CITY OF MEMPHIS CONSOLIDATED PLAN by hih17846

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									   CITY OF MEMPHIS
     CONSOLIDATED PLAN
HOUSING AND COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT




 THREE-YEAR STRATEGY FOR 2011-2013
      AND FY 2011 ACTION PLAN
          Draft for Public Review
           A C WHARTON, JR. MAYOR
               CITY OF MEMPHIS

         ROBERT LIPSCOMB, DIRECTOR
     HOUSING AND COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT
TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                      Page Numbers

CERTIFICATIONS & FORMS

Part 1.   Executive Summary
               Introduction and Overview………………………………………….. 1
               Institutional Structure………………………………………………… 2
               Consultation with Agencies…………………………………………. 3
               Citizen Participation Summary……………………………………... 4
               Amendments ………………………………………………………... 11
               Summary of Action Plan………………………………………………12


Part 2. Three-Year Strategic Plan
              A. Introduction …………………………………………………... ……1
              B. The Planning Process …………………..…………………………2
              C. Homeless ……………………………………………………………3
              D. Housing ……………………………………………………………. 24
              E. Special Needs Population ………………………………………..31
              F. Neighborhood, Economic & Community Development ………..40

Part 3. Annual Action Plan
              Introduction ………………………………………………….…………1
              Sources of Funds ………………………………………………….…5
              Resources ……………………………………………………………..8.
              Leverage Resources …………………………………………………8
              Geographic Distribution ………………………………………………10
              Homeless Section………………………………..............................19
              Special Needs Section……………………………………………… 23
              Neighborhood/Community/Economic Plan………………………..34
              Housing Section………………………………………………………37


              Other Actions …………………………………………………. …….40

              Monitoring ……………………………………………………………..56
                          City of Memphis
          Division of Housing and Community Development
                     Consolidated Plan 2011-2013
                               EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

Introduction and Overview

The City of Memphis’ Consolidated Plan is a reflection of the city’s efforts to collaborate
and coordinate the planning for the use of federal entitlement grant funds and to meet
the requirements of the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD).
The opportunities for receiving input from other local government, community
organizations, non-profits and private/business sectors entities are numerous and on-
going. As the lead agency responsible for managing the development of the plan, the
City of Memphis Division of Housing and Community Development (HCD) administers
primarily housing and community development programs and activities. It is through the
skills and abilities of other divisions of local government, non-profit agencies, private
organizations and developers that many homeless programs, public services, and
economic development initiatives are provided. HCD’s relationship with the Memphis
Housing Authority (MHA) has strengthened the City’s ability to combine its forces in
meeting the housing needs of low and moderate-income citizens.

For the foreseeable future, Memphis and Shelby County’s attention will continue to be
focused on strategies for neighborhood revitalization in the inner-city. These include
planning, identification of new incentives for redevelopment, smart growth, and
collaboration.

The primary goal of Memphis’ Consolidated Plan is to foster the development of viable
urban neighborhoods which include decent housing for everyone, a suitable living
environment, and expanded economic opportunities, especially for low and moderate
income citizens. Four major groups of activities address this goal:

   Housing
   Homelessness
   Special Needs Populations
   Neighborhood, Community and Economic Development

The Consolidated Plan combines into a single submission a Federal grant application for
Community Development Block Grant (CDBG), HOME, Housing Opportunities for
Persons with AIDS (HOPWA) and Emergency Shelter Grant (ESG) Programs. This
Consolidated Plan document is comprised of this Executive Summary, the 2011-2013
Three-Year Strategy, and the 2011 Annual Action Plan. It presents a Three-Year
Strategy that describes how current and future funds will be used to address housing
and community needs over the next three years. The Annual Action Plan for July 1,
2010 – June 30, 2011, identifies projects that will be or are currently being implemented
and describes the use of Federal, State and local housing resources. The combined
CDBG, HOME, HOPWA, and ESG entitlement funding, program income, and re-
programmed funds for FY11 from HUD is expected to be $19,721,878.00. Also included
in the Three-Year Strategy is a study of the Memphis housing market (Memphis Housing
Study 2010) that was prepared by the Regional Economic Development Center at the
University of Memphis.

In the pages to follow, you will find a summary of our current and future plans, priorities,
programs, activities and the organizational structure, which will support the plan.

Institutional Structure

HCD was functionally consolidated with the Memphis Housing Authority (MHA) in 2000.
The institutional structure of HCD/MHA is currently organized by twelve "key result
areas" led by a senior management team. The institutional structure allows the agencies
to eliminate duplication of positions at each agency and to consequently save critical
resources and also to maximize the effectiveness by managing the key functions in the
consolidated entity. HCD/MHA continually evaluates the institutional structure and looks
for ways to enhance it.

Several factors have contributed to the enhancement of the institutional structure of
HCD. First, continual decreases in funding have exposed a need to operate on a more
efficient level. Second, today's challenging economic and business environments dictate
that we explore creative ways to operate more efficiently.

There continues to be a strong emphasis on planning which provides an opportunity to
rethink and restructure the way that HCD and MHA conduct their housing, community,
and economic development activities. This enables the agencies to thoroughly examine
duplication and other crosscutting issues that hinder our ability to serve the community in
the most time sensitive and customer friendly manner.

To further the development of internal institutional structure, agency strategic goals have
been developed. These include compliance/reporting/policy & asset protection, housing
for low/moderate income citizens, social/human/special needs services, economic
development opportunities for low/moderate income citizens, planning and development,
investment/improvement in human resources, and communications/ marketing/public
relations.

There is also an emphasis on overall system improvements and enhancements to
enhance the institutional structure. HCD/MHA will improve the effectiveness and
efficiency by dedicating resources and energy toward the improvement of internal
systems and processes. The organization will also improve the design and delivery of
programs and services using empirical data to support program changes and new
programs. Last, HCD/MHA will insure that programs remain appropriately linked to its
mission and strategic plan.

HCD/MHA values its partnerships with nonprofit, for-profit, public, philanthropic and
other organizations to carry out its housing and community development objectives. The
agency works with such organizations in a variety of ways. We provide funding through
contracts to operate programs and projects, with leverage being a factor in selecting
projects on a competitive basis. We also work with educational institutions to undertake
research efforts to identify needs and recommend solutions. Such partnerships are
especially critical in that they leverage the dollars received to accomplish more and
create a larger impact.


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                                     Executive Summary
Consultation and Coordination Efforts

The City consults with housing, social services and other agencies to better respond to
the respective needs of low/moderate income residents. Because HCD does not have
the resources to completely revitalize neighborhoods on its own, it is seeking creative
ways to coordinate services and to bring groups together in order to make a difference
within these areas. Leveraging of resources and partnerships with CDCs and other
neighborhood-based organizations, the faith based community, colleges and
universities, and private developers are critical components of this strategy.

Staff from HCD, and homeless services providers worked with Partners for the
Homeless and the Greater Memphis Interagency Coalition for the Homeless who, under
contract with HCD, coordinate several activities including: 1) a Point-in-Time count; 2)
the coordination and facilitation of a Retreat for Homeless Services providers as part of
the Continuum of Care planning process; help finalize and implement the use of the
Quality Standard of Care system among homeless service providers; 3) participate in the
SuperNofa Grant application process; and, 4) the preparation of the 2010-2011
Homeless Needs Assessment and Gaps Analysis.

HCD provides funding for most projects and programs through a competitive request for
proposal process. A request for proposals is issued and services providers submit their
proposals. The proposals are reviewed for completeness and eligibility. After
completeness and eligibility are certified, a committee reviews and ranks the proposals.
The proposals are funded according to the ranking of the committee. This process uses
Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) funds. The CDBG awards are
Community Service Grant Awards (CSG). Housing Opportunities for Persons With AIDS
(HOPWA) funds are used for supportive services, short-term housing and utilities and
short-term rental assistance. HOPWA funds are awarded by the City to nonprofit project
sponsors, some of which are selected competitively and some through negotiations.
The funds support a continuum of housing activities which include the following for
persons with AIDS and their family members living with them;
        Short Term Supported Housing for homeless persons with AIDS (12 beds)
        administered by Whitehaven Southwest Mental Health Center at Peabody House
        Short Term Rent, Mortgage and Utility Assistance along with Permanent Housing
        Placement provided by Friends for Life in Mississippi and Arkansas counties
        within the EMSA and by Family Services within Shelby County and the other
        Tennessee counties in the EMSA (services include assessment and on-going
        assistance from case managers)
        Tenant Based Rental Assistance provided by Friends for Life in all counties in
        Mississippi, Arkansas and Tennessee in the Memphis EMSA (services include
        assessment and on-going assistance from case managers). Additionally, Hope
        House, a day care facility that serves children infected or affected by AIDS, also
        administers a TBRA program for the parents of the day care children.
        Homemaker-Caretaker Services provided by Friends for Life
        Supportive services for persons with AIDS to help clients remain adherent to their
        medical treatment and learn skills necessary to ensure their housing stability.

HOME funds are used for Tenant Based Rental Assistance programs and to match
housing construction funds to rehabilitate / construct new units of permanent supportive


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                                    Executive Summary
rental housing. Both programs target homeless and special needs populations. Funding
is awarded competitively through the Strategic Community Investment Fund.

A request for proposal process, the Strategic Community Investment Fund (SCIF), is
similar to the HUD SuperNOFA process and it enables HCD to have all grant
applications and requests for proposals held at one time. Since its inception in FY2002,
the process has broadened to include applications made available by other City
Divisions, foundations, and the nonprofits. As a result, Memphis is able to become
better coordinated in its approach to community funding. Workshops are held to inform
and educate constituents of the process. Another component of this funding process
includes project tracking with a central point of entry allowing HCD to better track and
monitor projects.

Effort was made to expand the participation and inclusion of constituents representing
the categories of housing, economic, neighborhood and community development.
Community development corporations and representatives from the Hispanic community
participated in Fair Housing sessions. A variety of organizations, including non-profit
housing developers, social service agencies and health/mental health-care professionals
were invited to participate in one or more needs and planning groups. These service
providers and program implementers were convened to provide consultation on housing
and community development needs of low/moderate income families in Memphis.
Surveys, in the form of comment cards, were made available on the internet and at
planning meetings for constituents to provide information on community needs and
priorities. HCD holds workshops on a variety of topics, including funding and technical
assistance, and these are attended by CDC’s and other nonprofit organizations.

Memphis is continually working to update its Impediments to Fair Housing Study and has
convened a task force to assist in this endeavor. HCD continues its contract with
Memphis Area Legal Services to operate the Fair Housing Center and to enforce the
City’s adopted fair housing policy.


                       Citizen Participation Process For
                                City of Memphis
           Division of Housing and Community Development (HCD)

In addition to citizens and Memphis Housing Authority, the Memphis Division of
Housing and Community Development (HCD) consults with and seeks input on
housing and community development needs from a wide variety of social
service/advocacy groups and public agencies. To facilitate this process, HCD
identifies and meets with several planning session groups, which represent
organizations and individuals served by our programs. As much as possible,
these are coordinated and conducted by members involved in the planning
sessions. Each group is asked to provide HCD with information on current
issues, needs, priorities and long and short term recommendations on resource
allocation and inter-agency coordination. HCD also has a website for it’s
Consolidated Plan and posts information about the planning process, draft
documents, and presentations on the City’s web-site as well as the public
hearing notices.

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                                    Executive Summary
Requirements for HCD to Provide Information:

In meeting with citizens and planning session groups about the Consolidated
Plan, HCD provides information on:

•   The amount of funding to be received from federal sources

•   The types of activities that may be undertaken under various grant programs

•   Amount of funding that will benefit low- and very low-income persons

•   Plans to minimize displacement of persons or assist those who are displaced

In addition, HCD makes every effort to provide technical assistance to groups
representative of low and very low-income groups in developing proposals for
funding under any of the programs described in the Consolidated Plan.
Furthermore, HCD provides, as required by the Consolidated Plan rules, access
to records and reports relating to the plan and to the use of federal funds for the
preceding five years.

Public Hearing:

HCD meets the requirements of holding two public hearings. At the first hearing,
prior year performance, the Consolidated Planning process, and citizen
participation process are presented. The second hearing presents the proposed
draft Consolidated Plan and includes citizen/planning session attendants’
comments on the proposed plan.

This year, the first public hearing was held February 3, 2010. The second
hearing was held on April 7, 2010 and began the thirty day comment period on
the draft Consolidated Plan.

Public hearings are held at times and locations convenient to potential
beneficiaries and accommodations will be made for those with disabilities. All
public hearings are publicized at least ten days in advance in one newspaper of
general daily circulation and in one newspaper of general circulation.

The Planning Session Group Process:

Many social service agencies and nonprofits in Memphis are engaged in meeting
the needs of the poor, the homeless and the disadvantaged. Many of HCD’s
programs make funds available to these nonprofits to carry out their work.
Through the planning session group process, HCD attempts to tap into coalitions
of agencies, to identify existing conditions, needs, priorities for funding, resource
allocation and other ideas. At minimum, HCD brings agencies together in group

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                                  Executive Summary
meetings during each year to discuss the concerns required by the Consolidated
Plan. However, for existing groups (such as the A.I.D.S. Consortium, the
Homeless Coalition or the CDC council), these meetings are ongoing, and
coordination and communication with HCD will be continuous.

Publication of the Consolidated Plan:

Copies of the draft Consolidated Plan are available for review and comment for a
period not less than 30 days before final submission to HUD. Copies of the draft
plan are provided to planning session groups, MHA and local governmental
agencies/officials and copies will also be available for review in the public
libraries. In addition, a public notice is published which summarizes the contents
and purpose of the plan, publicizes its availability and identifies locations where
copies may be obtained or reviewed.

After HUD approves the Consolidated Plan, HCD prepares another public notice
to inform citizens of the availability of the final Consolidated Plan as approved by
HUD. Public notices are also published regarding availability of annual
performance reports and amendments to the plan.

            Citizen Participation in Other HCD Projects and Programs

The following pages describe HCD’s projects and programs which serve to
distribute grant funds to nonprofit organizations, neighborhoods and other
agencies.

While many programs are carried out through HCD itself, others are contracted
out to eligible organizations on a competitive basis. The Strategic Community
Investment Funds (SCIF) applies a community-based approach to HCD's
programs that require organizations and agencies to submit competitive
applications for funding.

The funds available on a competitive basis are awarded to eligible nonprofit, for-
profit, faith-based, and other organizations to implement community and
economic development programs. The funds through this process are primarily
available for programs that benefit low and moderate income persons of
Memphis as defined by HUD's income criteria. In order to assist organizations
that apply for these programs, HCD has adapted its competitive grant processes
through the Strategic Community Investment Funds (SCIF), modeled after the
U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development's SuperNOFA program.

All of HCD's competitive funding programs fall under the SCIF. The SCIF
provides a complete picture of programs and funding available on a competitive
basis through HCD. The programs include:

•   Emergency Shelter Grant Program


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                                  Executive Summary
•   Community Housing Development Organization Program
•   Housing Opportunities for Persons With AIDS
•   Affordable Multi/Single Family Housing Program
•   Housing Developer's incentive Program
•   HOME Match for Housing for Homeless and Special Needs Populations
•   Community Service Grants
•   Community Economic Development Grants
•   Neighborhood Development Program
•   Tenant Based Rental Assistance

The SCIF regulates the application and selection processes. The intention is to
provide a simple process and to make expectations of applicants clear. While
each applicant might apply for more than one available program, much of the
documentation needs to be provided only once. Applicants only need to submit
one General SCIF Application along with the individual program application for
each program the applicant is applying for (plus copies).

Emergency Shelter Grant Program

The Emergency Shelter Grant (ESG) Program is a competitive funding process
open to organizations that serve homeless populations. The ESG program is
specifically designed for rehabilitating and/or converting existing emergency and
transitional shelters; to provide adequate operating funds for existing or new
emergency and transitional shelters; to provide certain essential services to
homeless individuals; and provide funding for programs and activities designed
to prevent homelessness. The maximum amount that an organization may apply
for is $50,000.00.


Community Housing Development Organization Program

Funds for next fiscal year will only be awarded to organizations that have already
been designated as Community Housing Development Organizations.

The Community Housing Development Organization (CHDO) program is a
competitive funding process open to a type of private, nonprofit organization
called a CHDO. CHDOs must be organized under state and local law for the
purpose of providing decent, affordable housing (this must be evidenced in the
Charter, Articles of Incorporation by-laws, or board resolution); have no individual
benefit to members; have a clearly defined geographic service area; have
nonprofit status; have a board that is representative of the community it serves;
and demonstrate at least one year of experience in serving its community.

The activities that CHDOs may apply for under the competitive process are
acquisition and/or rehabilitation of rental housing, new construction of rental
housing, acquisition and/or rehabilitation of homebuyer properties, new

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                                  Executive Summary
construction of homebuyer properties, and direct financial assistance to
purchasers of CHDO-developed housing.

Housing Opportunities for Persons with AIDS (HOPWA) Program

The HOPWA Program provides housing assistance and related support services
for low-income persons living with HIV/AIDS and their families. The focus of the
program is to reduce the risks of homelessness to this population and increase
access to appropriate healthcare and other support. Eligible program activities
include: housing information; resource identification; acquisition / rehabilitation /
conversion, lease and repair of housing; new construction of single room
occupancy facilities or community residences; short-term supported housing;
supportive services; operating costs for housing; project or tenant-based rental
assistance; and short-term rent, mortgage and utility assistance.

Affordable Multi/Single Family Housing Program

The Real Estate Department within the City of Memphis, Division of Housing and
Community Development receives funding allocations annually from City and
Federal sources. The allocations received are to be used for the development
and/or re-development of affordable housing focusing on the priority and targeted
neighborhoods as defined by Mayor Herenton.

The City funding allocations are reserved for the development and/or re-
development of infrastructure improvements only whereas the federal funding
allocations can be used not only for infrastructure but also for renovation and
new construction projects.

Due to the fluctuation of allocated funds from year to year, the availability of
funds permitted uses and funding amounts are referenced in the individual
program application.

Housing Developer’s Incentive Program

The purpose of the Middle Income Developer's Assistance Program (MIDAP) is
to promote middle income development for homeownership in Memphis
neighborhoods that have higher rates of poverty, lower home values, lower rates
of homeowners, and higher risk of return on investment for developers. MIDAP
projects must include a minimum of 5 contiguous units or 5 infill units within a
five-mile radius of each other. MIDAP funds are strictly for infrastructure-related
costs. Funding may not exceed 70% of total project cost. Home sales prices
must be between $135,750.00 and $221,166.00
.
HOME Match for Housing for Homeless and Special Needs Populations




                                            8
                                   Executive Summary
The purpose of the Continuum of Care HOME and Special Needs Housing Match
program is to encourage the development of permanent supportive housing for
special needs and homeless persons with disabilities. The program will help
meet HUD's Continuum of Care requirement for cash match for housing
acquisition, rehabilitation, and/or construction. These funds will provide the cash
match for Continuum of Care Permanent Supportive Housing projects that
involve the development of new housing units for homeless disabled persons.
Additionally, the funds will provide cash match for the development of rental
housing for members of homeless and special needs populations. Tenants
eligible to live in the housing must be 50% of the median income in Memphis,
homeless, and/or have a disability or be a member of a special needs group.
Maximum grants are $200,000.00 for Continuum of Care Match and $250,000.00
for non CoC match.

Community Service Grants

The purpose of the Community Service Grant program is to provide opportunities
for nonprofit organizations to carry out eligible public facility improvements or
public services activities. Project participants are limited to youth from primarily
low and moderate-income households and persons who are members of
homeless & special needs populations.

Community Economic Development Grants

The purpose of the Community Economic Development Grants are to encourage
nonprofit organizations to acquire, complete infrastructure, demolish, conduct
environmental assessments, or undertake planning and construction related to
neighborhood oriented economic development projects. Applicant must have
site control demonstrated through ownership or option and property must be
zoned commercial or mixed use. Project funding is not to exceed 60% of total
project cost. When funding is awarded for acquisition (land or building), the
project must be completed within 3 years from the time of award or the property
will either be deeded back to the City or the grant will be converted into a loan.
Maximum award is $250,000.00 and requires 40% secured financing or equity
investment

Neighborhood Development Program

The purpose of the Neighborhood Development Program is to encourage non
profit organizations to provide programs and services in the areas of
business/economic development, community development and community
initiatives Workforce development/job training for Low/Moderate Income persons.
Eligible activities include SBE/MBE/WBE Programs (Technical Assistance,
Counseling, etc.), job creation activities, Neighborhood Clean up Initiatives,
capacity building activities, youth development/mentoring programs (LMI areas),



                                           9
                                  Executive Summary
economic development initiatives, and affordable housing programs/related
activities (credit repair, financial planning/budgeting for LMI).

Tenant Based Rental Assistance

The Tenant based Rental Assistance program is open to Nonprofit agencies that
serve the homeless, those are imminent risk of homelessness and/or special
needs populations with income. TBRA pays up to 2 years of rental assistance
and utilities. (Program participants are required to pay 30% of their adjusted
income for rent and to pay a portion of the monthly utilities.) All program
participants must have income at or below 60% of the median for Memphis and
be homeless, at imminent risk of homelessness or a member of a special needs
population (physically, mentally or developmentally disabled; recovering from
substance abuse addiction; the elderly or a victim of domestic violence). The
$600,000 available in HOME funds will provide two years of rental assistance (at
an average of $475 per month) for approximately 45 to 50 households. No grants
will be made for programs serving less than 10 households. A lump sum
operating award will be made with each TBRA contract for 30% of the total grant
award (not to be less than $60,000 for the entire contract period.)




                                         10
                                 Executive Summary
                 Following are amendments made to the FY 2010 Consolidated Plan.

