QIO Configuration and Management Manual

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					QIO Configuration and
Management Manual



Abstract
     This manual describes how to configure, operate, and manage the QIO subsystem on
     an HP NonStop™ S-series server and an HP Integrity NonStop™ NS-series server.
     Included are detailed descriptions of the Subsystem Control Facility (SCF) commands
     used with the QIO subsystem.
Product Version
     QIO F40
     QIO H01
Supported Release Version Updates (RVUs)
     This manual supports G06.17 and all subsequent G-series RVUs and H06.03 and all
     subsequent H-series RVUs until otherwise indicated by its replacement publication.

Part Number       Published
424717-007        September 2006
Document History
 Part Number     Product Version   Published
424717-003       QIO F40           December 2003
424717-004       QIO F40           December 2004
424717-005       QIO F40           February 2005
                 QIO H01
424717-006       QIO F40           July 2005
                 QIO H01
424717-007       QIO F40           September 2006
                 QIO H01
          QIO Configuration and
          Management Manual


   Glossary          Index           Figures           Tables

   What’s New in This Manual v
     Manual Information v
     New and Changed Information     v
   About This Manual vii
      Who Should Use This Manual vii
      How This Manual Is Organized vii
      Where to Get More Information vii
      NonStop S-Series Configuration and Management Manuals        x
      Notation Conventions xv
      Abbreviations xix

1. Introduction to QIO
   Subsystem Architecture 1-3
   QIO Subsystem Requirements 1-4
      Servers Supported 1-4
      ServerNet LAN Systems Access (SLSA) Subsystem          1-4
   Configuration and Management Tools 1-4
      DSM/SCM 1-5
      NonStop Kernel Subsystem 1-5
      Event Management Service (EMS) 1-5
      QIO SCF Subsystem 1-6
   SCF and the QIO Subsystem 1-7
   Subsystem Functions 1-8
      Client Process Initialization 1-9
      Inbound Data Flow 1-10
      Outbound Data Flow 1-11
      Client Process Termination 1-11

2. Configuring the QIO Subsystem
   Overview 2-1
   Assumptions 2-1


                        Hewlett-Packard Company—424717-007
                                          i
Contents                                            2. Configuring the QIO Subsystem (continued)



2. Configuring the QIO Subsystem (continued)
      Understanding QIO Memory Configuration 2-2
         User-Addressable Data Space 2-2
         Process Globals and Process Heap Space 2-3
         QIO Shared Flat Memory and QIO IOperm Segment 2-4
         Flat Segment Memory Space and Unassigned Flat Memory Space 2-4
      Memory Management 2-5
         Situations in Which Addressing Conflicts Can Occur 2-5
         Memory Management Considerations 2-5
         Other Ways to Manage Memory Space Without Moving QIO 2-6
         Before You Begin 2-6
         Determining the Maximum Pool Size 2-6
         Understanding the Configuration File 2-7
         Configuring QIO to Reside in System Data Space 2-9
         Setting an Alternate Base Address 2-12
         Setting the Size of QIO Memory 2-14
         Configuring QIO in Individual Processors 2-16
      How to Associate the Configuration File With QIO 2-16
         Associating a New Configuration File When One Does not Already Exist         2-16
         Changing an Existing Configuration File 2-19
         Reverting to an Original Configuration File 2-20
         Falling Back to the Default Configuration 2-21

3. Managing the QIO Subsystem
      Verifying the Configuration 3-1
      Monitoring Subsystem Operations 3-2
      Troubleshooting 3-2
          Traces 3-3
          Subsystem Errors 3-3
      Routine Management 3-3
          Displaying Object Information 3-3
          Managing the Display of Event Messages     3-4

4. QIO Subsystem SCF Commands
      Overview 4-1
         SCF Commands       4-2
         Objects 4-3
         States 4-3
         How SCF Works      4-4

                     QIO Configuration and Management Manual—424717-007
                                               ii
Contents                                          4. QIO Subsystem SCF Commands (continued)



4. QIO Subsystem SCF Commands (continued)
      Overview (continued)
         Input Sources 4-4
         Output Destinations 4-5
         Running SCF 4-5
         SCF Online Help 4-6
      QIO Subsystem SCF Commands 4-6
         Object States 4-7
         Sensitive and Nonsensitive Commands 4-8
         QIO Subsystem SCF Wild-Card Support 4-8
      ALTER Command 4-9
         Altering a SEGMENT Object 4-9
      INFO Command 4-11
         Obtaining Configuration Information About a MON Object 4-12
      NAMES Command 4-13
         Obtaining Names Information About an APPL Object 4-14
         Obtaining Names Information About a MON Object 4-16
         Obtaining Names Information About a QUEUE Object 4-18
         Obtaining Names Information About a SEGMENT Object 4-19
      STATUS Command 4-21
         Obtaining Status Information About an APPL Object 4-21
         Obtaining Status Information About a MON Object 4-24
         Obtaining Status Information About a QUEUE Object 4-27
      STOP Command 4-32
         Stopping a MON Object 4-32
      TRACE Command 4-33
         Obtaining Trace Information About a MON Object 4-33
      VERSION Command 4-36

A. QIO SCF Error Messages
      QIO Error Messages A-1
         RECSIZE Not 2048 Bytes A-1
      Operator Messages A-2
         00001 Object A-2
         00002 Object A-3
         00003 Buffer A-5
         00004 MD Shortage A-5
         00005 Pool A-6


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                                              iii
Contents                                                                        Glossary



Glossary
Index
Figures
      Figure 1-1.   High-Level View of the QIO Subsystem 1-2
      Figure 1-2.   SCF and the QIO Subsystem 1-8
      Figure 1-3.   Queues Created by the Client Process 1-10
      Figure 1-4.   Flow of Data From the LAN to a Client Process 1-10
      Figure 1-5.   Flow of Data Sent to the LAN by a Client Process 1-11
      Figure 2-1.   Default Configuration of User-Addressable Data Space 2-3
      Figure 2-2.   QIO Memory in Kseg2 Memory Space (NonStop S-Series
                    Servers) 2-10
      Figure 2-3.   QIO Memory in Global Privileged Space (Integrity NonStop NS-Series
                    Servers) 2-11
      Figure 2-4.   QIO Shared Memory Segment Beginning at a Higher Base Address
                    than the Default 2-13
      Figure 2-5.   QIO Shared Memory Segment Reduced From the Default of 512
                    MB 2-15
      Figure 4-1.   Control and Inquiry Management Interface to the QIO Subsystem 4-2

Tables
      Table i.      Contents vii
      Table ii.     NonStop S-Series Server Manuals viii
      Table iii.    NonStop S-Series Configuration and Management xi
      Table iv.     Integrity NonStop NS-Series Server Manuals xiii
      Table 4-1.    QIO SCF Commands 4-7
      Table 4-2.    QIO Commands and Object Types 4-7
      Table 4-3.    QIO Subsystem SCF Object States 4-7
      Table 4-4.    Sensitive and Nonsensitive QIO Subsystem SCF Commands      4-8




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                                               iv
                 What’s New in This Manual
Manual Information
    QIO Configuration and Management Manual


Abstract
    This manual describes how to configure, operate, and manage the QIO subsystem on
    an HP NonStop™ S-series server and an HP Integrity NonStop™ NS-series server.
    Included are detailed descriptions of the Subsystem Control Facility (SCF) commands
    used with the QIO subsystem.
Product Version
    QIO F40
    QIO H01
Supported Release Version Updates (RVUs)
    This manual supports G06.17 and all subsequent G-series RVUs and H06.03 and all
    subsequent H-series RVUs until otherwise indicated by its replacement publication.

     Part Number                     Published
     424717-007                      September 2006

Document History
     Part Number                       Product Version                            Published
     424717-003                        QIO F40                                    December 2003
     424717-004                        QIO F40                                    December 2004
     424717-005                        QIO F40                                    February 2005
                                       QIO H01
     424717-006                        QIO F40                                    July 2005
                                       QIO H01
     424717-007                        QIO F40                                    September 2006
                                       QIO H01


New and Changed Information
Changes Made in This Version
    Changes made in this version of the manual, part number 424717-007, are contained
    in Section 2, Configuring the QIO Subsystem and include new recommendations for
    running QIO in system data space. These changes are indicated by change bars.


                                 QIO Configuration and Management Manual— 424717-007
                                                           v
What’s New in This Manual                                                  Changes Made in Previous Versions



Changes Made in Previous Versions
      Changes made in the version of the manual identified by part number 424716-006
      include:
      •    Manual-wide: Added mention of the HP Integrity NonStop™ NS-series server
           where appropriate.
      •    Manual-wide: Updated manual titles for Integrity NonStop NS-series servers.
      •    In About This Manual, updated Table iv, Integrity NonStop NS-Series Server
           Manuals.
      •    In Section 1, Introduction to QIO, added to the list of processes (page 1-1).
      •    In Section 2, Configuring the QIO Subsystem, replaced mention of “Kseg2” with
           “system data space”.
      •    In Section 2, Configuring the QIO Subsystem, added mention that the maximum
           size of QIO in system data space is 256 MB.
      •    In Section 2, Configuring the QIO Subsystem, added Figure 2-3, QIO Memory in
           Global Privileged Space (Integrity NonStop NS-series Servers).




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                                                      vi
          About This Manual
  This manual describes the architecture, configuration, management, and operation of
  the QIO subsystem on NonStop S-series servers and on Integrity NonStop NS-series
  servers.


Who Should Use This Manual
  This manual is intended for experienced system managers and operators who need to
  configure and manage the QIO subsystem.


How This Manual Is Organized
  Table i summarizes the contents of this manual.

  Table i. Contents
   Section or
   Appendix      Title                    Contents
   1             Introduction to QIO      Describes the architecture and function of the QIO
                                          subsystem.
   2             Configuring the QIO      Describes the configuration of the QIO subsystem.
                 Subsystem
   3             Managing the QIO         Describes the software tools and tasks used to
                 Subsystem                manage the QIO subsystem.
   4             QIO Subsystem SCF        Describes the QIO SCF commands and displays.
                 Commands
   A             QIO SCF Error            Describes the QIO SCF error messages.
                 Messages


Where to Get More Information
  The manuals in the NonStop S-series server and Integrity NonStop NS-series server
  manual set provide references for system managers, operators, analysts, and others
  who install, configure, operate, manage, and support NonStop S-series servers and
  Integrity NonStop NS-series servers.
  It is important to be familiar with the following manuals:
  •    SCF Reference Manual for the Kernel Subsystem
  •    NonStop S-Series Server Description Manual
  •    Guardian Programmer’s Guide




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About This Manual                                                      Where to Get More Information



      Table ii lists and describes all NonStop S-series server manuals.

      Table ii. NonStop S-Series Server Manuals
       Category        Purpose               Title
       Reference       Contains              The appropriate G-series Release Version Update
                       information about     Compendium
                       the manuals, the      NonStop S-Series Server Description Manual
                       software releases,
                       and the hardware      NonStop S-Series Servers Introduction
                       that supports
                       S-series servers
       Change          Describes how to      The appropriate G-series Release Version Update
       planning and    prepare for           Compendium
       control         changes to            NonStop S-Series Planning and Configuration Guide
                       software or
                       hardware              NonStop S-Series System Expansion and Reduction
                       configurations        Guide
       Installation    Describes how to      The appropriate G-series Software Installation and
                       install and upgrade   Upgrade Guide
                       components and        NonStop S-Series Hardware Installation and
                       systems               FastPath Guide
       Operations      Describes how to      NonStop S-Series Operations Guide
       and support     operate and           Nonstop S-Series Hardware Support Guide
                       maintain the
                       system                NonStop S-Series Service Provider Supplement

      •   The appropriate G-series Software Installation and Upgrade Guide
          This guide contains detailed procedures for:

          °    Upgrading to the latest RVU of the HP NonStop™ operating system on a single
               S-series server from any G03.00 or later G-series RVU

          °    Falling back from the latest RVU to a previous (G03.00 or later) G-series RVU
          The detailed procedures include using DSM/SCM to install the RVU and create a
          new SYSnn subvolume, using the OSM Service Application to update firmware,
          and other associated tasks. It lists the software and disk space required to install
          the current RVU, and discusses how installing the new RVU might affect your
          applications and other products.
      •   The appropriate G-series Release Version Update Compendium
          This guide provides an overview of the hardware and software supported for
          G-series systems and describes how to plan for the migration to a G-series
          system. It is written for system managers or anyone who needs to understand how
          migrating or upgrading to a G-series RVU affects installation, configuration,
          operations, system management, maintenance, applications, networks, and
          database files.

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About This Manual                                                    Where to Get More Information



      •   NonStop S-Series Hardware Installation and FastPath Guide
          This guide is written for anyone qualified to install an NonStop S-series server. This
          guide describes how to install and start a NonStop S-series server for the first time.
          It includes information about installing server hardware, cabling system enclosures,
          installing and starting NonStop system consoles, installing external system
          devices, starting the server, and configuring the server after startup. This guide
          also includes a case study of installing a sample system, and a quick reference to
          installing and configuring a two-processor or four-processor NonStop S-series
          server in the Tetra 8 topology.
      •   NonStop S-Series Hardware Support Guide
          This guide describes how to replace system hardware components defined as
          customer-replaceable units (CRUs) on a NonStop S-series server. This guide
          provides detailed replacement procedures for failed CRUs and includes tasks for
          preparing a CRU for replacement, removing a CRU, installing a CRU, and
          resuming operations on a CRU. This guide is written for system support personnel
          responsible for the correct operation of system hardware components.
      •   NonStop S-Series Operations Guide
          This guide describes how to perform routine system hardware operations for
          S-series servers. These tasks include monitoring the system, performing recovery
          operations, operating disk and tape subsystems, performing routine hardware
          maintenance, and starting and stopping the system. This guide is written for
          system operators.
      •   NonStop S-Series Planning and Configuration Guide
          This guide explains how to plan and configure NonStop S-series servers, plan and
          prepare your site, create the operational environment, and make hardware and
          software changes to an existing server. In addition, the guide describes the
          ServerNet system area network (ServerNet SAN) and the available hardware and
          software configurations for S-series servers and provides a glossary, case studies
          that document sample systems, and a guide to other S-series manuals. This guide
          is written for those who plan the installation, configuration, and maintenance of the
          server and the software environment at a particular site.
      •   NonStop S-Series Server Description Manual
          This manual describes the principal architectural features of and the instruction set
          used by the NonStop S-series servers. It is written for system analysts and others
          who require a technical understanding of the server.
      •   NonStop S-Series Service Provider Supplement
          This supplement provides information for service providers about removing and
          installing field-replaceable units (FRUs) that are not customer-replaceable units
          (CRUs) and installing enclosures in 19-inch racks. Installation and service
          information about equipment identified as CRUs is located in the S-series server
          manual set for which this manual is a supplement. This supplement also contains

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About This Manual                                                  Where to Get More Information



          information for upgrading an enclosure from a 7000 server for use in a S7x000
          server.
          The NonStop S-Series Service Provider Supplement is available only to service
          providers who have completed special training provided by HP.
      •   NonStop S-Series System Expansion and Reduction Guide
          This guide describes how to add enclosures to, and remove enclosures from, a
          NonStop S-series system online.
      •   NonStop S-Series Servers Introduction
          This manual gives new users an orientation to NonStop S-series servers. It
          describes the application environment, architecture, and networking capabilities of
          these servers and explains basic concepts, terms, and entities in the HP
          environment.

NonStop S-Series Configuration and Management Manuals
      The S-series configuration and management manuals describe how to configure:
      •   Entire systems
      •   Individual hardware and software components such as peripheral devices and
          communications software
      •   SCF subsystem configuration manuals




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About This Manual                                                     Where to Get More Information



       Table iii lists and describes the NonStop S-series configuration and management
       manuals.
   .

       Table iii. NonStop S-Series Configuration and Management
        Category        Purpose              Title
        Stem manual     Describes how to     NonStop S-Series Planning and Configuration Guide
                        prepare for and
                        plan configuration
                        tasks
        Configuration   Describes how to     DSM/SCM Event Management Programming Manual
        manuals         install the          DSM/SCM Messages Manual
                        NonStop OS and
                        perform online       DSM/SCM Quick Reference Guide
                        configuration        DSM/SCM User’s Guide
                                             Kernel-Managed Swap Facility (KMSF) Manual
                                             SCF Reference Manual for G-Series RVUs
                                             System Generation Manual for G-Series RVUs
        SCF             Describes SCF        WAN Subsystem Configuration and Management
        subsystem       commands that        Manual
        configuration   you use to           LAN Configuration and Management Manual
        manuals         configure and
                        manage objects
                        in a specific
                        subsystem.

       •   DSM/SCM Event Management Programming Manual
           This manual provides information about the token-oriented event messages from
           the programmatic interface to the Distributed Systems Management/Software
           Configuration manager (DSM/SCM). It serves as both a reference manual for
           DSM/SCM event messages, and a programmer’s manual for writing applications
           and filters to select DSM/SCM event messages.
       •   DSM/SCM Messages Manual
           This manual provides cause, effect, and recovery information for messages and
           errors that may be encountered while using the Distributed Systems
           Management/Software Configuration Manager (DSM/SCM).
       •   DSM/SCM Quick Reference Card
           This guide, intended for experienced users of the Distributed Systems
           Management/Software Configuration Manager (DSM/SCM), provides concise,
           task-oriented procedures for configuring DSM/SCM and using it to manage and
           install software revisions on your system.




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About This Manual                                                  Where to Get More Information



      •   DSM/SCM User’s Guide
          This guide introduces the Distributed Systems Management/Software
          Configuration Manager (DSM/SCM), and explains how to configure DSM/SCM and
          use it to manage and install software revisions on your NonStop S-series system.
      •   Kernel-Managed Swap Facility (KMSF) Manual
          This manual describes the installation, configuration, and management of the
          Kernel-Managed Swap Facility (KMSF). KMSF manages virtual memory for native
          processes and, to a lesser extent, TNS processes. This manual describes the
          operation of and command syntax for NSKCOM, the NonStop Kernel command
          interface to KMSF. This manual is primarily written for those who configure,
          manage, and monitor kernel-managed swap space.
      •   SCF Reference Manual for G-Series RVUs
          This manual describes the operation of the Subsystem Control Facility (SCF) on
          G-series RVUs and how it is used to configure, control, and inquire about
          supported SCF subsystems. SCF is the configuration and management tool used
          by persons responsible for configuring system objects or monitoring their status.
      •   System Generation Manual for G-Series RVUs
          This manual describes how to use the SYSGENR program on G-series RVUs to
          create a new set of NonStop OS files. It describes the contents of the CONFTEXT
          configuration file and how to run the SYSGENR program to create a new OS
          image. This manual is intended for system managers, analysts, and support
          persons responsible for installing and configuring NonStop S-series servers.
      •   LAN Configuration and Management Manual
          This manual describes how to configure, operate, and manage the ServerNet LAN
          Systems Access (SLSA) subsystem on a NonStop S-series server. Included are
          detailed descriptions of the Subsystem Control Facility (SCF) commands used with
          the SLSA subsystem and a quick-reference section showing the command syntax.
          This manual is written for anyone who is responsible for configuring, managing, or
          monitoring the SLSA subsystem on a NonStop S-series server.
      •   WAN Subsystem Configuration and Management Manual
          This manual describes how to configure a ServerNet wide area network (SWAN)
          concentrator on a NonStop S-series server. It also describes how to monitor,
          modify, and control the WAN subsystem. Included are detailed descriptions of the
          Subsystem Control Facility (SCF) commands used with the WAN subsystem. This
          manual is written for anyone who is responsible for configuring, managing,
          troubleshooting, or maintaining the WAN subsystem and the SWAN concentrator.




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About This Manual                                                       Where to Get More Information



      Table iv lists and describes Integrity NonStop NS-series server manuals.

      Table iv. Integrity NonStop NS-Series Server Manuals
       Category           Purpose                  Title
       Reference          Contains information     H0x.xx Release Version Update
                          about the manuals,       Compendium
                          the software releases,   Introduction to Networking for HP
                          and the hardware that    Integrity NonStop NS-Series Servers
                          supports NS-series
                          servers
       Change             Describes how to         H0x.xx Release Version Update
       planning and       prepare for changes      Compendium
       control            to software or           H-Series Application Migration Guide
                          hardware
                          configurations           HP Integrity NonStop NS-Series Servers
                                                   Site Preparation
                                                   HP Integrity NonStop NS-Series
                                                   Planning Guide
                                                   HP Integrity NonStop NS-Series System
                                                   Expansion and Reduction Guide
       Installation       Describes how to         H0x.xx Software Installation and
                          install and upgrade      Upgrade Guide
                          components and           HP Integrity NonStop NS-Series
                          systems                  Hardware Installation Manual
       Operations and     Describes how to         HP Integrity NonStop NS-Series
       support            operate and maintain     Operations Guide
                          the system

      •   H0x.xx Software Installation and Upgrade Guide
          This guide provides detailed procedures for installing H0x.xx software on a
          NonStop NS-series server and falling back from a previous SYSnn. This guide
          requires a working knowledge of Windows XP Professional, HP NonStop Open
          System Management (OSM) client and server components, system console
          software, the DSM/SCM Planner Interface, Target Interface (ZPHITI), and
          ZPHIRNM applications.
      •   H0x.xx Release Version Update Compendium
          This compendium provides a summary for the products that have major changes in
          the H0x.xx release version update (RVU), including the products’ new features,
          migration issues, and fallback considerations.
      •   H-Series Application Migration Guide
          This guide introduces the H-series development and execution environments and
          explains how to migrate existing G-series applications to systems running the
          H-series RVUs of the NonStop OS.

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About This Manual                                                     Where to Get More Information



      •   Introduction to Networking for HP Integrity NonStop NS-Series Servers
          This manual provides an overview of networking and data communications
          concepts, tasks, products, and manuals for Integrity NonStop NS-series servers.
      •   HP Integrity NonStop NS-Series Servers Site Preparation
          This manual provides the physical, electrical, and environmental specifications for
          use by HP professional service personnel for site preparation, HP field support
          personnel, and by customer consultants, engineers, and contractors in the design
          and construction of the installation site for Integrity NonStop NS-series servers.
      •   HP Integrity NonStop NS-Series Hardware Installation Manual
          This manual is written for anyone qualified to install an Integrity NonStop NS-series
          server. This manual describes how to install and bring up a new Integrity NonStop
          NS-series server for the first time. It includes installation procedures for installing,
          cabling, and configuring the server hardware, I/O adapter module, disk drive
          enclosures, and system console.
      •   HP Integrity NonStop NS-Series Operations Guide
          This guide describes how to perform routine system hardware operations for
          Integrity NonStop NS-series servers. These tasks include monitoring the system,
          performing common operations tasks, and performing routine hardware
          maintenance.
      •   HP Integrity NonStop NS-Series Planning Guide
          This guide explains how to plan for new Integrity NonStop NS-series servers. In
          addition, the guide describes the ServerNet system area network (ServerNet SAN)
          and the available hardware and system configurations. It also provides a guide to
          other Integrity NonStop NS-series manuals.
      •   HP Integrity NonStop NS-Series System Expansion and Reduction Guide
          This guide describes how to expand or reduce a Integrity NonStop NS-series
          system by adding or removing enclosures.




