These
topics are similar to those from which you will choose for the research paper, which you will write
during the first quarter of the school year. This dialectical journal will be invaluable to you as you begin
to develop that paper.

Possible topics:

      1. In her novel, Mary Shelley explores the responsibilities of a creator and the responsibilities of his
         creation. Look for instances in the novel where Shelley comments on or alludes to these
         particular responsibilities.
      2. One of the main themes of the novel has to do with the effects of isolation on the human mind,
         body, and spirit. Identify instances where specific characters isolate themselves, and observe
         what happens when they do so.
      3. The protagonist of the novel chooses to pursue knowledge in order to bring glory to himself.
         Identify what Shelley has to say about this pursuit, either through her narration or what specific
         characters say.
      4. Shelley identifies in her novel the detriments of seeking revenge. Look for instances in the novel
         where particular characters are pursuing revenge, and identify what Shelley (or her
         characters) has to say about this.

You will be expected to have a
        minimum of 25 entries for an 80
        10 additional entries for a 90
        20 additional entries for a 100

Your grade is based on quantity and quality. I expect to see thoughtfully selected quotations and
meaningful responses. This is an individual assignment, which means that you are not to share or
discuss your entries with others. Those who share work can share zeroes.

Journals are due on the first day of class. They are a double quiz grade.

See me if you have any questions.
                      Summer Reading Assignment – Part I: Annotation
                               12th Grade Honors English
                                      Frankenstein

Annotation – Quiz Grade: Due August 25/26
Reading Check Quiz – Quiz Grade: September 9/10


 Highlighting and Annotation Tips

  1. Make brief notes at the top of the page or on sticky notes to mark important plot
     events.

  2. Circle or highlight words that are unfamiliar or unusual. Any other vocabulary word
     that you do not know should be highlighted, and you need to look up the meaning
     of the word.

  3. When new characters are introduced, highlight phrases that describe them.

  4. Highlight words, images, and details that seem to form a pattern throughout the text.
     For example, if a large clock appears in the first chapter, and then you notice the
     author using the words, “timely” or “ticking” in the text, and then an incident occurs
     in which a character breaks a watch or is late for an appointment, you may have
     uncovered a pattern of imagery that will lead the close reader to discover a
     thematic idea. Highlight these related strands and observe the rest of the text
     closely to see if the author uses other linked words, image or details.

  5. Highlight passages you think might be symbolic.

  6. Mark key ideas and note briefly your reflections about them.

  7. Highlight passages in which figurative language appears. Be careful about this –
     there is plenty of figurative language so highlight what you believe to be the most
     significant figurative language.

  8. When you get an idea while reading the text, note it in a brief form in the margin.
     You may never think of this idea again unless you write it down.

  9. If you have a question about something in the book, write it on the page when it first
     occurs to you.

  10. Use brackets, checks, stars, bullets, or asterisks to mark very important items or detail
      you want to return to later. Then in the front of the book record the symbol you used
      and write the page numbers that have that symbol.

  11. Don’t mark too much. If you mark everything, nothing will stand out.
                          Summer Reading Assignment – Part II: Dialectical Journal
                                         12th Grade AP English
                                              Frankenstein

 Annotation – Quiz Grade: Due August 25
 Reading Check Quiz – Quiz Grade: September 9

To create your dialectical journal for Frankenstein, you are to do the following:

1.    Title the journal (include the title of the work).
2.    Give the chapter number that goes with each entry.
3.    Divide your paper vertically into two halves.
4.    The left side should contain meaningful quotations from the text.
5.    Use quotation marks and document correctly (according to MLA citation).
6.    Indicate the speaker of direct quotations.
7.    The right side should include your response to the quotation – in responding you should make
      comments, ask questions, record observations, draw inferences, connect to other readings, etc.
8.    Number all entries consecutively.
9.    Skip a line between each entry.
10.   Make sure that entries and responses parallel each other.
11.   Do not write on the back of your paper.
12.   Type your journal.

Very important: All of the entries in your journal must focus on the one of the topics listed below. These
topics are similar to those from which you will choose for the research paper, which you will write
during the first quarter of the school year. This dialectical journal will be invaluable to you as you begin
to develop that paper.

Possible topics:

      1. In her novel, Mary Shelley explores the responsibilities of a creator and the responsibilities of his
         creation. Look for instances in the novel where Shelley comments on or alludes to these
         particular responsibilities.
      2. One of the main themes of the novel has to do with the effects of isolation on the human mind,
         body, and spirit. Identify instances where specific characters isolate themselves, and observe
         what happens when they do so.
      3. The protagonist of the novel chooses to pursue knowledge in order to bring glory to himself.
         Identify what Shelley has to say about this pursuit, either through her narration or what specific
         characters say.
      4. Shelley identifies in her novel the detriments of seeking revenge. Look for instances in the novel
         where particular characters are pursuing revenge, and identify what Shelley (or her
         characters) has to say about this.

You will be expected to have a
        minimum of 25 entries for an 80
        10 additional entries for a 90
        20 additional entries for a 100

Your grade is based on quantity and quality. I expect to see thoughtfully selected quotations and
meaningful responses. This is an individual assignment, which means that you are not to share or
discuss your entries with others. Those who share work can share zeroes.

Journals are due on the first day of class. They are a double quiz grade.

See me if you have any questions.
                      Summer Reading Assignment – Part I: Annotation
                                 12th Grade AP English
                                The Return of the Native

Annotation – Quiz Grade: Due August 25
Reading Check Quiz – Quiz Grade: August 25


 Highlighting and Annotation Tips

  1. Make brief notes at the top of the page or on sticky notes to mark important plot
     events.

  2. Circle or highlight words that are unfamiliar or unusual. Any other vocabulary word
     that you do not know should be highlighted, and you need to look up the meaning
     of the word.

  3. When new characters are introduced, highlight phrases that describe them.

  4. Highlight words, images, and details that seem to form a pattern throughout the text.
     For example, if a large clock appears in the first chapter, and then you notice the
     author using the words, “timely” or “ticking” in the text, and then an incident occurs
     in which a character breaks a watch or is late for an appointment, you may have
     uncovered a pattern of imagery that will lead the close reader to discover a
     thematic idea. Highlight these related strands and observe the rest of the text
     closely to see if the author uses other linked words, image or details.

  5. Highlight passages you think might be symbolic.

  6. Mark key ideas and note briefly your reflections about them.

  7. Highlight passages in which figurative language appears. Be careful about this –
     there is plenty of figurative language so highlight what you believe to be the most
     significant figurative language.

  8. When you get an idea while reading the text, note it in a brief form in the margin.
     You may never think of this idea again unless you write it down.

  9. If you have a question about something in the book, write it on the page when it first
     occurs to you.

  10. Use brackets, checks, stars, bullets, or asterisks to mark very important items or detail
      you want to return to later. Then in the front of the book record the symbol you used
      and write the page numbers that have that symbol.

  11. Don’t mark too much. If you mark everything, nothing will stand out.

								
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