           Priority Area and Program Year
                                                         Description of Change and Amount                                    The Impact
Source: FY 10/PY 09 CDBG Line-of-Credit                  Amend: CDBG Float-Fund Project – Memphis Pyramid                    Economic Development
An Interim Loan which will be re-paid within 24 months   Redevelopment Project reduced from $5,000,000 to $3,200,000         Job Creation
from distribution [Economic Development]
Source: Section 108 Loan Guarantee of $9,914,000 and     Receipt funds from BEDI Grant and Section 108 Loan totaling         Economic Development
a $2,000,000 BEDI Grant [Economic Development]           $11,914,000 toward the debt refinancing and rehabilitation of the   Job Creation
                                                         Memphis Pyramid Redevelopment Project                               566 Full Time Equivalent
                                                                                                                             Jobs
Source: FY 09 CDBG HARP Single-family Rehab              Adjust FY 2009 (PY2008) CDBG Program Income Projections:            Decreases FY 2009
($250,000 and Targeted Multi-family ($339,137.70)        Reduce by $589,137.70 due to under-collection                       funding for Housing
[Housing]
Source: FY 09 CDBG HARP Single-family Rehab              Adjust FY 2009 (PY2008) HOME Program Income Projections:            Decreases FY 2009
($4,239.93 [Housing]                                     Reduce by $4,239.93 due to under-collection                         funding for Housing



Source: FY 09 CDBG Targeted Single and Multi-family      Create New Project: Reduce Targeted Single and Multi-family         Increase Non-housing
Program ($100,000) [Housing], FY09 CDBG                  Program and Planning Activities - Create Step Prep - $190,000       Community Development
Neighborhood Plans ($34,300), FY07 CDBG Plan and
Mat Development ($17,500), and FY07 Planning
($38,200)
Source: FY 09 HOME ($750,000) Un-programmed funds        Re-Program FY 09 HOME funds – Create New Project FY 2011            No net impact
[Housing]                                                Multi-family/SF Housing $750,000
Source: FY 09 CDBG Targeted Single and Multi-family      Create New Project: Reduce Targeted Single and Multi-family         Increase Non-housing
Program ($175,502) [Housing]                             Program by $175,502 – Create Mid-South Junior Golf                  Community Development
                                                                        st
                                                         Association 1 Tee Project $175,502                                  (youth activities)
Source: FY 07 CDBG Targeted Single and Multi-family      Create New Project: Reduce Targeted Single and Multi-family         No net impact
Program ($300,000) [Housing]                             Program by $300,000 - Create Exchange Building Loan
                                                         Guarantee $300,000
Source: FY 2007 CDBG Memphis Center Independent          Close-out projects – Return funds to Community services grants      No net impact
Living ($12,041.11) and LeMoyne HOPE VI ($281.61)        for re-programming ($12,322.72)
[Special Needs]
Sources: Various Awards – Admin ($2,301,259.32)          Create New Project: Close-out various Administrative awards –       Economic Development
Multifamily/Rental ($118,000.00)                         Create Pyramid Acquisition Project $3,200,000                       Job Creation
Binghampton-Tillman ($310,171.84); Leath-Bayou
($152,836.03); New Chicago Acquisition ($3,931.44);
HARP ($263,801.37) Totaling $3,200,000 [Housing and
Admininstraion]
Sources: Various Projects CDBG Awards FY 06 Program      Re-Program CDBG funds to FY 2011– Create 2 New Projects –           Economic Development
Income ($32,930.57); FY 08 ($50,894); FY 07              Nucor Steel ($500,000) and Beale Street Landing ($500,000)          Job Creation
($397,580); FY 05 ($278,000); FY 09 Closed Activity
($240,595.43)




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                                                               Executive Summary
                 SUMMARY OF FY 2010 ANNUAL ACTION PLAN

Fiscal Year 2011 for HCD will begin July 1, 2010 and end on June 30, 2011. The text of
the Consolidated Plan mentions projects and activities that are ongoing and may be
funded with prior year funds. The projects in the Listing of Proposed Projects table are
those for which HCD plans to spend re-programmed entitlement funds and FY10
Federal entitlement funds received from HUD.

                Program Name                                Estimated Funds
 CDBG Program                                                  $8,768,683.00
 Projected CDBG Program Income                                 $2,203,420.00
 Re-Programmed CDBG                                            $1,000,000.00
 HOME Program                                                  $4,921,520.00
 Projected HOME Program Income                                  $20,000.00
 HOME Re-Program                                                $750,000.00
 ESG Program                                                    $357,054.00
 HOPWA Program                                                 $1,701,201.00

 TOTAL                                                         $19,721,878.00


The Program Year 2010 (FY 2011) Annual Plan, covers the period of July 1, 2010
through June 30, 2011, and represents the first year of the City of Memphis’ Three-Year
Strategy for the 2011-2013 Consolidated Plan. It is prepared in compliance with the
U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development guidelines for submission for
Federal entitlement funds. The Annual Plan outlines the priorities determined by citizen
participation, research, and input from housing and community development
professionals, social service providers and others who participated in the planning
process. The first Public Hearing, conducted on February 3, 2010 presented the FY
2009 Consolidated Annual Performance Report (CAPER) and announced the start of the
planning process for the 2011-2013 Three Year Strategy and the FY 2011 Annual Action
Plan. The second Public Hearing, conducted on April 7, 2010, presented a draft
summary of the 2011-2013 Three Year Strategy and Proposed FY 2011 Annual Action
Plan.
There are four (4) proposed project/activity categories: Housing, Homeless, Special
Needs Populations, Neighborhood, and Community and Economic Development (non-
housing community development). Together, the proposed activities represent
Memphis’ efforts to achieve overall and specific objectives, as presented in the priority
needs assessments established for the Three-year Strategy.

The redevelopment and revitalization of neighborhoods is a high priority as the FY 2011
Annual Plan continues to reflect. HCD’s neighborhood redevelopment strategy targets
areas and neighborhoods that have been selected for physical, social, and economic
development that will help create viable neighborhoods of choice. Given the
tremendous amount of blight in these neighborhoods, as well as the level of
disinvestment, the City of Memphis continues to commit federal resources to activities
that will achieve measurable impact. Neighborhood plans will be prepared for targeted
areas as part of a new Neighborhoods of Choice initiative.

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                                     Executive Summary
HCD’s response to public services and facility needs is primarily accomplished through a
request for proposal process known as the Community Service Grant application
process. The overall competitive process for grant awards is coordinated through the
Strategic Community Investment Fund (SCIF). The City’s ability to address the many
community service needs is limited by a 15% cap placed on the use of CDBG funds for
public services. Projects proposed for funding includes those that address homeless
and special needs supportive services, youth and elderly services and look to increase
employment either through skills training, job placement, and literacy programming.

The Continuum of Care is used to develop the assessment of homeless needs. This
process helps in developing the homeless priority needs, objectives and strategies.
Projects proposed for ESG funding are determined through the competitive grant
application process that reviews requests for funding from agencies and service
providers who provide shelter and implement services that meet the needs of homeless
persons. The City contracts with Partners for the Homeless (Partners) and The Greater
Memphis Interagency Coalition for the Homeless (GMICH) to coordinate the planning
and research of the homeless population, to gather input and information from homeless
service providers, and to facilitate the Continuum of Care application process. Two high
priority needs for the homeless are reflected in proposed activities that foster the
development of permanent supportive housing and coordinated and increased outreach
efforts from service providers and agencies.

The City of Memphis has three general housing objectives that address a range of
housing needs presented in the Strategic Plan. These objectives include an emphasis
on keeping families in their homes, increasing housing choices, and supporting housing
development plans that will create patterns that are convenient, walkable, and have
access to services. These objectives encompass the priority needs categories identified
for the City of Memphis in the three year Strategic Plan and are the specific targets of
the various objectives and proposed activities in the current action plan.

Memphis’ commitment to providing assistance in maintaining homes owned by low-
income residents continues in FY 2011 with the owner-occupied rehabilitation programs
that are funded with CDBG funds. These include the HARP and the Minor Home Repair
program, which assists predominantly low-income senior citizens and persons with
disabilities to make repairs to their homes.

To address rental housing needs in Memphis, the multi-family program available through
the City of Memphis competitive grant program, SCIF, encourages the rehabilitation of
new construction of housing units that are available for rent throughout the City of
Memphis. Community Housing Development Organizations (CHDO’s) are also being
encouraged to apply for set-aside HOME funds that will be used to develop rental and
multi-family units.

To address the objective of increasing homeownership, HOME funds are proposed for
the continuation of the City’s Down Payment Assistance Program. HCD also provide
support to the local housing counseling agencies working to help potential and existing
homeowners to be successful.

HCD will continue to place emphasis on persons having special needs in FY2011.
Special needs populations are classified into seven different categories. The categories

                                            13
                                    Executive Summary
are HIV/AIDS, Mentally Ill, Elderly, Chronic Substance Abusers, Developmentally
Disabled, Physically Disabled, and Victims of Domestic Violence. Elderly needs include
the Frail Elderly. Funding for most special needs activities are awarded through the
process known as the Strategic Community Investment Funds (SCIF) which makes
funds available annually on a competitive basis and are awarded to eligible nonprofit,
for-profit, faith-based, and other organizations to implement public service, community
and economic development programs. Housing Opportunities for Persons With AIDS
(HOPWA) funds are used for supportive services, short-term housing and utilities and
short-term rental assistance. The proposed projects reflect actions to address the
Memphis priority needs balanced by the quality of applications we receive through the
SCIF process. Included are activities that provide emergency/ transitional housing, and
rent and utility assistance for persons living with HIV/AIDS; assistance with housing
repairs to enable elderly to remain in their homes; supportive services; increasing
options for developmentally disabled to choose from “specialty” housing, respite
housing, and transportation services; and efforts to increase housing accessibility for the
physically disabled.

Key findings from the needs assessment for “special needs” persons in Memphis found
that:

   Most of the special needs population cannot work and are dependent on either family
   or public support.
   Their main source of public monetary support is the Supplemental Security Income
   (SSI), which in 2010 pays an average of $498 per month.
   This amount is well below the level required for normal living expenses (for example,
   the 2010 “Fair Market Rent” in Memphis was $705 per month for a one bedroom
   housing unit and $783 for a two bedroom unit.)

For FY2011, the City’s focus on meeting the non-housing community development
needs continues with proposed activities that encourage redevelopment of targeted
areas through infrastructure improvements that support housing development; the
provision of public services that address the needs of low-income elderly and youth;
economic development and job training initiatives; fair housing enforcement; and efforts
that respond to poverty amongst those having the least.

HERA/ARRA Programs

Neighborhood Stabilization Program (NSP)

In December of 2008, the City of Memphis Division of Housing and Community
Development (HCD) amended its 2008 Annual Action Plan for July 1, 2008 through June
30, 2009. The amendment was made in accordance with the U. S. Department of
Housing and Urban Development’s (HUD) guidelines for the Neighborhood Stabilization
Program (NSP), as authorized under Title III of the Housing and Economic Recovery Act
(HERA) of 2008. HUD allocated $11,506,415 in NSP funds to the City of Memphis. The
amendment described how HCD proposes to use these funds to address the
requirements of HERA for meeting identified needs within the community.

In response to the NSP allocation, HCD established a planning committee to examine
foreclosure and subprime loan data for the City of Memphis in order to identify the areas
of greatest need for NSP funding. The committee took into account the three required

                                             14
                                     Executive Summary
criteria stipulated by HUD for identifying areas of greatest need, and identified 10 ZIP
Codes that have been or will be most severely impacted by foreclosures, subprime
lending and future foreclosures. These 10 ZIP Codes are: 38127, 38109, 38128, 38118,
38106, 38141, 38115, 38114, 38116, and 38111.

Based on its analysis, HCD is allocating the majority of NSP funds available for use by
nonprofit and for-profit affordable housing developers within these 10 ZIP Codes. HCD
expects that this funding will result in the acquisition, rehabilitation and disposition of
approximately 145 units of abandoned or foreclosed properties for use as affordable
housing for sale or rent to low-, middle-, and moderate-income (LMMI) households. It is
further anticipated that 25 percent of NSP funds will be used to benefit households
earning less than 50 percent of area median income, including provision of housing for
homeless and special needs populations. All program income received as a result of
NSP activities will be revolved into additional NSP-eligible activities for LMMI households
within the 10 target ZIP Codes.

Homeless Prevention and Rapid Re-housing Program (HPRP)

Authorized under Title XII of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009,
HUD has allocated $3,329,685 in Homeless Prevention and Rapid Re-housing Program
(HPRP) funds to the City of Memphis. The City of Memphis is submitting to the U.S.
Department of Housing & Urban Development (HUD) an application for an entitlement
grant of $3,329,685 in Homeless Prevention and Rapid Re-housing Program funds.
This application includes the substantial amendment to City’s PY 08/FY 09 Annual Plan.
HPRP funds will be used to prevent and rapidly re-house individuals and families who
but for this assistance would be homeless and whose incomes are 50% or less than the
area median income by household size. Eligible activities are limited to four categories:
financial assistance, housing relocation and stabilization services, data collection and
evaluation, and administrative costs. There is a 5% cap on administrative costs.

The City of Memphis is creating a two-year prevention and rapid re-housing program
that proposes to serve as many as 650 households per year (1,300 over the course of
the grant period) with financial assistance and services to support self-sufficiency and
housing stability. This initiative includes the creation of a centralized intake and referral
program which will: 1) prevent shelter entry for those for whom homelessness may be
avoided thru mediation and/or financial assistance, and 2) to provide access to shelter or
other appropriate resources. Memphis proposes utilizing approximately 4% of its
allocation for data collection and evaluation and 5% of its allocation for administrative
costs related to the administration and oversight of the program. Finally, Memphis
expects to initiate a Request for Proposal that will identify qualified agencies who would
provide housing-based case management services for individuals and households
receiving financial assistance through the HPRP program.

Memphis was required to make the amendment available to the public for review and
comment for a period of 12 days. The amendment was available for review by the public
at the offices of the Division of Housing and Community Development and on the City of
Memphis’ main website during this 12 day period which commenced on May 1, 2009
and ran through May 13, 2009.




                                             15
                                     Executive Summary
          FY 2011 (PY10) Federal Resources and Proposed Projects

The following project categories are proposed by HCD for funding with FY 2011 (PY10)
CDBG, HOME, ESG, HOPWA funds, Program Income and Prior Year funding.


                      Project Name                        Funding           Funding
                                                         Source(s)          Amount

      Salvation Army - Emergency Family Shelter              ESG             $25,000.00
      (OM)

      Memphis Area Legal Services (MALS) -Fair              CDBG            $190,000.00
      Housing Center
      Tenant Based Rental Assistance (TBRA)                 HOME            $600,000.00
      Karat Place (ES)                                       ESG              $8,000.00
      TBRA Case Management/Housing Services                 CDBG            $181,000.00
      Community & Economic Development                      CDBG            $500,000.00
      Housing and Rehabilitation Program (HARP)            HOME             $665,291.00
                                                            CDBG             $71,299.68
                                                      CDBG Program           $88,539.00
                                                      Income                 $20,000.00
                                                       HOME Program
                                                           Income
      Minor Home Repair                                CDBG Program        $1,000,000.0
                                                           Income                     0
      Volunteer Housing Repair                         CDBG Program         $100,000.00
                                                           Income
      Monitoring and Compliance Program Delivery            CDBG            $631,174.27
      CD Council Bank Lending Study (MACRO)                 CDBG             $29,500.00
      Memphis Food Bank                                     CDBG             $75,000.00
      Down Payment Assistance Program                      HOME             $200,000.00
      Section 109 Loan Repayment - University          CDBG Program         $499,881.00
      Place/Millcreek                                      Income

      Memphis Family Shelter - Transitional Housing          ESG             $35,000.00
      shelter for Women & Children (OM)
      HOPWA Programs                                       HOPWA           $1,650,164.9
                                                                                      7
      Hope House (CSG)                                     CDBG             $35,000.00
      Door of Hope (ES)                                     ESG             $15,000.00
      Lowenstein House (ES)                                 ESG             $11,000.00
      Summer Enrichment Sports Program (Shelby         CDBG Program        $200,000.00
      Metro Basketball)                                   Income
      Door Of Hope (CSG)                                   CDBG              $50,000.00
      Friends for Life (CSG)                               CDBG              $49,968.00
      Title XX Program Match-Help Care Program             CDBG             $186,615.00
      Memphis Family Shelter (CSG)                         CDBG              $41,268.00

                                          16
                                  Executive Summary
               Project Name                      Funding       Funding
                                                Source(s)      Amount
Senior Companion Program (CSG)                     CDBG        $32,840.00
Meritan (CSG)                                      CDBG        $50,000.00
Intern Contracts                               CDBG Program   $125,000.00
                                                  Income
Employment Concepts (Shelby Residential &          CDBG        $50,000.00
Vocational Services –Personal and Career
Development)
Synergy Treatment Centers (OM)                      ESG         $5,000.00
CHDO Projects                                      HOME       $742,563.00
                                                 HOME Re-     $750,000.00
                                                Programmed
CHDO Administration                                HOME        $247,520.00
HOME Administration                                HOME        $492,152.00
General Administration                             CDBG       $1,260,302.9
                                                                         4
Cocaine Alcohol Awareness Program –CAAP            ESG          $20,000.00
(OM)
Finance Program Delivery                          CDBG        $404,638.32
Special Needs – Public Services Program           CDBG        $476,987.16
Delivery
Real Estate Development Program Delivery           CBG         $241,405.12
Single-Family Rehab (HARP) Program Delivery       CDBG         $496,522.24
Targeted Single & Multi-Family Housing            HOME        $1,500,000.0
Development                                                              0
Douglas Bungalow Crump                             CDBG         $36,000.00
Community Alliance for the Homeless                CDBG        $191,699.00
Harbor Dredging ED Project                       CDBG Re-      $500,000.00
                                                Programmed
Historic Property Survey                           CDBG        $10,000.00
Genesis House -Catholic Charities (ES)              ESG        $20,000.00
HOME - Match (Homeless Continuum of Care           HOME       $250,000.00
Fair Housing Enforcement - Memphis Area            CDBG        $70,000.00
Legal Services(MALS)
HOME Match(Special Needs)                         HOME        $250,000.00
Case Management Inc. (HP)                          ESG         $30,000.00
Neighborhood Plans                                CDBG        $100,000.00
Salvation Army Homeless Referral Center           CDBG        $108,800.00
Salvation Army Emergency Family Shelter (ES)       ESG         $10,094.05
The Grant Center (Alliance for Nonprofit          CDBG         $50,000.00
Excellence)
Planning and Material Development                 CDBG         $50,000.00

Helpcare Homemaker Services (CSG)                 CDBG         $50,000.00
Legal Program Delivery                            CDBG        $320,528.67
Design Program Delivery                           CDBG         $79,710.18
Portfolio Management Program Delivery             CDBG        $311,848.68
Lowenstein House (CSG)                            CDBG         $50,000.00

                                   17
                           Executive Summary
               Project Name                    Funding     Funding
                                              Source(s)    Amount
Planning and Development Program Delivery       CDBG      $204,060.742
Girls, Inc. (CSG)                               CDBG        $40,200.00
Exchange Club (CSG)                             CDBG        $50,000.00
Memphis Child Advocacy Center (CSG)             CDBG        $50,000.00
Court Appointed Special Advocates (CSG)         CDBG        $50,000.00
Beale Street Landing                            CDBG       $500,000.00
                                              Reprogram
Alpha Omega (OM)                                 ESG        $35,000.00
Memphis Center for Independent Living           CDBG        $50,000.00
HOPWA Admin                                    HOPWA        $51,036.03
Neighborhood Networks                           CDBG         $8,400.00
ESG Administration                               ESG        $17,852.70
Director’s Program Delivery                     CDBG       $238,035.64
Accounting Program Delivery                     CDBG       $378,929.36
Human Resources Program Delivery                CDBG       $208,183.17
Information Services Program Delivery           CDBG        $80,000.00
Central Office Program Delivery                 CDBG       $123,600.00
Community Development Program Delivery          CDBG       $505,251.86
Property Maintenance                            CDBG        175,000.00
Community Development Loan Guarantee            CDBG       $250,000.00
Hospitality Hub (OM)                             ESG         $8,272.25
Hospitality Hub (ES)                             ESG         $4,000.00




                                  18
                          Executive Summary
                           2011 ANNUAL ACTION PLAN
                                 Memphis, Tennessee
Introduction

The Annual Action Plan describes how entitlement funds will be used to carry out the
strategies and programs outlined in the Three-year Consolidated Plan during the City of
Memphis Fiscal Year 2011 (HUD Program Year 2010), which begins July 1, 2010 and
ends June 30, 2011. It is prepared in compliance with the U.S. Department of Housing
and Urban Development guidelines for submission for Federal entitlement funds. The
four programs under the Consolidated Planning process include Community
Development Block Grant (CDBG), HOME Investment Partnership Program (HOME),
Emergency Shelter Grant (ESG) and Housing Opportunities for Persons with AIDS
(HOPWA). The Division of Housing and Community Development is the lead agency
responsible for the development and administration of its Consolidated Plan and its four
entitlement programs.

The FY2011 Annual Plan represents the first year of the City of Memphis’ Three-Year
Strategy for the 2011-2013 Consolidated Plan. The Annual Plan outlines the priorities
determined by citizen participation, research, and input from housing and community
development professionals, social service providers and others who participated in the
planning process. The first Public Hearing, conducted on February 3, 2010 presented
the FY 2009 Consolidated Annual Performance Report (CAPER) and announced the
start of the planning process for the 2011-2013 Three Year Strategy and the FY 2011
Annual Action Plan. The second Public Hearing, conducted on April 7, 2010 presented
a draft summary of the 2011-2013 Three Year Strategy and Proposed FY 2011 Annual
Action Plan.
There are four (4) proposed project/activity categories: Housing, Homeless, Special
Needs Populations, and Neighborhood, and Community and Economic Development.
Together, the proposed activities represent Memphis’ efforts to achieve overall and
specific objectives, as presented in the priority needs assessments established for the
Three-year Strategy.