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About This Manual                                                             Notation Conventions




Notation Conventions
Hypertext Links
      Blue underline is used to indicate a hypertext link within text. By clicking a passage of
      text with a blue underline, you are taken to the location described. For example:
          This requirement is described under Backup DAM Volumes and Physical Disk
          Drives on page 3-2.

General Syntax Notation
      This list summarizes the notation conventions for syntax presentation in this manual.

UPPERCASE LETTERS. Uppercase letters indicate keywords and reserved words. Type
    these items exactly as shown. Items not enclosed in brackets are required. For
    example:
      MAXATTACH

lowercase italic letters. Lowercase italic letters indicate variable items that you supply.
     Items not enclosed in brackets are required. For example:
      file-name

computer type. Computer type letters within text indicate C and Open System Services
    (OSS) keywords and reserved words. Type these items exactly as shown. Items not
    enclosed in brackets are required. For example:
      myfile.c

italic computer type. Italic computer type letters within text indicate C and Open
       System Services (OSS) variable items that you supply. Items not enclosed in brackets
       are required. For example:
      pathname

[ ] Brackets. Brackets enclose optional syntax items. For example:
      TERM [\system-name.]$terminal-name
      INT[ERRUPTS]
      A group of items enclosed in brackets is a list from which you can choose one item or
      none. The items in the list can be arranged either vertically, with aligned brackets on
      each side of the list, or horizontally, enclosed in a pair of brackets and separated by
      vertical lines. For example:
      FC [ num ]
         [ -num ]
         [ text ]
      K [ X | D ] address

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About This Manual                                                            General Syntax Notation



{ } Braces. A group of items enclosed in braces is a list from which you are required to
     choose one item. The items in the list can be arranged either vertically, with aligned
     braces on each side of the list, or horizontally, enclosed in a pair of braces and
     separated by vertical lines. For example:
      LISTOPENS PROCESS { $appl-mgr-name }
                        { $process-name }
      ALLOWSU { ON | OFF }

| Vertical Line. A vertical line separates alternatives in a horizontal list that is enclosed in
     brackets or braces. For example:
      INSPECT { OFF | ON | SAVEABEND }

… Ellipsis. An ellipsis immediately following a pair of brackets or braces indicates that you
    can repeat the enclosed sequence of syntax items any number of times. For example:
      M address [ , new-value ]…
      [ - ] {0|1|2|3|4|5|6|7|8|9}…
      An ellipsis immediately following a single syntax item indicates that you can repeat that
      syntax item any number of times. For example:
      "s-char…"

Punctuation. Parentheses, commas, semicolons, and other symbols not previously
    described must be typed as shown. For example:
      error := NEXTFILENAME ( file-name ) ;
      LISTOPENS SU $process-name.#su-name
      Quotation marks around a symbol such as a bracket or brace indicate the symbol is a
      required character that you must type as shown. For example:
      "[" repetition-constant-list "]"

Item Spacing. Spaces shown between items are required unless one of the items is a
     punctuation symbol such as a parenthesis or a comma. For example:
      CALL STEPMOM ( process-id ) ;
      If there is no space between two items, spaces are not permitted. In this example, no
      spaces are permitted between the period and any other items:
      $process-name.#su-name

Line Spacing. If the syntax of a command is too long to fit on a single line, each
     continuation line is indented three spaces and is separated from the preceding line by




                       QIO Configuration and Management Manual—424717-007
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About This Manual                                                              Notation for Messages



        a blank line. This spacing distinguishes items in a continuation line from items in a
        vertical list of selections. For example:
        ALTER [ / OUT file-spec / ] LINE

            [ , attribute-spec ]…

!i and !o. In procedure calls, the !i notation follows an input parameter (one that passes data
      to the called procedure); the !o notation follows an output parameter (one that returns
      data to the calling program). For example:
        CALL CHECKRESIZESEGMENT (            segment-id                                  !i
                                           , error              ) ;                      !o

!i,o. In procedure calls, the !i,o notation follows an input/output parameter (one that both
      passes data to the called procedure and returns data to the calling program). For
      example:
        error := COMPRESSEDIT ( filenum ) ;                                              !i,o

!i:i.   In procedure calls, the !i:i notation follows an input string parameter that has a
        corresponding parameter specifying the length of the string in bytes. For example:
        error := FILENAME_COMPARE_ (             filename1:length                        !i:i
                                               , filename2:length ) ;                    !i:i

!o:i. In procedure calls, the !o:i notation follows an output buffer parameter that has a
      corresponding input parameter specifying the maximum length of the output buffer in
      bytes. For example:
        error := FILE_GETINFO_ (           filenum                                       !i
                                         , [ filename:maxlen ] ) ;                       !o:i

Notation for Messages
        This list summarizes the notation conventions for the presentation of displayed
        messages in this manual.

Bold Text. Bold text in an example indicates user input typed at the terminal. For example:
        ENTER RUN CODE
        ?123
        CODE RECEIVED:              123.00
        The user must press the Return key after typing the input.

Nonitalic text. Nonitalic letters, numbers, and punctuation indicate text that is displayed or
     returned exactly as shown. For example:
        Backup Up.




                        QIO Configuration and Management Manual—424717-007
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About This Manual                                     Notation for Management Programming Interfaces



lowercase italic letters. Lowercase italic letters indicate variable items whose values are
     displayed or returned. For example:
      p-register
      process-name

[ ] Brackets. Brackets enclose items that are sometimes, but not always, displayed. For
     example:
      Event number = number [ Subject = first-subject-value ]
      A group of items enclosed in brackets is a list of all possible items that can be
      displayed, of which one or none might actually be displayed. The items in the list can
      be arranged either vertically, with aligned brackets on each side of the list, or
      horizontally, enclosed in a pair of brackets and separated by vertical lines. For
      example:
      proc-name trapped [ in SQL | in SQL file system ]

{ } Braces. A group of items enclosed in braces is a list of all possible items that can be
     displayed, of which one is actually displayed. The items in the list can be arranged
     either vertically, with aligned braces on each side of the list, or horizontally, enclosed in
     a pair of braces and separated by vertical lines. For example:
      obj-type obj-name state changed to state, caused by
      { Object | Operator | Service }
      process-name State changed from old-objstate to objstate
      { Operator Request. }
      { Unknown.          }

| Vertical Line. A vertical line separates alternatives in a horizontal list that is enclosed in
     brackets or braces. For example:
      Transfer status: { OK | Failed }

% Percent Sign. A percent sign precedes a number that is not in decimal notation. The
    % notation precedes an octal number. The %B notation precedes a binary number.
    The %H notation precedes a hexadecimal number. For example:
      %005400
      %B101111
      %H2F
      P=%p-register E=%e-register

Notation for Management Programming Interfaces
      This list summarizes the notation conventions used in the boxed descriptions of
      programmatic commands, event messages, and error lists in this manual.



                       QIO Configuration and Management Manual—424717-007
                                                xviii
About This Manual                                                              Change Bar Notation



UPPERCASE LETTERS. Uppercase letters indicate names from definition files. Type these
    names exactly as shown. For example:
      ZCOM-TKN-SUBJ-SERV

lowercase letters. Words in lowercase letters are words that are part of the notation,
     including Data Definition Language (DDL) keywords. For example:
      token-type

!r.   The !r notation following a token or field name indicates that the token or field is
      required. For example:
      ZCOM-TKN-OBJNAME               token-type ZSPI-TYP-STRING.                             !r

!o.   The !o notation following a token or field name indicates that the token or field is
      optional. For example:
      ZSPI-TKN-MANAGER               token-type ZSPI-TYP-FNAME32.                            !o

Change Bar Notation
      Change bars are used to indicate substantive differences between this manual and its
      preceding version. Change bars are vertical rules placed in the right margin of changed
      portions of text, figures, tables, examples, and so on. Change bars highlight new or
      revised information. For example:
          The message types specified in the REPORT clause are different in the COBOL85
          environment and the Common Run-Time Environment (CRE).
          The CRE has many new message types and some new message type codes for
          old message types. In the CRE, the message type SYSTEM includes all messages
          except LOGICAL-CLOSE and LOGICAL-OPEN.


Abbreviations
API. application program interface

DIH. Driver Interrupt Handler

DSM/SCM. Distributed Systems Management/Software Configuration Manager

EMS. Event Management Service

IOP. input/output process

LAN. local area network

MAC. media access control

SCF. Subsystem Control Facility

                       QIO Configuration and Management Manual—424717-007
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About This Manual                                                        Abbreviations



SCP. Subsystem Control Point

SQL. Structured Query Language

SWAN. ServerNet wide area network

TACL. HP Tandem Advanced Command Language

TAL. Transaction Application Language

WAN. wide area network




                    QIO Configuration and Management Manual—424717-007
                                              xx
1      Introduction to QIO
This section describes the architecture and functions of the QIO subsystem.
The QIO subsystem improves I/O performance by providing efficient sharing of
processor memory for the following processes:
•   SLSA (ServerNet LAN Systems Access) subsystem
•   SWAN (ServerNet wide area network) concentrator
•   NonStop TCP/IP, NonStop TCP/IPv6, and Parallel Library TCP/IP
•   NonStop IPX/SPX
•   Expand/IP line-handler
QIO provides this function by providing a shared data segment and associated
functions to manage the various resources of the shared segment.
The QIO subsystem consists of the following components:
•   QIOMON process per processor
•   QIO memory segment
•   QIO library
•   QIO drivers and interrupt handlers




                  QIO Configuration and Management Manual—424717-007
                                           1 -1
Introduction to QIO




      Figure 1-1. High-Level View of the QIO Subsystem

                       Client              Client             Client
                      Process            Process             Process         SCF/SCP

       QIO
       Subsystem




                                        QIO Library


                                                                             QIOMON
                                                                             Process



                                  Shared Memory
                                  Segment




                      Driver/Interrupt Driver/Interrupt   Driver/Interrupt
                         Handler           Handler            Handler




                         LAN                LAN               LAN               VST001.vsd
                          1                  2                 3



      The QIOMON process creates and manages the shared memory segment and
      presents a system-wide view of the shared memory subsystem.
      The QIO shared memory segment is used by the client processes, LAN drivers, and
      interrupt handlers to send and receive data. From the shared memory segment, the
      client process acquires the resources it needs—queues, buffer pools, and control
      blocks—for its internal use and for I/O data transfer. Acquired memory resources are
      released by the client process when they are no longer needed.
      QIO manages memory within a single processor. Client processes that use QIO are
      able to transfer data from multiple, noncontiguous memory addresses without
      physically moving the data, thus reducing processor overhead and improving
      performance.
      QIO provides four methods of solving memory problems without the need to change
      the application:


                          QIO Configuration and Management Manual—424717-007
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Introduction to QIO                                                         Subsystem Architecture



      •    You can configure QIO to create its shared segment in a system data area known
           as Kseg2. This removes the QIO segment from the user data segment space
           allowing more space for the heap and flat segment memory to grow.
      •    You can configure QIO to create its memory segment space with a different starting
           base address. This can allow more room for the process heap to grow.
      •    You can change the size of the QIO shared memory segment to allow more room
           for the heap and flat segment memory space to grow.
      •    You can change individual processors to different configurations independently of
           one another.


Subsystem Architecture
      QIO runs on NonStop S-series servers and on Integrity NonStop NS-series servers.
      The QIO subsystem consists of the following major components:
      •    QIO Monitor (QIOMON) process. The QIOMON process is responsible for creating
           the shared memory segment, monitoring the client processes that are using the
           segment, and performing the functions needed to manage the segment.
      •    Low-level LAN Driver Interrupt Handler (DIH). The DIH provides an interface to the
           LAN adapter for all client processes that must write to or read from the LAN. The
           driver is a set of procedures that client processes call to access the LAN. The
           interrupt handler routes incoming packets to specific inbound queues for the
           appropriate client processes. Client processes send and receive data by creating
           queues and associating them with a particular DIH.
      •    QIO library. The library is a set of procedures for QIO functions used by client
           processes, the QIOMON process, and the DIH. Library procedures are used to
           manage the shared memory segment and the interface between the client
           processes and the DIH. The QIO library interface is an internal interface and is not
           documented.
      The QIO subsystem allocates the shared memory segment as a memory pool. The
      memory pool is used by all QIO client processes for control structures, variable size
      buffers that are not used for data transfers, and message buffers. The message buffers
      are used by client processes to send and receive data.
      The amount of memory is limited by the total amount of memory available in the
      processor. You can further limit the memory used by specifying the maximum
      percentage of processor memory that QIO can consume. By default, QIO resources
      consume no more than 80 percent of the available memory in a processor or a
      maximum of 512 megabytes (MB) for the memory pool.
      The message buffers are referenced by a data structure called a message descriptor
      (MD). The client processes use the MDs to split message buffers into messages for the
      LAN. MDs and all message buffers are dynamically allocated based on usage and
      demand.


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                                                1 -3
Introduction to QIO                                                 QIO Subsystem Requirements




QIO Subsystem Requirements
      This subsection describes the NonStop S-series servers, Integrity NonStop NS-series
      servers, and LAN adapters supported by the QIO subsystem.

Servers Supported
      The QIO subsystem is supported on all NonStop S-series servers and on Integrity
      NonStop NS-series servers, that are shipped with a generic preconfiguration of the
      QIO subsystem.

ServerNet LAN Systems Access (SLSA) Subsystem
      The SLSA subsystem provides an architecture that supports parallel local area network
      input-output (LAN I/O) in a system based on the ServerNet architecture. This
      architecture allows NonStop S-series servers and Integrity NonStop NS-series servers
      to communicate across a ServerNet system area network (ServerNet SAN) and access
      communication adapters through various LAN protocols.
      The SLSA subsystem uses the shared memory segment provided by the QIO
      subsystem to move the ownership of data between processes. The subsystem also
      uses QIO-based DIHs to communicate to the appropriate adapter type over the
      ServerNet LAN. A driver exists for each ServerNet adapter and as a set of system
      library routines accessible by each process that must use the SLSA subsystem.
      Currently, the only adapters supported are:
      •    MFIOB (in the PMF CRU)
      •    ATM 3 ServerNet adapter (ATM3SA)
      •    Ethernet 4-port ServerNet adapter (E4SA)
      •    Common Communication ServerNet adapter (CCSA)
      •    Fast Ethernet ServerNet adapter (FESA)
      •    Gigabit Ethernet ServerNet adapter (GESA)
      •    Token-Ring ServerNet adapter (TRSA)
      For more information about LAN adapters, see the LAN Configuration and
      Management Manual.

Configuration and Management Tools
      Software tools help you configure and manage the QIO subsystem as described in the
      following subsections




                      QIO Configuration and Management Manual—424717-007
                                               1 -4
Introduction to QIO                                                                     DSM/SCM



DSM/SCM
      The Distributed Systems Management/Software Configuration Manager (DSM/SCM) is
      a system for the centralized planning, management, and installation of software on
      distributed NonStop S-series systems and Integrity NonStop NS-series systems.
      DSM/SCM performs the activities associated with installing and managing software
      revisions.

NonStop Kernel Subsystem
      On NonStop S-series servers and on Integrity NonStop NS-series servers, the
      NonStop Kernel subsystem configures, starts, and stops a QIOMON process. A
      configuration file can optionally be specified when starting the QIOMON process. For
      more information about the NonStop Kernel subsystem, see the SCF Reference
      Manual for the Kernel Subsystem.

Event Management Service (EMS)
      EMS provides event-collection, logging, and distribution facilities. The QIO subsystem
      reports events to EMS, as illustrated in Figure 1-2 on page 1-8. Operators and
      applications can retrieve these event messages from EMS. EMS lets each operator or
      application specify filters that determine the event messages received. EMS supports
      network analysis, problem determination, and remote operations.
      Event messages are sent directly from the subsystem to the EMS event collector ($0).
      You can select (filter) the types of event messages to be displayed, printed, or stored.
      For more information, see the DSM/SCM User’s Guide and the EMS Reference
      Summary.
      Note. The Subsystem Programmatic Interface (SPI) is not supported externally for the QIO
      subsystem.




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                                               1 -5
Introduction to QIO                                                           QIO SCF Subsystem



QIO SCF Subsystem
      The QIO Subsystem Control Facility (SCF) subsystem provides the SCF commands
      used to configure and manage the various QIO subsystem objects.
      •    The MON and SEGMENT objects are at the highest point of the hierarchy, with all
           other objects subordinate to them. (The null object is not an actual object type but
           is used in commands that do not require specification of an object type.)
      •    Immediately subordinate to the MON object are the APPL and QUEUE objects.
      The MON, SEGMENT, APPL, and QUEUE objects (see following subsections) are
      supported by the QIO SCF subsystem. A brief description is provided here; detailed
      information about the QIO SCF subsystem objects and commands is given in
      Section 4, QIO Subsystem SCF Commands, and software configuration planning is
      described in Section 2, Configuring the QIO Subsystem.

      MON Object
      The MON object refers to the QIOMON process that is running in each processor.
      The MON object name is the same as the process name used when the QIOMON
      process was started (persistence manager process).

      SEGMENT Object
      The SEGMENT object represents the shared memory segment and the objects within
      the segment, including buffer lists, message descriptor lists, and pool space.
      The object name for the SEGMENT object is the same as that for the MON object
      name.
      Most of the attributes for the SEGMENT object are specified in a configuration file.

      APPL Object
      The APPL object refers to the client processes that are using the QIO subsystem.
      Each APPL object is associated with a client process that is using the QIO subsystem.
      The APPL name has the following format:

      QIOMON_process_name.#application_process_name
      For example, $ZM02.#ZTC2 is a QIO client process under the $ZM02 QIOMON
      process.
      The APPL object refers to the client processes that are using the QIO subsystem.

      QUEUE Object
      The QUEUE object represents the queues created by an APPL object. It is subordinate
      to the MON object.

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Introduction to QIO                                                    SCF and the QIO Subsystem



      Each QUEUE object is associated with an APPL object. The QUEUE name is defined
      by the client process and must be unique within the segment. It is recommended that
      the name of the APPL that is creating the queue be used as the prefix for the QUEUE
      name. For example, $ZM02.#ZTC2.IN is the queue that belongs to the $ZTC2 client
      process under the $ZM02 QIOMON process.
      The QUEUE object represents the queues created by an APPL object and are thus
      subordinate to the APPL object.


SCF and the QIO Subsystem
      This section describes QIO management interfaces and shows how they fit into the
      architecture of the QIO subsystem. Descriptions of QIO subsystem objects and
      commands are presented.
      The QIO subsystem is managed by entering interactive (SCF) commands for
      subsystem objects.
      The response to a command indicates whether or not the specified action was
      successfully completed. If the command requires the subsystem to furnish information,
      then the information is included in the response.
      Figure 1-2 illustrates the relationship between SCF and the QIO subsystem.

      Note. SCF provides an operator interface to an intermediate process, the Subsystem Control
      Point (SCP), which in turn provides the interface to the QIOMON process.




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Introduction to QIO                                                                               Subsystem Functions




      Figure 1-2. SCF and the QIO Subsystem


                                                                                    SCF




                                                                                    SCP

                          Client
                         Process



                                                                                 QIOMON
          QIO
          Subsystem

                                                QIO
                                                Library

         Driver/Interrupt Driver/Interrupt   Driver/Interrupt Driver/Interrupt Driver/Interrupt          QIO
             Handler         Handler            Handler          Handler          Handler              Memory

                                                                                                       Segment
             LAN1              LAN2             LAN3                                LANn




                                                                                                           VST002.vsd




      SCF is a software product designed to provide a common interactive management
      interface for a variety of data communications products, QIO being one of them. The
      system operator or network manager can use SCF commands to monitor various
      objects in the QIO environment.
      The interactive SCF commands supported by the QIO subsystem are presented in
      Section 4, QIO Subsystem SCF Commands, which approaches the management
      functions from a task-oriented perspective. However, all the options and parameters for
      each SCF command may not be described in Section 4. For complete descriptions of
      all applicable SCF commands and details about using the interactive SCF interface for
      QIO, see the SCF Reference Manual for G-Series RVUs.


Subsystem Functions
      This subsection is a high-level view of how the QIO subsystem works. It is meant to
      give you a general understanding of QIO functions to enable you to configure and
      manage the QIO subsystem. Because the QIO library interface is an internal interface,
      this subsection does not describe any QIO procedure calls.

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                                                    1 -8
Introduction to QIO                                                       Client Process Initialization



      For more information about configuring and starting the QIO subsystem, see Section 2,
      Configuring the QIO Subsystem.
      QIOMON is created as a generic process. On NonStop S-series servers and on
      Integrity NonStop NS-series servers, generic processes are created by the Kernel
      subsystem and are started automatically when a processor is reloaded.
      For more information about generic processes and the Kernel subsystem, see the SCF
      Reference Manual for the Kernel Subsystem.

Client Process Initialization
      After a client process is started, it acquires queues, buffers, and pool space from the
      shared memory segment. This subsection describes the sequence of steps that a
      client process completes to acquire resources from the shared memory segment. For
      each step the client process uses one or more internal QIO library calls.
      1. The client process attaches the shared memory segment to its data space.
      2. The client process identifies itself with the QIO subsystem. This procedure creates
         a module data structure in the shared memory segment. The module data structure
         contains the process handle, which is used by the QIO subsystem to awaken the
         client (for example, when an inbound message is received).
           A module ID is returned to the client process. The module ID, which is unique
           within a processor, is used by the client process for subsequent interaction with the
           QIO subsystem.
           The client process has the option of configuring a buffer space limit (which includes
           space requirements in the form of pool space, control structures, and message
           buffers) to a certain percentage of the total segment size. If the client process does
           not set the buffer space limit, it defaults to 100 percent. This might be used, for
           example, if you are running two QIO client processes (for example, TCP/IP and
           IPX/SPX) in the same processor. You may want to assign 50 percent of the total
           shared memory available to each client process. This would prevent a client
           process from consuming all available shared memory.
      3. The client process requests pool space from the QIO subsystem. Once acquired,
         this space remains the private resource of the client process until it is released.
      4. The client process registers with the designated LAN and port. This creates
         inbound and outbound queues for the client process. The inbound queue is used to
         hold message descriptors for data received from the LAN. The outbound queue is
         used to hold message descriptors for data to be sent on the LAN. Each queue is
         marked with an ID that identifies the client process to which it belongs. The QIO
         subsystem returns queue identifiers to the client process.
           An entry for the client process is made in an internal table that is used by the
           Driver Interrupt Handler (DIH) to route inbound messages to the appropriate
           inbound queue. The client process can then retrieve messages from its inbound
           queue and return processed messages.