The Memphis Housing Authority (MHA) continues to use its resources, including HOPE
VI, to leverage the Division of Housing and Community Development’s entitlement
grants (HOME and CDBG funds) to redevelop neighborhoods housing sites where
previous public housing development once were situated. Core City neighborhoods in
Memphis have deteriorated due to significant disinvestment, commercial and residential
population declines and overall blight. The redevelopment and revitalization of
neighborhoods is a high priority as the FY 2011 Annual Plan continues to reflect. HCD’s
neighborhood redevelopment strategy targets areas and neighborhoods that have been
selected for physical, social, and economic development that will help create viable
neighborhoods of choice. Given the challenges that exist in these neighborhoods, as
well as the level of disinvestment, the City of Memphis will continue to commit federal
resources to activities that will achieve measurable impact. Neighborhood plans will be
prepared for targeted areas in areas where Memphis Housing Authority revitalization
activities are underway. These areas include the New Chicago (former Oates Manor)
redevelopment, Legends Park, and Triangle Noir. For areas not subject to large-scale
redevelopment, smaller projects and initiatives are being developed that are expected to
yield benefits over a shorter term.



                                            1
HCD’s response to public services and facility needs is primarily accomplished through a
request for proposal process known as the Community Service Grant Program
application process. The overall competitive process for grant awards is coordinated
through the Strategic Community Investment Fund (SCIF). The City’s ability to address
the many community service needs is limited by a 15% cap placed on the use of CDBG
funds for public services. Projects proposed for funding includes those that address
homeless and special needs supportive services, youth and elderly services and look to
increase employment either through skills training, job placement, and literacy
programming.

The Continuum of Care is used to develop the assessment of homeless needs. This
process helps in developing the homeless priority needs, objectives and strategies.
Projects proposed for ESG funding are determined through the competitive grant
application process that reviews requests for funding from agencies and service
providers who provide shelter and implement services that meet the needs of homeless
persons. In the past, the City has contracted with Partners for the Homeless (Partners)
and The Greater Memphis Interagency Coalition for the Homeless (GMICH) to
coordinate the planning and research of the homeless population, to gather input and
information from homeless service providers, and to facilitate the Continuum of Care
application process. The two organizations have merged into a new unified organization
called the Community Alliance for the Homeless. Two high priority needs for the
homeless are reflected in proposed activities that foster the development of permanent
supportive housing and coordinated and increased outreach efforts from service
providers and agencies.

The City of Memphis has four general housing objectives that address a range of
housing needs: 1) the development of affordable rental housing (elderly, special needs
sub-populations and large families that include children; 2) the development of new
single-family, owner-occupied housing for rent and ownership (re-enforcing support for
non-profit housing developers and using LIHTC incentives for private sector
participation); 3) the rehabilitation of owner-occupied housing in targeted areas; and 4)
to provide direct and indirect assistance to first-time homebuyers (downpayment
assistance that emphasizes the HUD objective of increasing minority homeownership,
homeownership counseling and education on predatory lending,).

Memphis’ commitment to providing assistance in maintaining homes owned by low-
income residents continues in FY 2011 with the modified owner-occupied rehabilitation
programs that are funded with CDBG funds.

To address rental housing needs in Memphis, the SCIF multi-family program
encourages rehabilitated or newly constructed housing units that are available for rent
throughout the City of Memphis. Community Housing Development Organizations
(CHDO’s) are also being encouraged to apply for set-aside HOEM funds that will be
used to develop rental and multi-family units.

To address the objective of increasing homeownership, the American Home Dream
Down Payment Initiative (ADDI) funds in conjunction with HOME funds that are
proposed for the continuation of the City’s Down Payment Assistance Program.

Key findings from the needs assessment for “special needs” persons in Memphis found
that:


                                             2
   Most of the special needs population cannot work and are dependent on either family
   or public support.
   Their main source of public monetary support is the Supplemental Security Income
   (SSI), which in 2010 pays an average of $498 per month.
   This amount is well below the level required for normal living expenses (for example,
   the 2010 “Fair Market Rent” in Memphis was $705 per month for a one bedroom
   housing unit and $783 for a two bedroom unit.)

Special needs populations are classified into seven different categories. The categories
are HIV/AIDS, Mentally Ill, Elderly, Chronic Substance Abusers, Developmentally
Disabled, Physically Disabled, and Victims of Domestic Violence. Elderly needs include
the Frail Elderly. Funding for most special needs activities are awarded through the
process known as the Strategic Community Investment Funds (SCIF) which makes
funds available annually on a competitive basis and are awarded to eligible nonprofit,
for-profit, faith-based, and other organizations to implement public service, community
and economic development programs. Housing Opportunities for Persons With AIDS
(HOPWA) funds are used for supportive services, short-term housing and utilities and
short-term rental assistance. The proposed projects reflect actions to address the
Memphis priority needs balanced by the quality of applications we receive through the
SCIF process. Included are activities that provide emergency/transitional housing, and
rent and utility assistance for persons living with HIV/AIDS; assistance with housing
repairs to enable elderly to remain in their homes; supportive services; increasing
options for developmentally disabled to choose from “specialty” housing, respite
housing, and transportation services; and efforts to increase housing accessibility for the
physically disabled.

For FY 2011, the City’s focus on meeting the non-housing community development
needs continues with proposed activities that create neighborhoods where people want
to live, work, and invest; provide public services and facilities that address the needs of
low and moderate-income people and communities; provide capital and financial
resources to support small business development and job creation; and provide the
funding and infrastructure support for neighborhood and economic development.

HERA/ARRA Programs

Neighborhood Stabilization Program (NSP)

In December of 2008, the City of Memphis Division of Housing and Community
Development (HCD) amended its 2008 Annual Action Plan for July 1, 2008
through June 30, 2009. The amendment was made in accordance with the U. S.
Department of Housing and Urban Development’s (HUD) guidelines for the
Neighborhood Stabilization Program (NSP), as authorized under Title III of the
Housing and Economic Recovery Act (HERA) of 2008. HUD allocated
$11,506,415 in NSP funds to the City of Memphis. The amendment described
how HCD proposes to use these funds to address the requirements of HERA for
meeting identified needs within the community.




                                             3
In response to the NSP allocation, HCD established a planning committee to
examine foreclosure and subprime loan data for the City of Memphis in order to
identify the areas of greatest need for NSP funding. The committee took into
account the three required criteria stipulated by HUD for identifying areas of
greatest need, and identified 10 ZIP Codes that have been or will be most
severely impacted by foreclosures, subprime lending and future foreclosures.
These 10 ZIP Codes are: 38127, 38109, 38128, 38118, 38106, 38141, 38115,
38114, 38116, and 38111.

Based on its analysis, HCD is allocating the majority of NSP funds available for
use by nonprofit and for-profit affordable housing developers within these 10 ZIP
Codes. HCD expects that this funding will result in the acquisition, rehabilitation
and disposition of approximately 145 units of abandoned or foreclosed properties
for use as affordable housing for sale or rent to low-, middle-, and moderate-
income (LMMI) households. It is further anticipated that 25 percent of NSP funds
will be used to benefit households earning less than 50 percent of area median
income, including provision of housing for homeless and special needs
populations. All program income received as a result of NSP activities will be
revolved into additional NSP-eligible activities for LMMI households
within the 10 target ZIP Codes.

To date, partners in the NSP program has purchased 52 properties for
rehabilitation.

Homeless Prevention and Rapid Re-housing Program (HPRP)

Authorized under Title XII of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of
2009, HUD has allocated $3,329,685 in Homeless Prevention and Rapid Re-
housing Program (HPRP) funds to the City of Memphis. The City of Memphis is
submitting to the U.S. Department of Housing & Urban Development (HUD) an
application for an entitlement grant of $3,329,685 in Homeless Prevention and
Rapid Re-housing Program funds. This application includes the substantial
amendment to City’s PY 08/FY 09 Annual Plan. HPRP funds will be used to
prevent and rapidly re-house individuals and families who but for this assistance
would be homeless and whose incomes are 50% or less than the area median
income by household size. Eligible activities are limited to four categories:
financial assistance, housing relocation and stabilization services, data collection
and evaluation, and administrative costs. There is a 5% cap on administrative
costs.

The City of Memphis is creating a two-year prevention and rapid re-housing
program that proposes to serve as many as 650 households per year (1,300 over
the course of the grant period) with financial assistance and services to support
self-sufficiency and housing stability. This initiative includes the creation of a
centralized intake and referral program which will: 1) prevent shelter entry for
those for whom homelessness may be avoided thru mediation and/or financial



                                         4
assistance, and 2) to provide access to shelter or other appropriate resources.
Memphis proposes utilizing approximately 4% of its allocation for data collection
and evaluation and 5% of its allocation for administrative costs related to the
administration and oversight of the program. Finally, Memphis expects to initiate
a Request for Proposal that will identify qualified agencies who would provide
housing-based case management services for individuals and households
receiving financial assistance through the HPRP program.

The City of Memphis received $3,329,685 in HPRP funds and the program
became fully operational November 2009. Since then, more than 150 households
have received financial assistance and nearly 2,000 households have been
screened for assistance and provided housing plans. Additionally, a 24-hour
hotline has responded to more than 5,000 callers seeking help.


FY 2011 (PY 10) Federal Resources and Proposed Projects

The following federal entitlement resources will be available during fiscal year
2011 (program year 2010), which begins on July 1, 2010 and ends on June 30,
2011. The text of the Consolidated Plan mentions projects and activities that are
ongoing and may be funded with prior year funds. The projects on the listing of
proposed projects table are only those that HCD plans to spend re-programmed
and FY2011 Federal entitlement funds received from HUD.

              Program Name                             Estimated Funds
 CDBG Program                                           $8,768,683.00
 Projected CDBG Program Income                          $2,203,420.00
 Re-Programmed CDBG                                     $1,000,000.00
 HOME Program                                           $4,921,520.00
 Projected HOME Program Income                            $20,000.00
 HOME Re-Program                                         $750,000.00
 ESG Program                                             $357,054.00
 HOPWA Program                                          $1,701,201.00
 TOTAL                                                  $19,721,878.00


The following projects are proposed by HCD for funding with FY 2011 (PY 10)
CDBG, HOME, ESG, HOPWA funds, Program Income and Prior Year funding.

                                                           Funding              Funding
                   Project Name                           Source(s)             Amount

  Salvation Army - Emergency Family Shelter (OM)             ESG                     $25,000.00


  Memphis Area Legal Services (MALS) -Fair                  CDBG                    $190,000.00


                                        5
                                                         Funding           Funding
                 Project Name                           Source(s)          Amount
Housing Center
Tenant Based Rental Assistance (TBRA)                     HOME              $600,000.00
Karat Place (ES)                                           ESG                $8,000.00
TBRA Case Management/Housing Services                     CDBG              $181,000.00
Community & Economic Development                          CDBG              $500,000.00
Housing and Rehabilitation Program (HARP)                 HOME              $665,291.00
                                                          CDBG               $71,299.68
                                                   CDBG Program Income       $88,539.00
                                                   HOME Program Income       $20,000.00
Minor Home Repair                                   CDBG Program Income   $1,000,000.00
Volunteer Housing Repair                           CDBG Program Income     $100,000.00
Monitoring and Compliance Program Delivery                CDBG             $631,174.27
CD Council Bank Lending Study (MACRO)                     CDBG               $29,500.00
Memphis Food Bank                                         CDBG               $75,000.00
Down Payment Assistance Program                           HOME              $200,000.00
Section 109 Loan Repayment - University             CDBG Program Income     $499,881.00
Place/Millcreek
Memphis Family Shelter - Transitional Housing              ESG              $35,000.00
shelter for Women & Children (OM)
HOPWA Programs                                          HOPWA             $1,650,164.97
Hope House (CSG)                                         CDBG                $35,000.00
Door of Hope (ES)                                         ESG                $15,000.00
Lowenstein House (ES)                                     ESG                $11,000.00
Summer Enrichment Sports Program (Shelby           CDBG Program Income     $200,000.00
Metro Basketball)
Door Of Hope (CSG)                                       CDBG               $50,000.00
Friends for Life (CSG)                                   CDBG               $49,968.00
Title XX Program Match-Help Care Program                 CDBG              $186,615.00
Memphis Family Shelter (CSG)                             CDBG               $41,268.00
Senior Companion Program (CSG)                           CDBG               $32,840.00
Meritan (CSG)                                            CDBG               $50,000.00
Intern Contracts                                   CDBG Program Income     $125,000.00
Employment Concepts (Shelby Residential &                CDBG               $50,000.00
Vocational Services –Personal and Career
Development)
Synergy Treatment Centers (OM)                            ESG                 $5,000.00
CHDO Projects                                            HOME              $742,563.00
                                                   HOME Re-Programmed      $750,000.00
CHDO Administration                                      HOME               $247,520.00
HOME Administration                                      HOME               $492,152.00
General Administration                                   CDBG             $1,260,302.94
Cocaine Alcohol Awareness Program –CAAP (OM)              ESG                $20,000.00
Finance Program Delivery                                 CDBG              $404,638.32
Special Needs – Public Services Program Delivery         CDBG              $476,987.16
Real Estate Development Program Delivery                  CBG               $241,405.12
Single-Family Rehab (HARP) Program Delivery              CDBG              $496,522.24
Targeted Single & Multi-Family Housing                   HOME             $1,500,000.00


                                       6
                                                     Funding         Funding
                Project Name                        Source(s)        Amount
Development
Douglas Bungalow Crump                                CDBG             $36,000.00
Community Alliance for the Homeless                   CDBG            $191,699.00
Harbor Dredging ED Project                      CDBG Re-Programmed    $500,000.00
Historic Property Survey                              CDBG             $10,000.00
Genesis House -Catholic Charities (ES)                 ESG             $20,000.00
HOME - Match (Homeless Continuum of Care              HOME            $250,000.00
Fair Housing Enforcement - Memphis Area Legal         CDBG             $70,000.00
Services(MALS)
HOME Match(Special Needs)                             HOME            $250,000.00
Case Management Inc. (HP)                              ESG             $30,000.00
Neighborhood Plans                                    CDBG            $100,000.00
Salvation Army Homeless Referral Center               CDBG            $108,800.00
Salvation Army Emergency Family Shelter (ES)           ESG             $10,094.05
The Grant Center (Alliance for Nonprofit              CDBG             $50,000.00
Excellence)
Planning and Material Development                     CDBG             $50,000.00

Helpcare Homemaker Services (CSG)                     CDBG             $50,000.00
Legal Program Delivery                                CDBG            $320,528.67
Design Program Delivery                               CDBG             $79,710.18
Portfolio Management Program Delivery                 CDBG            $311,848.68
Lowenstein House (CSG)                                CDBG             $50,000.00
Planning and Development Program Delivery             CDBG           $204,060.742
Girls, Inc. (CSG)                                     CDBG             $40,200.00
Exchange Club (CSG)                                   CDBG             $50,000.00
Memphis Child Advocacy Center (CSG)                   CDBG             $50,000.00
Court Appointed Special Advocates (CSG)               CDBG             $50,000.00
Beale Street Landing                              CDBG Reprogram      $500,000.00
Alpha Omega (OM)                                       ESG             $35,000.00
Memphis Center for Independent Living                 CDBG             $50,000.00
HOPWA Admin                                          HOPWA             $51,036.03
Neighborhood Networks                                 CDBG              $8,400.00
ESG Administration                                     ESG             $17,852.70
Director’s Program Delivery                           CDBG            $238,035.64
Accounting Program Delivery                           CDBG            $378,929.36
Human Resources Program Delivery                      CDBG            $208,183.17
Information Services Program Delivery                 CDBG             $80,000.00
Central Office Program Delivery                       CDBG            $123,600.00
Community Development Program Delivery                CDBG            $505,251.86
Property Maintenance                                  CDBG             175,000.00
Community Development Loan Guarantee                  CDBG            $250,000.00
Hospitality Hub (OM)                                   ESG              $8,272.25
Hospitality Hub (ES)                                   ESG              $4,000.00
Karat Place (OM)                                       ESG             $15,035.00
Barron Heights (ES)                                    ESG              $9,000.00
MIFA (OM)                                              ESG             $25,000.00


                                     7
                                                              Funding              Funding
                    Project Name                             Source(s)             Amount
  MIFA (ES)                                                     ESG                  $5,000.00
  SHIELD, Inc. (OM)                                             ESG                 $23,400.00
  MIHN (ES)                                                     ESG                 $15,000.00
  YWCA (OM)                                                     ESG                 $10,000.00

Other Federal Resources Available in FY 2011

In addition to the PY10/FY11 entitlement funds, other federal, resources that
have been awarded or anticipated for the program year are detailed in the
following table.

          Funding                            Use of Funds                    Funds
                                                                         Available in FY
                                                                              2011
Housing Choice Voucher        Memphis Housing Authority for rental
Contribution                  assistance                                 $38,631,612.00


Housing Choice Voucher        Helping Housing Choice Voucher
Family Self Sufficiency       residents to become homeowners
Program                       and/or achieve economic self-
                              sufficiency                                    $68,000.00
Continuum of Care Grants      Homeless Housing Developers                 $4,702,858.00
Public Housing Family Self-   Helping public housing FSS families to
Sufficiency program           become homeowners and/or achieve
                              economic self-sufficiency                      $68,000.00
ARRA CDBG funds               CDBG eligible activities that maximize
                              job creation and economic benefit           $2,177,302.00
ARRA Homelessness             Homelessness and re-housing
Prevention Funds                                                          $3,329,685.00
Neighborhood Stabilization    Acquisition and rehabilitation for
Program Funds                 housing units that have been foreclosed    $11,506,415.00
                              and related services.
Lead Hazard Reduction         Reduction of lead paint hazard in rental
Demonstration                 units, especially those housing families    $4,000,000.00
                              with children
Public Housing Neighborhood   Increase access to technology for
Networks                      residents of public housing                   $250,000.00


Other Resources

Other resources expected to be available for housing and community
development activities include foundations and other private sources, State
resources, and other non-entitlement Federal sources. In FY 2011 the City of


                                         8
Memphis will provide General Funds in the amount of $4,765,911.00 and Capital
Improvement Funds totaling $11,300,000.00 that will be used to develop
infrastructure, housing, social and economic initiatives. Other sources of
revenue may include low-income housing and historic tax credits, New Markets
Tax Credits, Tax Increment Financing, private-sector equity investments that will
finance redevelopment efforts in conjunction with HOPE VI and other
development projects.

During FY 2011, HCD will continue to leverage its federal entitlement dollars
through its partnerships with other government agencies, mortgage companies,
lenders, and private investors in the implementation of housing and other
development projects that will generate in excess of $5 Million.

The City of Memphis continues to provide funding for the implementation of
HCD’s Downpayment Assistance Program. Similarly, the down payment
assistance program is expected to leverage over $2,500,000 in private mortgage
financing in FY 2011.

HUD requires a match of 25% for HOME funds. The City will require Community
Housing Development Organizations (CHDOs) and agencies that receive
Emergency Shelter Grant funds to provide their own match with eligible non-
federal sources. The competitive grant applications process that HCD uses for
entitlement funds, such as CDBG (local community and public services grants),
ESG and HOPWA, require commitments from other funding sources.

There are several economic development projects in which Federal entitlement
dollars and city funds continue to leverage funds from other sources. HCD is
providing funding to for various economic development projects, including
NUCOR, the competitive community and economic development program, and
Beale Street Landing

The City has several economic development programs that use Federal
entitlement funds and city funds to leverage additional funds from other sources.
The Renaissance Business Center provides business assistance to small,
minority, and women businesses. The Center houses multiple services,
programs, and agencies to address this goal. The Center also has staff
designated to work in target areas to provide information about incentives to
existing businesses, work to attract new businesses, and develop a plan for
economic opportunities. The Memphis Business Opportunity Fund is a joint
venture between the City, banks, home loan banks, and Southeast Community
Capital that makes loans up to $500,000.00 to small businesses. The
Contractor’s Assistance Program is designed to assist small, minority, and
women contract firms by providing assistance with technical assistance, bonding,
insurance, and capital.




                                        9
Allocation Priorities and Geographic Distribution of Funds

In order to make the biggest impact in neighborhoods, HCD utilizes a targeted
approach to neighborhood revitalization. HCD also recognizes that
neighborhoods have distinct needs and must have different revitalization
strategies and approaches to redevelopment. To accomplish this, HCD engages
in community planning efforts, working closely with neighborhood-based
organizations and other City Divisions, including the Office of Planning and
Development to identify what is needed in a particular community. HCD also
uses Geographic Information Systems technology to map existing conditions and
to track progress made in targeted areas.

HCD also targets neighborhoods on the basis of the following criteria:
   Location
   Amount of investment already occurring or planned
   Presence of a viable CDC/CHDO
   Assets present in the neighborhood
   Ability to attract private investment
   Ability to sustain and leverage City/federal investment

The following neighborhoods are those where activity is planned or will occur in
FY 2011 is as follows:
    Uptown                                     University Place
    New Chicago                                Linden/ Pontotoc
    Whitehaven/West                            Frayser
    Whitehaven/Levi
    Binghampton                                Hickory Hill/ Southeast Memphis
    Southgate                                  College Park/Soulsville USA
    Fairgrounds/University                     South Memphis
    District/Beltline
    Cooper Young                               Victorian Village
    Zipper Zone/Midtown Corridor               Jackson Avenue Corridor
    Legends Park                               Hollywood Springdale
    Latham Terrace                             Medical Center
    Orange Mound                               Bickford/Bearwater/Uptown North
    Downtown                                   Hyde Park/Douglas
    Glenview                                   Raleigh
    Riverview Kansas                           Mall of Memphis/Parkway Village
    Pyramid/Pinch District                     Heart of the Arts/Overton Square
    Klondike/Smokey City                       Berclair
    MANDCO                                     St. Mary’s/SMART
    Annesdale Snowden                          Aerotropolis
    Riverfront                                 Triangle Noir


                                        10
In addition to these areas, HCD has also mapped the low and moderate income
census tracts (where 51% of the population or greater is below the median
income). These are also areas of focus for HCD programs.