                       QIO Configuration and Management Manual—424717-007
                                                1 -9
Introduction to QIO                                                                   Inbound Data Flow




      Figure 1-3. Queues Created by the Client Process

                                     Client
                                     Process
        Driver/Interrupt
        Handler


                           Inbound             Outbound
                            Queue               Queue



                                                    VST007.vsd




Inbound Data Flow

      Figure 1-4. Flow of Data From the LAN to a Client Process

                                  Client
                                 Process


       Driver/Interrupt
                                 Message              Message
       Handler



                                 Inbound             Outbound    DIH Return
                                                                   Queue
                                  Queue               Queue




                               Inbound Data



                                           LAN
                                                                         VST004.vsd




      When inbound packets are received from the LAN, the interrupt handler places a
      message descriptor into a client process’s inbound queue.
      The interrupt handler then wakes up the client process. The client process reads its
      inbound queue, processes the data, and then returns the message descriptor to the
      interrupt handler for reuse.




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                                                    1- 10
Introduction to QIO                                                            Outbound Data Flow



Outbound Data Flow

      Figure 1-5. Flow of Data Sent to the LAN by a Client Process

                                                  Client
                                                 Process


                                                Message
              Driver/Interrupt Handler



                             Inbound            Outbound
                              Queue              Queue




                                               Outbound Data



                                         LAN
                                                               VST005.vsd




      To send data, the client process retrieves a message descriptor from the shared
      memory segment. The data to be sent is placed in the message buffer and the
      message descriptor is put onto the outbound queue, invoking the driver to send the
      data to the LAN adapter.

Client Process Termination
      Before terminating, the client process must release the QIO resources that it holds.
      This section describes the normal termination sequence that the client processes
      should follow.
      1. The client process deregisters its queues and the data structures allocated for
         each port.
      2. The client process releases all the pool space acquired from the shared memory
         segment.
      3. The client process releases the module data structures to the shared memory
         segment.
      4. Finally, the client process detaches the shared memory segment from its data
         space.




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Introduction to QIO                                                    Client Process Termination




                      QIO Configuration and Management Manual—424717-007
                                               1- 12
 2
Configuring the QIO Subsystem
  This section describes custom configuration of the QIO subsystem on a NonStop
  S-series server and on an Integrity NonStop NS-series server.


Overview
  The default configuration of QIO is set to maximize QIO memory availability. However,
  the default configuration sacrifices memory space available to applications. Read this
  section to determine whether you should keep the default configuration or configure
  QIO differently. This section also provides procedures for changing the default
  configuration.
  Starting with the G06.17 RVU, QIO has four configuration parameters that you can use
  to tailor QIO to your environment. The four options are discussed in Before You Begin
  on page 2-6.


Assumptions
  The following discussions assume that you are familiar with how flat memory space is
  allocated, the structure and uses of system data space, and the demands on your
  user-addressable data space.

  Note. System data space refers to Kseg2 memory space for NonStop S-series servers and to
  global privileged space for Integrity NonStop NS-series servers. Kseg2 still appears in displays,
  for backward compatibility, on the Integrity NonStop NS-series server.

  For more information refer to the following manuals:
  •   SCF Reference Manual for the Kernel Subsystem
  •   NonStop S-Series Server Description Manual
  •   Guardian Programmer’s Guide




                      QIO Configuration and Management Manual— 424717-007
                                               2 -1
Configuring the QIO Subsystem                                       Understanding QIO Memory Configuration




Understanding QIO Memory Configuration
      By default, QIO memory is stored in a flat memory space known as user-addressable
      data space.

      Note. On Integrity NonStop NS-series servers, HP recommends that you configure QIO to run in
      system data space unless your environment is using more than 256 MB of QIO shared memory space.
      On NonStop S-series servers, HP also recommends that you consider configuring QIO to run in system
      space unless your environment is using more than 128 MB of QIO shared memory space.

      Before you try to reconfigure your QIO subsystem you must understand user-
      addressable data space and how QIO works within it.

User-Addressable Data Space
      User-addressable data space is flat, nonprivileged memory space. Flat memory
      appears to a program as one large addressable space. Each native process has a
      user-addressable data area that it accesses. By default, the allocated space for the flat
      segment memory space begins at 0x4E00.0000 and grows toward the lower address
      of 0x0800.0000.
      Elements of this area are:
      •    Segments for process globals and the process heap
      •    QIO shared memory
      •    An unassigned flat memory space
      •    A memory segment that is available for use by programs
      Following are discussions of each of these elements.




                            QIO Configuration and Management Manual— 424717-007
                                                     2 -2
Configuring the QIO Subsystem                                           Process Globals and Process Heap Space




      Figure 2-1. Default Configuration of User-Addressable Data Space

            Base Addresses

                0800.0000


                                 Process Heap and
                                  Process Globals



                2000.0000


                                QIO Shared Memory
                                     Segment
                                 (default 512 MB)


                4000.0000                                    Flat Memory Space
                                                             (User Addressable
                                 QIO IOperm (32 MB)              Data Space)
                4200.0000

                                  Unassigned Flat
                                  Memory Space

                 4E00.0000


                                   Main Stack and
                                Flat Segment Memory
                                 Space Reserved for
                                      Programs



                 5000.0000
                                                VST011.vsd




Process Globals and Process Heap Space
      Process globals represent global variables defined by processes for use by the entire
      process environment.
      The process heap (C/C+) is flat memory space for a program to use for temporary
      storage of data structures.
      Process globals and the process heap share the area of flat memory between
      0x0800.0000 and 0x2000.0000. Within their segment, process globals and the process
      heap grow dynamically as required by a program. When a program fills up the globals
      and heap segment, it fails and issues an error. The error displayed depends on the
      process that is running. Runtime error messages are:
      18 Extended stack overflow
      31 Cannot obtain data space


                             QIO Configuration and Management Manual— 424717-007
                                                      2 -3
Configuring the QIO Subsystem                               QIO Shared Flat Memory and QIO IOperm Segment



      The process globals space and the process heap space are cleared when the program
      exits.

QIO Shared Flat Memory and QIO IOperm Segment
      The QIO memory segment within the user-addressable data space has a default size
      of 512 MB, which is also its maximum size. QIO memory is followed by 32 MB of
      IOperm memory, which is space in flat segment memory to provide an aliased memory
      space. The total QIO memory segment is 544 MB.
      The QIO memory segment and IOperm space starts at base address 0x20000000 and
      ends at the address 0x42000000.
      These addresses were chosen to:
      •    Put the QIO and IOperm segments close to the middle of the data segment area
           for native processes
      •    Provide space for the heap growth
      •    Provide space for the creation of other flat segments without conflict
      When a process uses the QIO shared memory subsystem with the default values, the
      QIO shared memory becomes a part of the process’s address space.

Flat Segment Memory Space and Unassigned Flat Memory
Space
      The remaining user-addressable data space is available to programs for storing
      process-defined segments. The flat, unassigned space between the end of the QIO
      memory segment and the default start of flat segment memory is available for the flat
      segment memory to grow into.
      When the flat segment memory space and the unassigned flat memory space are full,
      the flat segment memory begins to use empty space in the process globals and
      process heap segment space. If flat segment space cannot be allocated because there
      is not enough unassigned space, memory problems can occur.
      The following subsection describes how you can manage memory within
      user-addressable data space.




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Configuring the QIO Subsystem                                                     Memory Management




Memory Management
      QIO is configured to run in user-addressable data space, but if your environment is a
      NonStop S-series server and uses less than 128 MB of QIO shared memory or an
      Integrity NonStop NS-series server and uses less than 256 MB of QIO shared memory,
      HP recommends that you configure QIO to run in system data space (see Configuring
      QIO to Reside in System Data Space on page 2-9). If you are going to leave QIO
      running in user-addressable data space (the default configuration), be aware of the
      potential memory conflicts that can occur. The rest of this subsection discusses these
      potential conflicts.

Situations in Which Addressing Conflicts Can Occur
      In extreme memory-use situations, problems can arise in user-addressable data
      space. These problems are mostly related to memory conflicts and overlapping
      addresses. This subsection discusses these situations and how to identify them.
      Several common circumstances under which address conflicts can occur in the user-
      addressable data space are:

      Note. A memory-related error message is generated in these situations.

      •    If the process globals and process heap segment grows to the point where it
           becomes filled
      •    If you try to specify a program to a flat segment address that overlaps QIO space,
           the allocation fails
      •    If your program needs more than the available flat memory space and the process
           globals and process heap space memory do not have room for it
      •    If a program calls Parallel Library TCP/IP or NonStop TCP/IPv6,, the attachment of
           the socket can be in QIO space. The socket call causes the attachment of the QIO
           segment. A conflict occurs if another address space occupied by QIO is already
           allocated to either heap space or another flat segment.

Memory Management Considerations
      If you want to run QIO in user-addressable data space, watch for these symptoms of
      memory-management problems:
      •    Does the user application fail to attach to the QIO segment?
      •    Does the user application use a large amount of process heap space?
      •    Does the user application create its own flat segments, and, if so, where is a base
           address specified in the segment call?
      Use the STATUS SEGMENT, DETAIL command to display information about your QIO
      process. (For more information, see Determining the Maximum Pool Size on page 2-6.)


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Configuring the QIO Subsystem                             Other Ways to Manage Memory Space Without Moving
                                                                                                      QIO


Other Ways to Manage Memory Space Without Moving QIO
      QIO provides three methods of solving memory-conflict problems that do not involve
      running QIO in system data space:
      •    You can configure QIO to create its memory segment space with a different starting
           base address. This allows more room for the process heap to grow.
      •    You can change the size of the QIO shared memory segment to allow more room
           for the process heap and flat segment memory space to grow.
      •    You can change individual processors to different configurations independently of
           one another to tailor processor configuration to program requirements.

Before You Begin
      Before you begin to configure QIO, ensure that you are taking the correct approach for
      your system. For guidelines on memory management, see Memory Management on
      page 2-5. In evaluating memory management situations, you must first know the
      maximum memory that QIO is using. The information is available in the Max Pool Size
      field displayed by the STATUS SEGMENT, DETAIL command.

Determining the Maximum Pool Size
      To find the maximum size of the pool space you need in QIO shared memory, use the
      STATUS SEGMENT, DETAIL command as follows:
           -> status segment $zm**, detail




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Configuring the QIO Subsystem                                            Understanding the Configuration File



      This command results in a display similar to the following example:


          QIO Detailed Status SEGMENT \OSCAR.$ZM00

           State..................     DEFINED
           Segment State..........     STARTED
           Segment Type...........     FLAT_UA
           Segment Size...........     536870912
           MDs in Use.............     1265
           Max MDs Used...........     1440
           Last Fail Size.........     0
           Current Pool Size......     30406276          Initial Pool Size......      16776992
           Max Pool Size..........     56620676          Min Pool Size..........      16776992
           Current Pool Alloc.....     5442176           Max Pool Alloc.........      48083968
           Current Pool Frags.....     284               Max Pool Frags.........      286

          QIO Detailed Status SEGMENT \OSCAR.$ZM01

           State..................     DEFINED
           Segment State..........     STARTED
           Segment Type...........     RESIDENT
           Segment Size...........     100663296
           MDs in Use.............     1249
           Max MDs Used...........     1259
           Last Fail Size.........     0
           Current Pool Size......     45086340          Initial Pool Size......      16776992
           Max Pool Size..........     75495044          Min Pool Size..........      16776992
           Current Pool Alloc.....     5478400           Max Pool Alloc.........      46991360
           Current Pool Frags.....     418               Max Pool Frags.........      418


      In this NonStop S-series server display, the maximum pool size (Max Pool Size) for
      both processor 00 and processor 01 is less than 128 MB, so moving the QIO memory
      to Kseg2 is possible.
      The default pool size is 16 MB.
      For more information on the memory pool, see Subsystem Architecture on page 1-3.

Understanding the Configuration File
      Before you begin to take steps to resolve the memory problems, you need to
      understand the configuration file.
      You can change the specifications of the QIO memory segment by using a
      configuration file. This section describes the configuration file and its attributes.
      The configuration file is an EDIT file (file code 101). It contains attributes that define the
      QIO environment. If no configuration file is configured, the default values of the
      configuration attributes are used.




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Configuring the QIO Subsystem                                            Understanding the Configuration File



      Configuration File Attributes
      You can specify the following attributes in the configuration file:
      BaseAddress                   where starting address is the base address where the
      starting address              segment is to start. The valid range of addresses is from
                                    0x1000.00000 through 0x4e00000.
      CPU #                         where # (pound sign) specifies the number of the
                                    processor to be configured. If you specify no processor
                                    number or if you specify -1, all the processors are
                                    configured.
      SegmentType type              where type specifies whether QIO is to run in flat
                                    memory space or system data space:
                                    •    201 specifies flat memory space and is the default.
                                    •    202 specifies system data space.
      PoolSize size                 where size specifies the size of the pool in bytes.
                                    The default pool size is 16 MB (16M).
      SegmentSize size              where size specifies size of the QIO memory segment in
                                    bytes.
                                    •    The default size of flat memory in QIO space is
                                         512 MB.
                                    •    The default size of memory in system data space is
                                         128 MB for NonStop S-series and 256 MB for
                                         Integrity NonStop NS-series.
      You can specify the size parameter in bytes, kilobytes (K), or megabytes (M). The
      following are equivalent:
      Poolsize 67108864
      Poolsize 65536K
      Poolsize 64M
      The following rules apply to the configuration file:
      •    // indicates a comment line.
      •    You can configure QIO in each processor separately. The processor is configured
           with the CPU attribute. If no CPU attribute is specified, the defined attributes apply
           to all processors, or you can specify attributes to all processors by entering the
           attributes into the configuration file before specifying the CPU option. The
           specification CPU -1 also makes the attributes global. Attributes specified after the
           CPU attribute is specified, will apply only to the processor specified. If no attributes
           are set in the configuration file or if no configuration file exists, the default values
           for the configuration are used.


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Configuring the QIO Subsystem                                  Configuring QIO to Reside in System Data Space



      •     You can specify an attribute multiple times in the configuration file, but only the last
            attribute processed is applied.
      •     Blank lines are ignored.
      •     The configurations specified are not case-sensitive.
      •     Only one configuration parameter is allowed per line.
      If an invalid or undefined parameter is found in the configuration file, QIO will not start,
      and an EMS message is issued.

      Example Configuration Files
      The following example sets all CPU pool sizes to 64 MB:
            PoolSize 64MB
      The following example specifies that processor 1 has its QIO segment in Kseg2:
            CPU 1
            SegmentType 202
      The following two examples specify that all processors are to run in Kseg2:
            SegmentType 202
      and
            CPU -1 SegmentType 202

Configuring QIO to Reside in System Data Space
      One way to solve many heap and flat segment memory problems is to move QIO to
      the system data space area by configuring the QIO configuration file. (For more
      information, see Understanding the Configuration File on page 2-7.)
      The system data space area is privileged data space reserved for the NonStop OS and
      system processes.

      Note. In system data space, the QIO size is limited to 128 MB for NonStop S-series and 256
      MB for Integrity NonStop NS-series.

      Moving QIO to system data space frees QIO shared memory space such that the
      globals and heap, and flat memory space can use this empty space to grow. This move
      might provide enough space for large process globals and process heap space
      requirements, and also solve the problem of not enough free space for program
      allocations in flat memory.




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Configuring the QIO Subsystem                                    Configuring QIO to Reside in System Data Space




      Figure 2-2. QIO Memory in Kseg2 Memory Space (NonStop S-Series Servers)




                                 Base Addresses

                                      0800.0000



                                                     Process Heap and
                                                      Process Globals

                                        Variable
                                        Address                                     Flat Memory
                                                   Flat Segment Memory           (User Addressable
                                                           Space                    Data Space)
                                      5000.0000




                                      8000.0000

                                                         Kseg0




                                                         Kseg1
                                                                                  Privileged space
                                     C000.0000


                                        Kseg2      QIO Shared Memory
                                                   Segment (default 128
                                                    MB, max 128 MB)


                                                                    VST016.vsd




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Configuring the QIO Subsystem                                    Configuring QIO to Reside in System Data Space



      Figure 2-3. QIO Memory in Global Privileged Space (Integrity NonStop NS-Series
      Servers)




                         Base Addresses

                     00000000.08000000



                                             Process Heap and
                                              Process Globals

                                Variable
                                Address                                  Region 0 (User
                                           Flat Segment Memory          Addressable Data
                                                   Space                     Space)
                     00000000.50000000




                     00000000.80000000




                     FFFFFFFF.80000000




                                            QIO Shared Memory
                                                 Segment                Region 7 (Global
                                              (Default 256 MB           Privileged Space)
                                               Max 256 MB)




                                                           VST017.vsd




      Note the following about QIO in system data space:
      •    The starting address of the QIO is not fixed in system data space as it is in the
           default flat space memory. The starting address is stored in a fixed location in
           system globals (QIO_FLATSEG_SGADDR).
      •    The QIO segment identifications 2100 and 2101 are created as dummy selectable
           segments. This allows for compatibility with programs that may look for these

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Configuring the QIO Subsystem                                               Setting an Alternate Base Address



           segment IDs to determine if QIO is running. They are selectable segments, and
           each is 8 bytes long.
      •    The QIO space segment (segment ID 2101/32 MB), which is created in flat
           memory to provide an aliased memory space, is not needed when QIO is
           configured to run in system data space. Requests for space from the IOperm
           segment are handled by the main QIO pool segment. This means that the
           additional 32 MB of address space provided by the IOperm segment is not
           allocated.
      To configure QIO to run in system data space, specify the following attribute in the
      configuration file:
           SegmentType 202
      For more information about system data space, see the NonStop S-Series Server
      Description Manual or the HP Integrity NonStop NS-Series Server Description Manual.

Setting an Alternate Base Address
      If your QIO space is larger than 128 MB for NonStop S-series or larger than 256 MB for
      Integrity NonStop NS-series, it must run in flat memory space. To gain more process
      heap and process globals space, you can change the base address of the QIO shared
      memory segment. This subsection discusses how to change the base address of the
      QIO shared memory segment.




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                                                    2- 12
Configuring the QIO Subsystem                                                       Setting an Alternate Base Address




      Figure 2-4. QIO Shared Memory Segment Beginning at a Higher Base Address
      than the Default

            Base Addresses

                0800.0000


                                 Process Heap and
                                  Process Globals



                2000.0000
                 (default)
                                                              QIO segment starting
                                                              address increased from
                                                              default of 2000.0000

                                QIO Shared Memory
                                      Segment
                             (Size reduced by specified
                                  starting address)



                4000.0000
                4200.0000                                     QIO IOperm 32 MB
                                                              (No change in size)
                                  Unassigned Flat
                                  Memory Space
               4E00.0000
                                   Main Stack and
                                Flat Segment Memory
                                 Space Reserved for
                                      Programs
                5000.0000
                                                 VST013.vsd




      Valid starting addresses for the QIO shared memory segment are from 0x10000000 to
      0x4c000000. The base addresses must be in 32 MB increments. The default starting
      address is 0x20000000.
      The last valid flat segment address for the QIO segment is 0x4e000000-1. But you
      should decrease your segment size such that the last valid QIO segment address is
      the default value of 0x4000000-1; see the subsection Setting the Size of QIO Memory
      on page 2-14. By making the QIO segment stop at the default ending address, you
      ensure that the new environment does not conflict with dynamically allocated flat
      segments.
      Altering the base address of the QIO segment changes only the starting point of the
      QIO segment. Altering the base address does not change the size of the segment.
      Thus, changing the base address can cause the QIO segment to encroach on flat
      memory allocated to programs. You must thoroughly understand your memory
      requirements before altering the base address of the QIO segment.



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Configuring the QIO Subsystem                                                Setting the Size of QIO Memory



      The last valid flat segment address is 0x4e000000-1. If the base address specified
      causes the end address of the QIO segment to exceed this boundary, the segment
      size is automatically reduced to fit. This does not take into account other flat segment
      requirements.
      To change the base address, specify the following attribute in the configuration file:
           BaseAddress starting address
      where the valid starting addresses are 0x10000000 to 0x4c000000.

      Note. You can only change the base address in the flat segment, not in the global privileged
      space.

      The base address increases in 32 MB increments. The default starting address is
      0x20000000.

Setting the Size of QIO Memory
      If the flat memory space reserved for program use needs more space, and your QIO
      shared segment memory is less than the default size of 512 MB, you can reduce the
      size of the QIO segment. This change creates more space for programs in flat
      memory, and if you also change the starting base address, you can provide more
      space for the process heap and process globals.
      If you need no more than 128 MB of QIO memory space on NonStop S-series servers
      or 256 MB on Integrity NonStop NS-series servers, move the QIO segment to system
      space.




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                                                    2- 14
Configuring the QIO Subsystem                                                     Setting the Size of QIO Memory




      Figure 2-5. QIO Shared Memory Segment Reduced From the Default of 512 MB

               Base Addresses

                    0800.0000


                                    Process Heap and
                                     Process Globals



                    2000.0000


                                   QIO Shared Memory
                                        Segment

          QIO IOperm 32 MB
          (No change in size)                                   QIO shared memory space
                                                                reduced by a smaller
                                                                specified segment size
                  4200.0000
                 (QIO default)
                                  Unassigned Flat Memory
                                          Space


                                  Flat Segment Memory
                                   Space Reserved for
                                        Programs

                    8000.0000
                                                   VST012.vsd




      Some applications define their own flat segments. You might want to decrease the
      segment size such that the end of the QIO segment remains at 0x42000000-1. By
      sizing the QIO segment to end in the default setting, you can ensure that the
      environment will not encroach on flat segments that follow the QIO segment.
      Remember that an additional 32 MB of space for the IOperm segment is created right
      after the main QIO segment. To allocate only 128 MB for the QIO memory segment,
      specify the following attribute in the configuration file:
           SegmentSize 128M
      Sometimes you may want to change both the segment size and the base address.
      Following is an example of an allocation that increases the amount of memory that the
      process heap can allocate while not interfering with other flat segment allocations:
           SegmentSize 128M
           BaseAddress 0x38000000
      In this example, the starting address of the shared segment is 0x38000000 and the
      starting address of the IOperm segment is 0x40000000. The next available address for
      client processes is 0x42000000.




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Configuring the QIO Subsystem                                        Configuring QIO in Individual Processors



Configuring QIO in Individual Processors
      QIO allows you to configure each processor independently of the others. This lets you
      assign programs with different memory needs to individual processors that have been
      tailored to specific requirements.
      To configure QIO in individual processors, analyze your system for QIO clients and
      QIO usage and configure QIO in each processor based on those needs. For example,
      in processors 0 - 2 you might configure all of your LIFs. This is QIO intensive, so those
      processors would have QIO in the default location where it gets the full 512 MB of
      space. In processors 3 - 6 you might run your SQL applications and move QIO to
      Kseg2 to allow more memory for applications.


How to Associate the Configuration File With
QIO
      •    Associating a New Configuration File When One Does not Already Exist on
           page 2-16
      •    Changing an Existing Configuration File on page 2-19
      •    Reverting to an Original Configuration File on page 2-20
      •    Falling Back to the Default Configuration on page 2-21

Associating a New Configuration File When One Does not
Already Exist
      Follow these instructions to associate a configuration file with QIO when one does not
      already exist in QIO.

      Task 1
      Determine if a configuration file is already defined for the QIOMON process.
      Enter the following command:
           -> INFO process $zzkrn.#qiomon, detail




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                                                    2- 16
Configuring the QIO Subsystem                             Associating a New Configuration File When One Does
                                                                                              not Already Exist


      Following is an example of an INFO process, detail display:


         NONSTOP KERNEL - Detailed Info PROCESS \OSCAR.$ZZKRN.#QIOMON

          *AutoRestart...............10
          *BackupCPU.................Not Specified
          *CPU.......................ALL
          *DefaultVolume.............$SYSTEM.SYSTEM
          *ExtSwap...................Not Specified
          *Highpin...................ON
          *HomeTerminal..............$YMIOP.#CLCI
          *InFile....................$YMIOP.#CLCI
          *Library...................Not Specified
          *MemPages..................0
          *Name......................$ZMnn
          *OutFile...................$YMIOP.#CLCI
          *PFSSize...................Not Specified
          *PrimaryCPU................Not Specified
          *Priority..................199
          *Program...................$SYSTEM.SYSTEM.QIOMON
          *SaveAbend.................ON
          *StartMode.................KERNEL
          *StartupMessage............Not Specified
          *StopMode..................STANDARD
          *Type......................OTHER
          *UserId....................SUPER.SUPER ( 255,255 )




      In the example, the InFile attribute for this system is not associated with a configuration
      file. Instead, the InFile attribute is assigned to the same InFile as the persistence
      manager process $YMIOP.#CLCI.

      Task 2
      Create a configuration file with the values you want QIO to have. (For more information
      on the configuration file, see Understanding the Configuration File on page 2-7.)
      You can give the new configuration file any name and put it in any location you want.
      However, it is best to locate the file in a place that will not change from release to
      release and give the file a meaningful name, such as $system.system.qioconf.

      Task 3
      Rename the QIOMON object file to a temporary name such as QIOMONX to prevent
      the persistence manager from starting the QIOMON process.
           -> RENAME qiomon, qiomonx

      Task 4
      Stop all the processors, then reload one of the processors (such as CPU 0).
      Because the object file for QIOMON is not found, the persistence manager will not start
      the QIOMON process. The QIOMON process is now in a stopped state and can be
      altered.



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                                                    2- 17
Configuring the QIO Subsystem                             Associating a New Configuration File When One Does
                                                                                              not Already Exist


      Task 5
      Start an SCF session and enter the following command:
           -> ALTER process $zzkrn.#qiomon, infile
                    $system.system.qioconf
      where infile filename specifies the name of the new configuration file you
      created.

      Task 6
      Rename the QIOMON object file back to QIOMON such that the persistence manager
      can start it:
           -> RENAME qiomonx, qiomon

      Task 7
      Reload all the processors.
      Use SCF to start the QIOMON process:
           -> START process $ZZKRN.#QIOMON
      The persistence manager starts QIOMON using the configuration file you created in
      Task 2.

      Task 8
      Verify your configuration changes.
      You can verify that the changes you made to the configuration file have taken effect in
      three ways:
      •    Check that the configuration file is open.
      •    Enter the command:
                -> INFO mon $zm00, detail
           and look at the display to verify the configuration file name.
                Config FileName........ \OSCAR.$SYSTEM.SYSTEM.QIOCONF
                 Program FileName....... \OSCAR.$SYSTEM.SYSTEM.QIOMON
                 Library FileName.......

      •    Enter the command:
                -> STATUS segment $ZMnn, detail
           and verify that the changes have taken effect. If QIO is running in Kseg2, the
           segment type will be KSEG2, and the size will never be greater than 128 MB. If QIO
           is running in flat memory, the segment type will be Flat UA, and the size will
           never be greater than 512 MB.

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                                                    2- 18
Configuring the QIO Subsystem                                          Changing an Existing Configuration File



Changing an Existing Configuration File
      To associate a new configuration file when one already exists, perform the following
      tasks:

      Task 1
      Create a configuration file with the values you want QIO to have. (For more information
      on the configuration file, see Understanding the Configuration File on page 2-7.)
      You can give the new configuration file any name and put it in any location you want.
      However, it is best to locate the file in a place that will not change from release to
      release and give the file a meaningful name, such as $system.system.qioconf.

      Task 2
      Navigate to the volume in which QIO is running:
           -> VOLUME $system.system

      Task 3
      Rename the current configuration file:
           -> RENAME qioconf, qioconfx
      where qioconf is the name of the current configuration file.

      Task 4
      Rename the new configuration file:
           -> RENAME qioconfo, qioconf
      where qioconfo is the name of the new configuration file.

      Task 5
      Reload the processor that you want to reconfigure and run the new QIO configuration
      file.

      Task 6
      Verify your configuration changes.
      You can verify that the changes you made to the configuration file have taken effect in
      three ways:
      •    Check that the configuration file is open.
      •    Enter the command:
                -> INFO mon $zm00, detail
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                                                    2- 19
Configuring the QIO Subsystem                                       Reverting to an Original Configuration File



           and look at the display to verify the configuration file name.
                Config FileName........ \OSCAR.$SYSTEM.SYSTEM.QIOCONF
                 Program FileName....... \OSCAR.$SYSTEM.SYSTEM.QIOMON
                 Library FileName.......

      •    Enter the command:
                -> STATUS segment $ZMnn, detail
           and verify that the changes have taken effect. If QIO is running in Kseg2, the
           segment type will be KSEG2, and the size will never be greater than 128 MB. If QIO
           is running in flat memory, the segment type will be Flat UA, and the size will
           never be greater than 512 MB.

Reverting to an Original Configuration File
      To revert to the original configuration file, perform these tasks:

      Task 1
      Navigate to the volume in which QIO is running:
           -> VOLUME $system.system

      Task 2
      Rename the current configuration file:
           -> RENAME qioconf, qioconfx
      where qioconf is the name of the current configuration file.

      Task 3
      Rename the original configuration file:
           -> RENAME qioconfo, qioconf
      where qioconfo is the name of the original configuration file.

      Task 4
      Reload the processor that you want to reconfigure and run the new QIO configuration
      file.

      Task 5
      Verify your configuration changes.
      You can verify that the changes you made to the configuration file have taken effect in
      three ways:
      •    Check if the configuration file is open.
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                                                    2- 20
Configuring the QIO Subsystem                                         Falling Back to the Default Configuration



      •    Enter the command:
                -> INFO mon $zm00, detail
           and look at the display to verify the configuration file name.
                Config FileName........ \OSCAR.$SYSTEM.SYSTEM.QIOCONF
                 Program FileName....... \OSCAR.$SYSTEM.SYSTEM.QIOMON
                 Library FileName.......

      •    Enter the command:
                -> STATUS segment $ZMnn, detail
           and verify that the changes have taken effect. If QIO is running in Kseg2, the
           segment type will be KSEG2, and the size will never be greater than 128 MB. If QIO
           is running in flat memory, the segment type will be Flat UA, and the size will
           never be greater than 512 MB.

Falling Back to the Default Configuration
      To fall back to the default configuration values, perform the following tasks:

      Task 1
      Create an empty configuration file.

      Task 2
      Navigate to the volume in which QIO is running:
           -> VOLUME $system.system

      Task 3
      Rename the current configuration file:
           -> RENAME qioconf, qioconfx
      where qioconf is the name of the current configuration file.

      Task 4
      Rename the empty configuration file:
           -> RENAME qioconfo, qioconf
      where qioconfo is the name of the empty configuration file.

      Task 5
      Reload the processor that you want to reconfigure and run the new QIO configuration
      file.


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                                                    2- 21
Configuring the QIO Subsystem                                         Falling Back to the Default Configuration



      Task 6
      Verify your configuration changes.
      You can verify that the changes you made to the configuration file have taken effect in
      three ways:
      •    Check that the configuration file is open.
      •    Enter the command:
                -> INFO mon $zm00, detail
            and look at the display to verify the configuration file name.
                Config FileName........ \OSCAR.$SYSTEM.SYSTEM.QIOCONF
                 Program FileName....... \OSCAR.$SYSTEM.SYSTEM.QIOMON
                 Library FileName.......

      •    Enter the command:
                -> STATUS segment $ZMnn, detail
           and verify that the changes have taken effect. If QIO is running in Kseg2, the
           segment type will be KSEG2, and the size will never be greater than 128 MB. If QIO
           is running in flat memory, the segment type will be Flat UA, and the size will
           never be greater than 512 MB.




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                                                    2- 22
 3        Managing the QIO Subsystem
  This section describes several tools provided to verify that your QIO environment is
  properly configured. These tools are also useful for troubleshooting your environment.
  Managing the QIO subsystem includes the following tasks:
  •   Configuring and starting the QIOMON process.
  •   Observing and controlling the shared memory segment while the subsystem is
      running.
  •   Determining how much of the segment is actually used, so the segment size can
      be adjusted for optimal system performance.
  •   Limiting how much of the segment each client process can consume. (This task is
      performed through the management interfaces for the client processes.)
  •   Starting and stopping tracing of the QIO subsystem to facilitate the investigation
      and resolution of shared memory problems.
  •   Displaying statistics for the shared memory segment.

  Note. QIO subsystem tracing is not a substitute for protocol tracing, which must be performed
  by the client processes.


Verifying the Configuration
  The SCF INFO MON command with the DETAIL option displays the CPU and
  configuration, program, and library file names that were specified when the QIOMON
  process was started.

   SCF> info mon $zm02,detail

   QIO Detailed Info MON \NATIVE.$ZM02

   Config FileName.......... \NATIVE.$SYSTEM.SYSTEM.QIOCONF
   Program FileName......... \NATIVE.$SYSTEM.SYSTEM.QIOMON
   Library FileName.........




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Managing the QIO Subsystem                                        Monitoring Subsystem Operations




Monitoring Subsystem Operations
     The SCF STATUS command is useful for monitoring the operation of the QIO
     subsystem.
     The STATUS MON command with the DETAIL option displays the number of client
     processes and client process queues using the QIOMON process.

       SCF> status mon $zm02, detail

       QIO Detailed Status MON \NATIVE.$ZM02

       State......................   STARTED
       CPU........................   2
       Priority...................   201
       Num Queues.................   27
       Num Appls..................   7
       Trace Status...............   OFF
       Trace FileName.............


     Some of the values displayed with the STATUS commands are configurable for QIO
     via the configuration file specified when starting the QIOMON process. For information
     on which keywords and values can be set in the QIO configuration file, and instructions
     for reconfiguring the QIOMON process, see Section 2, Configuring the QIO
     Subsystem.


Troubleshooting
     Several types of problems can occur if the QIO subsystem is not configured correctly.
     •   If the QIOMON process fails to start, an EMS event number 2 “Object Unavailable”
         event is produced. Usually these events indicate that the amount of memory
         available in the CPU is not sufficient for the specified QIO configuration or that the
         QIOMON process and the QIO library (QIOLIB) are not from the same release.
         The symptom string displayed in the event describes the cause of the problem.
     •   If the QIOMON process starts but the client processes fail, a QIO resource
         shortage might have been detected. This situation normally causes a QIO event 3,
         4, or 5, possibly multiple times. The client process typically reports its own event
         that identifies a failure to obtain resources and then reacts to that condition. The
         reaction of the client process on a failure to obtain QIO resources depends upon
         the client process; it might decline a request (such as adding a TCP/IP subnet),
         exercise a flow control protocol on an API (such as not receiving data on a socket),
         or fail to start. Use the SCF STATUS SEGMENT $ZM* command with the DETAIL
         option to examine the QIO segment object. The display of this command shows
         the resources in use for the segment that has a resource shortage.
     If you need to change any values in the QIO configuration file, see Before You Begin
     on page 2-6. For more information on changing the configuration file, see
     Understanding the Configuration File on page 2-7.



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Managing the QIO Subsystem                                                              Traces



Traces
     The QIO subsystem displays information on its operation. This information can be
     obtained through SCF STATUS commands.

Subsystem Errors
     Most of the errors encountered at startup are configuration errors. If you have modified
     an HP-supplied configuration file, recheck your modifications to make sure they are
     correct.
     Inappropriate configuration of the QIO subsystem might result in a QIO event 2
     message. The symptom string displayed in the message describes the cause of the
     problem. Edit the QIO configuration file or specify a different configuration file.


Routine Management
     This subsection describes how to perform routine tasks such as displaying object
     information and managing the display of event messages.

Displaying Object Information
     SCF provides several commands that retrieve information for the objects associated
     with the QIO subsystem. The INFO, NAMES, and STATUS commands all return useful
     configuration and operation data.
     •   The INFO MON command displays the CPU and configuration, program, and
         library file names for a specified QIOMON process.
     •   The NAMES command displays all the names currently configured for a specific
         object type (APPL, MON, QUEUE, or SEGMENT), or for all object types if an
         object type is not specified. For example, NAMES $ZM* displays all QIO objects in
         all QIO subsystems.
     •   The STATUS command displays the status (STARTING, STARTED, or STOPPING)
         of a specific object type (APPL, MON, QUEUE, or SEGMENT).
     These commands and responses are explained in detail in Section 4, QIO Subsystem
     SCF Commands.




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Managing the QIO Subsystem                                 Managing the Display of Event Messages



Managing the Display of Event Messages
     You can display event messages in three different ways:
     •   Use the ViewPoint application as described in the ViewPoint Manual.
     •   Run an EMS distributor, which writes event messages to a printer, terminal, or file.
     •   Read the event message display on the operator console.
     For more information on event messages, see the Event Management Service (EMS)
     Analyzer Manual.




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 4
QIO Subsystem SCF Commands
  This section contains the following information:
  •   An overview of the Subsystem Control Facility (SCF) features and operation, and
      the objects on which SCF operates
  •   A general description of the SCF interface to the QIO subsystem
  •   The SCF commands supported by the QIO subsystem and the object types
      supported for each command
  •   Sensitive and nonsensitive commands
  •   The following detailed information about each SCF command:

      °   A description of the command function

      °   The command syntax, including the supported object types and object names

      °   The command usage, including prior actions to consider, the effect of the
          command completion, and subsequent steps to follow

      °   Command examples


Overview
  This subsection describes general information about SCF, which is used to configure,
  control, and collect information about data communications subsystems.
  SCF provides an operator interface to a process called the Subsystem Control Point
  (SCP). SCP is an intermediate process between SCF and other data communications
  subsystems. SCP functions as a network-management process for receiving and
  redistributing the messages that SCF sends to other data communications
  subsystems. SCP also provides security by restricting access to certain SCF
  commands, called sensitive commands, provides version control and tracing support
  for the various SCF subsystems, and supports NonStop application processes. This
  interface is illustrated in Figure 4-1 on page 4-2.




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                                             4-1
QIO Subsystem SCF Commands                                                        SCF Commands




     Figure 4-1. Control and Inquiry Management Interface to the QIO Subsystem

       Terminal
                   Application Process

                                                      Command
                                                     (OBEY) File




                          SCF                         Log
                                                      File




                          SCF


                                         QIO Subsystem




                         QIO             Configuration
                        Manager           Database

                                                  vst006.vsd




     SCF automatically opens and closes the SCP. In most cases, the default SCP, known
     to the system as $ZNET, is the only one you will ever need. If you should need to
     establish an SCF session through a specific SCP other than the default, you can start
     additional SCPs by using either the SCF RUN command or the TACL RUN command.
     For more information about SCP, see the SCF Reference Manual for SCP.

SCF Commands
     Some SCF commands operate on the objects (ADAPTERs, DEVICEs, PROCESSes,
     and so on) belonging to each subsystem. The ADD and DELETE commands add
     objects to and delete objects from the list of objects in the SCF sphere of control. Once
     an object is subject to control by SCF, you can use the START, STOP, and ABORT
     commands to change the state of the object, or you can use the ALTER command to
     change the values of selected attributes of the object. You can also use the INFO
     command to display the configured attribute values for objects, and the STATUS
     command to display the current dynamic status of objects.

     Note. For a complete description of the commands described in this subsection, see the SCF
     Reference Manual for G-Series RVUs. General SCF commands are not described in this
     manual.




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QIO Subsystem SCF Commands                                                              Objects



     Several commands are available for displaying and changing SCF session parameters.
     For example
     •    The SYSTEM and VOLUME commands control the default system, volume, and
          subvolume names used for expanding file names.
     •    The OBEY and OUT commands control the files used for command input and
          display output.
     •    The ASSUME command defines a default object to be used when the object is
          omitted from an SCF command.
     •    The ENV command displays the current settings of the SCF command parameters
          that establish the program environment.
     The HELP command can be used in several different ways. In its basic form, it displays
     a list of the available SCF commands. You can also request additional specific
     information, such as command syntax, for each command. For most subsystems, you
     can also request subsystem-specific information for their commands.
     The HELP key is also available, as it is in TACL, to display command syntax.
     The RUN command allows you to run another program during an SCF session.
     Because some commands can have detrimental effects if improperly used, special
     qualification is required to use them. These commands are called sensitive commands.
     When used with the security features of the NonStop OS, SCF provides effective
     access control for sensitive commands. Commands that request information or status
     but that do not affect operation are called nonsensitive commands. Nonsensitive
     commands are available to all users. Sensitive and nonsensitive commands in the QIO
     subsystem are described in more detail later in this section.

Objects
     SCF controls a wide variety of data communications subsystems, the individual
     components of which are called objects. Each object has an object type and an object
     name. The object name uniquely identifies an object within the system. The objects
     relevant to this subsystem are described later in this manual. For more information
     about objects and other subsystems, see Where to Get More Information on page vii.

States
     Objects can have operational states, such as STOPPED or STARTED. The exact
     sequence of states an object goes through varies from object to object and from
     subsystem to subsystem. Some subsystem commands recognize only a few states.
     The operational state of an object at a given instant is important. For example, certain
     commands have no effect on an object when that object is in some specific state but
     can affect the object when it is in another state.




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QIO Subsystem SCF Commands                                                         How SCF Works



How SCF Works
     For commands that relate only to the SCF session (such as VOLUME), SCF takes the
     appropriate action without communicating with SCP. For commands that relate to a
     subsystem or its objects, SCF translates the command into a formatted message for
     SCP, which then communicates with the appropriate subsystem to perform the
     specified task.
     SCF accepts commands from a terminal, a disk file, or an application process. It sends
     display output to a terminal, a file, a process, or a printer. When SCF is started
     interactively, the input source and output destination are specified in the command-
     interpreter RUN command used to start SCF. If SCF is started by a process creation
     procedure, its input source and output destination are taken from the startup message.
     Subsequent SCF commands can change the input source and output destination.

Input Sources
     SCF accepts command input from a terminal or a disk file. The initial input source is
     determined by the form of the RUN command used to initiate SCF. At any time during
     an SCF session, the input source can be temporarily changed to execute a series of
     commands from a command (OBEY) file.

     Modes of Operation
     SCF can be run interactively or noninteractively. Because interactive and
     noninteractive input are treated quite differently by SCF, the following distinctions are
     important:
     •    The mode is interactive when both input and output pass through the same
          terminal, or when the same process is used for both input and output. This rule can
          affect the use of abbreviations when you enter keywords. For instance, using the
          OUT command or the / OUT file-spec / parameter within a command line causes
          SCF to run in noninteractive mode.
     •    Interactive input from a terminal is characterized by the entry of a command
          followed by a carriage return. When a process is used for both input and output,
          SCF waits for the process to send a request and treats the process in the same
          manner as it would treat a terminal.
     •    Noninteractive input usually appears in the form of a command (OBEY) file.
          Command (OBEY) files are usually EDIT files that contain a series of commands.
     For more information about interactive and noninteractive modes of operation, see the
     SCF Reference Manual for G-Series RVUs.

     Setting the Initial Input Sources
     To specify an initial input source for an SCF session, use the IN option of the RUN
     command. You can specify a terminal (identified by its logical-device name) or a disk
     file. For example, the following TACL RUN command initiates SCF and directs it to

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QIO Subsystem SCF Commands                                                      Output Destinations



     read commands from a disk file named $DATA.SCF.STARTUP (if not specified, the
     system name and volume name are the default names currently in use by the TACL
     command interpreter through which the RUN command was entered):
     19> SCF / IN $DATA.SCF.STARTUP /
     If you run SCF from TACL without specifying an input file, SCF assumes that the input
     is coming from your terminal.

Output Destinations
     SCF can direct output to a disk file, an application process, a terminal, or a printer. The
     initial output destination is determined by the form of the RUN command used to
     initiate SCF. The output destination can be changed dynamically during an SCF
     session.
     To specify an initial output destination for an SCF session, use the OUT option of the
     RUN command. You can specify a terminal (identified by its logical-device name), a
     disk file, an application process, or a printer. For example, the following RUN command
     initiates SCF and directs it to send its output to a disk file named $DATA.SCF.DISPLAY
     (if not specified, the system name and volume name are the default names currently in
     use by the TACL command interpreter through which the RUN command was entered):
     20> SCF / OUT $DATA.SCF.DISPLAY /
     If you run SCF without specifying an output file, SCF assumes that the output is being
     sent to your terminal.

Running SCF
     This section describes how to start SCF, how to control its input and output files, and
     the general format of SCF commands.
     You can start SCF interactively by using the TACL command interpreter RUN
     command or by using a command (OBEY) file (or TACL macro or routine). The RUN
     command used to start SCF is described in this section. The QIO SCF commands are
     described later in this section.
     SCF can accept input from a terminal or a disk file. You can change the input source
     dynamically by using the OBEY command.
     SCF resides in a file named $SYSTEM.SYSTEM.SCF. To start SCF, use the TACL
     RUN command. For more information on RUN command, see the TACL Reference
     Manual.

     General Command Format
     An SCF command always begins with a keyword identifying the command (such as
     START, VERSION, or TRACE).
     If the command pertains only to the current SCF session, the keyword is followed
     immediately by whatever additional parameters are required to specify the action to be
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QIO Subsystem SCF Commands                                                            SCF Online Help



     taken by SCF. For example, the SYSTEM command can be entered as
     SYSTEM \newsys, where newsys is the name of the system that is to become the
     default system.
     If the command pertains to an object, it is followed immediately by the object type and
     the object name. For example, the following command aborts a subnet named
     $ZTC0.#SN1:
          SCF> ABORT SUBNET $ZTC0.#SN1
     The following command aborts a route named $ZTC0.#ROU1:
          SCF> ABORT ROUTE $ZTC0.#ROU1
     If additional information is required, the object name is followed by a comma and the
     parameters required to further specify the action to be taken. For example, the
     following command changes the value of the DELAYACKS attribute for a process:
          SCF> ALTER PROCESS $ZTC0, DELAYACKS OFF
     Detailed information about individual command format for the QIO subsystem is
     described later in this section.

SCF Online Help
     SCF provides online support when you use the HELP command described in the SCF
     Reference Manual for G-Series RVUs. If the HELP command alone is entered, SCF
     responds with a menu that guides you through the available help options. Select from
     the options displayed in the menu for the information you need.
     Using this menu-mode help facility, you can obtain general information about SCF
     basic components, such as attribute specifications, character strings, commands, file
     names, integers, and so on.
     In addition to getting general SCF information, you can obtain information specific to
     your particular subsystem.