There are ten zip codes targeted under the Neighborhood Stabilization Program,
which were selected based on the greatest percentage of home foreclosures; the
highest percentage of homes financed by subprime mortgage related loan; and
those likely to face a significant rise in the rate of home foreclosures. The zip
codes are 38127, 38109, 38128, 38118, 38106, 38141, 38115, 38114, 38116,
and 38111.

Targeted Populations

The Community Service Grant, Tenant-Based Rental Assistance, HOME Match
for Housing for Homeless and Special Needs Populations, HOPWA, and
Emergency Shelter Grant programs give priority to populations rather than
geographic area. Specifically, these programs are targeted to special needs
groups including the homeless, victims of domestic violence, the elderly, persons
with physical, mental, and developmental disabilities, and persons living with
HIV/AIDS.

All of the programs mentioned above, with the exception of HOPWA, are
allocated within the City limits. HOPWA is allocated to the Entitlement
Metropolitan Statistical Area (EMSA) which includes the following counties:

   1. Tennessee – Shelby, Fayette, Tipton
   2. Mississippi – DeSoto, Tate, Tunica,Marshall
   3. Arkansas - Crittendon

The following maps are provided to show the geographic locations of areas
where funding is targeted.




                                       11
12
13
14
                   EVALUATION OF PAST PERFORMANCE

Part VI assesses the progress made in FY09 by the City of Memphis in meeting
the priority needs and specific objectives identified in the 2009-2010 Three- Year
Strategic Plan and FY 2009 Annual Action Plan. The Division of Housing and
Community Development (HCD), Memphis continues in its efforts to target area
and neighborhood redevelopment initiatives. HCD and the Memphis Housing
Authority continues to implement its plans via the use of HOPE VI funding as a
major housing development tool. During FY09, the Memphis Housing Authority
used CDBG funds complete work at University Place and Legends Park The
planning process used in the preparation of the Consolidated Plan will continue
to be the basis used to determine how best all resources may be used to met the
needs of low-moderate income citizens in accordance with HUD’s statutory
goals.

The reporting format used in this CAPER’s “Assessment of Three-Year Goals”
and the “Affordable Housing Narrative” sections reflects the method used by
Memphis to measure productivity and results. HCD has improved a
“performance management system” in accordance with HUD guidelines.

Evaluation of Memphis achievements, and shortcomings was conducted with the
overall statutory purpose of HUD’s community development planning programs in
mind. For each priority need, HCD presents what it considers is a true and
accurate self-evaluation of FY 2009 actions.

FY 2009 represents the second year of the Three Year 2009-2010 strategy for
the City of Memphis. The City of Memphis made considerable efforts to meet
and exceed these objectives in each of the five objectives identified for housing.

Housing Evaluation

In using the HOME and ADDI funds, the City’s DPA program continues in it’s
efforts to assist low income first-time homebuyers to purchase their first homes.
In total, the City’s was able to assist 25 first-time homebuyers which was much
lower than the one year goal of 100. This is due to the economic downturn of
recent years and the analysis of the housing market for low-to-moderate income
households suggests that that demand for entry-level housing has decreased
which is compounded by the increase in credit problems experienced by low
income households. Emphasis will be placed on post-credit counseling as well
as increased underwriting reviews that will attempt to ensure that owners are less
likely to lose homes to foreclosure caused by insufficient incomes.

The Targeted Multi-Family and Multi-Family New Construction projects as part of
the competitive award process, are designed to increase the supply of rental
housing in Memphis. To this end, 220 units were rehabilitated or constructed by
the Targeted Multi-Family Housing rehabilitation efforts. Using additional CDBG,
the University Place HOPE VI development acquired additional properties and


                                        15
constructed infrastructure as part of its completion of Phase II and start of Phase
III of mixed-income rental housing. CHDO’s, in FY 09, made assisted in the
provision of new, rental housing with the production of 7units. HCD expects this
trend to continue with additional funding increase for CHDO set-aside allocations
to support rental/multi-family development.

The University Place and Legends Park demolition, infrastructure, and
acquisition will provide land for 921 units of housing as well as other amenities
such as parks and commercial space. These efforts are a continuation of the
City’s objective of targeted development in specific neighborhoods.

The City’s efforts to preserve and prevent losses to existing housing continued to
be successful during FY09. The rehabilitation of 18 units was completed by the
HARP Major Rehab program; 16 units were completed by the Volunteer Home
Repair program; 181 units by the Minor Home Repair program; various CHDOs
and non and for profits rehabilitated four (4) homes for ownership, thirteen (13)
units for rental and began or completed sixteen (16) units of single family new
construction for homeownership; and 160 multi-family units were rehabilitated
and 60 constructed through the Targeted Multi-Family Housing program. In all
290 units of affordable housing has contributed to Memphis’ meeting its one year
goal.

HOMELESS EVALUATION

In addition to the annual Continuum of Care application process, HCD uses the
Strategic Community Investment Fund (SCIF) competitive bid process to provide
funding to projects and activities that would implement the goals and objectives
of the 3 year Con Plan that serve the homeless population of Memphis. This
process allowed HCD to select the best possible service providers.

HCD was able to accomplish the Homeless Objectives I (Performance
Measures) of developing permanent supportive housing for homeless individuals.
In FY09, eleven agencies provided permanent supportive transitional housing for
homeless individuals and families. Alpha Omega’s Homeless Veteran’s program
used CDBG, ESG, and HOME funds to provide hospice and palliative care for
homeless veterans. Housing Options, Inc. provided four permanent supportive
three bedroom houses. Additionally, Memphis continues to emphasize the
availability of funding to provide matching funds for the creation of permanent
supportive housing that focuses on families with children.

With respect to Objective II, HCD was did not receive any applications for the
development of new beds or emergency shelter units through the competitive
grant process for FY2009.

Regarding Homeless Objective III, Memphis has achieved some success in the
establishment of a drop-in center. In FY 2009, the Door of Hope was awarded a



                                         16
CDBG/Community Services Grant to provide drop-in assistance to chronically
homeless persons that assisted 14 individuals by providing access to showers,
laundry facilities, snacks, telephone access, applying for disability assistance,
food stamps, housing subsidies, etc. The project is currently stalled because the
agency’s application made to another entity for additional funding is pending.
HCD recognizes the concerns agencies have for continued operations of a
SafeHaven facility, particularly limited funding availability and concerns for
neighborhood safety where such a facility would be located.

Homeless Objective IV addresses the need to maintain the current inventory of
transitional and emergency housing for homeless persons and families with
children. HCD provided funding for 25 programs serving the homeless. This
included 12 ESG-funded contracts that served 723 homeless individuals and 347
families, 4 CDBG funded programs that assisted 116 children from homeless
families, and 1 CDBG funded program that established a community
intake/assessment and referral center that assisted 6,188 consumers by way of
the supportive housing hotline.

HCD will continue to work diligently with non-profits who serve the homeless
population of Memphis and with those who seek to make a positive impact in
providing safety nets and supportive services for the homeless population.
Additional funding, the development of permanent supportive housing for
homeless families; and continued planning by service providers targeting the
homeless mentally ill will make an even greater impact in the City of Memphis.

SPECIAL NEEDS POPULATION EVALUATION

Using the competitive bid process also allowed HCD to select the best service
providers to serve the Special Needs population. In creating permanent
supportive housing, Housing Options, Inc. developed eight units of permanent
supportive housing for the developmentally disabled in FY2009.

The supportive service objective of 4000 families was again exceeded in the
second year on the three year strategy given that HOPWA funded supportive
services to 2483 people. Other programs providing a variety of services as
described in the program narratives assisted an additional 2282 persons.

The tenant based rental assistance program provided assistance to 148
households, which exceeded the three-year goal of 140 per year. Eight agencies
provided rental housing to mentally ill women and their children or person who
are otherwise in a special needs category.

The public facilities objective has a goal of producing two public facilities in a
three-year period. In FY2009, Porter Leath completed renovations to Sarah’s
Place, which serves abused children.




                                          17
HCD continues to seek service providers committed to serving the Special Needs
population and this evaluation indicates that overall, HCD has done an excellent
job in serving the Special Needs Population.

Non-Housing Community Development Evaluation

HCD continues neighborhood planning efforts that will better define non-housing
community development needs. Memphis’ non-housing community development
needs are addressed by program activities that are grouped under the categories
of neighborhood, community and economic development.

Memphis increased support to organizations that provide essential, supportive,
and public services to very-low to moderate income persons. Many of the
agencies funded exceeded expectations. Other activities funded included
neighborhood support services benefited low/moderate income persons (with
specific emphasis on the youth, the elderly, and the unskilled). In FY09, non-
housing, community development programs expended approximately
$1,305,172.00. These program activities served more than 2,000 youth, adults,
and families. In addition to the Federal funds used in this category, City funds
were used to make 42 small business loans valued at $1,630,149.00.

Public facilities development over the last assessment period has resulted in one
new resource center being completed Klondyke/Smokey City, which served 250
people in the Klondyke/Smokey City neighborhood. HCD’s efforts to respond to
and community service needs are primarily based on applications received
through its Community Services Grant Program, a competitive-grant application
process. However, the use of these funds are limited to a 15% cap on public
services. CDBG funds are used to fund these project activities although the City
of Memphis annual provides significant General Revenue funding for community
initiatives.

HCD will request assistance from HUD in developing goals, objectives and
indicators that will help to better measure its performance in creating and
meeting non-housing community development objectives.

The following section of the FY2011 Annual Action Plan addresses the priority
needs categories for homeless, housing, special needs populations and non-
housing community development. The section will conclude with specific annual
objectives and outcome measures for each proposed activity.




                                        18
                         ANNUAL HOMELESS PLAN

The Memphis Division of Housing and Community Development (HCD) allocates
Community Development Block Grant (CDBG), HOME and Emergency Shelter Grant
(ESG) entitlement funds to programs that provide permanent supportive housing,
emergency shelter and transitional housing, homeless prevention activities, and
essential supportive services for homeless persons and families. Allocating funds that
produce permanent supportive housing represents one of Memphis’ high priorities for
meeting the needs of homeless persons and families that are transitioning from
emergency shelters and transitional housing. HCD contracts with Partners for the
Homeless (Partners) to produce an annual Needs Assessment for Homeless Population
report. The Greater Memphis Interagency Coalition for the Homeless coordinates and
acts as the “clearinghouse” and “convener” of agencies for their participation in the
Memphis/Shelby County Continuum of Care process. The Needs Assessment
describes the nature and extent of homelessness, inventories of facilities and services,
and helps to identify priority homeless needs. The Needs Assessment helps the City of
Memphis to fulfill the homeless requirement submission for the Consolidated Plan. HCD
is the lead entity responsible for the planning process for the Memphis/Shelby County
Continuum of Care (the CoC) and applies for annual CoC funding from HUD.

An initial step for HCD is to assess the capacity of agencies and organizations as they
plan to deliver the current and/or new levels of shelter, housing and services. The task
is very important because the resources available to HCD are insufficient and are not
intended to fully fund projects and activities. Additional funds from other mainstream
Federal sources, private foundations, and other sources will always be necessary. A
significant barrier to the development of viable housing projects for the homeless has
been inadequate leveraging of resources. For example, a Safe Haven is a high priority
need in Memphis for several years. However, the facility and operations costs and the
requisite 24/7 staffing and essential supportive services that are essential in meeting the
co-occurring conditions of the chronically homeless individuals served by a Safe Haven
has consistently proved an insurmountable barrier – so far. In addition, area service
providers consistently provide feedback stating the lack of other funds to fully fund
projects.

The following homeless needs, objectives and performance measures are
proposed for the FY 2011 Annual Action Plan.




                                            19
  2011 HOMELESS NEEDS, OBJECTIVES & PERFORMANCE MEASURES

       PRIORITY NEED I – PERMANENT SUPPORTIVE HOUSING FOR
                 CHRONICALLY HOMELESS PERSONS

Homeless Objective I: To assist the development of permanent supportive housing for
chronically homeless individuals

               One-Year Homeless Performance Measures Objective I

   Support the development of permanent supportive housing for chronically
   homeless individuals                                                    30 units
   Plan to fully utilize permanent supportive housing for chronically homeless
   individuals



PRIORITY NEED II – TRANSITIONAL & PERMANENT SUPPORTIVE HOUSING
FOR MENTALLY ILL HOMELESS PERSONS and FAMILIES

Homeless Objective II-A: To assist the development of a range of permanent
supportive housing options for homeless families in which the primary caregiver has a
mental illness.

Homeless Objective II-B: To develop a local policy that as a requirement of receiving
funding to provide transitional and permanent supportive housing, organizations will
coordinate and focus outreach efforts to unsheltered, mentally ill people and those in
emergency shelters

Homeless Objective II-C: To develop a plan which provides permanent supportive
housing for mentally ill homeless persons who are ineligible for program assistance that
is restricted to serving chronically homeless persons

              One-Year Homeless Performance Measures Objective II

   Develop permanent supportive housing for homeless individuals and for women
   without children who are mentally ill                                   7 units
   Develop transitional housing units for homeless individuals and for women without
   children who are mentally ill                                           5 units




                                           20
PRIORITY NEED III - ACCESS TO BENEFITS FOR HOMELESS PERSONS AND
FAMILIES:

Homeless Objective III: - To provide funding for workers who are trained to assist
homeless persons, including the mentally ill, to receive Supplemental Security Income
(SSI)

              One-Year Homeless Performance Measures Objective III

To identify funding that will provide additional workers that will assist homeless persons
and families to receive Supplemental Security Income benefits 25 homeless persons



     PRIORITY NEED IV – EMERGENCY and TRANSITIONAL SUPPORTIVE
HOUSING FOR HOMELESS PERSONS & FAMILIES WHO ARE SUBSTANCE
                        ABUSERS

Homeless Objective IV - A: To develop incentives and funding that will help transitional
housing programs that have underutilized space to develop programs that assist
homeless substance abusers

Homeless Objective IV - B: To develop incentives and funding that will encourage the
use of existing and the development of new transitional housing and emergency shelters
that will serve primary caregivers who are substance abusers who are homeless

              One-Year Homeless Performance Measures Objective IV

   Use Emergency Shelter Grant to assist organizations to provide essential services,
   rehabilitate facilities, prevent homelessness and operate/maintain facilities to
   homeless persons/families who are substance abusers                     3 persons

   Use Community Development Block Grant funds to provide services to homeless
   persons/families who are substance abusers                        3 persons




                                            21
                 FY 2011 Homeless Proposed Projects and Funding

                                                  Funding
Project Name                                     Source(s)   Funding Amount

Door of Hope                                      CDBG              $50,000.00
Memphis Family Shelter                            CDBG              $41,268.00
Salvation Army Housing Resource & Referral Ctr    CDBG             $108,800.00
HOME Match (Homeless)                             HOME             $250,000.00
Lowenstein House (Essential Services)              ESG              $11,000.00
Memphis Family Shelter (Operations & Mgmt)         ESG              $35,000.00
The Salvation Army (Operations & Mgmt)             ESG              $25,000.00
The Salvation Army (Essential Services)            ESG              $10,094.05
Catholic Charities Inc. (Essential Services)       ESG              $20,000.00
CAAP, Inc. (OM)                                    ESG              $20,000.00
Alpha Omega Veteran Services (Operating &
Mgmt)                                              ESG              $35,000.00
Case Management, Inc. (Homeless Prevention)        ESG              $30,000.00
Door of Hope (Essential Services)                  ESG              $15,000.00
Synergy Substance Abuse Center (Operating &
Mgmt)                                              ESG               $5,000.00
YWCA (OM)                                          ESG              $10,000.00
Karat Place, Inc. (Operating & Mgmt)               ESG              $15,435.00
Karat Place, Inc. (Essential Services)             ESG               $8,000.00
AGAPE Child & Family Services (ES)                 ESG              $10,000.00
Barron Heights (ES)                                ESG               $9,000.00
Hospitality Hub (OM)                               ESG               $8,272.25
Hospitality Hub (ES)                               ESG               $4,000.00
MIFA (OM)                                          ESG              $25,000.00
MIFA (ES)                                          ESG               $5,000.00
MIHN (ES)                                          ESG              $15,000.00
SHIELD, Inc. (OM)                                  ESG              $23,400.00
TOTAL HOMELESS                                                     $789,269.30




                                            22
                  ANNUAL SPECIAL NEEDS POPULATION PLAN



The primary Special Needs goal for HCD is to help ensure that low-moderate income
members of special needs populations and their families have access to decent and
affordable housing and to associated services and treatment that helps them live as
independently as possible.


Priority needs, services and programs that are being proposed to respond to priority
needs are based upon the needs assessment and consultation. Consultation has
occurred through application processes and forums held with service providers to reach
consensus on gaps in services and housing, priority needs and objectives.


The following section describes and presents the estimate of the special needs
population, an inventory of programs and services available, the priority needs, the
objectives, the strategies, and three-year performance measures.

HIV/AIDS
A growing body of practice-based evidence shows that for persons living with HIV/AIDS,
improved housing status is directly related to the reduction of high risk behaviors,
improved access to health care, higher levels of adherence to medical treatment
including life-sustaining medications, lowered viral loads, and reduced mortality.
According to the Shelby County Health Department, as of 12/31/2009, there were 6,653
persons living with HIV/AIDS in the Memphis metropolitan area with 5,949 (89%) living in
Shelby County.


                       AIDS Incidence:      AIDS Prevalence         HIV (not AIDS)
Demographic            01/01/07-12/31/08    As of 12/31/08          Prevalence
Group/                                                              As of 12/31/08
Exposure Category      AIDS incidence is    AIDS prevalence is      HIV prevalence is
                       defined as the       defined as the number   defined as the
                       number of new AIDS   of people living with   estimated number of
                       cases diagnosed      AIDS as of the date     diagnosed people living
                       during the period    specified.              with HIV (not AIDS) as
                       specified.                                   of the date specified.
Race/Ethnicity         Number       % of    Number      % of        Number         % of
                                    Total               Total                      Total
White, not Hispanic    39           9.8     555         18.8        722            19.4
Black, not Hispanic    351          88.2    2332        78.9        2921           78.5
Hispanic               4            1.0     47          1.6         50             1.3
Asian/Pacific          1            0.3     5           0.2         7              0.2
Islander
American
Indian/Alaska Native   0           0        1           0           3             0.1
Not Specified          3           0.8      14          0.5         16            0.4
Total                  398         100      2954        100         3719          100
Gender                 Number      % of     Number      % of        Number        % of



                                            23
                                Total                  Total                  Total
Male                 251        63.1      2116         71.6      2402         64.6
Female               147        36.9      838          28.4      1317         35.4
Total                398        100       2954         100       3719         100
Age at Diagnosis     Number     % of      Number       % of      Number       % of
(Years)                         Total                  Total                  Total
<13 years            0          0         7            0.2       43           1.2
13-19 years          11         2.8       18           0.6       112          3.0
20-44 years          267        67.1      1769         59.9      2572         69.2
45+ years            120        30.1      1160         39.3      992          26.6
Total                398        100       2954         100       3719         100
Percentages are rounded

AIDS INCIDENCE, AIDS PREVALENCE AND HIV (NOT AIDS) PREVALENCE (CONT’D)
                        AIDS Incidence:    AIDS Prevalence        HIV (not AIDS)
Demographic Group/      01/01/07-12/31/08  As of 12/31/08         Prevalence
Exposure Category                                                 As of 12/31/08
                        AIDS incidence is  AIDS prevalence is     HIV prevalence is
                        defined as the     defined as the         defined as the
                        number of new AIDS number of people       estimated number of
                        cases diagnosed    living with AIDS as of diagnosed people
                        during the period  the date specified.    living with HIV (not
                        specified.                                AIDS) as of the date
                                                                  specified.
Adult/Adolescent AIDS Number         % of  Number        % of     Number         % of
Exposure Category                    Total               Total                   Total
Men who have sex with   139          34.9  1385          47.0     1344           36.8
men
Injection drug users    11           2.8   223           7.6      178            4.9
Men who have sex with                                    4.0
men and inject drugs    2            0.5   117                    78             2.1
Heterosexual            134          33.7  788           26.8     1043           28.5
Other/hemophilia/blood
transfusion             1            0.3   16            0.5      18             0.5
Risk not reported or    111          27.9  416           14.1     993            27.2
identified
Total                   398          100   2945          100      3654           100
Pediatric AIDS          Number       % of  Number        % of     Number         % of
Exposure Categories                  Total               Total                   Total
Mother with/at risk for
HIV infection           0            0     7             77.8     53             81.5
Other/hemophilia/ blood
transfusion             0            0     1             11.1     7              10.8
Risk not reported or    0            0     1             11.1     5              7.7
identified
Total                   0            0     9             100      65             100


Over the past five years the number of persons living with HIV/AIDS in Shelby County
has increased 22% from 4,653 in 2004 to 5,949 in 2008. There are significant gender
and racial disparities revealed in the data. African Americans represented 83% of the
persons living with HIV/AIDS in Shelby County in 2008 and 86% of the new cases of
HIV/AIDS in 2008 in Shelby County. There have been 2,599 deaths due to HIV/AIDS in
the Memphis Metro Area with African Americans making up 85% of these deaths.


                                          24
These figures reflect the greater prevalence of HIV/AIDS in the African American
community, as well as disparate access to HIV medical care, resulting in a marked
survival disadvantage for African Americans. The number of deaths attributed to
HIV/AIDS has declined consistently in Shelby County since 2005. Deaths decreased by
50% between 2007 and 2008 in Shelby County, primarily due to the advances in the
treatment of the disease through new medications. This means that the number of
persons living with the disease continues to increase as deaths decrease, placing a
continued strain on the ability of services providers to meet the housing and supportive
service needs of these individuals.