     Note. The online help facility can be used interactively or with an obey file.

     To obtain information about the syntax of TCP/IP object types and the commands that
     apply to them, you enter the following command:
          SCF> HELP QIO

QIO Subsystem SCF Commands
     The remainder of this section describes the SCF commands supported by the QIO
     subsystem. Other commands that are generally supported by SCF, such as the
     ASSUME and ENV commands, are not documented in this manual. The SCF
     Reference Manual for G-Series RVUs provides general information about SCF
     commands, and you should be familiar with that information before reading the QIO
     subsystem-specific information provided here.

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QIO Subsystem SCF Commands                                                               Object States




     Table 4-1. QIO SCF Commands
       Command       Description
       ALTER         Changes the values of the attributes of an existing object.
       INFO          Obtains configuration information, such as the configured attribute values
                     for an object.
       NAMES         Displays a list of the subordinate object types and names for an object.
       STATUS        Displays current status and configuration information about an object.
       STOP          Terminates the activity of objects in a normal manner.
       TRACE         Collects trace information about an object.
       VERSION       Displays the version level of the specified object.


     Table 4-2. QIO Commands and Object Types
       Commands               APPL          MON           QUEUE        SEGMENT           null
       ALTER                                                                  X
       INFO                                   X
       NAMES                    X             X             X                 X           X
       STATUS                   X             X             X                 X
       STOP                                   X
       TRACE                                  X
       VERSION                                X                                           X

Object States
     Objects in the QIO subsystem have operational states, known as summary states and
     transitional states. The operational state of an object at a given instant is important;
     certain commands have no effect on an object when it is in one state but can affect the
     object when it is in another state.
     Table 4-3. QIO Subsystem SCF Object States
       State           Description
       DEFINED         The object is available for use.
       STARTED         The process is running and is ready to accept requests from other
                       subsystem components. This state results from the START command.
       STARTING        This is a transient state. The process is on its way to the STARTED state
                       because a command was issued to start it.
       STOPPED         The process does not accept requests from other subsystem components.
                       This state results from the STOP command.
       STOPPING        This is a transient state. The process is on its way to the STOPPED state
                       because a command was issued to stop it.



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QIO Subsystem SCF Commands                                           Sensitive and Nonsensitive Commands



Sensitive and Nonsensitive Commands
     Because some SCF commands can have detrimental effects if improperly used,
     special qualification is required to use them. These commands are called sensitive
     commands. Sensitive commands can change the state or configuration of subsystem
     objects, start or stop tracing, or change the values of statistics counters. The use of
     sensitive commands is limited to the following user IDs:
     •    Members of the super group (group ID 255)
     •    Members of the user group that owns the process to which the command is sent
     SCF commands that request information or status but that do not affect operation are
     available to all users. These commands are called nonsensitive commands.

     Table 4-4. Sensitive and Nonsensitive QIO Subsystem SCF Commands
       Sensitive Commands                             Nonsensitive Commands
       ALTER                                          INFO
       STOP                                           STATUS
       TRACE                                          VERSION
                                                      NAMES

QIO Subsystem SCF Wild-Card Support
     Object name templates (wild-cards) are supported for QIO subsystem SCF commands
     as described in the SCF Reference Manual for G-Series RVUs. The following is a
     summary of wild-card support for QIO SCF commands.
     Normally, an SCF command line must include an object type and an object name.
     However, many commands accept object-name templates. Object-name templates are
     used to cause multiple objects of a given type to respond to a single command.
     Object-name templates allow you to specify multiple objects by entering a pattern
     composed of a single wild-card character or of text and one or more wild-card
     characters. With QIO, you can use the asterisk (*) and the question mark (?) as wild
     cards in object-name templates. You can use both of these wild cards in any valid
     combination.
     *Use an asterisk to represent a character string of undefined length. You can use an
     asterisk to represent the following strings:
          •    A whole separated name; for example, $ZM* selects all monitor processes on
               the system.
          •    A trailing string; for example, $ZM01.#ZNV0* selects all objects subordinate to
               $ZM01 that have names starting with #ZNV0.
          •    An undefined number of characters; for example, #Z*5 selects all names that
               start with #Z and end with 5.

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QIO Subsystem SCF Commands                                                    ALTER Command



     ? Use the question mark to represent a single unknown character in a specific position;
     for example, $ZM01.#Z?1 selects all object names subordinate to $ZM01 that begin
     with #Z, end with 1, and contain exactly one character between the #Z and the 1.


ALTER Command
     Use the ALTER command to change the values of the attributes of an existing object.
     The ALTER command changes only the specified attributes of the target object.
     This is a sensitive command.
     The ALTER command is supported for the following QIO subsystem object:
     •    SEGMENT

Altering a SEGMENT Object
     Use the ALTER SEGMENT command to change the memory pool size of a SEGMENT
     object.
     The ALTER SEGMENT command allows you to change the size of the current pool
     space. This command is most useful to immediately shrink the current pool size when
     less pool space is required. Although the QIO subsystem automatically shrinks the size
     of the pool space when less pool space is being used, this shrinkage normally occurs
     in increments and over a period of time. Note that the rate of shrinkage is slower than
     the rate at which the pool space is increased. ALTER SEGMENT is a sensitive
     command.
     The ALTER SEGMENT command has the following syntax:

         ALTER [ / OUT file-spec / ] SEGMENT segment-name

            , poolsize size         [ , unit       [ B | K | M ] ]

     OUT file-spec
          causes any SCF output generated for this command to be directed to the specified
          file as described earlier in this section under Output Destinations on page 4-5.




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QIO Subsystem SCF Commands                                                      Altering a SEGMENT Object



     SEGMENT segment-name
          indicates the SEGMENT you want to alter.
          Value:     The SEGMENT name is the same as the MON name.
                     The name of the MON object as defined by the Kernel subsystem
                     on NonStop S-series servers or on Integrity NonStop NS-series
                     servers.
                     The possible values are:
                     $ZMnn, where nn are numeric digits 00 through 15 that designate
                     the processor in which the QIOMON process is running,
                     or the asterisk ($ZM*) to specify all configured MON objects.
                     For example, $ZM00 specifies the QIO monitor process running in
                     processor 0, and $ZM14 specifies the QIO monitor process
                     running in processor 14.
          Default:   None provided.

     poolsize size
          size of the shared memory pool to be used by all current client processes. Valid
          integer values are 0 to 512 MB; however, the amount of memory available in the
          processor determines the practical limit (as does the segment size).
          indicates the value you want to change the memory pool size to.
          Value:     In bytes: 0-128*1024*1024
                     In kilobytes: 0-128*1024
                     In megabytes: 0-128
          Default:   None provided

     unit     [ B | K | M ]
          indicates the value of the poolsize attribute.
          Value:     B indicates the value specified for poolsize is in bytes.
                     K indicates the value specified for poolsize is in kilobytes.
                     M indicates the value specified for poolsize is in megabytes.
          Default:    B




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                                                  4- 10
QIO Subsystem SCF Commands                                                               INFO Command



     Using the ALTER SEGMENT Command
     Use the following command to alter a SEGMENT object:
          SCF ALTER SEG $ZM03, POOLSIZE 4, UNIT M

     Considerations
     •    The specified SEGMENT object must be in the STARTED summary state.
     •    The ALTER command does not alter the summary state of the object.
     •    You cannot use the ALTER command to change the maximum percentage of
          available memory that the QIO subsystem will consume. To change the maximum
          percentage, you must stop client processes, stop the QIOMON process, edit the
          QIO configuration file, then restart the QIOMON process.

     Example
     This example shows the correct way of specifying the command syntax.
     This command, changes the memory pool size for the QIO monitor process running in
     processor 3 to a size of 64K bytes:
     ALTER SEGMENT $ZM03, poolsize 64, unit K

INFO Command
     Use the INFO command to obtain configuration information, such as the configured
     attribute values for the specified object.
     This is a nonsensitive command.
     The INFO command is supported for the following QIO subsystem object:
     •    MON

     Notes.

     1.   In all the displays for the INFO command, an asterisk (*) indicates that the value of the
          attribute can be changed by using the ALTER command.

     2.   In all the INFO commands, DETAIL is the default. When attributes or modifiers are
          included in the command syntax, only information about that attribute or modifier is
          displayed.

     3.   The display examples are preceded by the command syntax that generated the display.




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QIO Subsystem SCF Commands                                Obtaining Configuration Information About a MON
                                                                                                     Object


Obtaining Configuration Information About a MON Object
     The INFO MON command returns the static configuration attribute values for a QIO
     monitor process object.
     The INFO MON command has the following syntax:

       INFO [ / OUT file-spec / ] MON monitor-name [ , DETAIL ]

     OUT file-spec
          causes any SCF output generated for this command to be directed to the specified
          file as described earlier in this section under Output Destinations on page 4-5.

     MON monitor-name
          indicates the QIO monitor process you want to obtain information about.
          Value:      The name of the MON object as defined by the Kernel subsystem on
                      NonStop S-series servers.
                      The possible values are:
                      $ZMnn, where nn are numeric digits 00 through 15 that designate the
                      processor in which the QIOMON process is running,
                      or the asterisk ($ZM*) to specify all configured MON objects.
                      For example, $ZM00 specifies the QIO monitor process running in
                      processor 0, and $ZM14 specifies the QIO monitor process running in
                      processor 14.
          Default:    None provided.

     DETAIL
          specifies that the display is to include additional detailed information about the
          object.
     The format of the display for the INFO MON command without the DETAIL option is:

       2-> info mon $zm00

       QIO Info MON

        Name                  Config FileName
       $ZM00




     Name
          is the name of QIOMON process for which you are requesting information.



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QIO Subsystem SCF Commands                                                       NAMES Command



     Config FileName
                 is the name of the configuration file that the QIOMON process used at startup
                 (if supplied).
     The format of the display for the INFO MON command with the DETAIL option is:

       3-> info mon $zm00, detail

       QIO Detailed Info MON \MYSYS.$ZM00

         Config FileName........
         Program FileName....... \MYSYS.$SYSTEM.SYS01.QIOMON
         Library FileName.......



     Config FileName
          is the name of the configuration file that the QIOMON process used at startup.

     Program FileName
          is the name of the QIOMON program file.

     Library FileName
                 is the name of the QIOMON library file (should always be blank).


NAMES Command
     Use the NAMES command to display a list of the subordinate object types and names
     for the specified object.
     This is a nonsensitive command.
     The NAMES command is supported for the following QIO subsystem objects:
     •    APPL
     •    MON
     •    null
     •    QUEUE
     •    SEGMENT

     Note. The display examples are preceded by the command syntax that generated the display.




                           QIO Configuration and Management Manual— 424717-007
                                                   4- 13
QIO Subsystem SCF Commands                             Obtaining Names Information About an APPL Object



Obtaining Names Information About an APPL Object
     The NAMES APPL command has the following syntax:

       NAMES [ / OUT file-spec / ] APPL appl-name

     OUT file-spec
          causes any SCF output generated for this command to be directed to the specified
          file as described earlier in this section under Output Destinations on page 4-5.

     APPL appl-name
              indicates the APPL name you want to obtain information about.
          Value:     The APPL name has the following format:
                     QIOMON_process_name.#application_process_name
                     For example, $ZM02.#ZTC2 is a QIO client process under the
                     $ZM02 QIOMON process.
          Default:   None provided.




                        QIO Configuration and Management Manual— 424717-007
                                                4- 14
QIO Subsystem SCF Commands                             Obtaining Names Information About an APPL Object



     The format of the display for the NAMES APPL command is:

       4-> names appl $zm00

       QIO Names APPL \MYSYS.

       APPL
       $ZM00.#FOXKAU.30165E80

       QUEUE
       $ZM00.#FOXKAU.30165E80.$FOXKAU.#COMP_Q
       $ZM00.#FOXKAU.30165E80.$FOXKAU.#WANR_Q

       APPL
       $ZM00.#IPCORE.301727C0

       QUEUE
       $ZM00.#IPCORE.301727C0.$IPCORE.#COMP_Q
       $ZM00.#IPCORE.301727C0.$IPCORE.#WANR_Q

       APPL
       $ZM00.#IPCORE.30172FC0

       QUEUE
       $ZM00.#IPCORE.30172FC0.EXPAND_UIP_COMPLQ_0031
       $ZM00.#IPCORE.30172FC0.EXPAND_UIP_RCVQ_0031

       APPL
       $ZM00.#ZLM00.30165C00

       QUEUE
       $ZM00.#ZLM00.30165C00.E4SA0.0.MGMT.RXPENDQ
       $ZM00.#ZLM00.30165C00.E4SA0.0.MGMT.TXHOLDQ
       $ZM00.#ZLM00.30165C00.E4SA0.0.MGMT.TXPENDQ
       $ZM00.#ZLM00.30165C00.E4SA0.1.MGMT.RXPENDQ
       $ZM00.#ZLM00.30165C00.E4SA0.1.MGMT.TXHOLDQ
       $ZM00.#ZLM00.30165C00.E4SA0.1.MGMT.TXPENDQ
       $ZM00.#ZLM00.30165C00.LAN0.OUTPUT
       $ZM00.#ZLM00.30165C00.LAN01.OUTPUT
       $ZM00.#ZLM00.30165C00.LAN02.OUTPUT
       $ZM00.#ZLM00.30165C00.LAN04.OUTPUT
       $ZM00.#ZLM00.30165C00.LAN21.OUTPUT
       $ZM00.#ZLM00.30165C00.LAN22.OUTPUT
       $ZM00.#ZLM00.30165C00.LAN23.OUTPUT
       $ZM00.#ZLM00.30165C00.LAN24.OUTPUT
       $ZM00.#ZLM00.30165C00.LAN03.OUTPUT
       $ZM00.#ZLM00.30165C00.LAN3.OUTPUT
       $ZM00.#ZLM00.30165C00.LAN4.OUTPUT
       $ZM00.#ZLM00.30165C00.LAN7.OUTPUT
       $ZM00.#ZLM00.30165C00.LMON_BCAST_INPUT
       $ZM00.#ZLM00.30165C00.ZLM00_DR_INPUT
       $ZM00.#ZLM00.30165C00.ZLM00_INPUT

       APPL
       $ZM00.#ZTC0.300B5E80

       QUEUE
       $ZM00.#ZTC0.300B5E80.$ZTC0.#QIOSOCK.CMD

       APPL
       $ZM00.#ZTC1.30006280

       QUEUE
       $ZM00.#ZTC1.30006280.$ZTC1.#QIOSOCK.CMD
                                                                                (continued)




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                                                4- 15
QIO Subsystem SCF Commands                               Obtaining Names Information About a MON Object




       (continued)

       APPL
       $ZM00.#ZTC2.3010DC40

       QUEUE
       $ZM00.#ZTC2.3010DC40.$ZTC2.#QIOSOCK.CMD

       APPL
       $ZM00.#ZTC3.300060C0

       QUEUE
       $ZM00.#ZTC3.300060C0.$ZTC3.#QIOSOCK.CMD

       APPL
       $ZM00.#ZZLAN.30006140


     APPL
          shows a list of the configured APPL objects.

     QUEUE
          shows a list of the configured QUEUE objects.

Obtaining Names Information About a MON Object
     The NAMES MON command has the following syntax:

       NAMES [ / OUT file-spec / ] MON monitor-name

     OUT file-spec
          causes any SCF output generated for this command to be directed to the specified
          file as described earlier in this section under Output Destinations on page 4-5.

     MON monitor-name
          indicates the QIO monitor process you want to obtain information about.
          Value:     The name of the MON object as defined by the Kernel subsystem on
                     NonStop S-series servers.
                     The possible values are:
                     $ZMnn, where nn are numeric digits 00 through 15 that designate
                     the processor in which the QIOMON process is running,
                     or the asterisk ($ZM*) to specify all configured MON objects.
                     For example, $ZM00 specifies the QIO monitor process running in
                     processor 0, and $ZM14 specifies the QIO monitor process running
                     in processor 14.
          Default:   None provided.
                        QIO Configuration and Management Manual— 424717-007
                                                4- 16
QIO Subsystem SCF Commands                               Obtaining Names Information About a MON Object



     The format of the display for the NAMES MON command is:

       2-> names mon $zm00

       QIO Names MON \MYSYS.

       MON
       $ZM00

       APPL
       $ZM00.#FOXKAU.30165E80

       QUEUE
       $ZM00.#FOXKAU.30165E80.$FOXKAU.#COMP_Q
       $ZM00.#FOXKAU.30165E80.$FOXKAU.#WANR_Q

       APPL
       $ZM00.#IPCORE.301727C0

       QUEUE
       $ZM00.#IPCORE.301727C0.$IPCORE.#COMP_Q
       $ZM00.#IPCORE.301727C0.$IPCORE.#WANR_Q

       APPL
       $ZM00.#IPCORE.30172FC0

       QUEUE
       $ZM00.#IPCORE.30172FC0.EXPAND_UIP_COMPLQ_0031
       $ZM00.#IPCORE.30172FC0.EXPAND_UIP_RCVQ_0031

       APPL
       $ZM00.#ZLM00.30165C00

       QUEUE
       $ZM00.#ZLM00.30165C00.E4SA0.0.MGMT.RXPENDQ
       $ZM00.#ZLM00.30165C00.E4SA0.0.MGMT.TXHOLDQ
       $ZM00.#ZLM00.30165C00.E4SA0.0.MGMT.TXPENDQ
       $ZM00.#ZLM00.30165C00.E4SA0.1.MGMT.RXPENDQ
       $ZM00.#ZLM00.30165C00.E4SA0.1.MGMT.TXHOLDQ
       $ZM00.#ZLM00.30165C00.E4SA0.1.MGMT.TXPENDQ
       $ZM00.#ZLM00.30165C00.LAN0.OUTPUT
       $ZM00.#ZLM00.30165C00.LAN01.OUTPUT
       $ZM00.#ZLM00.30165C00.LAN02.OUTPUT
       $ZM00.#ZLM00.30165C00.LAN03.OUTPUT
       $ZM00.#ZLM00.30165C00.LAN04.OUTPUT
       $ZM00.#ZLM00.30165C00.LAN21.OUTPUT
       $ZM00.#ZLM00.30165C00.LAN22.OUTPUT
       $ZM00.#ZLM00.30165C00.LAN23.OUTPUT
       $ZM00.#ZLM00.30165C00.LAN24.OUTPUT
       $ZM00.#ZLM00.30165C00.LAN3.OUTPUT
       $ZM00.#ZLM00.30165C00.LAN4.OUTPUT
       $ZM00.#ZLM00.30165C00.LAN7.OUTPUT
       $ZM00.#ZLM00.30165C00.LMON_BCAST_INPUT
       $ZM00.#ZLM00.30165C00.ZLM00_DR_INPUT
       $ZM00.#ZLM00.30165C00.ZLM00_INPUT

       APPL
       $ZM00.#ZTC0.300B5E80

       QUEUE
       $ZM00.#ZTC0.300B5E80.$ZTC0.#QIOSOCK.CMD

       APPL
       $ZM00.#ZTC1.30006280

       QUEUE
       $ZM00.#ZTC1.30006280.$ZTC1.#QIOSOCK.CMD



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                                                4- 17
QIO Subsystem SCF Commands                            Obtaining Names Information About a QUEUE Object




       (continued):
       APPL
       $ZM00.#ZTC2.3010DC40

       QUEUE
       $ZM00.#ZTC2.3010DC40.$ZTC2.#QIOSOCK.CMD

       APPL
       $ZM00.#ZTC3.300060C0

       QUEUE
       $ZM00.#ZTC3.300060C0.$ZTC3.#QIOSOCK.CMD

       APPL
       $ZM00.#ZZLAN.30006140

       SEGMENT
       $ZM00


     MON
          shows a list of the configured MON objects.

     APPL
          shows a list of the configured APPL objects.

     QUEUE
          shows a list of the configured QUEUE objects.

     SEGMENT
          shows a list of the configured SEGMENT objects.

Obtaining Names Information About a QUEUE Object
     The NAMES QUEUE command has the following syntax:

       NAMES [ / OUT file-spec / ] QUEUE queue-name

     OUT file-spec
          causes any SCF output generated for this command to be directed to the specified
          file as described earlier in this section under Output Destinations on page 4-5.




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                                                4- 18
QIO Subsystem SCF Commands                          Obtaining Names Information About a SEGMENT Object



     QUEUE queue-name
          specifies the name of the QUEUE you want to obtain information about.
          Value:     The QUEUE name is defined by the client process and must be
                     unique within the segment. The name can as long as 23 characters.
                     It is recommended that the name of the APPL that is creating the
                     queue be used as the prefix for the QUEUE name. For example,
                     $ZM02.#ZTC2.IN is the queue that belongs to the $ZM02.#ZTC2
                     client process under the $ZM02 QIOMON process.
          Default:   None provided.
     The format of the display for the NAMES QUEUE command is:

       6-> names queue $zm00

       QIO Names QUEUE \MYSYS.

       QUEUE
       $ZM00.#FOXKAU.30165E80.$FOXKAU.#COMP_Q
       $ZM00.#FOXKAU.30165E80.$FOXKAU.#WANR_Q
       $ZM00.#IPCORE.301727C0.$IPCORE.#COMP_Q
       $ZM00.#IPCORE.301727C0.$IPCORE.#WANR_Q
       $ZM00.#IPCORE.30172FC0.EXPAND_UIP_COMPLQ_0031
       $ZM00.#IPCORE.30172FC0.EXPAND_UIP_RCVQ_0031
       $ZM00.#ZLM00.30165C00.E4SA0.0.MGMT.RXPENDQ
       $ZM00.#ZLM00.30165C00.E4SA0.0.MGMT.TXHOLDQ
       $ZM00.#ZLM00.30165C00.E4SA0.0.MGMT.TXPENDQ
       $ZM00.#ZLM00.30165C00.E4SA0.1.MGMT.RXPENDQ
       $ZM00.#ZLM00.30165C00.E4SA0.1.MGMT.TXHOLDQ
       $ZM00.#ZLM00.30165C00.E4SA0.1.MGMT.TXPENDQ
       $ZM00.#ZLM00.30165C00.LAN0.OUTPUT
       $ZM00.#ZLM00.30165C00.LAN01.OUTPUT
       $ZM00.#ZLM00.30165C00.LAN02.OUTPUT
       $ZM00.#ZLM00.30165C00.LAN03.OUTPUT
       $ZM00.#ZLM00.30165C00.LAN04.OUTPUT
       $ZM00.#ZLM00.30165C00.LAN21.OUTPUT
       $ZM00.#ZLM00.30165C00.LAN22.OUTPUT
       $ZM00.#ZLM00.30165C00.LAN23.OUTPUT
       $ZM00.#ZLM00.30165C00.LAN24.OUTPUT
       $ZM00.#ZLM00.30165C00.LAN3.OUTPUT
       $ZM00.#ZLM00.30165C00.LAN4.OUTPUT
       $ZM00.#ZLM00.30165C00.LAN7.OUTPUT
       $ZM00.#ZLM00.30165C00.LMON_BCAST_INPUT
       $ZM00.#ZLM00.30165C00.ZLM00_DR_INPUT
       $ZM00.#ZLM00.30165C00.ZLM00_INPUT
       $ZM00.#ZTC0.300B5E80.$ZTC0.#QIOSOCK.CMD
       $ZM00.#ZTC1.30006280.$ZTC1.#QIOSOCK.CMD
       $ZM00.#ZTC2.3010DC40.$ZTC2.#QIOSOCK.CMD
       $ZM00.#ZTC3.300060C0.$ZTC3.#QIOSOCK.CMD


     QUEUE
          shows a list of the configured QUEUE objects.

Obtaining Names Information About a SEGMENT Object
     The NAMES SEGMENT command has the following syntax:

       NAMES [ / OUT file-spec / ] SEGMENT segment-name

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QIO Subsystem SCF Commands                          Obtaining Names Information About a SEGMENT Object



     OUT file-spec
          causes any SCF output generated for this command to be directed to the specified
          file as described earlier in this section under “Output Destinations.”

     SEGMENT segment-name
          indicates the SEGMENT you want to obtain information about.
          Value:     The SEGMENT name is the same as the MON name.
                     The name of the MON object as defined by the Kernel subsystem
                     on NonStop S-series servers.
                     The possible values are:
                     $ZMnn, where nn are numeric digits 00 through 15 that designate
                     the processor in which the QIOMON process is running,
                     or the asterisk ($ZM*) to specify all configured MON objects.
                     For example, $ZM00 specifies the QIO monitor process running in
                     processor 0, and $ZM14 specifies the QIO monitor process running
                     in processor 14.
          Default:   None provided.
     The format of the display for the NAMES SEGMENT command is:

       7-> names segment $zm00

       QIO Names SEGMENT \MYSYS.

       SEGMENT
       $ZM00


     SEGMENT
          shows a list of the configured SEGMENT objects.




                        QIO Configuration and Management Manual— 424717-007
                                                4- 20
QIO Subsystem SCF Commands                                                       STATUS Command




STATUS Command
     Use the STATUS command to display current status and configuration information
     about an object.
     This is a nonsensitive command.
     The STATUS command is supported for the following QIO subsystem objects:
     •    APPL
     •    MON
     •    QUEUE
     •    SEGMENT

     Note. The display examples are preceded by the command syntax that generated the display.


Obtaining Status Information About an APPL Object
     Use the STATUS APPL command to display current status and configuration
     information about an APPL object.
     The STATUS APPL command has the following syntax:

         STATUS [ / OUT file spec / ] APPL appl-name [ , DETAIL ]

     OUT file-spec
          causes any SCF output generated for this command to be directed to the specified
          file as described earlier in this section under “Output Destinations.”

     APPL appl-name
          specifies the client process.

     DETAIL
          specifies that the display is to include additional detailed information about the
          object.

     Considerations
     •    The summary state of the object does not prevent the STATUS command from
          being successfully completed.
     •    The STATUS command does not alter the summary state of the object.




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QIO Subsystem SCF Commands                               Obtaining Status Information About an APPL Object



     The format of the display for the STATUS APPL command without the DETAIL option
     is:

       8-> status appl $zm00

       QIO Status APPL

        Name                                         State       Appl Id
       $ZM00.#FOXKAU.30165E80                        DEFINED     806772352
       $ZM00.#IPCORE.301727C0                        DEFINED     806823872
       $ZM00.#IPCORE.30172FC0                        DEFINED     806825920
       $ZM00.#ZLM00.30165C00                         DEFINED     806771712
       $ZM00.#ZTC0.300B5E80                          DEFINED     806051456
       $ZM00.#ZTC1.30006280                          DEFINED     805331584
       $ZM00.#ZTC2.3010DC40                          DEFINED     806411328
       $ZM00.#ZTC3.300060C0                          DEFINED     805331136
       $ZM00.#ZZLAN.30006140                         DEFINED     805331264


     Name
          is the name of the APPL object.

     State
          is the current summary state of the queue. The only valid value is DEFINED.

     Appl Id
          the module ID assigned to the application. The number is displayed in decimal
          numbers.
     The format of the display for the STATUS APPL command with the DETAIL option is:




                         QIO Configuration and Management Manual— 424717-007
                                                 4- 22
QIO Subsystem SCF Commands                              Obtaining Status Information About an APPL Object




       9-> status appl $zm00, detail

       QIO Detailed Status APPL \MYSYS.$ZM00.#FOXKAU.30165E80

        State..................    DEFINED
        Appl Id................    806772352
        Current Space..........    0
        Space Limit............    0

       QIO Detailed Status APPL \MYSYS.$ZM00.#IPCORE.301727C0

        State..................    DEFINED
        Appl Id................    806823872
        Current Space..........    0
        Space Limit............    0

       QIO Detailed Status APPL \MYSYS.$ZM00.#IPCORE.30172FC0

        State..................    DEFINED
        Appl Id................    806825920
        Current Space..........    9152
        Space Limit............    26843520

       QIO Detailed Status APPL \MYSYS.$ZM00.#ZLM00.30165C00

        State..................    DEFINED
        Appl Id................    806771712
        Current Space..........    143939
        Space Limit............    0

       QIO Detailed Status APPL \MYSYS.$ZM00.#ZTC0.300B5E80

        State..................    DEFINED
        Appl Id................    806051456
        Current Space..........    352348
        Space Limit............    0

       QIO Detailed Status APPL \MYSYS.$ZM00.#ZTC1.30006280

        State..................    DEFINED
        Appl Id................    805331584
        Current Space..........    352348
        Space Limit............    0

       QIO Detailed Status APPL \MYSYS.$ZM00.#ZTC2.3010DC40

        State..................    DEFINED
        Appl Id................    806411328
        Current Space..........    352348
        Space Limit............    0

       QIO Detailed Status APPL \MYSYS.$ZM00.#ZTC3.300060C0

        State..................    DEFINED
        Appl Id................    805331136
        Current Space..........    352348
        Space Limit............    0

       QIO Detailed Status APPL \MYSYS.$ZM00.#ZZLAN.30006140

        State..................    DEFINED
        Appl Id................    805331264
        Current Space..........    0
        Space Limit............    0




                        QIO Configuration and Management Manual— 424717-007
                                                4- 23
QIO Subsystem SCF Commands                               Obtaining Status Information About a MON Object



     Name
          is the name of the APPL object.

     State
          is the current summary state of the queue. The only valid value is DEFINED.

     APPL Id
          the module ID assigned to the application. The number is displayed in decimal
          numbers.

     Current Space
          is the size of the pool, in bytes, that the client obtained from the shared memory
          segment.

     Space Limit
          is the maximum memory, in bytes, that the client can obtain from the QIO segment.
          0 means no limit is set for this application.

Obtaining Status Information About a MON Object
     Use the STATUS MON command to display current status and configuration
     information about a MON object.
     The STATUS MON command has the following syntax:

       STATUS [ / OUT file spec / ] MON monitor-name [ , DETAIL ]

     OUT file-spec
          causes any SCF output generated for this command to be directed to the specified
          file as described earlier in this section under Output Destinations on page 4-5.




                        QIO Configuration and Management Manual— 424717-007
                                                4- 24
QIO Subsystem SCF Commands                               Obtaining Status Information About a MON Object



     MON monitor-name
          indicates the QIO monitor process you want to obtain information about.
          Value:     The name of the MON object as defined by the Kernel subsystem
                     on NonStop S-series servers.
                     The possible values are:
                     $ZMnn, where nn are numeric digits 00 through 15 that designate
                     the processor in which the QIOMON process is running,
                     or the asterisk ($ZM*) to specify all configured MON objects.
                     For example, $ZM00 specifies the QIO monitor process running in
                     processor 0, and $ZM14 specifies the QIO monitor process running
                     in processor 14.
          Default:   None provided.

     DETAIL
          specifies that the display is to include additional detailed information about the
          object.

     Considerations
     •    The summary state of the object does not prevent the STATUS command from
          being successfully completed.
     •    The STATUS command does not alter the summary state of the object.
     The format of the display for the STATUS MON command without the DETAIL option
     is:

       10-> status mon $zm00

       QIO Status MON

        Name                 State        CPU       Priority     Trace Status
       $ZM00                 STARTED      0         201          OFF


     Name
          is the name of the QIOMON process.

     State
          is the current summary state of the MON object.

     CPU
          is the processor where the QIOMON process is running.



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QIO Subsystem SCF Commands                                Obtaining Status Information About a MON Object



     Priority
                  °    is the priority of the QIOMON process.

     Trace Status
          indicates whether the trace facility is ON or OFF.
     The format of the display for the STATUS MON command with the DETAIL option is:

       11-> status mon $zm00, detail

       QIO Detailed Status MON \MYSYS.$ZM00

        State..................     STARTED
        CPU....................     0
        Priority...............     201
        Num Queues.............     31
        Num Appls..............     9
        Trace Status...........     OFF
        Trace FileName.........


     MON Name
          is the name of the MON object. This is the same as the QIOMON process name. In
          the above example, it is \NATIVE.$ZM02.

     State
          is the current state of the QIOMON process. Valid state is STARTED.

     CPU
          is the processor in which the QIOMON process is running.

     Priority
          is the priority of the QIOMON process.

     Num Queues
          is the count of the queues added to the QIO subsystem by its clients.

     Num Appls
          is the number of clients using the QIO subsystem. Each client is represented by an
          APPL object.

     Trace Status
          specifies whether tracing is enabled for this MON object.

          Trace FileName
          is the name of the trace destination file if trace is on.



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QIO Subsystem SCF Commands                             Obtaining Status Information About a QUEUE Object



Obtaining Status Information About a QUEUE Object
     Use the STATUS QUEUE command to display current status and configuration
     information about an QUEUE object.
     The STATUS QUEUE command has the following syntax:

         STATUS [ / OUT file spec / ] QUEUE queue-name [ ,DETAIL ]

     OUT file-spec
          causes any SCF output generated for this command to be directed to the specified
          file as described earlier in this section under Output Destinations on page 4-5.

     QUEUE queue-name
          specifies the name of the QUEUE object.

     DETAIL
          specifies that the display is to include additional detailed information about the
          object.

     Considerations
     •    The summary state of the object does not prevent the STATUS command from
          being successfully completed.
     •    The STATUS command does not alter the summary state of the objects.




                        QIO Configuration and Management Manual— 424717-007
                                                4- 27
QIO Subsystem SCF Commands                             Obtaining Status Information About a QUEUE Object



     The format of the display for the STATUS QUEUE command without the DETAIL option
     is:

       12-> status queue $zm00

       QIO Status QUEUE

       Name                                                          State        Queue Id
       $ZM00.#FOXKAU.30165E80.$FOXKAU.#COMP_Q                        DEFINED      806772480
       $ZM00.#FOXKAU.30165E80.$FOXKAU.#WANR_Q                        DEFINED      806773056
       $ZM00.#IPCORE.301727C0.$IPCORE.#COMP_Q                        DEFINED      806826176
       $ZM00.#IPCORE.301727C0.$IPCORE.#WANR_Q                        DEFINED      806826048
       $ZM00.#IPCORE.30172FC0.EXPAND_UIP_COMPLQ_0031                 DEFINED      806830912
       $ZM00.#IPCORE.30172FC0.EXPAND_UIP_RCVQ_0031                   DEFINED      806825792
       $ZM00.#ZLM00.30165C00.E4SA0.0.MGMT.RXPENDQ                    DEFINED      806805632
       $ZM00.#ZLM00.30165C00.E4SA0.0.MGMT.TXHOLDQ                    DEFINED      806805888
       $ZM00.#ZLM00.30165C00.E4SA0.0.MGMT.TXPENDQ                    DEFINED      806805760
       $ZM00.#ZLM00.30165C00.E4SA0.1.MGMT.RXPENDQ                    DEFINED      806930432
       $ZM00.#ZLM00.30165C00.E4SA0.1.MGMT.TXHOLDQ                    DEFINED      806821568
       $ZM00.#ZLM00.30165C00.E4SA0.1.MGMT.TXPENDQ                    DEFINED      806930304
       $ZM00.#ZLM00.30165C00.LAN0.OUTPUT                             DEFINED      806874304
       $ZM00.#ZLM00.30165C00.LAN01.OUTPUT                            DEFINED      806879488
       $ZM00.#ZLM00.30165C00.LAN02.OUTPUT                            DEFINED      806884224
       $ZM00.#ZLM00.30165C00.LAN03.OUTPUT                            DEFINED      806773184
       $ZM00.#ZLM00.30165C00.LAN04.OUTPUT                            DEFINED      806776704
       $ZM00.#ZLM00.30165C00.LAN21.OUTPUT                            DEFINED      806780224
       $ZM00.#ZLM00.30165C00.LAN22.OUTPUT                            DEFINED      806783744
       $ZM00.#ZLM00.30165C00.LAN23.OUTPUT                            DEFINED      806787392
       $ZM00.#ZLM00.30165C00.LAN24.OUTPUT                            DEFINED      806791040
       $ZM00.#ZLM00.30165C00.LAN3.OUTPUT                             DEFINED      806794688
       $ZM00.#ZLM00.30165C00.LAN4.OUTPUT                             DEFINED      806798336
       $ZM00.#ZLM00.30165C00.LAN7.OUTPUT                             DEFINED      806801984
       $ZM00.#ZLM00.30165C00.LMON_BCAST_INPUT                        DEFINED      805330688
       $ZM00.#ZLM00.30165C00.ZLM00_DR_INPUT                          DEFINED      806771968
       $ZM00.#ZLM00.30165C00.ZLM00_INPUT                             DEFINED      806771840
       $ZM00.#ZTC0.300B5E80.$ZTC0.#QIOSOCK.CMD                       DEFINED      806051584
       $ZM00.#ZTC1.30006280.$ZTC1.#QIOSOCK.CMD                       DEFINED      805691712
       $ZM00.#ZTC2.3010DC40.$ZTC2.#QIOSOCK.CMD                       DEFINED      806411456
       $ZM00.#ZTC3.300060C0.$ZTC3.#QIOSOCK.CMD                       DEFINED      805332288


     Name
          is the name of the queue.

     State
          is the current summary state of the queue. The only valid value is DEFINED.

     Queue Id
          is the internal number/pointer assigned to the queue by the QIOMON process.
          The format of the display for the STATUS QUEUE command with the DETAIL
          option is:

     Name
          is the name of the queue.

     State
          is the current summary state of the queue. The only valid value is DEFINED.
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QIO Subsystem SCF Commands                             Obtaining Status Information About a QUEUE Object



     Queue Id
          is the internal name assigned to the queue by the QIOMON process.

     Current MD Count
          is the number of message descriptors (MDs) currently in the queue.

     High MD Count
          is the maximum number of simultaneous MDs allowed on the queue.
          Obtaining Status Information About a SEGMENT Object
     Use the STATUS SEGMENT command to display current status and configuration
     information about an SEGMENT object.
     The STATUS SEGMENT command has the following syntax:

       STATUS [ / OUT file-spec / ] SEGMENT segment-name [ , DETAIL
       ]

     OUT file-spec
          causes any SCF output generated for this command to be directed to the specified
          file as described earlier in this section under Output Destinations on page 4-5.

     SEGMENT segment-name
          indicates the SEGMENT you want to obtain information about.
          Value:     The SEGMENT name is the same as the MON name.
                     The name of the MON object as defined by the Kernel subsystem
                     on NonStop S-series servers.
                     The possible values are:
                     $ZMnn, where nn are numeric digits 00 through 15 that designate
                     the processor in which the QIOMON process is running,
                     or the asterisk ($ZM*) to specify all configured MON objects.
                     For example, $ZM00 specifies the QIO monitor process running in
                     processor 0, and $ZM14 specifies the QIO monitor process running
                     in processor 14.
          Default:   None provided.

     DETAIL
          specifies that the display is to include additional detailed information about the
          object.




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QIO Subsystem SCF Commands                             Obtaining Status Information About a QUEUE Object



     Considerations
     •    The summary state of the object does not prevent the STATUS command from
          being successfully completed.
     •    The STATUS command does not alter the summary state of the objects.
     The format of the display for the STATUS SEGMENT command without the DETAIL
     option is:

       14-> status segment $zm00

       QIO Status SEGMENT

       Name                                          State            Segment State
       $ZM00                                         DEFINED          STARTED


     Name
          is the name of the segment.

     State
          indicates the current summary state of the SEGMENT object. DEFINED is the only
          valid value.

     Segment State
          is the current state of the QIO segment. Valid values are STARTED and
          STOPPING.
     The format of the display for the STATUS SEGMENT command running in Kseg2
     memory space with the DETAIL option is:

       15-> status segment $zm00, detail

       QIO Detailed Status SEGMENT \MYSYS.$ZM00

        State..................    DEFINED
        Segment State..........    STARTED
        Segment Type...........    KSEG2
        Segment Size...........    134217728
        MDs in Use.............    28974
        Max MDs Used...........    29182
        Last Fail Size.........    0
        Current Pool Size......    84932228            Initial Pool Size...... 16776992
        Max Pool Size..........    99612292            Min Pool Size.......... 16776992
        Current Pool Alloc.....    160821632            Max Pool Alloc.........
       60958720
        Current Pool Frags.....    132                 Max Pool Frags......... 166


     Name
          is the name of the segment.




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QIO Subsystem SCF Commands                              Obtaining Status Information About a QUEUE Object



     State
          indicates the current summary state of the MON object. DEFINED is the only valid
          value.

     Segment State
          is the current state of the QIO segment. Valid values are STARTING, STOPPING,
          and DEFINED.

     Segment Type
          is the type of the shared memory segment. Valid values are KSEG2 (for segments
          in Kseg2) and FLAT_UA (for segments in the flat memory space).

     Segment Size
          is the size, in bytes, of the QIO segment in the QIO subsystem. The segment size
          is computed from the information in the configuration file.

     MDs in Use
          is the number of message descriptors (MDs) currently in use. Each message in the
          QIO subsystem is represented by an MD.

     Max MDs Used
          is the highest number of message descriptors (MDs) ever in use in the QIO
          subsystem.

     Last Fail Size
          is the buffer size requested on the last failure.

     Current Pool Size
          is the current size (in bytes) of the shared memory pool.

     Initial Pool Size
          is the size of the shared memory pool, in bytes, configured in the QIO subsystem.
          The initial pool size is specified in the QIO configuration file (the default value is
          4 MB Max Pool Size
          is the high water mark, in bytes, that the shared memory pool has reached.

     Min Pool Size
          is the low water mark, in bytes, that the shared memory pool has reached.

     Current Pool Alloc
          is the number of bytes currently allocated from the shared memory pool.


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QIO Subsystem SCF Commands                                                      STOP Command



     Max Pool Alloc
          is the high water mark, in bytes, allocated from the shared memory pool.

     Current Pool Frags
          is the current number of fragments in the shared memory pool.

     Max Pool Frags
          is the high water mark of fragments contained in the shared memory pool.


STOP Command
     Use the STOP command to terminate the activity of objects in a normal manner. The
     STOP command prevents the object from accepting further service requests. Upon
     successful completion of the STOP command, the object is left in the STOPPED state
     and is still configured in the QIO subsystem configuration database.
     This is a sensitive command.
     The STOP command is supported for the following QIO subsystem objects:
     •    MON

Stopping a MON Object
     Use the STOP MON command to shutdown the QIO subsystem.
     The STOP MON command has the following syntax:

         STOP [ / OUT file-spec / ] MON monitor-name

     OUT file-spec
          causes any SCF output generated for this command to be directed to the specified
          file as described earlier in this section under Output Destinations on page 4-5.




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QIO Subsystem SCF Commands                                                     TRACE Command



     MON monitor-name
     indicates the QIO monitor process you want to stop.
          Value:     The name of the MON object as defined by the Kernel subsystem on
                     NonStop S-series servers.
                     The possible values are:
                     $ZMnn, where nn are numeric digits 00 through 15 that designate
                     the processor in which the QIOMON process is running,
                     or the asterisk ($ZM*) to specify all configured MON objects.
                     For example, $ZM00 specifies the QIO monitor process running in
                     processor 0, and $ZM14 specifies the QIO monitor process running
                     in processor 14.
          Default:   None provided.

     Using the STOP MON Command
     Use the following command to stop a MON object:
              SCF STOP MON $ZM03

     Example
     This example stops the MON object:
     STOP MON $ZM03

TRACE Command
     Use the TRACE command to collect trace information about an object.
     This is a nonsensitive command.
     The TRACE command is supported for the following QIO subsystem object:
     •    MON

Obtaining Trace Information About a MON Object
     Use the TRACE MON command to collect trace information. Issue the TRACE
     command (without the STOP option) to specify trace options and start tracing. While
     tracing is on, the TRACE command can be issued (without the STOP option) to modify
     COUNT, RECSIZE, or any of the SELECT specifications. Issue the TRACE command
     with the STOP option to stop tracing.
     This is a sensitive command.



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QIO Subsystem SCF Commands                                Obtaining Trace Information About a MON Object



     The STATUS MON command has the following syntax:

       TRACE [ / OUT file-spec / ] MON monitor-name

          { , STOP                          }
          { [ , COUNT count            ]
            [ , NOCOLL                 ]
            [ , PAGES pages            ]
            [ , RECSIZE size           ]
            [ , SELECT select-spec     ]
            [ , TO file-spec           ]       ***
            [ , WRAP                   ]    }
            [ , NOBULKIO               ]
       *** This attribute is required when a trace is started.

     OUT file-spec
          causes any SCF output generated for this command to be directed to the specified
          file.

     MON monitor-name
          indicates the QIO monitor process you want to obtain trace information for.
          Value:     The name of the MON object as defined by the Kernel subsystem
                     on NonStop S-series servers.
                     The possible values are:
                     $ZMnn, where nn are numeric digits 00 through 15 that designate
                     the processor in which the QIOMON process is running,
                     or the asterisk ($ZM*) to specify all configured MON objects.
                     For example, $ZM00 specifies the QIO monitor process running in
                     processor 0, and $ZM14 specifies the QIO monitor process running
                     in processor 14.
          Default:   None provided.

     STOP
          discontinues the trace currently in progress.

     COUNT count
          specifies the number of trace records to be captured. count is an integer in the
          range -1 through 32767. If COUNT is omitted or if count equals -1, records are
          accumulated until the trace is stopped. The default is -1. The trace stops when the
          trace file reaches EOF, unless WRAP has been specified.

          NOBULKIO
          indicates that pages are not written using bulk (cached) disk IO.

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QIO Subsystem SCF Commands                                Obtaining Trace Information About a MON Object



     NOCOLL
          indicates that the trace collector process should not be initiated.

     PAGES pages
          designates how much space, in units of pages, is allocated in the extended data
          segment used for tracing. PAGES can be specified only when a trace is being
          initiated, not when its parameters are being modified. pages is an integer in the
          range 4 through 1024, or it is equal to 0 (zero). If PAGES is omitted or if pages
          equals 0, the default value of 64 pages is assumed.