Based on the annual ‘point-in-time shelter and street count’ conducted in 2007, there are
an estimated 5 to 15% of persons living with HIV/AIDS are homeless. Data from social
service agencies that serve persons living with HIV/AIDS show that as many as 17% of
persons with the disease who receive services are homeless or lack stable housing.
According to the 2009 Ryan White HIV/AIDS Services Comprehensive Plan, 91% of
persons living with HIV/AIDS in Memphis area are living at or below 300% of federal
poverty level. The document also states that respondents to the 2008 Ryan White Needs
Assessment had net monthly incomes of $1,000 or below.

According to The 2009 Memphis TGA Ryan White HIVAIDS Care Needs Assessment
(6/1/2009; T. G. McGowan, Ph. D., Principal Investigator), for those persons living with
HIV/AIDS who were in care, an ‘HIV Doctor’ was ranked as the most frequently reported
service that was needed and utility assistance and low-income housing rank 6th and 7th.
Food pantry was ranked 4th and HIV health insurance assistance was ranked 5th. Among
persons who are not in care in the Memphis area, housing was ranked the number 1
need and various supportive services that helped the individuals remain in housing (case
management, support groups, nutritional assistance and treatment adherence programs)
were ranked as a high need. This fifty-four percent (54%) of persons living with
HIV/AIDS who are not in care represents a disturbing number of 3,581 persons. Due to
their not being adherent with medical treatment the life expectancy and quality of life of
these individuals is dramatically affected. This lack of adherence often is due to a
number of issues with stable housing being one of the most significant issues affecting
their adherence.

Mentally Ill
From estimates extrapolated by the Center for Mental Health Services, Substance
Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, United States Department of Health
and Human Services, it was determined that in 2000 there are approximately 35,589
adults in Memphis and 41,547 in all of Shelby County who suffer from serious mental
illness. There were approximately 6,629 persons in 1999 in Shelby County that were
enrolled in the Medicaid program that had a serious and persistent mental illness.

Most agencies serving persons with mental illness also serve persons with dual
diagnoses of mental illness and substance abuse. The 2004 data reflects that of the 562
families that were sheltered/housed by participating programs during the reporting year,
mental problems were reported as a primary or secondary disabling condition for 137
adults in the families. Severe mental illness was reported for 38 primary caregivers, with
71 reporting depression, and 28 reporting a mental disorder. There is only one
transitional housing program (Genesis House, 29 beds) in the city that specifically
serves only homeless men and women with severe and persistent mental illnesses.



                                           25
Low and very-low income adults with children find it especially difficult to cope with
mental illness. Complicating the issue even further is the high incidence of alcohol
and/or other drug abuse that often goes hand-in-hand with mental illness as clients “self-
medicate.” Unfortunately, many find it impossible to care for their children and relinquish
care of the children to family members or lose them to the foster care system. The city’s
progressive action in reprogramming HOME funds in 2004 to be used as tenant-based
rental assistance (TBRA) for these families has been exceptionally well-received.

Elderly
The number of elderly in Memphis is 71,026 people with approximately 10,370 living
below the poverty level (2000 Census). Frail elderly, those with more than four times the
risk for death or functional declined over a two-year period, are estimated by the
American College of Physicians-American Society of International Medicine to comprise
a population between 15,000 to 23,000 people in Memphis.

The demographics of aging continue to change dramatically across the nation, with a
larger population of older Americans who are more racially and ethnically diverse and
better educated than previous generations. Having its share of the baby boomers who
are contributing strongly to these trends, Tennessee is experiencing a similar pattern of
growth and change. Based on Census 2000, Tennessee ranks as the 16th state in
population aged 65 and over (703,311) and 29th in the percentage of population aged
65 and over (12.4%). Of these older Americans, approximately two thirds reported
relying on Social Security, with 33,584 (4.8%) residing in nursing homes (He, Sengupta,
Velkoff, & DeBarrios, 2005).

Along with the nation and many parts of the world, Tennessee’s economy took a
downward spiral in 2008. Job losses occurred monthly, while the number of unemployed
people skyrocketed and retail sales collapsed. Tennessee’s housing markets declined,
with residential building permits in November at 28.1% of the 2007 level. Planners and
policy makers at all levels must take into consideration the current economic low and the
dismal forecast held for the near future. State economic conditions are likely to rebound
only if the same holds true for national and global economies. Significant rebound may
not be seen in Tennessee until at least late 2009 or perhaps not even before 2010
(Murray, 2009).

Health care costs have risen dramatically for most older Americans, especially in relation
to prescription drugs. More and more attention is placed on quality and availability of
services, insurance coverage, utilization rates, demographic effects of an aging
population, technology, and other aspects of health care, including patient literacy about
this field and self-managed care. In fact, more and more people are adopting a wellness
attitude and taking personal responsibility for identifying and meeting their own health
needs. Greater emphasis on wellness and prevention can help in making long-term
improvements. Choices made in day-to-day living—diet, physical activity, obesity, and
smoking—and the preventive measures taken—screenings and vaccinations—
contribute significantly to health and well-being throughout the lifespan, but particularly
as individuals grow older and experience the results of earlier choices.

Within this context, the statewide needs assessment tapped current thinking expressed
in literature on aging and disability, experience and expertise of key informants across
the state, and selected indicators of the current and future status of Tennessee’s


                                            26
vulnerable adult populations. Findings help to surface possible items to be given priority
in the development of the new state plan. Transportation and housing are prime
examples; they are essential to creating livable communities, enhancing quality of life,
and helping people to age in place. Lack of accessible, affordable transportation and
appropriate housing options undermines the individual and the community at large.
Effectively addressing these two needs can lead to improvement in a number of other
areas of concern and possible savings overall in the long run. With the intricacies of the
aging and disability arena and the interrelationships among attendant strengths and
needs, the same can be said of many other services, barriers, programs, and initiatives.

Without question, there is a critical need to educate the general population about aging,
disability, and available services in Tennessee. This need extends to health care
professionals, law enforcement, community planners, and others who deal directly or
indirectly with the needs of vulnerable adults. Key informants repeatedly suggest
increased marketing and raised public awareness. Better communication, coordination,
and collaboration are essential. In fact, partnerships may be the way to optimize
resources and reduce barriers to services. Partnerships can enhance advocacy and
outreach. Partnerships can help meet needs for case management and coordination of
services. Agencies and service providers can be further strengthened by more effective
support for their personnel through better pay and opportunities for training and
professional development. Otherwise, as it now stands, it is difficult to maintain
quality services and to carry forward program goals when turnover of essential staff is
high.

Health care and caregiving bring with them a host of needs, especially considering costs
and scarcity of providers in some areas. Health needs that are not covered by insurance
or Medicare may go neglected. People may forgo dental care, eyeglasses, or hearing
aids indefinitely, and these deficiencies can in turn exacerbate other problems. For
example, bad teeth or improper dentures may adversely affect nutrition, general health,
and overall quality of life. There are often not enough health care professionals who are
trained and willing to treat patients who are aging or disabled. More effort is needed to
encourage specialties in geriatrics and gerontology and to ensure that medical school
curricula adequately cover aging and disability.

Tennessee’s health care system is fragmented; knowing how and where to access
services is confusing. A single point of entry has been mentioned as a possible solution.
Informal, unpaid caregiving continues to be the mainstay for many care receivers. In
fact, taking care of caregivers themselves is paramount. Programs like adult day care
and respite can help prevent burnout, diminished health and wellbeing, loss of paid
work, and other negative impacts to the caregivers. At the same time, more vigilance
must be maintained to forestall elder abuse either at the hands of questionable
caregivers, unethical providers, or scam artists.

Educating and empowering individuals to self-direct their care and to advocate for
themselves can help resolve many issues in aging and disability. Along that line, senior
centers can serve as hubs for socializing, acquiring information about health care and
services, learning about opportunities for employment and volunteering, and opening
doors to myriad programs and activities. Yet, planners must keep in mind that the
anticipated older generation is different from that of days gone by. The oncoming surge
of baby boomers is changing our society on every front, and services like senior centers
must update their policies and practices accordingly. These same principles and many of


                                            27
the key points brought out in this study also apply to the development of the new state
plan.

Aging in place means growing older without having to move from where we call home; it
has become the order of the day whenever possible. About 89% of older adults report
that they want to remain in their homes for as long as they are able. Of the 21.8 million
households headed by older persons in 2001, 80% were owners and 20% were renters.

Comparison of U.S. and Tennessee Average Rates for Selected Types of Care
Type of Care            United States    Nashville, TN      Memphis, TN

Private Room in                           $203 daily                    $162 daily                         $200 daily
Nursing Home

Semiprivate Room in                       $176 daily                    $147 daily                         $146 daily
Nursing Home

Home Health Aide                          $19 hourly                    $19 hourly                         $18 hourly

Homemaker/Companion $17 hourly                                          $19 hourly                         $15 hourly
Adapted from: The University of Tennessee Social Work Office of Research and Public Service. March 2009.



Chronic Substance Abusers
Statistics extrapolated from the U.S. Department of Mental Health and Human Services
Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration reflect that approximately
51,660 individuals in Memphis/Shelby County (2000) abuse or are dependent on alcohol
and/or illicit drugs with approximately 7,500 of those being eligible for publicly funded
services.

Data reported by transitional housing programs for families with children shows that only
14 percent of the adults in families served reported substance abuse as a primary or
secondary handicap. These statistics are at great odds with statistics from prior years
and more than likely reflect a failure to document this disabling condition when it is
identified. Primary caregivers in families with children seeking admittance to most
emergency shelters or transitional housing programs must agree to drug-testing as a
condition for admittance; however, passing the drug test does not guarantee that the
client will remain drug-free, nor does the test identify problems with alcohol abuse.
Increasingly, as these problems are identified, case managers refer or link the caregiver
to an outpatient treatment program. It is highly likely that the failure to record the
problem in the database occurs at that time.

Developmentally Disabled
According to extrapolations of statistics provided by the Department of Health and
Human Services, there are 24,862 (based on 2000 Census and 1996 disability rates)
persons with developmental disabilities in Memphis. Little quantitative data exists
concerning persons with developmental disabilities.




                                                                 28
Physically Disabled
According to the 2008 U.S. Census American Communities Survey for the City of
Memphis, 14.4% of population, or 89,964 people have a physical disability. Of
these, 7.2%, or 11,964 people, are under 18, 12.6% or 49,441 people are
between the ages of 18 to 64, and 43.9%, or 28,559 people are 65 and older.
This compares to 14.8% of people living in the State of Tennessee who have a
physical disability.

Victims of Domestic Violence
In 2009, there were 719 incidences of domestic violence reported in Memphis (Memphis
Police Department). However, researchers estimate that only between one-seventh to
one-half of all incidents of domestic violence are ever reported. Data regarding domestic
violence is also significantly lower than anecdotal reports or in-depth research indicates.
It is important to note that providers consistently state that from 30 to 50 percent of the
families they serve have experienced domestic violence. While a smaller percentage of
homeless families may be fleeing domestic violence, the overall percentage as
estimated by providers could reflect that the families had a history of having experienced
domestic violence. Also, citing the safety and security of other client families, most
programs are not able to accommodate families in which the primary caregiver is
actively abusing illegal substances or is unwilling to comply with treatment plans that
require psychotropic medications.

While overall crime rates in the City of Memphis have declined consistently within the
last three years, domestic violence offenses are on the rise.

   •   Between 2008 and 2009, domestic violence offenses have increased by 7.4% in
       the city of Memphis. (Janikowski & Reed, 2009).
   •   In the last 3 1/2 years, there have been almost 30,000 reported domestic
       offenses in Memphis. (Janikowski & Reed, 2009).
   •   The economic impact of domestic violence in Memphis and Shelby County is
       estimated to be $45 million annually (The Tennessee Economic Council on
       Women, 2006).

Use of HOME funds to provide Tenant-base Rental Assistance for Special Needs
Sub-populations

Recent research indicates the following:
     Most of the special needs population cannot work and their survival depends on
     either family or public support.
     Their main source of public monetary support is the Supplemental Security Income
     (SSI), which in 2010 pays an average of $498 per month.
     This amount is well below the level required for normal living expenses (for
     example, the 2010 “Fair Market Rent” in Memphis was $705 per month for a one
     bedroom housing unit and $783 for a two bedroom unit.)

The recent Housing Market Study reports an increase in cost-burdening amongst both
large and small-families that rent. Over the next three years, Memphis proposes to
provide Tenant-Base Rental Assistance (TBRA) to the mentally ill, women with


                                            29
substance abuse problems, and the developmentally disabled. These priorities have
been established based upon the demand for assistance and the limited level of
assistance presently available to these sub-populations.


    SPECIAL NEEDS POPULATIONS PRIORITY NEEDS, OBJECTIVES &
             PERFORMANCE MEASURES ANNUAL PLAN

Funding for most projects and programs are awarded through a competitive
process known as the Strategic Community Investment Funds (SCIF). SCIF
makes funds available annually on a competitive basis and are awarded to
eligible nonprofit, for-profit, faith-based, and other organizations to implement
public service, rental assistance, community and economic development
programs. The funds available through this process are awarded to programs
that benefit very low income as well as low and moderate income persons of
Memphis as defined by HUD's income criteria.

The Homeless and Special Needs Department offers competitive grants to
agencies that serve special needs populations. These include the CDBG-funded
Community Service Grant, the HOME-funded Tenant Based Rental Assistance
Program and the HOME-Match Program to create permanent supportive housing
and the Housing Opportunities for Persons with AIDS (HOPWA) Program. All
TBRA programs require preparation of housing and service plans for program
participants as well as their agreement to work the programs in their efforts to
become stably and independently housed.

Housing Opportunities for Persons With AIDS (HOPWA) funds are used for
supportive services including homemaker services and case management, short-
term housing (emergency shelter for the homeless with HIV/AIDS), homeless
prevention assistance in the form of short term rent, mortgage and utility
assistance and Tenant-Based Rental Assistance (TBRA), which are addressed
under “Housing.” All of these activities are provided along with case
management and supportive services as required by HUD. HOPWA services

In addition to administering competitive grants, HCD actively pursues funding to
serve special needs groups to supplement HUD Entitlement funds. The City
applied for renewal of a HUD Shelter Plus Care grant that serves homeless
mentally ill individuals. That grant was approved for a one year period

HCD includes in its annual plan the support of Memphis Center for Independent
Living, a local advocacy group for persons with disabilities. In an effort to address
the lack of information regarding accessible rental units in Memphis, HCD has
recognized MCIL as the clearinghouse for information concerning housing for
persons with disabilities. CDBG funds are being used to help administer MCIL’s
housing retrofit program and to develop a database of accessible public and
private housing.



                                         30
The staff of the Homeless and Special Needs Department helps coordinate
HCD’s programs with other local funding for special needs populations by
participation on various planning and review committees. Specifically, the
Administrator of the department is a member of Shelby County’s Ryan White Part
A Planning Council as well as United Way’s FEMA committee.. Since the
inception of the HOPWA program, the Department has reached out to other
recipients of funds for AIDS victims to help coordinate services and address
unfulfilled needs.

The following section presents the priority needs, objectives, strategies, and
annual performance measures for special needs populations. The proposed
projects reflect actions to address the Memphis priority needs balanced by the
quality of applications received through the SCIF process.


  PRIORITY NEED I – PERMANANENT SUPPORTIVE HOUSING: New permanent
   supportive housing units/beds for Special Needs sub-populations to assist
                    rehabilitation and/or new construction

Special Needs Objective I: To make funding available that will assist the development
of permanent supportive housing for Special Needs sub-populations

      One-Year Special Needs Populations Performance Measure Objective I

   Provide funding that will help to develop new permanent supportive housing for
   income eligible Special Needs sub-populations                        7 units

  PRIORITY NEED II – SUPPORTIVE SERVICES: Supportive services for Special
  Needs sub-populations is needed to sustain housing support and assistance

Special Needs Objective II: To continue to give preference to funding requests that
propose to provide supportive services to Special Needs sub-populations

      One-Year Special Needs Populations Performance Measure Objective II

   Fund supportive service programs that will assist income eligible Special Needs sub-
   populations                                            650 families & individuals




                                          31
PRIORITY NEED III – TENANT-BASED RENTAL ASSISTANCE: Tenant-based rental
assistance for income eligible persons within the Special Needs sub-populations

Special Needs Objective III: To make funding available that will respond to the
increase demand for tenant-based rental assistance for income eligible persons within
the Special Needs sub-populations

     One-Year Special Needs Populations Performance Measure Objective III

   Increase the number of income eligible persons within the Special Needs sub-
   populations to receive tenant-based rental assistance              75 individuals


 PRIORITY NEED IV – PUBLIC FACILITIES: Public facilities and improvements to
 public facilities that provide supportive services to income eligible persons who
                    are members of Special Needs sub-populations

Special Needs Objective IV: To continue to give preference to funding requests that
propose to develop new or rehabilitate public facilities which provide supportive services
to income eligible Special Needs sub-populations

     One-Year Special Needs Populations Performance Measure Objective IV

Fund improvements to public facilities that will assist income eligible Special Needs sub-
populations                                                           1 facilities




                                            32
   The following table lists the proposed funding for Special Needs Populations for
   FY 2011.

       FY 2011 Special Needs Populations Proposed Projects and Funding

                                                    Funding
Project Name                                       Source(s)       Funding Amount

CASA                                                 CDBG                $  50,000.00
Exchange Club                                        CDBG                $  50,000.00
Friends for Life                                     CDBG                $  49,968.00
Helpcare Homemakers                                  CDBG                $  50,000.00
Hope House                                           CDBG                $  35,000.00
Lowenstein House                                     CDBG                $  50,000.00
Memphis Child Advocacy                               CDBG                $  50,000.00
Meritan                                              CDBG                $  50,000.00
MIFA (Senior Companion)                              CDBG                $  32,840.00
HOME Match (Special Needs)                           HOME                 $250,000.00
Memphis Center for Independent Living                CDBG                $ 50,000.00
HOPWA Projects                                      HOPWA               $1,650,164.97
Homeless/Special Needs Program Delivery              CDBG                 $476,987.16
TOTAL                                                                   $2,844,960.13




                                           33
          Neighborhood, Community and Economic Development

The FY2011 Neighborhood, Community, and Economic Development activities
include neighborhood/community, public services and economic development
activities. HCD consulted with community-based organizations, Community
Housing Development Organization’s (CHDO’s), neighborhood and community
development professionals and economic development specialists to assess and
develop priority needs and objectives as listed below. In order to meet federal
statutory goals and the primary objective of the Community Development Block
Grant (CDBG) program, this section also includes specific long and short-term
community development objectives.
For the 2011-2013 Consolidated Plan, HCD developed long-term and short-term
objectives for Neighborhood, Community and Economic Development that were
designed to meet the outcomes that include:

   1. Create neighborhoods where people choose to live, work, and invest
   2. Retention of small business and expansion of small business opportunities
   3. Provide public services and facilities that address the needs of low and moderate
      income persons and communities
   4. Financial resources and physical infrastructure support for economic and
      neighborhood development

 Long Term Objectives

    •   To redevelop Targeted Areas and neighborhoods
    •   To provide capital and financial resources to support small business development
        and job creation & employment training
    •   To increase the number of neighborhood and public facilities in targeted areas
    •   To give preference to grant requests from organizations and businesses that
        provide employment training and job opportunities that provide a living wage
    •   To give preference to grant requests from non-profit organizations that provide
        essential, supportive and public services to elderly persons and to programs that
        seek to improve the self-sufficiency of very-low to moderate-income persons

 Short Term Objectives

    To develop area/neighborhood redevelopment plans
    To provide infrastructure improvements that support the redevelopment of targeted
    areas




Inner city neighborhoods in Memphis have deteriorated due to significant
disinvestment, commercial and residential population declines and overall blight.
With the City’s new administration establishing redevelopment and neighborhood
revitalization as high priorities, the FY 2011 Annual Plan reflects this emphasis.


                                          34
Neighborhood redevelopment strategies include targeting areas and
neighborhoods that have been selected for public improvements and community
services that will foster neighborhood improvement. Given the tremendous
amount of blight in these neighborhoods, as well as the level of disinvestment, a
sustained/integrated approach to redevelopment is required. This degree of
redevelopment requires a level of commitment that will cover several years to
make a real difference. Also important is the selection of neighborhoods that
have Community Development Corporations (CDC's). The presence of a CDC is
critical to help plan and execute the overall redevelopment as well as insure the
redevelopment plan continues to be implemented and sustained. CDC’s and
other non-profit organizations will receive substantial funding this year for
recreational, after school, and life enrichment opportunities for youth; and for
essential, supportive, and public services to seniors. The services these
agencies provide help to improve self-sufficiency for very low-moderate income
persons.

In the FY 2011 Annual Plan, Memphis has committed $4,683,120.36in CDBG
funding for projects that respond to neighborhood, community and economic
development. HCD’s response to public services and facility needs is primarily
accomplished through a request for proposal process known as the Community
Service Grant application process. The overall competitive process for grant
awards is coordinated through the Strategic Community Investment Fund (SCIF).
The City’s ability to address the many community service needs is limited by a
15% cap placed on the use of CDBG funds for public services. The Annual Plan
also proposes the funding of several essential type services that address the
needs of the elderly and economically disadvantage populations. In addition, the
City will utilize General Funds to supplement Memphis’ efforts to respond to non-
housing community development needs.

Economic Development activities funding are also provided through the City’s
General Fund. The Renaissance Business Center is a City funded service that is
located at 555 Beale Street that provides a small-business development and
assistance center. The center provides technical assistance and has assembled
a group of service providers to coordinate and implement various economic
development strategies that are designed to increase access to capital and
support small, women/minority business enterprises. A host of service providers
are located at the center including the Tennessee Small Business Association,
the Black Business Association, along with the City’s Micro Loan Program, the
Contractor’s Assistance Loan and Bonding Programs.