     RECSIZE size
          specifies the length of the data in the trace data records. You must specify the
          RECSIZE option, and size must be at least 4000.

     SELECT select-spec
              specifies which records are collected and written to the trace file. Records are
              identified by trace record type, using the descriptions that appear in PTrace
              display formats. The select-spec is one or more of the following specifications:

       { keyword                      }
       { ( keyword [ , keyword ]... ) }

       or

       { keynumber                      }
       { ( keynumber [ , keynumber ]... ) }

     where keyword is one or more of the following values:
            Keyword     Keynumber       Description
            ALL         -1              (or blank) specifies that all trace options are selected.
                                        This is the default value.
                                        The trace file can get very large very quickly. It will wrap,
                                        if requested, or will simply stop tracing when the TO file
                                        gets full.
            QIODRIV     0               Traces QIO driver operations
            QIOMSG      1               Traces QIO message and buffer descriptor operations
            QIOMOD      2               Traces QIO client operations
            QIOMEM      3               Traces QIO shared segment and pool operations
            QIOQUE      4               Traces QIO queue operations

     TO file-spec
              specifies the file to which trace information is to be written. The file might have
              been previously created as an unstructured file with file code 830. An old file is
              purged of data before the trace is initiated. If the file does not exist, SCF
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QIO Subsystem SCF Commands                                                      VERSION Command



              creates the file with an extent size of 100 pages for the primary extent and 20
              pages for secondary extents. There are a maximum of 15 secondary extents
              for a maximum file size of 400 pages. If a file larger than 400 pages is needed,
              use a previously created file.

     WRAP
          specifies that when the trace disk file end-of-file (EOF) is reached, trace data will
          wrap around to the beginning of the file and overwrite any data that is there. The
          default is “NOWRAP.”

     Example
     This example traces the QIOMON process $ZM02 and puts the data from the trace
     into a file named montr:
          SCF> trace mon $zm02,to trace.montr,select all,recsize 4000

VERSION Command
     Use the VERSION command to display the version level of the specified object.
     This is a nonsensitive command.
     The VERSION command is supported for the following QIO subsystem object:
     •    MON

     The VERSION MON command has the following syntax:

         VERSION [ / OUT file-spec / ] MON monitor-name

     OUT file-spec
          causes any SCF output generated for this command to be directed to the specified
          file.




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QIO Subsystem SCF Commands                                                    VERSION Command



     MON monitor-name
          indicates the QIO monitor process you want to obtain information about.
          Value:     The name of the MON object as defined by the Kernel subsystem on
                     NonStop S-series servers.
                     The possible values are:
                     $ZMnn, where nn are numeric digits 00 through 15 that designate
                     the processor in which the QIOMON process is running,
                     or the asterisk ($ZM*) to specify all configured MON objects.
                     For example, $ZM00 specifies the QIO monitor process running in
                     processor 0, and $ZM14 specifies the QIO monitor process running
                     in processor 14.
          Default:   None provided.
     The format of the display of the VERSION MON command is (NonStop S-series
     example):

       16-> version mon $zm00
       VERSION MON \MYSYS.$ZM00: QIOMonitor - T8671F40 - 27Feb00 - Ver. 30.0


     The format of the display of the VERSION MON command is (Integrity NonStop
     NS-series example):

       16-> version mon $zm00
       VERSION MON \MYSYS.$ZM00: QIOMonitor - T8671H01 - 01OCT2004 [H01] - Ver. 33.




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QIO Subsystem SCF Commands                                                    VERSION Command




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 A         QIO SCF Error Messages
   This appendix contains the following information:
   •    A description of the QIO subsystem operator messages and error messages
        generated by the QIO Monitor (QIOMON) process
   •    A description of the probable cause of each error and suggested recovery action
   Italics indicate actual values that are inserted into the message by the QIOMON
   process.


QIO Error Messages
   The QIOMON process can generate error and operator messages. The error
   messages are presented in alphabetical order based on the text of the message.
   Usually, an error message is preceded by a header provided by the application
   program that displays the message.

RECSIZE Not 2048 Bytes
       QIO 00001 RECSIZE of 4000 must be specified for QIO Trace

   Cause. A value of 2048 bytes was not specified for RECSIZE in the TRACE
   command. QIO creates traces with a fixed record size of 2048 bytes. Each QIO
   TRACE record is 64 bytes and each SCP trace record has 32 QIO trace records in it.
   Recovery. Specify RECSIZE 2048 in the Trace command.




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                                            A- 1
QIO SCF Error Messages                                                         Operator Messages




Operator Messages
     Operator messages are identified by number. You can use the SCF HELP command to
     display the text of a message. For example, if the system displays:
         00001 Object
     you can enter the following command to display the text of the message:
         -> HELP QIO 1
     The following QIO operator messages are presented in numerical order.

00001 Object
       yy-dd-mm hh:mm:ss monitor-name TANDEM.ZQIO.D30 000001 Object
       available Segment - segment-name:sequence-no,
       event number:1, reason:
       event-reason, previous state: previous-state,
       current state: current-state, user content: undefined

     yy-dd-mm hh:mm:ss
         is the date and time that the event occurred.

     monitor-name
         is the name of the QIOMON process that generated the event message.

     segment-name
         is the name of the memory segment for which the QIOMON process generated this
         event.

     sequence-no
         is the sequence number from the process handle. This number increments each
         time the QIOMON process is started.

     event-reason
         describes the reason for the event. This field displays “internal failed” or “operator
         initiated.”

     previous-state
         indicates the state that the QIOMON process was in before this event occurred.




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                                                  A- 2
QIO SCF Error Messages                                                                00002 Object



     current-state
         indicates the state of the QIOMON process after the event occurred.
     Cause. The system has initialized the QIO segment, and the MON object is ready.
     The QIOMON process also generates this message when it receives a COUP STOP
     command, and the QIOMON process finds active client processes using the shared
     segment.
     Effect. The symptom string “T8671 - QIOMON - Unable to Stop because of Active
     Client Processes” is displayed if a COUP STOP command was received; otherwise, no
     symptom string is displayed and no recovery action is necessary.
     Recovery. If the symptom string is displayed, use the NAMES command to show
     current APPLs, then stop them. Once no APPLs are displayed, the QIOMON process
     accepts a COUP STOP command. You can use the COUP STOP! command to force
     the QIOMON process to stop; however, the client processes will receive failure
     messages from most of the QIO Library calls.

00002 Object
       yy-dd-mm hh:mm:ss monitor TANDEM.ZQIO.D30   000002 Object
       unavailable Segment -
       segment-name:sequence-no, event number:2,
       cause:cause-reason,previous state:
       previous-state,current state: current-state, user content:
       undefined

     yy-dd-mm hh:mm:ss
         is the date and time that the event occurred.

     monitor
         is the name of the QIOMON process that generated the event message.

     segment-name
         is the name of the memory segment for which the QIOMON process generated this
         event.

     sequence-no
         is the sequence number from the process handle. This number increments each
         time the QIOMON process is started.

     cause-reason
         describes the reason for the event. This field will display “internal failed” or
         “operator initiated.”


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QIO SCF Error Messages                                                                00002 Object



     previous-state
         indicates the state that the QIOMON process was in before this event occurred.

     current-state
         indicates the state of the QIOMON process after the event occurred.
     Cause. The cause for this event message can be one of the following:
     •   The amount of memory QIO needs for use is too large or the MemoryPercent
         parameter is too small. If one of these is the cause, the symptom string “T8671 -
         QIOMON - Not Enough Unlocked Memory in CPU to Start” is displayed in the
         event message.
     •   The Priority parameter is not in the range 0 through 255. If this is the cause, the
         symptom string “T8671 - QIOMON - Unable to Set Priority” is displayed in the
         event message.
     •   The PoolSize parameter is too large or too small. If this is the cause, the symptom
         string “T8671 - QIOMON - Unable to Create Module ID” is displayed in the event
         message.
     •   An invalid value is configured in the QIO configuration file. If this is the case, the
         event message contains the symptom string “T8671 - QIOMON - Invalid value
         value for parameter name was detected in the configuration file. Valid values
         are lower-limit to upper-limit.”
     •   An unknown keyword is contained in the QIO configuration file. If this is the case,
         the symptom string “T8671 - QIOMON - Unknown token token was detected in
         the configuration file” is displayed in the event message.
     •   The QIOMON process received a QIO event from another process and detected
         that another process has corrupted the shared segment. The QIOMON process
         wishes to stop the segment from being used. If this is the case, the symptom string
         “T8671 - QIOMON - Bad Segment Event Received” is displayed in the event
         message.
     Effect. The QIO segment is unavailable for use by client applications, and the
     QIOMON process sets the segment to the STOPPING state.
     Recovery. If the symptom string is “Not Enough Unlocked Memory In CPU to Start,”
     you can reduce memory by lowering the initial PoolSize or MemoryPercent values in
     the QIO configuration file. You can use PEEK to see how much memory is available in
     the processor. If the symptom string is “Unable to Set Priority,” retry the action that
     caused the event message; if the error reoccurs, either change the priority value in the
     QIO configuration file or call your support representative. If the symptom string is
     “Unable to Create Module ID,” report the error to your support representative. If the
     symptom string is “Invalid value,” correct the specified value in the QIO configuration
     file. If the symptom string is “Unknown token,” check the QIO configuration file for
     spelling or syntax errors. If the symptom string is “Bad Segment Event Received,” stop
     the QIO client processes and restart them.

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QIO SCF Error Messages                                                           00003 Buffer



00003 Buffer
       yy-dd-mm hh:mm:ss monitor TANDEM.ZQIO.D30   000003 Buffer
       shortage occurred nn times in last 3 minutes.

     yy-dd-mm hh:mm:ss
          is the date and time that the event occurred.

     monitor
          is the name of the QIOMON process that generated the event message.

     nn
          is the number of times the event occurred.
     Cause. The QIO Library was unable to obtain a buffer. This condition may occur often,
     so events after the initial event are accumulated and reported approximately every 3
     minutes.
     Effect. None. This is an informational message only.
     Recovery. None.

00004 MD Shortage
       yy-dd-mm hh:mm:ss monitor TANDEM.ZQIO.D30 000004 MD shortage
       shortage occurred nn times in last 3 minutes.

     yy-dd-mm hh:mm:ss
          is the date and time that the event occurred.

     monitor
          is the name of the QIOMON process that generated the event message.

     nn
          is the number of times the event occurred.
     Cause. The QIO Library was unable to obtain a message descriptor (MD). This
     condition may occur often, so events after the initial event are accumulated and
     reported approximately every 3 minutes.
     Effect. None. This is an informational message only.
     Recovery. None.




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QIO SCF Error Messages                                                           00005 Pool



00005 Pool
       yy-dd-mm hh:mm:ss monitor TANDEM.ZQIO.D30 000005 Pool
       shortage occurred nn times in last 3 minutes.

     yy-dd-mm hh:mm:ss
          is the date and time that the event occurred.

     monitor
          is the name of the QIOMON process that generated the event message.

     nn
          is the number of times the event occurred.
     Cause. The QIO Library has declined a pool request. This condition may occur often,
     so events after the initial event are accumulated and reported approximately every 3
     minutes.
     Effect. None. This is an informational message only.
     Recovery. None.




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             Glossary
API. See application program interface (API).

appearance side. The side of an HP NonStop™ S-series system enclosure that contains
    disk customer-replaceable units (CRUs) and the power monitor and control unit
    (PMCU) CRUs that do not require cables. The appearance side always has a short
    door and panel, or a tall door, that is required for cooling the enclosure. The
    appearance side is opposite the service side. The appearance-side door is lockable for
    security purposes. See also service side.

application program interface (API). A set of services (such as programming language
     functions or procedures) that are called by an application program to communicate with
     other software components. For example, an application program in the form of a client
     might use an API to communicate with a server program.

Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM). A transfer mode in which the information is
    organized into cells. It is asynchronous in the sense that the recurrence of cells
    containing information from an individual user is not necessary periodic.

ATM 3 ServerNet adapter (ATM3SA). A ServerNet adapter that provides access to
    Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM) networks from an HP NonStop™ S-series system
    enclosure. The 3860 ATM3SA supports the ATM User-Network Interface (UNI)
    specification over a 155-megabit/second (Mbps) OC-3 Sonet (Synchronous Optical
    Network) connection.

attribute. (1) For the Subsystem Control Facility (SCF), a characteristic of an entity. For
      example, two attributes of a process might be its program file and its user ID. An
      attribute is sometimes called a modifier. (2) In OSM client interfaces, a data item
      associated with a system or cluster resource. All attributes can be viewed and some
      can be modified.

backup processor. A processor running the NonStop OS that communicates with the
    primary processor, allowing the processors to remain independent. A component
    failure in one processor has no effect on any other processor.

base address. An address in memory that is the starting point of a memory segment.

Class-1 CRU. A customer-replaceable unit (CRU) that probably will not cause a partial or
     total system outage if the documented replacement procedure is not followed correctly.
     Customers replacing Class-1 CRUs do not require previous experience with replacing
     HP NonStop™ S-series CRUs. However, for some CRUs, customers must be able to
     use the tools needed for the replacement procedure (which are common tools) and
     must protect components from electrostatic discharge (ESD).

Class-2 CRU. A customer-replaceable unit (CRU) that might cause a partial or total system
     outage if the documented replacement procedure is not followed correctly. Customers
     replacing Class-2 CRUs should have either three or more months of experience with

                      QIO Configuration and Management Manual—424717-007
                                            Glossary -1
Glossary                                                                            Class-3 CRU



      replacing HP NonStop™ S-series CRUs or equivalent training. Customers must be
      able to use the tools needed for the replacement procedure and must protect
      components from electrostatic discharge (ESD).

Class-3 CRU. A customer-replaceable unit (CRU) that probably will cause a partial or total
     system outage if the documented replacement procedure is not followed correctly.
     Customers replacing Class-3 CRUs should have either six or more months of
     experience with replacing HP NonStop™ S-series CRUs or equivalent training.
     Customers must be able to use the tools needed for the replacement procedure, must
     protect components from electrostatic discharge (ESD), and must understand the
     dependencies involved in CRU-replacement procedures, such as disk-path switching.
     Replacement by a service provider trained by HP is recommended.

client process. A process that uses QIO. Client processes can include the TLAM IOP
      running in QIO mode and other processes, such as the TCP/IP and HP NonStop™
      IPX/SPX protocol processes.

collector. A process, defined by Event Management Service (EMS), to which subsystems
     report events.

command. A demand for action by or information from a subsystem, or the operation
   demanded by an operator or application. A command is typically conveyed as an
   interprocess message from an application to a subsystem.

command file. An EDIT file that contains a series of commands and serves as a source of
   command input.

Common Communication ServerNet adapter (CCSA). A ServerNet adapter for Signaling
   System Number 7 (SS7) protocol communications.

communications line. A two-way link consisting of processing equipment, I/O devices,
    protocol conventions, and cables that connect a computer to other computers.

communications subsystem. The combination of data communications hardware and
   software processes that function together as an integrated unit to provide services and
   access to wide and local area networks.

configuration. (1) The arrangement of enclosures, system components, and peripheral
     devices into a working unit. (2) The definition or alteration of characteristics of an
     object.

configuration file. In G-series RVUs, one of the following files: CONFBASE, CONFIG, one
     or more saved configuration files named CONFxxyy, and CONFSAVE. See also
     system configuration database. In RVUs prior to G-series, the configuration file is
     either the OSCONFIG file used by the Configuration Utility Program (COUP) or the
     CONFTEXT file used during system generation.




                      QIO Configuration and Management Manual—424717-007
                                            Glossary -2
Glossary                                                                        configured object



configured object. A Subsystem Control Facility (SCF) object that exists at the time a
     subsystem completes its initialization process, or an SCF object that is brought into
     existence by a command issued through a subsystem management interface.

connection. (1) The path between two protocol modules that provides reliable stream
    delivery service. (2) For OSM software, the logical link established between the client
    software on a workstation and the server software on an HP NonStop™ S-series
    system after a logon sequence has been performed. Two types of logical connections
    are service connections and low-level links.

control and inquiry. The aspects of Subsystem Control Facility (SCF) object management
     related to the state or configuration of an object. Such aspects include actions that
     affect the state or configuration of an object, inquiries about the object, and commands
     pertaining to the session environment (for example, commands that set default values
     for the session).

CRU. See customer-replaceable unit (CRU).

current configuration file. See configuration file.

customer-replaceable unit (CRU). A unit that can be replaced in the field either by
     customers or by qualified personnel trained by HP. CRUs are divided into the
     categories of Class 1, Class 2, and Class 3 according to the risk of causing a system
     outage if the documented replacement procedure is not followed correctly and how
     much CRU-replacement training or experience is advisable. See also Class-1 CRU
     Class-2 CRU, Class-3 CRU, and field-replaceable unit (FRU)

DIH. See Driver Interrupt Handler.

Distributed Systems Management (DSM). A set of tools used to manage HP NonStop™
      systems and Expand networks.

Distributed Systems Management/Software Configuration Manager (DSM/SCM). A
      graphical user interface (GUI)-based program that installs new software and creates a
      new NonStop OS. DSM/SCM creates a new software revision and activates the new
      software on the target system.

Driver Interrupt Handler. The driver interrupt handler provides an interface to the LAN for
     all client processes that want to write to or read from the LAN. The driver is a set that
     client processes call to set up access to, send data to, and enable receipt of data from
     the LAN. The interrupt handler routes incoming packets to specific inbound queues for
     the appropriate client processes.

DSM. See Distributed Systems Management (DSM).

DSM/SCM. See Distributed Systems Management/Software Configuration Manager
    (DSM/SCM).

EMS. See Event Management Service (EMS).

                      QIO Configuration and Management Manual—424717-007
                                            Glossary -3
Glossary                                                                                     error



error. A condition encountered when performing a command or other operation that causes
      the command or operation to fail.

error number. For the Subsystem Programmatic Interface (SPI), a value that can be
      assigned to a return token or to the last field of an error token to identify an error that
      occurred. SPI defines a small set of error numbers, but most error numbers are defined
      by subsystems.

Ethernet. A local area network (LAN) that uses the carrier sense multiple access with
     collision detection (CSMA/CD) access method on a bus topology and is the basis for
     the IEEE 802.3 standard.

Ethernet 4 ServerNet adapter (E4SA). A ServerNet adapter for Ethernet local area
     network (LAN) that contains four Ethernet ports.

Event Management Service (EMS). A Distributed Systems Management (DSM) product
    that provides event collection, event logging, and event distribution facilities. EMS
    provides different event descriptions for interactive and programmatic interfaces, lets
    an operator or an application select specific event-message data, and allows for
    flexible distribution of event messages within a system or network.

event message. Text intended for a system operator that describes a change in some
     condition in the system or network, whether minor or serious. The change of condition
     is called an event. Events can be operational errors, notifications of limits exceeded,
     requests for action needed, and so on. Each event message, when displayed on an
     event screen, is displayed as one line of text. See also operator message.

Expand network. The NonStop OS network that extends the concept of fault-tolerant
    operation to networks of geographically distributed HP NonStop™ systems. If the
    network is properly designed, communication paths are constantly available even if
    there is a single line failure or component failure.

Fast Ethernet ServerNet adapter (FESA). A single-ported ServerNet adapter that supports
     100-megabit/second (Mbps) or 10-Mbps Ethernet data transfer rates on an HP
     NonStop™ S-series server.

field-replaceable unit (FRU). A unit that can be replaced in the field only by qualified
      personnel trained by HP and cannot be replaced by customers. A unit is classified as a
      FRU because of safety hazards such as weight, size, sharp edges, or electrical
      potential; contractual agreements with suppliers; or national or international standards.
      See also customer-replaceable unit (CRU).

filename. In the Open System Services (OSS) environment, a component of a pathname
      containing any valid characters other than slash (/) or null. See also file name.

file name. A string of characters that uniquely identifies a file.
      In the PC environment, file names for disk files normally have at least two parts (the
      disk name and the file name); for example, B:MYFILE.

                       QIO Configuration and Management Manual—424717-007
                                             Glossary -4
Glossary                                                                   flat segment memory



      In the Guardian environment, disk file names include a node name, volume name,
      subvolume name, and file identifier; for example, \NODE.$DISK.SUBVOL.MYFILE.
      In the Open System Services (OSS) environment, a file is identified by a pathname; for
      example, /usr/john/workfile. See also filename

flat segment memory. Nonprivileged memory space that appears a single large
      addressable space.

FRU. See field-replaceable unit (FRU).

generic process. A process created and managed by the HP NonStop™ Kernel
    subsystem; also known as a system-managed process. A common characteristic of a
    generic process is persistence.

Gigabit Ethernet ServerNet adapter (GESA). A single-port ServerNet adapter that
    provides 1000 megabits/second (Mbps) data transfer rates between HP NonStop™
    systems and Ethernet LANs. A GESA can be directly installed in slots 51 through 54 of
    an I/O enclosure and in slots 53 and 54 of a processor enclosure.
      Two versions of the GESA are available:
      •    3865 GESA-C (T523572): a single-port copper version compliant with the 1000
           Base-T standard (802.3ab)
      •    3865 GESA-F (T523572): a single-port fiber version compliant with the 1000
           Base-SX standard (802.z)

gigabyte (GB). A unit of measurement equal to 1,073,741,824 bytes (1024 megabytes).
     See also kilobyte (KB), megabyte (MB), and terabyte (TB).

globals. A memory space that stores data used by all processes.

heap. A portion of memory used by a program for temporary storage of data structures
     whose size and existence cannot be determined until the program is running.

HP NonStop™ Open System Management (OSM) Interface. Identifies software used to
    manage or service HP NonStop servers.

HP NonStop™ S-series servers. The HP NonStop servers having product numbers
    beginning with the letter S. These servers implement the ServerNet architecture and
    run the NonStop OS.

HP NonStop™ servers. The entire line of HP NonStop servers, including Integrity NonStop
    NS-series and NonStop S-series servers.

HP NonStop™ Technical Library (NTL). The application for accessing, searching, and
    viewing technical publications and support information for the HP NonStop server. NTL
    replaces Total Information Manager (TIM).



                      QIO Configuration and Management Manual—424717-007
                                            Glossary -5
Glossary                                          HP Tandem Advanced Command Language (TACL)



HP Tandem Advanced Command Language (TACL). The user interface to the NonStop
     OS. The TACL product is both a command interpreter and a command language.
     Users can write TACL programs that perform complex tasks or provide a consistent
     user interface across independently programmed applications.

inbound queue. The inbound queue is used to hold message descriptors for data received
     from the LAN.

input source. The resource from which Subsystem Control Facility (SCF) accepts
     command input. SCF can accept input from a terminal or a disk file. The initial input
     source is determined by the form of the RUN command used to initiate SCF. At any
     time during an SCF session, the input source can be temporarily changed to execute a
     series of commands from a command file.

input/output process (IOP). A running program (part of the NonStop OS) that manages the
     I/O functions for one or more ServerNet addressable controllers (SACs) of the same
     type.

interactive mode. A mode of operation that is characterized by having the same input and
      output device (a terminal or a process) for the session. If a terminal is used, a person
      enters a command and presses Return. If a process is used, the system interface waits
      for the process to send a request and treats the process in the same manner as a
      terminal. Contrast with noninteractive mode.

IOP. See input/output process (IOP).

IOperm. A space in flat segment memory to provide an aliased memory space.

kilobyte (KB). A unit of measurement equal to 1024 bytes. See also gigabyte (GB),
     megabyte (MB) and terabyte (TB).

Kseg2. The part of virtual memory that provides addressing for the absolute memory
    allocations.

LAN. See local area network (LAN).

local area network (LAN). A network that is located in a small geographical area and
      whose communications technology provides a high-bandwidth, low-cost medium to
      which low-cost nodes can be connected. One or more LANs can be connected to the
      system such that the LAN users can access the system as if their workstations were
      connected directly to it. Contrast with wide area network (WAN).

MAC address. See media access control (MAC) address.

management process. A process through which an application issues commands to a
    subsystem. A management process can be part of a subsystem, or it can be
    associated with more than one subsystem. In the latter case, the management process
    is logically part of each subsystem. Subsystem Control Point (SCP) is the management
    process for all subsystems controlled by Subsystem Control Facility (SCF).

                      QIO Configuration and Management Manual—424717-007
                                            Glossary -6
Glossary                                                                                 MB



MB. See megabyte (MB).

Mbps. See megabits per second (Mbps).

media access control (MAC) address. A value in the Medium Access Control sublayer of
    the IEEE/ISO/ANSI LAN architecture that uniquely identifies an individual station that
    implements a single point of physical attachment to a LAN.

megabits per second (Mbps). A data rate equal to 1,048,576 bits per second.

megabyte (MB). A unit of measurement equal to 1,048,576 bytes (1024 kilobytes) for
    memory size. See also gigabyte (GB), kilobyte (KB), and terabyte (TB).

memory pool. Data structure used by QIO client processes for control structures and
   variable size buffers that are not used for data transfers.

message buffers. Data structures used by QIO client processes to send and receive data
    on the LAN.

message descriptors. Data structures used to reference message buffers.

MFIOB. See multifunction I/O board (MFIOB).

MON object type. The Subsystem Control Facility (SCF) object type for the storage pool
    master process.

multifunction I/O board (MFIOB). A ServerNet adapter that contains ServerNet
     addressable controllers (SACs) for SCSI and Ethernet; a service processor; ServerNet
     links to the processor, to the two ServerNet adapter slots, and to one of the ServerNet
     expansion board (SEB) slots; and connections to the serial maintenance bus (SMB),
     which connects components within an enclosure to the service processor.

network. Two or more computer systems (nodes) connected so that they can exchange
    information and share resources. See also Expand network, wide area network (WAN),
    and local area network (LAN).

noninteractive mode. A mode of operation that usually involves a command file (an EDIT
     file that contains a series of commands). Contrast with interactive mode.

nonsensitive command. A command that can be issued by any user or program that is
    allowed access to a subsystem—that is, a command on which the subsystem imposes
    no further security restrictions. For Subsystem Control Facility (SCF) subsystems,
    nonsensitive commands are those that cannot change the state or configuration of
    objects; most of them are information commands. Contrast with sensitive command.

NonStop NS-series. Refers to fault-tolerant HP computers that support the NonStop OS
    and are based on the Intel® Itanium® processor. Integrity NonStop NS-series systems
    run the Itanium instruction set and can run TNS object files by interpretation or after


                     QIO Configuration and Management Manual—424717-007
                                           Glossary -7
Glossary                                                                      NonStop™ Series TNS



      acceleration. Integrity NonStop NS-series systems include all HP NonStop™ systems
      that use NSE-x processors.

NonStop™ Series TNS. See TNS.

NonStop™ Series TNS/R. See TNS/R.

NonStop Technical Library. See HP NonStop™ Technical Library (NTL).

OBEY file. See command file.

object. One or more of the devices, lines, processes, and files in an subsystem; any entity
     subject to independent reference or control by one or more subsystems. In the
     Subsystem Control Facility (SCF), each object has an object type and an object name.

object file. A file generated by a compiler, Binder program, or nld utility, that contains
     machine instructions and other information needed to construct the executable code
     spaces and initial data for a process. The file might be a complete program that is
     ready for immediate execution, or it might be incomplete and require linking with other
     object files before execution.

object name. A unique name for an Subsystem Control Facility (SCF) object within an SCF
     subsystem.

object-name template. A name that stands for more than one Subsystem Control Facility
     (SCF) object. Such a name includes one or more wild-card characters, such as *
     (asterisk) and ? (question mark). See also wild-card character.

object type. The category of Subsystem Control Facility (SCF) objects to which a specific
     SCF object belongs. For example, a specific disk has the object type DISK, and a
     specific terminal may have the object type SU. Each subsystem has a set of object
     types for the objects it manages.

operator message. A message, intended for an operator, that describes a significant event
     on an HP NonStop™ system. An operator message is the displayed-text form of an
     Event Management Service (EMS) event message.

OSM. See HP NonStop™ Open System Management (OSM) Interface.

outbound queue. The outbound queue is used to hold message descriptors for data to be
     sent on the LAN.

packet. A block of information that contains fields for addressing, sequencing information,
    possible priority indicators, and a portion of a message or an entire message. See also
    ServerNet packet.

pathname. In the Open System Services (OSS) file system and Network File System
     (NFS), the string of characters that uniquely identifies a file within its file system. A


                       QIO Configuration and Management Manual—424717-007
                                             Glossary -8
Glossary                                                                              Pathway



      pathname can be either relative or absolute. See also ISO/IEC IS 9945-1:1990
      (ANSI/IEEE Std. 1003.1-1990 or POSIX.1), Clause 2.2.2.57.

Pathway. An HP NonStop™ application that configures and manages online transaction
    applications.

persistence. For the Subsystem Control Facility (SCF), the capability of a generic process
     to restart automatically if it was stopped abnormally. You configure this capability by
     specifying a nonzero AUTORESTART value in an ADD command.

persistence manager process. The $ZPM process that is started and managed by the
     $ZCNF configuration utility process and that starts generic processes in G-series and
     H-series release version updates (RVUs) and manages their persistence.

persistent process. A process that must always be either waiting, ready, or executing.
     Persistent processes are usually controlled by a monitor process that checks on the
     status of persistent processes and restarts them if necessary.

PMF CRU. See processor multifunction (PMF) CRU.

POOL object type. The Subsystem Control Facility (SCF) object type for storage pools.

primary processor. The processor that is designated as owning the ServerNet addressable
     controller (SAC) connected to separate processors running the NonStop OS. The
     primary processor is the processor that has direct control over the SAC. Contrast with
     backup processor.

process. (1) A program that has been submitted to the NonStop OS for execution, or a
     program that is currently running in the computer. (2) An address space, a single
     thread of control that executes within that address space, and the system resources
     required by that thread of control.

processor. (1) A functional unit of a computer that reads program instructions, moves data
     between processor memory and the input/output controllers, and performs arithmetic
     operations. A processor is sometimes referred to as a central processing unit (CPU),
     but the HP NonStop™ servers have multiple cooperating processors rather than a
     single CPU. (2) One or more computer chips, typically mounted on a logic board, that
     are designed to perform data processing or to manage a particular aspect of computer
     operations.

processor multifunction (PMF) CRU. (1) An HP NonStop™ S-series customer-
     replaceable unit (CRU) that contains a power supply, service processor (SP),
     ServerNet router 1, Ethernet controller, three ServerNet addressable controllers
     (SACs), and a processor and memory system in a single unit. The PMF CRU consists
     of three subassemblies: the processor and memory board (PMB), the multifunction I/O
     board (MFIOB), and the power supply subassembly. (2) A collective term for both PMF
     CRUs and PMF 2 CRUs when a distinction between the two types of CRUs is not
     required.


                     QIO Configuration and Management Manual—424717-007
                                           Glossary -9
Glossary                                                                     PROFILE object type



PROFILE object type. The Subsystem Control Facility (SCF) object type for the storage
    subsystem configuration profile.

protocol. A set of rules used by processes or devices for exchanging data.

QIO. An HP NonStop™ product that provides buffers and control blocks for client
     processes, (including TCP/IP, TLAM, NonStop IPX/SPX, and other processes) running
     on the same processor.

QIO library. The QIO library is a set of procedures for QIO functions used by client
     processes, the QIO monitor process, and the LAN driver and interrupt handler.

QIO monitor. The QIO monitor process is responsible for creating the shared memory
    segment, allocating the segment to client processes, monitoring the client processes
    that are using the segment, and performing functions needed to manage the segment.

queue. A queue holds a list of message descriptors for a client process.

request packet. A ServerNet packet sent from one ServerNet device to another, requesting
     either a read action or a write action on the part of the receiving device. In the case of
     a write request, the packet contains the data to be written. The receiving device is
     expected to take the appropriate action and return a response packet to the device that
     sent the request packet. See also response packet, ServerNet packet,and ServerNet
     transaction.

response packet. A ServerNet packet returned from one ServerNet device to another,
     responding to an earlier received read request or write request. In the case of
     responding to a read request, the response packet contains the data that the
     requesting device wanted to have read. See also request packet, ServerNet packet,
     and ServerNet transaction.

SCF. See Subsystem Control Facility (SCF).

SCP. See Subsystem Control Point (SCP).

segment. In general, a contiguous sequence of logically related pages of virtual memory.
    The pages of the segment are individually swapped in and out of physical memory as
    needed. Within a loadable object file, one of the portions of the file that is mapped as
    one unit into virtual memory as the file is loaded.

sensitive command. A Subsystem Control Facility (SCF) command that can be issued only
     by a user with super-group access, by the owner of the subsystem, or by a member of
     the group of the owner of the subsystem. The owner of a subsystem is the user who
     started that subsystem (or any user whose application ID is the same as the server
     ID—the result of a PROGID option that requires super-group access). See also
     nonsensitive command.

server. (1) An implementation of a system used as a stand-alone system or as a node in an
     Expand network. (2) A combination of hardware and software designed to provide

                      QIO Configuration and Management Manual—424717-007
                                            Glossary -10
Glossary                                           ServerNet LAN Systems Access (SLSA) subsystem



      services in response to requests received from clients across a network. For example,
      the HP NonStop™ servers provides transaction processing, database access, and
      other services. (3) A process or program that provides services to a client or a
      requester. Servers are designed to receive request messages from clients or
      requesters; perform the desired operations, such as database inquiries or updates,
      security verifications, numerical calculations, or data routing to other computer
      systems; and return reply messages to the clients or requesters. A server process is a
      running instance of a server program.

ServerNet LAN Systems Access (SLSA) subsystem. A subsystem of the NonStop OS for
     configuration and management of ServerNet local area network (LAN) objects in
     G-series release version updates (RVUs).

ServerNet packet. The unit of transmission in a ServerNet communications network. A
     ServerNet packet consists of a header, a variable-size data field, and a 32-bit cyclic
     redundancy check (CRC) checksum covering the entire packet. The header contains
     fields for control, virtual memory address, and destination and source fields to identify
     the processor or I/O controller transmitting and receiving the packet. See also request
     packet and response packet.

ServerNet transaction. The bidirectional, successful transmission of a pair of ServerNet
     packets between two ServerNet devices. The device that originates the transaction
     sends a request packet, and the device that receives the request returns a response
     packet. See also request packet and response packet.

ServerNet wide area network (SWAN) concentrator. (1) An HP data communications
     peripheral that provides connectivity to an HP NonStop™ server. The SWAN
     concentrator supports both synchronous and asynchronous data over RS-232,
     RS-449, X.21, and V.35 electrical and physical interfaces. (2) A collective term for both
     SWAN concentrators and SWAN 2 concentrators when a distinction between the two is
     not required.

ServerNet wide area network (SWAN) 2 concentrator. An HP data communications
     peripheral that provides connectivity to an HP NonStop™ server. The SWAN 2
     concentrator supports both synchronous and asynchronous data over RS-232,
     RS-449, X.21, and V.35 electrical and physical interfaces. The SWAN 2 concentrator is
     the next-generation SWAN concentrator and has 12 WAN ports.

service side. The rear side of a HP NonStop™ S-series system enclosure. It contains
     processor multifunction (PMF) customer-replaceable units (CRUs) or I/O multifunction
     (IOMF) CRUs, ServerNet expansion boards (SEBs) or modular SEBs (MSEBs), and
     ServerNet adapters. The service side is opposite the appearance side. All cables are
     accessed from the service side. Most service actions are performed from the service
     side. Service side doors are supplied with later HP NonStop™ S-series servers but are
     optional on earlier servers. Service-side doors are cosmetic and are not required for
     system cooling.



                      QIO Configuration and Management Manual—424717-007
                                            Glossary -11
Glossary                                                                  shared memory segment



shared memory segment. The shared memory segment is allocated when QIO is started.
     The shared memory segment contains the data structures used to send and receive
     data for each LAN controller in the processor.

SLSA subsystem. See ServerNet LAN Systems Access (SLSA) subsystem.

state. In Subsystem Control Facility (SCF), one of the generally defined possible conditions
      of an object with respect to the management of that object. Examples of states are
      DEFINED, STARTED, and STOPPED.

storage pool. A set of physical disk volumes administered as a set of logical disk volumes.
     A logical disk volume can span multiple physical disk volumes. When a logical disk
     volume becomes full, more physical disk volumes can be added.

subsystem. (1) A secondary or subordinate system, usually capable of operating
    independently of or asynchronously with a controlling system. (2) A program or set of
    processes that manages a cohesive set of Subsystem Control Facility (SCF) objects.
    Each subsystem has a manager through which applications can request services by
    issuing commands defined by that subsystem. See also subsystem manager.

Subsystem Control Facility (SCF). An interactive interface for configuring, controlling, and
    collecting information from a subsystem and its objects. SCF enables you to configure
    and reconfigure devices, processes, and some system variables while your HP
    NonStop™ server is online.

Subsystem Control Point (SCP). The message router for Subsystem Control Facility
    (SCF). There can be several instances of this process. Using the Subsystem
    Programmatic Interface (SPI), applications send each command for a subsystem to an
    instance of the SCP process, which in turn sends the command to the manager
    process of the target subsystem. SCP also processes a few commands itself. It
    provides security features, version compatibility, support for tracing, and support for
    applications implemented as process pairs.

subsystem manager. A process that performs configuration and management functions for
    a subsystem.

SWAN concentrator. See ServerNet wide area network (SWAN) concentrator.

SWAN 2 concentrator. See ServerNet wide area network (SWAN) 2 concentrator.

system configuration database. The database file on the $SYSTEM.ZSYSCONF
     subvolume that contains configuration information for all system objects that can be
     configured by the Subsystem Control Facility (SCF). Configuration information for all
     system objects that can be configured during system generation is contained on the
     $SYSTEM.SYSnn subvolume.

TACL. See HP Tandem Advanced Command Language (TACL).



                     QIO Configuration and Management Manual—424717-007
                                           Glossary -12
Glossary                                                                        terabyte (TB)



terabyte (TB). A unit of measurement equal to 1,099,511,627,776 bytes (1024 gigabytes).
     See also gigabyte (GB), kilobyte (KB), and megabyte (MB).

TIM. See HP NonStop™ Technical Library (NTL).

TNS. Refers to fault-tolerant HP computers that support the NonStop OS and are based on
    microcoded complex instruction-set computing (CISC) technology. TNS systems run
    the TNS instruction set. Contrast with TNS/R and TNS/E.

TNS/R. Refers to fault-tolerant HP computers that support the NonStop OS and are based
    on 32-bit reduced instruction-set computing (RISC) technology. TNS/R systems run the
    MIPS-1 RISC instruction set and can run TNS object files by interpretation or after
    acceleration. TNS/R systems include all HP systems that use NSR-x processors.
    Contrast with TNS and TNS/E.

TNS/E. See NonStop NS-series.

Token-Ring ServerNet adapter (TRSA). A ServerNet adapter that provides a single line
    from an HP NonStop™ server to a token-ring network, allowing the server to act as a
    station on the ring. The 3862 TRSA can be configured to support network speeds of 4
    megabits/second (Mbps) or 16 Mbps.

user-addressable data space. Flat, nonprivileged memory space beginning at base
     address 0x0800.0000 for QIO.

WAN. See wide area network (WAN).

wide area network (WAN). A network that operates over a larger geographical area than a
     local area network (LAN); typically, an area with a radius greater than one kilometer.
     The elements of a WAN may be separated by distances great enough to require
     telephone communications.

wild-card character. A character that stands for any possible character or characters in a
     search string or in a name applying to multiple objects. In Subsystem Control Facility
     (SCF) object-name templates, two wild-card characters appear: ? for a single character
     and * for zero or more consecutive characters. See also object-name template.

$ZNET. The name of the Subsystem Control Point (SCP) management process.

$ZPM. The name of the persistence manager process.




                     QIO Configuration and Management Manual—424717-007
                                           Glossary -13
Glossary                                                        $ZPM




           QIO Configuration and Management Manual—424717-007
                                 Glossary -14
               Index
A                                                 Display examples
                                                      INFO MON 4-12
Acquiring resources from shared memory                NAMES APPL 4-15
segment 1-9
                                                      NAMES MON 4-17, 4-19
APPL
   name 1-6                                           NAMES SEGMENT 4-20
   object 1-6                                         STATUS APPL 4-22
   object type 1-6                                    STATUS MON 4-25
Architecture of QIO subsystem 1-3                     STATUS QUEUE 4-28
                                                      STATUS SEGMENT 4-30
B                                                 Driver and interrupt handler (DIH) 1-3

Base address 2-12
                                                  E
C                                                 EMS
                                                      See Event Management Service
Client process
                                                  Errors 3-3
    acquiring resources 1-9
                                                  Event Management Service
    displaying number of 3-2                          description of 1-5
    initialization 1-9                                event collection, distribution,
    releasing resources 1-11                          logging 1-5
    termination 1-11                              Event messages
Components of QIO subsystem 1-3                       description of A-1
Configuration                                         displaying 3-4
    detecting errors 3-3
    QIO memory 2-2                                F
    verifying 3-1
                                                  Flat segment memory 2-4
Configuration file
                                                  Functions of the QIO subsystem 1-8
    displaying file name 3-3
    understanding of 2-7/2-9
Configuration Utility Program (COUP) 1-5
                                                  G
COUP                                              Generic process 1-8
    See Configuration Utility Program
                                                  H
D                                                 Heap space 2-3
DIH
      See Driver and interrupt handler




                       QIO Configuration and Management Manual—424717-007
                                              Index -1
Index                                                                                         I




I                                                 NULL object 1-6
                                                  Number of client processes displaying 3-2
INFO MON
    attribute 4-12
    command 3-3, 4-12
                                                  O
Interrupt handler 1-3                             Object names
IOperm 2-4                                           APPL object 1-6
                                                     displaying 3-3
K                                                    INFO MON 4-12
                                                     MON object 1-6
Kseg2 2-8, 2-9, 2-10
                                                     NAMES 4-14, 4-16, 4-18, 4-19
                                                     QUEUE object 1-7
L                                                    SEGMENT object 1-6
LAN driver and interrupt handler 1-3                 templates 4-8
Library file, displaying file name 3-3               wild-card characters 4-8
Library of QIO procedures 1-3                     Operational states, displaying 3-3
                                                  Operator messages A-1, A-2
M
Management interfaces to QIO                      P
subsystem 1-5
                                                  Process globals space 2-3
Management tasks 3-1
                                                  Process heap space 2-3
Memory management 2-5
                                                  Program file displaying file name 3-3
Memory pool
                                                  PTrace 3-3
   description of 1-3
   size 2-6, 3-2
Message
                                                  Q
   buffer 1-3                                     QIO Monitor process
   descriptor 1-3                                    See QIOMON process
MON                                               QIO subsystem
   INFO MON command 4-12                             architecture 1-3
   object 1-6                                        associating configuration file with
                                                     QIO 2-16/2-22
   object name 1-6
                                                     client process initialization 1-9
                                                     client process termination 1-11
N                                                    components 1-3
NAMES command 3-3, 4-14, 4-16, 4-18,                 configuration verification 2-18, 2-19,
4-19                                                 2-20, 2-22, 3-1
Nonsensitive commands                                description 1-1
    INFO MON 4-12
                                                     displaying file name 3-3
    NAMES 4-14, 4-16, 4-18, 4-19
                                                     displaying object information 3-3
NonStop systems supporting QIO 1-4
                                                     errors 3-3

                       QIO Configuration and Management Manual—424717-007
                                              Index -2
Index                                                                                   R



QIO subsystem (continued)                       Requirements for QIO subsystem 1-4
   functions 1-8                                Routine management 3-3
   IOperm 2-4
   library 1-3                                  S
   management interfaces 1-5                    SCF
   management tasks 3-1                             See Subsystem Control Facility
   memory 2-14                                  SCF commands
   monitoring 3-2                                   INFO MON 3-3, 4-12
   NonStop systems 1-4                              NAMES 3-3, 4-14, 4-16, 4-18, 4-19
   object                                           STATUS 3-3
        displaying operational state 3-3            STATUS APPL 3-2
   program file                                     STATUS MON 3-2
        displaying file name 3-3                    STATUS QUEUE 4-27
   QIO library                                  SEGMENT object
        displaying file name 3-3                    description of 1-6
   QIO object                                       name 1-6
        displaying names 3-3                        type 1-6
        displaying summary state 3-3            Segment size 2-14
   requirements for 1-4                         Shared flat memory 2-4
   troubleshooting 3-2                          Shared memory segment
QIOMON process 1-3                                  acquiring resources from 1-9
   generic process 1-8                              memory pool 1-3
   name 1-6                                         message buffer 1-3
   reconfiguring 3-2                                message descriptor 1-3
   starting and stopping 1-5                        queues 1-3
   starting before client processes 1-8             reconfiguring 3-2
   verifying configuration 3-1                      releasing resources to 1-11
QUEUE object                                    Starting
   name 1-7                                         QIOMON process 1-5
   STATUS QUEUE command 4-27                             before client processes 1-8
   type 1-7                                     STATUS APPL command 3-2
Queues 1-3                                      STATUS command 3-3
                                                STATUS MON command 3-2
R                                               STATUS QUEUE
                                                    attribute 4-27
Reconfiguring
                                                    command 4-27
   QIOMON process 3-2
                                                Stopping QIOMON process 1-5
   shared memory segment 3-2
                                                Subsystem Control Facility 1-8
Releasing resources from shared memory
                                                Subsystem monitoring 3-2
segment 1-11

                     QIO Configuration and Management Manual—424717-007
                                            Index -3
Index                                                                    T



Summary states
   description of 4-7
   displaying 3-3


T
Templates for object names 4-8
TRACE MON command example 4-36
Tracing 3-3
Troubleshooting QIO subsystem 3-2

U
User 2-2
User addressable data space 2-2

V
ViewPoint application 3-4

W
Wild-card characters in object names 4-8

Special Characters
$ZMnn QIOMON process name 1-6




                    QIO Configuration and Management Manual—424717-007
                                           Index -4