                                       35
     FY 2011 Neighborhood, Community and Economic Development Proposed
     Projects and Funding




   Project Name                             Funding Source(s)   Funding Amount

Girls Inc.                                           CDBG                 $40,200
The Memphis Food Bank                                CDBG                 $75,000
MALS Fair Housing Center                         CDBG Program            $190,000
                                                   Income
MALS Fair Housing Enforcement                        CDBG                 $70,000
Harbor Dredging Project                              CDBG                $500,000
                                                Reprogrammed
Summer Enrichment Sports Program                 CDBG Program            $200,000
                                                   Income
Personal and Career Development                      CDBG                 $50,000
Douglas Bungalow Crump Program Delivery              CDBG                 $36,000
Property Maintenance                                 CDBG                $175,000
Helpcare Homemaker Srvs (Title XX Match)             CDBG                $186,615
Community & Economic Development                 CDBG Program            $500,000
Projects                                           Income
Community Development Loan Guarantee                 CDBG                $250,000
Beale Street Landing                                 CDBG                $500,000
                                                Reprogrammed
Director’s Office Program Delivery                   CDBG             $238,035.64
HR Program Delivery                                  CDBG             $208,183.17
Compliance Program Delivery                          CDBG             $631,174.27
Planning Program Delivery                            CDBG             $204,060.42
Central Office Program Delivery                      CDBG             $123,600.00
Community Development Program Delivery               CDBG             $505,251.86
TOTAL                                                                $4,683,120.36




                                           36
                           HOUSING ANNUAL PLAN


The City of Memphis has three general housing objectives that address a range
of housing needs presented in the Strategic Plan. These objectives include an
emphasis on keeping families in their homes, increasing housing choices, and
supporting housing development plans that will create patterns that are
convenient, walkable, and have access to services. These objectives encompass
the priority needs categories identified for the City of Memphis in the three year
Strategic Plan and are the specific targets of the various objectives and proposed
activities in the current action plan.

The City will implement neighborhood redevelopment initiatives that target its
housing and community development resources to specific areas and
neighborhoods. Memphis’ commitment to providing assistance in maintaining
homes owned by low-income residents continues in FY2011 with the modified
owner-occupied rehabilitation programs that are funded with HOME and CDBG
funds.

The City partners will several non-profit agencies to enhance and extend the
capabilities of the Minor Home Repair Program by providing funding for repair
costs. This has increased the impact that the program has made throughout the
City. The City continues to implement its major rehabilitation and volunteer
home repair programs as well.
To address rental housing needs in Memphis, the SCIF multi-family program
encourages rehabilitated or newly constructed housing units that are available for
rent throughout the City of Memphis. These multi-family units are developed to
assist individuals or families whose income is at or below 80% of the area
median income as set by HUD. The program is a competitive process that helps
developers of affordable housing to meet financing needs to complete projects in
strategically targeted areas throughout the City. For FY2011, two projects were
selected, and a second RFP has been issued to solicit projects using FY2011
funds.

To address the objective of increasing homeownership, HOME funds will be used
to continue the City’s Down Payment Assistance Program. This program helps
low/moderate income first-time homebuyers to make down payments and to pay
closing costs on eligible home purchases. To be eligible, participants must meet
low and moderate income status as well as other local guidelines. Assistance is
available towards the purchase of single family homes, town homes, and zero
lot-line homes. Although the program will apply city-wide, Memphis will
emphasize the use of this program in areas targeted for redevelopment.

Specific housing priority needs, objectives, performance measures, and
proposed projects for FY2011 follow.


                                        37
PRIORITY HOUSING NEED I – ASSISTANCE THAT INCREASES RENTAL
AFFORDABILITY FOR VERY-LOW AND LOW-INCOME RESIDENTS

Housing Objective I: To provide funding that assists the development and production of
affordable rental housing for very-low and low income residents

                       One-Year Annual Performance Measures
    Provide Tenant Based Rental Assistance to seniors and
    disabled persons                                                          50 Units
    Support multi-family housing projects and programs that
    assist low and very-low income renters with large families                100 Units
    Provide funding to Community Housing Development
    Organizations for rental housing projects                                 10 Units


PRIORITY HOUSING NEED II – DEVELOPMENT OF ACCESSIBLE AND SOCIALLY
INTEGRATED HOUSING

Housing Objective II-A: To fund and further develop programs that provide accessibility up-
grades or modifications to existing housing (owner-occupied and rental housing)
Housing Objective II-B To seek passage of local requirements that will increase the minimum
number of accessible housing units in publicly-assisted housing developments

                      One-Year Annual Performance Measures
    Develop accessibility modification program                                15units
    Increase percentage of accessible units                                   10% minimum


PRIORITY HOUSING NEED III – PRESERVE THE EXISTING HOUSING STOCK

Housing Objective III: To provide assistance to homeowners that preserves and prevents the
loss of their properties

                      One-Year Annual Performance Measures
    Provide housing rehabilitation assistance to low and moderate
    income homeowners                                                         60 Units
    Provide minor home repair to seniors and disabled persons                 125 Units




                                             38
      PRIORITY HOUSING NEED IV – INCREASE THE SUPPLY OF AFFORDABLE HOUSING
      THAT CREATES MIXED INCOMED HOUSING CHOICES AND SPECIAL NEEDS HOUSING

      Housing Objective IV: To provide funding that will help increase housing choices

                             One-Year Annual Performance Measures
          Provide down payment assistance to new homeowners                  25 Clients
          Provide homeownership and credit counseling to new
          and existing homeowners                                            200 Clients
          Collaborate with lenders and non-profits to develop home improvement and loan
          programs as alternative to predatory lending                    1 Loan program

      Following is the list of proposed housing projects in accordance with priority
      housing needs.

                      FY2011 Housing Proposed Projects and Funding
                                                        Funding Source(s)
Project Name                                                                        Funding Amount

                                                         HOME/                             $742,563
CHDO Projects
                                                   HOME Reprogrammed                      $750,000.00
Minor Home Repair                                  CDBG Program Income                   $1,000,000.00
Volunteer Housing Program                          CDBG Program Income                    $100,000.00

DPA-American Home Dream                                      HOME                         $200,000.00

Millcreek Section/University Place 108
                                                    CDBG Re-programmed                    $499,881.00
Loan Repayment

Targeted Rental/Multi-Family
Housing Development                                          HOME                        $1,500,000.00

                                                        CDBG                               $71,299.68
                                                        HOME                              $665,291.00
HARP Major Rehab
                                                   CDBG Program Income                     $88,539.00
                                                   HOME Program Income                     $20,000.00
Tenant Based Rental Assistance (TBRA)                    HOME                             $600,000.00
TBRA Housing Services                                    CDBG                             $181,000.00
Accounting Program Delivery                              CDBG                             $378,929.36
IS Program Delivery                                      CDBG                              $80,000.00
Real Estate Program Delivery                             CDBG                             $241,405.12
HARP Program Delivery                                    CDBG                             $496,522.24
Design Program Delivery                                  CDBG                              $79,710.18
Finance Program Delivery                                 CDBG                             $404,638.32
Portfolio Management Program Delivery                    CDBG                             $311,848.68
TOTAL                                                                                    $8,971,556.94




                                                   39
OTHER ACTIONS

In FY2011, Memphis will undertake the following actions in response to the
categories identified below.

Actions to address obstacles to meeting under-served needs

The Continuum of Care planning process will continue to be conducted by the
City’s sub-contract agreement with Partners for the Homeless (Partners) and the
Greater Memphis Inter-Agency Coalition for the Homeless (GMICH). GMICH will
continue to assist in the planning process by ensuring there is input from the
broader community. Partners in collaboration with GMICH will help facilitate the
preparation of the City’s Continuum of Care application and update the Needs
Assessment for Homeless and Other Special Needs Populations. HCD will give
particular attention to outreach efforts and expanding options to serve the
severely mentally ill who are homeless. There are currently three new
permanent supportive housing projects in the development stages that will serve
the homeless mentally ill. Additionally, the Tenant Based Rental Assistance
program will serve agencies that provide services to people with special needs.
The Rapid Re-housing initiative through the American Recovery and
Reinvestment Act will also go a long way in assisting under-served people and
families.

A lack of quality affordable rental housing continues to be a challenge for
FY2011. HCD has a competitive process for selecting projects that provide multi-
family and other rental housing and will continue that process in FY2011. Two
projects were awarded funding in FY2010 that involve rehabilitation of rental
housing which will create 426 units that are currently not available. Other rental
housing development that is supported by HCD includes the HOPE VI projects at
University Place and Legends Park.

Actions to foster and maintain affordable housing

In FY11, HCD will continue to support new affordable housing construction by
contracting with nonprofit and for-profit housing developers. There are sixteen
(16) certified CHDOs are that are implementing single-family and multi-family,
housing rehabilitation and new construction projects. HCD is constantly
evaluating it’s rehabilitation programs to determine if there are alternative ways to
maximize the available dollars and the number of people served. Partnerships
with nonprofits, including CDC’s, CBDO’s, and CHDO’s as well as for-profit
developers will continue to be an important part of the HCD affordable housing
strategy. HCD has made changes to its competitive process for selecting
affordable single and multi family housing development with the intention of
increasing the number and quality of proposals.




                                         40
In 2008, the City of Memphis sponsored the first Diversity Developer Incubator
Project. This class was created to educate persons underrepresented in the Land
Development field. The curriculum took students through everything from land
acquisition, financing, zoning and construction permitting, construction costs,
operation budgets. The students had the opportunity to actually compete for
three properties donated by the City. There were 3 successful bids and the
projects are underway. One project was for seven affordable Green homes in
North Memphis. A second project was a Senior Housing Development located
south of Memphis International Airport for under 100 units. The third project was
for a assisted living home with cottages located in the Binghampton community.
These projects were applying for THDA and HUD funds. There were 114
graduates in 2008. In 2009, there were 101 students in the class and three
projects were awarded. The first one was in the Smokey City area for 8
apartments for the disabled. The second project was the conversion of a gutted
apartment complex into a townhouse style complex in the Triangle Noir area to
market rate housing. The last project was for a single family residential
subdivision located in the Barton Heights community. These single family homes
will be built with carports and garages for an affordable market. These graduates
will be applying to TDHA and HCD for any sources of funding or tax credits.

This program is entering its third year with 70 students and may possibly have 5
or 6 properties available for development.

The success of this program has cause cities such as Durham, NC and Atlanta,
GA to start up similar program, to encourage women and other minorities to enter
the land development arena.

C. Actions to remove barriers to affordable housing
Efforts to remove barriers to affordable housing include the development of the
Unified Development Code (UDC), which is a comprehensive zoning ordinance
change that is driven by the Memphis and Shelby County Office of Planning and
Development. A major emphasis of this initiative is to create more flexibility for
development and rehabilitation in inner city neighborhoods, as current zoning
regulations prohibit a great deal of this due to small lot sizes and other factors.
The UDC is expected to be brought before the legislative bodies for approval in
FY2011. Land assembly and infrastructure are also impediments to development
in the inner city, and these are also areas where HCD works with other agencies
to develop solutions to these issues.

D.        Actions to Evaluate and Reduce Lead-based Paint Hazards

Actions to Evaluate and Reduce Lead-based Paint Hazards

HCD’s Lead Hazard Risk Reduction Initiative (LHRRI) is a federally funded
program to reduce lead-based paint hazards in single-family and multi-family
rental units. This is a coordinated effort between inter-governmental agencies


                                        41
that include the Memphis and Shelby County Health Department, Memphis
Housing Authority, the State of Tennessee Department of Environment and
Conservation, the State of Tennessee Department of Health, Middle Tennessee
University, and Shelby County Department of Housing. The City of Memphis,
Division of Housing and Development received a grant for $4,000,000 from HUD
to reduce lead-based paint hazards. The goal of this concerted effort is to
complete 350 lead inspection/risk assessments and reduce lead hazards in 275
pre-1978 housing units over the life of the grant which ends February 1, 2012.
Since 1994, LHRRI has reduced lead hazards in more than 990 units.

Memphis Shelby County Health Department (MSCHD) provides free blood lead
level screening for children under age six. During FY2009, MSCHD screened
13,052 children, with 106 children screening positive for elevated blood lead
levels. Memphis/Shelby County continues to rank at one half the national
averages for lead-poisoned children. MSCHD provides testing of children at day
care centers, head start centers, WIC clinics and health fairs. The MSCHD
Childhood Lead Poisoning Prevention Program also provides educational
materials, information on nutrition and proper cleaning demonstrations to reduce
lead paint dust hazards.

Memphis Housing Authority, the State of Tennessee Department of Environment
and Conservation and Shelby County Department of Housing provide referrals of
properties that meet the criteria to participate in the program.

HCD will be taking an active role in raising public awareness of lead-based paint
hazards through the creation of a database that will be maintained by the
Memphis and Shelby County Health Department. This database will track the
childhood lead poisoning incidents in Shelby County. The MSCHD also provide
educational materials, information on nutrition and proper cleaning
demonstrations to reduce lead paint hazards.

E.    Development of Institutional Structure

HCD was functionally consolidated with the Memphis Housing Authority (MHA) in
2000. The institutional structure of HCD/MHA is currently organized by twelve
"key result areas" led by a senior management team. The institutional structure
allows the agencies to eliminate duplication of positions at each agency and to
consequently save critical resources and also to maximize the effectiveness by
managing the key functions in the consolidated entity. HCD/MHA continually
evaluates the institutional structure and looks for ways to enhance it.

Several factors have contributed to the enhancement of the institutional structure
of HCD. First, continual decreases in funding have exposed a need to operate
on a more efficient level. Second, today's challenging economic and business
environments dictate that we explore creative ways to operate more efficiently.




                                        42
There continues to be emphasis on planning at the neighborhood, agency, and
citywide level, which provides an opportunity to rethink and restructure the way
that HCD and MHA conduct their housing, community, and economic
development. This will enable the agencies to thoroughly examine duplication
and other crosscutting issues that hinder our ability to serve the community in the
most time sensitive and customer friendly manner.

To further the development of internal institutional structure, agency strategic
goals have been developed. These include compliance/reporting/policy & asset
protection, housing for low/moderate income citizens, social/human/special
needs services, economic development opportunities for low/moderate income
citizens, planning and development, investment/improvement in human
resources, and communications/marketing/public relations.

There is also an emphasis on overall system improvements and enhancements
to enhance the institutional structure. HCD/MHA will improve effectiveness and
efficiency by dedicating resources and energy toward the improvement of internal
systems and processes. The organization will also improve the design and
delivery of programs and services using empirical data to support program
changes and new programs. Last, HCD/MHA will insure that programs remain
appropriately linked to its mission and strategic plan.

HCD/MHA also recognizes the growing importance of partnerships with nonprofit,
for-profit, public, philanthropic and other organizations to carry out its housing
and community development objectives. The agency works with such
organizations in a variety of ways. We provide funding through contracts to
operate programs and projects. We also work with educational institutions to
undertake research efforts to identify needs and recommend solutions. Such
partnerships are especially critical in that they leverage the dollars received to
accomplish more and create a larger impact.

F.        Actions to Reduce the Number of Poverty Level Families

HCD will participate in a number of initiatives toward poverty reduction in
Memphis. These include the Memphis Opportunity Fund, the Contractors
Assistance program and other programs that provide job and life skills training,
assisted and transitional housing, and micro-enterprise development. Job
creation through major economic development activities is another critical part of
HCD’s strategy. HCD partners with MHA on a number of activities aimed at
increasing the economic self-sufficiency of public housing and housing choice
voucher tenants. These include three Neighborhood Networks programs, and
three active Resident Opportunities for Self-Sufficiency (ROSS) programs. All of
these provide access to technology, training, and other resources to move
people into employment.

A majority of the funding used to support job/life skills training and micro-
enterprise development is provided through direct City general revenue funding.


                                        43
As prescribed by HUD, assistance to low and moderate income families remains
a focal point of HCD’s mission.

The City of Memphis Division of Housing and Development has partnered with
Southeast Community Capital to provide access to capital for small businesses in
Memphis through the Memphis Business Opportunity Fund (MBOF). The MBOF
is designed to promote access to capitals for small businesses, with
nontraditional needs. The MBOF provides funding resources for individuals
desiring to start a business or entrepreneurs wishing to grow and expand their
existing business in the Memphis City limits. This program is targeted for small,
minority, and women owned businesses.

The Renaissance Business Center (RBC) under HCD is funded with City general
funds and provide entrepreneurs and small businesses in Memphis with training,
counseling, and information. The RBC houses the Small Business Association,
Southeast Community Capital, Tennessee Small Business Development Center,
Black Business Association, and Memphis Area Minority Contractor’s
Association, all of which provide counseling, financing opportunities, trainings,
seminars, and technical assistance.



G.        ACTIONS TO AFFIRMATIVELY FURTHER FAIR HOUSING

HCD will continue its agreement with Memphis Area Legal Services to operate
the Memphis Fair Housing Center, which is located at 109 North Main Street.
The contract called for outreach, education, investigation and enforcement
activities. The funds helped pay for operating costs of the Center, including a
portion of staff salaries HCD will provide $29,500 to Memphis Community
Development Council to continue updates of their lending studies to determine
trends by banks, savings and loans, credit unions, mortgage companies and
finance companies that do business in Shelby County.

For FY 2011, HCD has again allocated $289,500 in CDBG funds for activities
that affirmatively furthered fair housing in Memphis. This includes three
contracts:
1) The Memphis Area Legal Services (MALS) contract helps operate the
   Memphis Fair Housing Center ($190,000), and
2) A second MALS contract funds the acceptance and investigation of
   complaints related to the Memphis Fair Housing Ordinance ($70,000), and
3) The Memphis Community Development Council (formerly MACRO) contract
   allows update of their bank lending study ($29,500).

Other activities include participation in the 2009 Annual Fair Housing Conference
entitled “Stabilizing Our Future” held on April 30, 2010.




                                       44
In 2006, HCD and Shelby County Housing Department entered into a contract
with the University of Memphis to develop an up-dated Analysis of Impediments
to Fair Housing Study for Memphis and Shelby County, Tennessee. The City’s
portion of the contract was $15,794. By the end of the reporting period, a draft of
the study was being reviewed by HCD and the County but had not been finalized.
The City Administration is convening a Fair Housing Task Force to review the
study, consider the findings and recommendation and to propose “Actions that
Address Impediments to Fair Housing in the City of Memphis”

The following recommendations are found in the 2007 Impediments to Fair
Housing Study.

      Research and Planning. There are large gaps in data and information
      about both fair housing opportunity and need for affordable housing for
      low and moderate income households. The census data is now out of
      date and real time data sets from building permits (public and private
      construction/demolition) are not available.
      Organization. The response to fair housing issues is fragmented.
      Although a strong network of fair housing agencies exists, there is no
      single source clearinghouse to guide and coordinate responses.
      Legislation. The predatory lending law passed by the Tennessee General
      Assembly does not address all of the unfair practices within the sub-prime
      lending market, and Shelby County does not have a Fair Housing Law to
      complement the law in Memphis.
      Education. The new Memphis Housing Counseling Network can be a key
      organization to provide education for first time homebuyers, but there
      needs to be a coordinated effort between the Fair Housing Alliance of
      Greater Memphis and the Fair Housing Center to educate the general
      population about predatory lenders and discrimination in the rental and
      sale of housing units.
      Housing Production. The production of housing by public agencies is
      divided into ownership and rental subsidy programs. Because of the
      national objective of increasing ownership, both State and local
      community development agencies have emphasized ownership
      assistance in part to stabilize neighborhoods and in part to increase
      household wealth. The amount of low-income rental housing will be to be
      increased to satisfy public housing and Section 8 waiting lists without
      concentrating poverty households in high density, isolated areas.

Under the facilitation of Memphis Area Legal Services, Inc., a task force is being
formed to address the findings in the Analysis of Impediments to Fair Housing
Study for Memphis and Shelby County, Tennessee. To ensure an inclusionary
process, this task force will consists of fair housing organizations, local
government, advocacy groups, and business leaders. The goal of this group will
be to develop actions plans or strategies to overcome the impediments identified




                                        45
in the 2006 study and to examine other impediments that were not identified in
the orginal study and develop action plans to overcome those as well.

The task force will form sub-committees to address the major impediments
identified. Each sub-committee will make specific recommendations for inclusion
in the overall action plan. The action plan developed by the task force will be
presented to the Memphis City Council for formal adoption.

H.    Actions to Enhance Coordination Between Housing and Social
      Service Agencies

Colleges and Universities
LeMoyne-Owen College, the University of Memphis, and Rhodes College,
undertake outreach efforts in Memphis communities. In FY 2010, these
institutions will continue their working relationships with MHA and HCD to bring
expertise and other resources that exist within universities to redevelopment
areas through research-oriented centers, service learning initiatives, evaluation
of programs, and Community Resource Centers. HCD funds internship
placements for students at Rhodes College, LeMoyne-Owen College, and the
University of Memphis. This program provides opportunities for students to work
with area community based organizations in ways that complement their studies
and career goals. Additionally, HCD will work with universities on a variety of
research and planning efforts including problem property inventories, specific
neighborhood strategies, and neighborhood plans.

Memphis Shelby County Health Department
The HCD lead hazard reduction program is implemented in coordination with the
Memphis and Shelby County Health Department (MSCHD). MSCHD conducts
lead screenings, tests homes for lead hazards, and makes referrals to HCD for
hazard reduction projects. MSCHD has several other departments that impact
neighborhood revitalization efforts and the general health of neighborhoods,
including vector control, environmental health, and neighborhood health clinics,

Memphis Fair Housing Alliance
The Memphis Fair Housing Alliance is a partnership between HCD and Shelby
County Housing, along with Memphis Area Legal Services and the Fair Housing
Center and other housing organizations.

The Office of Youth Services and Community Affairs
The Neighborhood Relations department of the Office of Youth Services and
Community Affairs work to assist neighborhoods with the development of existing
and new neighborhood associations, asset mapping and capacity building,
leadership training, technical assistance, and management of beautification
projects and grants. HCD works with the office as a resource for those
organizations that are not eligible to be CHDOs or otherwise receive Federal




                                       46
funds. Neighborhood Relations regularly attends community meetings hosted by
HCD in order to publicize their programs.

HCD/MHA and the Office of Planning and Development (OPD) work together in
the preparation of neighborhood planning activities. Currently, HCD and OPD are
working jointly to assist North Memphis and Hickory Hill. OPD has been working
on the Unified Development Code that will replace the current zoning ordinance.
Once approved, the new ordinance will be very beneficial for inner-city
neighborhoods in terms of appropriate development. OPD and HCD coordinate
carefully on redevelopment plans to insure that plans match zoning, land use,
and other conditions.

The Memphis Police Department will continue to use Community Policing as a
key strategy to combat crime in our communities. Based on community need and
demand, the police use bicycle patrols, create neighborhood substations,
promote business and neighborhood watch groups, and use a police
ambassador program to hear from communities. HCD/MHA continue to work
closely with the planning department of MPD to match locations of planned police
precincts with redevelopment efforts.

The Public Works Division is responsible for infrastructure and improvements for
the City of Memphis, including water mains, lighting, and streets. HCD will work
with Public Works on a number of levels related to affordable housing and
neighborhood development. Many of the targeted neighborhoods need
significant lighting improvements, street paving, streetscapes, and other
improvements, so HCD will work closely with Public Works to insure that
activities are budgeted where possible or where they are in the division capital
plan. Public Works regularly attends community meetings to listen to
neighborhood concerns and address opportunities for solving the issues.

Memphis Light Gas and Water (MLGW) provides a special program to provide
incentives for developers of low-income housing and developers of housing in
the inner-city, including utility rebates. The On Track program administered by
MLGW assists low-income participants in learning how to manage their finances
and reduce energy consumption continues in FY2010. MLGW also encourages
green building through their Eco-Build program and HCD strongly encourages
grantees and other partners who are constructing new housing units to adhere to
the Eco-Build standards and inspections.

The Memphis Area Transit Authority (MATA) works with HCD/MHA to find
solutions for low-income people needing transportation to work including plans
for a light rail that will link residents and jobs downtown, in the Medical Center,
and at the airport. HCD also participates in planning efforts with MATA, such as
its planned development of a regional light rail system. MATA recently updated it
routes and has provided this information to MHA/HCD for use in planning
purposes.



                                         47
The Memphis Fire Department contains a department aimed to enforce the anti-
neglect ordinance and eliminate the blight in the community that vacant and/or
dangerous commercial properties inflict. HCD will work very closely with them to
identify these properties and to take the measures necessary to eliminate this
blight.

Center City Commission
The Center City Commission is the primary organization to direct “the
comprehensive redevelopment of Downtown as the economic, cultural, and
governmental heart of the city and county” (City Code, chapter 7). City and
County Mayors Willie W. Herenton and AC Wharton continue to support the
Center City Commission in its role as the official partnership between local
government and the private business community in revitalization of Memphis’s
downtown and Medical District. Armed with planning expertise and the financial
incentives to encourage development, the Center City Commission receives the
support of HCD in its efforts. These efforts include: the development of the Main
Street Mall and accompanying downtown neighborhood, the central business
district streetscape improvements, the trolley/light rail extension through the
Medical District, expansion of the riverwalk and Riverside Drive improvements,
the mixed-income neighborhood development at the north end of downtown,
development of Greenspace at Central Station, Redevelopment of the Pinch
District, and many other public and private downtown improvements.

State of Tennessee
Historic tax credits and low income housing tax credits will continue to leverage
CDBG, HOME, and HOPE VI funds in the rehabilitation and development of
affordable housing in Memphis, including Uptown, University Place, Legends
Park, Fowler Homes, and other redevelopment projects. Many projects funded
through HCD’s competitive process for affordable multi family projects are funded
with low-income housing tax credits.

U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD)
The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development provides valuable
support and technical assistance to HCD, especially through the Community
Planning and Development (CPD) department. The local HUD office also works
closely with HCD in planning and implementing successful programs.
Additionally, HCD applies for and supports other applications under the
SuperNOFA competitive funding process. HCD recently partnered with HUD to
help plan an informative session on the ARRA programs and looks forward to
assisting in future efforts.

Private Foundations
As government resources for community development decrease, HCD
recognizes the need to engage philanthropic organizations who also have
community development as part of their mission. These working relationships



                                        48
provide opportunities to leverage scarce resources on behalf of both the public
and private sectors. The Hyde Family Foundations and the Women’s Foundation
for a Greater Memphis have played very active roles in addressing the needs of
residents of the HOPE VI communities. In FY2010, the City of Memphis, the
Assisi Foundation, and the Community Foundation of Greater Memphis provided
funding to pay for a consultant to assist in the development of a comprehensive
public/private community plan to support neighborhood redevelopment. This plan
is almost finalized and ready for implementation.

HCD is part of the Memphis DEBT Collaborative, and organization that is working
to reduce the number of bankruptcies and foreclosures in Memphis and to
improve the financial health of the community. The high debt carried by many
individuals in Memphis is an obstacle to meeting many community development
goals including increasing the homeownership rate, foreclosures, reductions in
the tax base, and many others.

Memphis City Schools
HCD and MHA work with Memphis City Schools when planning neighborhood
revitalization efforts in an attempt to be aware of the impact that they may have
on enrollment. The agencies also work to identify re-use opportunities for
schools that have been closed or are planned to be closed.




                                        49
                    PROGRAM SPECIFIC REQUIREMENTS

CDBG Specific Requirements
The Division of Housing and Community Development estimates that in FY2011
it will receive an estimated $2,203,420.00 in Program Income. The City
estimates that at least 85% of CDBG funds will be used for the benefit of low-
moderate income persons. Specific programs will provide for the delivery of
public services that will benefit low-moderate income youth, seniors, homeless
individuals and families. Housing rehabilitation will be provided to low/mod
income homeowners. Non-housing community development activities will
address slum/blight conditions and provide job-training assistance to unemployed
and under-employed persons.

HOME Program Specific Requirements

HOME funds will be used to provide rental assistance to special needs sub-
populations based upon findings by the 2010 Housing Study which confirms the
inability of low-incomes with disabilities to afford market rent housing. Further
research indicated the following additional needs: 1) most of the special needs
population cannot work and their survival depends on either family or public
support; 2) their main source of public monetary support is the Supplemental
Security Income (SSI), which in 2010 paid $498/person per month; and 3) this
amount is well below the level required for normal living expenses (for example,
the 2010 “Fair Market Rent” in Memphis was $671 per month for a one bedroom
housing unit and $783 for a two bedroom unit

Outreach to residents of public housing and other families assisted by public
housing agencies – The Division of Housing and Community Development
(HCD) has designed brochures that are used to describe and promote its
Downpayment Assistance Program which uses HOME funds to assist with
closing costs associated with purchases by first-time homebuyers. In addition,
HCD will use the Memphis Housing Authority’s (MHA) Quarterly Newsletter and
its Section 8 Quarterly Newsletter to reach and inform those receiving public
housing assistance of the special downpayment assistance provided for public
housing residents.

Action taken to ensure that families that receive downpayment assistance are
suitable to undertake and maintain homeownership – Prospective homebuyers
are required to participate in and complete a housing counseling program that
may consist of a one-on-one session or a classroom style approach. The City
maintains a referral list of Tennessee Housing Development Agency or HUD-
approved housing counseling agencies that provide a minimum of 8-10 hours of
homebuyer education and training and homebuyer qualification to all program
participants. In cases that involve mortgage delinquencies, special provisions
will be made to continue on-going counseling and to develop corrective
strategies to default situations where possible.



                                        50
Recapture Guidelines for HOME funded projects

The City of Memphis Division of Housing and Community Development, in
compliance with 24 CFR 92.254(a)(4), uses the following recapture guidelines in
the implementation of HOME program funded activities for homeowner assisted
and homebuyer programs. Memphis’ Single-family Rehabilitation Program
provides direct assistance to the homeowner in the form of a deferred loan.

The period of affordability shall be based on the per-unit subsidy as provided
under 24 CFR Part 92.254(4). (Per-unit subsidies may not exceed those
established by HUD for the HOME program.)

Affordability Period – HOME per unit Homeownership Assistance

1.      Based on a per-unit subsidy of less than $15,000.00 per unit, the period of
affordability shall be no less than five (5) years.
2.      Based on a per-unit subsidy of $15,000.00 to $40,000.00 per unit, the
period of affordability shall be no less than ten (10) years.
3.      Based on a per-unit subsidy of more than $40,000.00 per-unit, the period
of affordability shall be no less than fifteen (15) years.

Recapture Guidelines

Exception: Some Memphis HOME Program homebuyer activities provide
indirect subsidy funding (i.e. through developers - either non-profit CHDO’s or
private for-profit developers). These “developer subsidies” are used to reduce
home development costs to affordable purchase levels by low/moderate income,
first-time homebuyers. HOME regulations found at § 92.254 (a) (5) (ii) (5) state
that if HOME assistance is used only as a development subsidy, it is not subject
to recapture, and resale guidelines must be used.

Should an owner wish to sell a house that occurred from HOME Program
assistance provided to a developer, if the proposed sale does not meet the
affordability requirements for the specified time period, resale guidelines apply.
Grantees will include in the sales agreement that deed restrictions, or covenants
running with the land will be used to impose the resale requirements that ensure
the following:
    Only a buyer whose family qualifies as a low-income family will be an eligible
buyer; and the homebuyer shall occupy the property as the principal residence.

In the event of resale, the sales price must remain affordable to a reasonable
range of low-income homebuyers. As a guide, the maximum percentage of the
subsequent, new homebuyer’s annual gross income (AGI) that can be used to
pay the costs of principal, interest, taxes, and insurance should not exceed 35%
of AGI. Notwithstanding, the seller is entitled to a fair return on investment that



                                         51
includes the homeowner’s investment and any capital improvement that may be
documented by approved permits evidencing completed improvements, executed
improvement contracts, or filed Internal Revenue Service returns.

Lien, restrictive covenant or the deed restriction recorded with the property shall
enforce these provisions.

For All Other Cases of Direct Assistance to the Homebuyer:
If a homebuyer desires to resell or transfer ownership of a HOME-assisted
property during the affordability period, the recapture guidelines apply where
direct HOME Program assistance has been received by the homebuyer.

HOME regulations found at § 92.254 (a) (5) (ii) permit the City to develop and
enforce a recapture requirement to ensure the affordability period and to ensure
that the housing will remain affordable to a reasonable range of low-income
homebuyers. In events where a proposed sale does not comply with HOME
regulations governing the period of affordability or income-eligibility, the following
recapture provisions apply. Each original homebuyer, (who may become the
homeseller), is entitled to receive a fair return on his/her investment which shall
include the homeseller’s out-of-pocket downpayment (closing) costs and any
capital improvement that may be documented by approved permits evidencing
completed improvements, executed improvement contracts, or filed Internal
Revenue Service returns. The City will place these guidelines in its agreement
with grantees and subrecipients who also shall include appropriate references to
the recapture guidelines in its associated sales contract, deeds of trust,
mortgages, and deed restrictions.

   1) When the initial homebuyer desires to sell the HOME assisted unit to a
      non-eligible family, the following apply:
      a) The seller will be entitled to pay-off of first/second mortgages; recover
         investment (or downpayment); and documented capital improvements
         expenses in that order;
      b) Should proceeds remain, the City shall recapture the pro rata share
         that remains on a straight-line declining basis the HOME subsidy
         assistance that was provided to each housing unit. The amount repaid
         shall be reduced by a pro rata fraction (1/10th or 1/15th, etc.) according
         to the anniversary of the closing date for each calendar year that the
         original buyer occupies the property.
   2) The sales price may not exceed the ability of a subsequent low-income
      family to purchase the home. In each specific case where this attempt is
      made, the following applies:
      a) The seller will be entitled to pay-off of first/second mortgages;
      b) At that point, the seller must determine if he will lower the sales price in
         order to comply with HOME regulations governing resale to eligible,
         low-income families;




                                          52
      c) Should proceeds remain, the seller shall be entitled to recover out-of-
         pocket downpayment costs; and documented capital improvements
         expenses in that order.
      d) Should proceeds remain, the City shall recapture the pro rata share
         that remains on a straight-line declining basis the HOME subsidy
         assistance that was provided to each housing unit. The amount repaid
         shall be reduced by a pro rata fraction (1/10th or 1/15th, etc.) according
         to the anniversary of the
         closing date for each calendar year that the original buyer occupies the
         property.
   3) When the homeowner chooses simply to not comply with the City’s
      recapture option, has not made capital improvements, and seeks to resale
      the property at a price beyond the affordability of a low-income purchaser,
      the following will apply:
      a) The seller will be entitled to pay-off of first/second mortgages;
      b) The remaining proceeds may be recaptured by the City in an amount
         up to the full amount of the HOME subsidy assistance that was
         provided to the housing unit.

In the City’s Replacement Housing and Single-family Rehabilitation Programs, a
fifteen (15) year lien is used. If the property is abandoned within the 15-year
period, the City has the right to foreclose and seize the property.

Upon the City’s discovery that a violation of the terms and conditions of the
restrictive covenant have been breached, the City of Memphis will pursue a legal
remedy as expeditiously as practical.

Women and Minority Business Enterprises

It is city policy to require persons or organizations that enter into contractual
agreement with the City to agree to efforts to employ minority and women’s
business enterprises. HCD, in its administration of HOME Program funded
activities require that Grantees establish a minority participation goal that will
apply to contractors, sub-contractors (and there employees) as may participate in
program implementation and project development. Grantees will agree to make
efforts to employ minority and women business enterprises in connection with
activities funded under the HOME Program and the requirements of Executive
Orders 11625, 12432, and 12138.

Affirmative Marketing


The City of Memphis in compliance with the Federal regulations published as the
Final Rule on September 16,1996, for the HOME Investment Partnerships Act at
Title II of the Cranston-Gonzalez National Affordable Housing Act, as amended,
(42 U.S.C. 12701 et seq.) maintains affirmative marketing procedures and
requirements for rental and homebuyer projects containing 5 or more HOME-


                                        53
assisted units. Persons or organizations that enter into contractual agreement
with the City to develop projects consisting of 5 or more HOME-assisted units will
take steps to provide information and otherwise attract eligible persons in the
housing market area to available housing without regard to race, color, national
origin, sex, religion, familial status or disability. (The affirmative marketing
procedures do not apply to families with Section 8 tenant-based rental housing
assistance or families with tenant-based rental assistance provided with HOME
funds.) The affirmative marketing requirements and procedures require at
minimum but are not limited to the following:

      1. Developers of eligible HOME-assisted projects must adopt methods for
         informing the public, owners, and potential tenants about Federal Fair
         Housing Laws and the City’s Affirmative Marketing Policy (e.g., the use
         of the Equal Housing Opportunity logotype or slogan in press releases
         and solicitations for owners, written communication to fair housing and
         other groups, and use of the City of Memphis Fair Housing Brochure).

      2. Developers of eligible HOME-assisted projects must use the Equal
         Housing Opportunity logotype or slogan in any advertisement
         purchased from commercial media.

      3. Developers of eligible HOME-assisted projects must display the Fair
         Housing Poster in view of any potential tenant, owner and the public.

      4. To the extent practicable, the developer of eligible HOME-assisted
         units must use community contacts for marketing such units and reach
         out to inform and solicit applications from persons who would not likely
         apply without special outreach (e.g., neighborhood associations,
         community development corporations, places of worship, employment
         centers, fair housing groups, or housing counseling agencies).

      5. Developers of eligible HOME-assisted units will maintain records that
         describe the actions taken to affirmatively market units and in such
         form to assess the results of these actions.

      6. As a part of the City of Memphis HOME Program requirements, the
         City will monitor the compliance with these affirmative marketing
         procedures and requirements. The City will seek expeditious correction
         of any infractions and make referrals to proper enforcement agencies
         as appropriate and applicable.

Developers of affordable Housing units authorized under this Act or any other
Federal housing law applicable to the jurisdiction of the City of Memphis must
submit minority outreach procedures acceptable to HUD and the City of
Memphis. This effort is to ensure inclusion, to the maximum extent possible, of
minorities and women, and entities owned by minorities and women, in all


                                        54
contracts entered into by the City of Memphis with such persons or entities,
public or private, in order to facilitate the activities of the City of Memphis to
provide affordable housing authorized under this Act or any other Federal
housing law applicable to the City of Memphis (i.e. real estate firms, construction
firms, appraisal firms, management firms, financial institutions, investment
banking firms, underwriters, accountants, and providers of legal services,.
(Section 85.36(e) of Part 24 of the Code of Federal Regulations describes
actions to be taken by participating jurisdictions to assure that minority business
enterprises are used when possible in the procurement of property and services.




                                         55
                                      MONITORING

HCD's compliance department provides: project eligibility and approval, federal reviews,
and long term monitoring. These three areas are coordinated with the legal, accounting,
and planning departments to insure overall project collaboration and to insure that
projects are tracked from conception to long-term monitoring and tracking. Compliance
also provides critical functions to individual departments that administer programs. All
HCD departments are in the process of finalizing policies and procedures to help insure
compliance.

HCD's strategic personnel plan includes the training of all essential staff in HUD
regulations, including CDBG, HOME, and the competitive grants it receives. The plans
include the hiring of consultants as needed to train staff in a manner that enables them
to effectively administer programs.

HCD has a project tracking system that it designed to insure that applicable program
requirements are followed for every HUD funded project. Program staff report monthly
to the Administration concerning all HCD projects which includes: budgets, number of
units, contract status, IDIS numbers, and other information. The document is a
summary of all projects/major resources in the division and the spending status. This is
critical to insure adherence to the budget, draw downs, the public service cap, and the
planning and administration cap.

HCD staff responsible for long-term project monitoring coordinates with all other
departments to insure compliance with long term contractual and regulatory
requirements.

The Law Division has assigned two attorneys to HCD and will continue to fund an
assistant City Attorney as well as a senior assistant City Attorney. In addition to other
services, the attorneys provide a legal review of all contracts to make sure that all legal
requirements are met. An internal auditor remains in place to provide and insure
compliance with HUD financial standards.

Monitoring procedures for subrecipient activities are include in HCD's subrecipient
management strategy. The manual provides a detailed outline of the City's policies and
procedures for informing and monitoring its nonprofit subrecipients. In addition, HCD
continues to consult with accounting firms to evaluate the financial management
systems of subrecipient agencies in complying with HUD financial standards.




                                             56
                             CONSOLIDATED PLAN
                                 FY 2011-2013
                          THREE YEAR STRATEGIC PLAN


The 2011-2013 Strategic Plan section of Memphis’ Consolidated Plan covers three fiscal
years and brings together needs, priorities, objectives and strategies that have been
crafted to provide decent housing, a suitable living environment and expanded economic
opportunities for low-moderate-income residents. The City of Memphis, through its
organizational unit, the Division of Housing and Community Development (“HCD”) will
use the Consolidated Plan’s Three-Year Strategic Plan and each respective Annual
Plan, as guides for program and project development and the use of federal
entitlements. In each successive Annual Plan after FY 2011 HCD will use the
Consolidated Plan’s 2011-2013 Three-Year Strategy as a foundation upon which the
City can adjust its strategies and add or omit projects/programs to better respond to the
housing, neighborhood and homeless needs of the low-moderate income population.

HCD’s response to public services and facility needs is primarily accomplished through a
request for proposal process known as the Community Service Grant application
process. The overall competitive process for grant awards is coordinated through the
Strategic Community Investment Fund (SCIF). The City’s ability to address the many
community service needs is limited by a 15% cap placed on the use of CDBG funds for
public services. Funding consideration will be given to those projects that propose to
increase employment either through skills training, job placement, and literacy
programming.

The City’s administration continues to prioritize redevelopment and neighborhood
revitalization as strategic solutions to combating crime, disinvestment, commercial and
residential population declines and overall blights. The Consolidated Plan 2011-2013
Three-Year Strategy and FY 2011 Annual Plan further reflects these priorities. It is
anticipated that neighborhood redevelopment and targeting neighborhoods for physical,
social, and economic redevelopment will help to create neighborhoods of choice. Given
the tremendous amount of blight in these neighborhoods, as well as the level of
disinvestment, it is recognized that such redevelopment will require a level of
commitment covering several years to make a real difference. Neighborhood plans will
be prepared for targeted areas. For areas not subject to large-scale redevelopment,
smaller projects and initiatives will be developed that are expected to yield benefits over
a shorter term. Also important is the selection of neighborhoods that have Community
Development Corporations (CDC's). The presence of a CDC is necessary to ensure
citizen participation in the plan development and to assist in the implementation of
certain sections of the redevelopment plan.

The Continuum of Care is used to develop the assessment of homeless needs. This
process helps in developing the homeless priority needs, objectives and strategies.
Projects proposed for ESG funding are determined through the competitive grant
application process that reviews requests for funding from agencies and service
providers who provide shelter and implement services that meet the needs of homeless
persons. In the past, the City has contracted with Partners for the Homeless (Partners)
and The Greater Memphis Interagency Coalition for the Homeless (GMICH) to
coordinate the planning and research of the homeless population, to gather input and


                                              1
                                        Strategic Plan
information from homeless service providers, and to facilitate the Continuum of Care
application process. The two organizations have merged into a new unified organization
called the Community Alliance for the Homeless. Two high priority needs for the
homeless are reflected in proposed activities that foster the development of permanent
supportive housing and coordinated and increased outreach efforts from service
providers and agencies.

The 2002 CHAS estimate which showed that 49,486 very-low and low income
households had housing problems, was the most important factor used to determine the
need for housing assistance by persons with special needs. In 2010, Memphians with a
SSI income of $498/month would need to pay 88% of their income to pay fair market
rent for an efficiency apartment and 95% of their income to pay fair market rent for a
one-bedroom apartment. Rental assistance was identified as a high priority need
specific to the HIV/AIDS, Developmentally Disabled, Elderly and Frail Elderly special
needs sub-populations.

The Strategic Planning Process

Two public hearings were held at which residents were presented opportunities to
comments on needs and priorities and those projects and activities that HCD has carried
out in accordance with the Consolidated Plan. The first Public Hearing was held on
February 3, 2010 to present the FY 2009 Annual Performance Report and to outline the
planning process for the Consolidated Plan’s 2011-2013 Strategy and 2011 Annual Plan.
At the second public hearing, held on April 7, 2010, a draft summary of the Consolidated
Plan 2011-2013 Strategy and 2011 Annual Plan was presented.

Memphis contracted with the Regional Economic Development Center at the University
of Memphis to prepare the 2010 Housing Study for Memphis. Housing data collection
consisted of an assembly of housing market information from proprietary sources, sales
data, tax assessor records, Memphis Housing Authority, Property surveys, and the
Census and American Communities Survey. Stakeholders specific to each Special
Needs sub-population were used to collect data to identify the needs of Special Needs
populations. A Housing Planning Conference called “Affordable and Decent Housing in
Memphis: Connecting Housing Needs to Actions” to discuss housing needs and
priorities. Included on the housing panel were housing development professionals,
lenders, apartment management professionals, Memphis Housing Authority staff,
CHDOs, the local HUD office, Memphis Area Legal Services, the Office of Planning and
Development, Memphis Center for Independent Living, and others. Homeless services
providers worked with Partners for the Homeless and the Greater Memphis Interagency
Coalition for the Homeless who, under contract with HCD, coordinated several activities
including: 1) a Point-in-Time count; 2) facilitation of a Retreat for Homeless Services
providers as part of the Continuum of Care planning process; 3) help finalize and
implement the use of the Quality Standard of Care system among homeless service
providers; 4) participation in the Continuum of Care grant application process; and, 5)
the preparation of the 2010-2011 Homeless Needs Assessment and Gaps Analysis
(Prepared by Partners for the Homeless.)

The following sections will present the needs assessments, priorities and objectives for
the categories of Homeless, Housing, Special Needs Population and Neighborhood,
Economic and Community Development. Also presented are measurable performance
goals for each category.
                                             2
                                       Strategic Plan
                    2011-2013 HOMELESS STRATEGIC PLAN

Priority Homeless Needs

In fiscal year 2008-2009, Shelby County’s Community Services Agency administered a
total of approximately $2 million from a variety of sources, primarily the U.S. Department
of Health and Human Services’ Community Service Block Grant program, to provide
rent, mortgage, and utility assistance. The number of households assisted with those
funds was not readily available for this report. In addition, Metropolitan InterFaith
Association (MIFA) administered approximately $550,000 in public and private funds to
help households pay rent, mortgages, and/or utilities, and reported having assisted
3,468 households. Although it is not known how many of the households assisted by
these two organizations would have been literally homeless without the financial
assistance, it is safe to assume that these households were at risk of becoming
homeless.

The City of Memphis’ Division of Housing and Community Development (HCD) receives
an annual allocation of funding through the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban
Development’s Emergency Shelter Grant (ESG) program. Approximately $350,000 is
received each year and is administered by HCD through a competitive process.
Although up to 30% of the allocation may be used for prevention, applications from the
various agencies serving homeless and at-risk individuals and families rarely request
amounts totaling the full 30% of the allocation. For example, the total amount of ESG
funds that could be used in the City’s 2009 competition for FY2010 funds for prevention
totaled $107,086. Applications from agencies requesting ESG dollars for prevention
activities totaled only $57,400. Given the extremely limited funding and competing
priorities, most agencies request funding for essential services and/or operations and
maintenance of their programs. As a result, in light of the huge disparity between funds
requested and funds available, and with cuts required across all categories, a total of
$45,000 was awarded for FY2010 for prevention activities.

Homeless Prevention and Rapid Re-housing Program (HPRP)

HUD’s Homelessness Prevention and Rapid Re-housing Program (HPRP), made
possible by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) of 2009 has a strong
focus on prevention of homelessness. That focus has already brought about a re-
structuring of the local system of services, shelter, and transitional housing for families
with children. In addition, the Homelessness Emergency and Rapid Transition to
Housing (HEARTH) Act, which is expected to be implemented in 2011, will continue
HUD’s strong focus on ending chronic homelessness.

In September 2009, the Memphis-Shelby County Emergency Housing Partnership (the
Partnership) was launched. This highly collaborative initiative includes Partners for the
Homeless, the Greater Memphis Interagency Coalition for the Homeless, and local
providers of services, emergency shelter and transitional housing for families with
children.
The program is utilizing $3.3 million in Homeless Prevention and Rapid Re-housing
funds allocated to and administered by the City of Memphis, along with an additional
$903,000 in HPRP funds allocated to the Memphis-Shelby County Continuum of Care by
the Tennessee Housing Development Agency (THDA) and administered by Partners for
the Homeless (Partners). The City has three years to expend the $3.3 million but, due to
                                              3
                                        Strategic Plan
the poor economy, planned for it to be expended in two years. Partners have one year
to expend the $903,000. However, THDA has indicated that the contract will be
extended and funded for an additional year. Given the current economy, and the fact
that funding for prevention has historically been quite limited, HPRP funds are especially
needed.

The funds are being used for prevention of homelessness and to rapidly re-house
homeless people. To be eligible for HPRP assistance for prevention, households: 1)
must be at imminent risk of homelessness, and 2) would, without the HPRP assistance,
be literally homeless; and 3) have adequate income to pay rent after the rental
assistance ends. To receive HPRP assistance for rapid re-housing, households must: 1)
be literally homeless, staying in emergency shelters or graduating/timing out of
transitional housing, and 2) be able to demonstrate that they have income sufficient to
remain housed at the end of the rental assistance.

Eligible activities for HPRP funding are listed below. Because localities have varying
needs and priorities, HUD does not require grantees to provide all of the eligible
activities.
    • short- or medium-term rental assistance,
    • housing relocation and stabilization services,
    • housing search assistance,
    • mediation or outreach to property owners,
    • credit repair,
    • security or utility deposits,
    • utility payments,
    • rental assistance for a final month at a location,
    • moving costs assistance,
    • case management, and
    • other appropriate homelessness prevention and re-housing activities.

To carry out the activities included in the Partnership’s program guidelines, the City of
Memphis and Partners sub-contracted with local providers of services to:
   • provide initial assessments of the potential eligibility of callers to a Hotline
       operated 24-hours a day, 7 days per week, excluding holidays,
   • provide in-depth assessments of households referred by staff operating the
       Hotline,
   • verify the income and circumstances of those applying for assistance,
   • administer the financial assistance for those households deemed eligible,
   • assist households in locating and accessing adequate, affordable housing,
   • work with local landlords to encourage acceptance of tenants despite histories of
       poor credit or records of poor tenancies and help resolve issues if and when
       issues arise, and
   • provide home-based case management services.

Despite delays in full implementation of the program due to the need to hire and train
staff, develop, revise and implement policies and procedures, statistics reflect that by the
end of February 2010:
    • The Hotline had received 6,074 calls, including 1,354 calls after the Hotline had
        ceased operation for the day and calls had been re-routed to providers of
        services participating in the Partnership.
                                              4
                                        Strategic Plan
   •   Hotline operators had conducted initial assessments to determine if those callers
       met, or might be able to meet the criteria for eligibility for assistance and had
       referred 1,725 of those deemed potentially eligible to MIFA for more in-depth
       assessments.

In addition, intake and assessment staff at MIFA (funded with HPRP dollars) had
screened/assessed 1,926 households, approved 166 households for rental assistance to
prevent homelessness, and obligated $146,377 to provide this assistance (an average of
$882 per household). Households to be served must be at imminent risk of
homelessness, meaning that the household, without this assistance, would be literally
homeless, on the streets or in emergency shelters or transitional housing for homeless
people, AND, at the end of the short-or medium-term assistance, would be able to
remain housed without further financial assistance.)

The Dynamics of Homelessness
Much attention, and rightly so, is being focused on the impact of the current economic
situation, particularly the staggering number of foreclosures and Memphis’ current
unemployment rate of 12% (higher than the state and national averages), on homeless
and other disadvantaged individuals and families. For example, the National Alliance to
End Homelessness, a highly regarded national advocacy group noted for its research on
homelessness, has predicted a 35% increase in dire poverty as a result of the economy.
How such an increase, or any increase in the poverty rate factors into an increase in
homelessness will depend on a myriad of other factors, not the least of which is the
resilience of low and very-low income individuals and families as they double-up and
triple-up in the struggle to remain housed.

In Memphis, as in many other cities, states, regions, and rural areas, structural factors
include, but are not limited to:
    • the critical lack of safe, decent housing, affordable for low and very-low income
       households;
    • educational systems struggling to educate extremely poor, seriously
       disadvantaged children and youth,
    • the lack of jobs that pay well enough for people to pay for housing and other
       basic necessities of life;
    • the lack of transportation to areas where better-paying jobs are located;
    • the lack of access to adequate health care;
    • an under-funded, fragmented mental health system, struggling with too few
       resources to meet the needs of mental health consumers who have far too few
       resources; and
    • the lack of mainstream funding for residential treatment and recovery services for
       uninsured individuals;

Individual risk factors include:
    • low educational levels;
    • learning disabilities;
    • histories of abuse and/or neglect as children or as adults;
    • poor health;
    • physical disabilities;
    • substance abuse; and

                                             5
                                       Strategic Plan
   •   severe and persistent mental illness or mental disorders that may not be as
       severe or chronic as schizophrenia or bipolar disorder, but still impair an
       individual’s ability to work and/or maintain relationships with family members or
       friends who might be able to assist him/her during difficult times.

The following chart reflects the number of men, women, and children reported to have
been sheltered/housed by participating providers on the night of the count.

Type of Program                             Number Sheltered/Housed
                                            January 26, 2010
Emergency Shelter                           Men      Women Children             Total
# Unaccompanied Individuals                 282      49       0                 331
# Number of People in Families              2        37       92                131
(Note: Number of Families = 37)
Total in Emergency Shelter                  284           86       92           462

Transitional Housing
# Unaccompanied Individuals                 467           71       0            538
#People in Families with Children           6             155      331          492
(Note: Number of Families = 155)
Total in Transitional Housing               473           226      331          1,030

Total Sheltered/Housed                      757           312      423          1,492

Gaps and Priorities

Effective planning to meet the needs of homeless people and people at risk of
homelessness requires thoughtful consideration of the dimensions, demographics and
dynamics of homelessness. And while point-in-time counts and annualized statistics are
critical in understanding the current need for emergency shelters, transitional housing,
and permanent supportive housing, these statistics do not tell the full story. For example,
point-in-time counts/surveys do not take into account the fluidity of the homeless
population or the seasonal and cyclical nature of homelessness. Counts in January
generally reflect lower census in shelters and transitional housing, often because some
or many individuals and families living on the edge of homelessness file “rapid returns”
and immediately receive funds through the Earned Income Tax Credit program that
enable them to avoid homelessness for a few more weeks or months. By contrast,
spring and summer counts reflect that those same programs are operating at, or often
above, capacity. And, as important as annualized statistics are, these can also vary
from year to year depending on a variety of factors including the funding to pay for
entering, analyzing, and reporting data, the emphasis, incentives, or requirements for
reporting certain statistics, training needed and provided for upgrades to the technology,
and competing priorities, especially during difficult economic times.

In any analysis of the needs of homeless people, it is a “given” that housing is critical to
preventing and ending homelessness. It is not possible to end homelessness but
homelessness encompasses much more than houselessness. Housing, in and of itself,
cannot reverse the effects of poverty and racism. Housing can, however, play a
significant role in lifting low educational levels by ensuring that children have a safe,
dependable place to sleep, play and study. Housing cannot “fix” mental illness,
                                               6
                                         Strategic Plan
    substance abuse, or learning disabilities. It can, however, help ensure a sense of
    security and well-being that can open doors to regaining health and hope, both of which
    are critical to recovery.

    For the past decade, meeting the housing and service needs of chronically homeless,
    disabled individuals has received much attention and rightly so. Many of these
    individuals have serious health problems and are at risk of premature death, particularly
    during periods of extreme weather. In addition, the aging of the general population of
    homeless unaccompanied individuals and/or the reported educational levels make it
    unlikely that they will be able to secure and retain employment and housing. For
    example:
•   of the 4,024 unaccompanied individuals homeless during the data year, a total of 1,132
    were over the age of 50, and
•   of the 2,319 unaccompanied individuals for whom educational status was reported,
    1,058 (46%) had less than a high school education (although 307 of that number had
    earned a GED, the equivalent of an eighth grade education.)

    In addition, recent local studies and concerns expressed by experienced, dedicated
    providers of services for families with children in Memphis reflect the need for more in-
    depth assessments of homeless mothers and their children and for additional services
    and housing options to help meet those needs. Temporary rental assistance can and
    does keep many families with children housed, but much more is needed to help ensure
    that the primary caregivers have the education and/or job skills to help lift them and their
    children out of poverty. Annualized statistics for the data year reflect that a total of 494
    families with children were served in emergency shelters or transitional housing. Of the
    182 adult caregivers in emergency shelters for whom educational status was reported,
    78 (43%) had not graduated from high school. Of the 78 that had not graduated, only 25
    had earned a GED. Their potential for earning enough money to ensure permanent
    housing for themselves and their families is surely limited.

    The following needs identified are clear evidence that housing and services are critical to
    any efforts to end homelessness, not just for unaccompanied adults or current family
    households but for the children in homeless and precariously housed households who
    are at great risk of becoming our next generation of homeless adults.

    Homeless Subpopulations
    Homeless subpopulations or categories of homeless people having special needs
    include veterans, youth, victims of domestic violence, and individuals and primary
    caregivers in families who struggle with severe mental illness and/or chronic substance
    abuse issues, and/or HIV/AIDS.

    A summary of the needs of these special sub-groups of the homeless population follows,
    along with recommended strategies to meet those needs as reflected by data and/or
    recommendations of providers of services and other key stakeholders.

    Needs of Homeless Individuals Unaccompanied by Children

    Chronically Homeless Individuals

    Analysis of the HMIS and street and shelter count statistics indicate that no fewer than
    168 individuals, including 124 who reported having slept unsheltered, were chronically
                                                  7
                                            Strategic Plan
homeless on the night of the point-in-time count (January 26, 2010). The current
inventory of permanent supportive housing totals 253 beds specifically for homeless
people with 155 of those beds funded specifically for chronically homeless individuals.
Of the total of 253 beds, 28 were not occupied on the night of the count. In addition, ten
beds have just been added and a total of 35 other beds/units specifically for chronically
homeless individuals are under development. More specifically,
• The Tennessee Mental Health Consumers Association (THMCA) has 10 beds under
    development (expected to open in May 2010),
• Door of Hope has recently brought 10 beds on-line and still has 5 beds under
    development and expected to open in early 2011), and
• Friends for Life has 10 beds under development (expected to open in 2011).

•   Priorities for Chronically Homeless Individuals:
•   Develop and implement a plan to ensure that all existing beds for chronically
    homeless individuals are fully utilized.
•   Develop and implement a plan to ensure that beds being brought on-line and/or
    created can be promptly utilized.
•   Bring on-line the 35 beds of permanent supportive housing for chronically homeless
    individuals currently under development.
•   Create no fewer than 126 additional beds of permanent supportive housing for
    chronically homeless individuals.
•   Make intensive outreach to the unsheltered population a top priority.
•   Since access to benefits to help pay rent and access to Medicaid/TennCare are
    critical to accessing permanent supportive housing or permanent housing in the for-
    profit sector, make funding of SOAR workers who are trained to assist homeless
    people in promptly being enrolled in Supplemental Security Income (SSI) a top
    priority.

Homeless Individuals with Mental Illness:

It is estimated that no fewer than 179 individuals with mental illness were served by
emergency shelters and/or transitional housing programs during the data year ending
September 30, 2009 and need permanent supportive housing or, at a minimum, access
to decent affordable housing and supportive services. This number does not include the
estimated 54 individuals with mental illness who slept unsheltered on the night of the
street and shelter/facility count and are included in the need for supportive housing
specifically for chronically homeless people. It does include the 29 individuals who were
in Genesis House, a transitional housing programs for individuals with mental illness.
The remainder are currently in, or have recently exited transitional housing programs for
individuals with chronic substance and co-occurring disorders but are unlikely to remain
housed with housing assistance and supportive services. Please see the following page
for priorities for serving this population.

Priorities for Homeless Individuals with Mental Illness:
• Develop and implement a plan to create additional permanent supportive housing
    options for clients exiting transitional housing specifically for individuals with mental
    illness and histories of residential instability who are not eligible for admittance to
    permanent supportive housing programs that are specifically funded to serve
    chronically homeless individuals.


                                                8
                                          Strategic Plan
•   Make intensive outreach to unsheltered, mentally ill individuals a top priority for
    funding.
•   Since access to benefits to help pay rent and access to Medicaid/TennCare are
    critical to accessing permanent supportive housing, make funding of SOAR workers
    who are trained to assist homeless people in promptly being enrolled in
    Supplemental Security Income (SSI) a top priority, with the focus on the most
    vulnerable, those sleeping unsheltered, in places not meant for human habitation, or
    in emergency shelters.
•   Require that any agency/organization receiving funds administered by the City of
    Memphis to provide transitional housing or permanent supportive housing to serve
    unaccompanied homeless individuals coordinate efforts with outreach programs to
    help ensure that mentally ill individuals sleeping unsheltered or in places not meant
    for human habitation are a top priority for admittance.
•   Likewise, require that any agencies/organizations seeking or receiving funds
    administered by the City of Memphis ensure that any outreach program/workers
    funded to serve homeless individuals with mental illness focus their efforts on the
    most vulnerable population, i.e., mentally ill people in the unsheltered population and
    in emergency shelters.

Chronic Substance Abusers

Although there are a total of 627 transitional housing beds that provide treatment and/or
recovery services for substance abuse for literally homeless individuals, there are no
permanent supportive housing programs specifically for those whose primary disabling
condition is chronic substance abuse. It has been well documented that substance
abuse is often complicated by co-occurring mental disorders and these individuals are
often represented in the housed population of chronically homeless people. Others,
often because of underlying mental health issues, have been unable to achieve and/or
maintain sobriety, have serious health issues, are extremely vulnerable and are at risk of
premature death. Some of these individuals are in emergency shelters, and others
sleep unsheltered.

Priorities for Chronic Substance Abusers:
• Develop and implement a plan for linking outreach workers with community outreach
    police officers (COPS) to identify homeless, chronic substance abusers and assist
    them, to the degree possible, in accessing permanent supportive housing programs
    and/or services.
• Offer incentives to develop permanent supportive housing options to programs
    providing transitional housing programs for chronic substance abusers, particularly
    transitional programs that are operating at well below maximum capacity.
• Create no fewer than 20 beds for homeless, chronic substance abusers,
    incorporating “housing first” strategies and requiring data collection for analysis of
    outcomes and cost-benefits.

Veterans
Alpha Omega Veterans Services (AOVS) has developed and is operating a total of 50
beds of permanent supportive housing specifically for homeless veterans, with 32 of
those beds specifically for chronically homeless veterans. Twenty additional beds are
under development by AOVS. The Director of Alpha Omega Veterans Services reports
that his agency is developing a permanent supportive housing project in Millington to

                                              9
                                        Strategic Plan
help meet the current need and the expected increase in homeless veterans returning
from Iraq and Afghanistan with Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), traumatic brain
injury, physical illnesses and physical disabilities. In addition, AOVS, Cocaine Alcohol
Awareness Program (CAAP), and Barron Heights CDC operate a total of 139 beds of
transitional housing for veterans in recovery from trauma and/or substance abuse.
VASH vouchers for rental assistance have also been well utilized to provide housing for
homeless veterans. The point-in-time survey of unsheltered people found that 20 (12%)
of the 163 individuals reporting having slept unsheltered or in places not meant for
human habitation the night before were veterans.

Priorities for Veterans:
• Bring remaining 20 beds of permanent supportive housing on-line.
• Identify “frequent fliers” who cycle through the transitional programs for veterans and
    target any additional VASH vouchers to this population.
• Encourage coordination of outreach to veterans with outreach to the general
    population as a tool for cross-fertilization of ideas and resources.

Persons Living with HIV/AIDS
Neither the point-in-time count or annualized statistics from the Homeless Management
Information System captured reliable data on the prevalence of HIV/AIDS. National and
regional statistics reflect that approximately 8% of homeless adults are HIV positive and
African-Americans, especially African-American women, are the fastest growing group
that is testing positive for the virus. As cited above, Friends for Life has been awarded
funding to develop 10 beds/units of permanent supportive housing for chronically
homeless individuals with chronic addictions, some of whom are reported to be sleeping
on the agency’s porch.

Priorities for Individuals Living with HIV/AIDS:
• Continue focus on focusing on HOPWA funds for housing needs.
• Encourage additional use of HOME Tenant Based Rental Assistance (TBRA)
    vouchers administered by Friends for Life as these appear to have been helpful in
    preventing homelessness of people with HIV/AIDS.

Victims of Domestic Violence
Local providers of services to homeless women with and without children, officers with
the Memphis Police Department, the leadership of the Domestic Violence Council,
representatives of Operation Safe Community, and the leadership of the Memphis Area
Women’s Council report the serious lack of accessible emergency shelter for women
with and without children who are victims of domestic violence, especially those with
mental health and/or substance abuse issues that go hand-in-hand with efforts to endure
and/or cope with abuse.

Priorities for Victims of Domestic Violence
Encourage/offer incentives for development of no fewer than three emergency shelter
beds to be promptly accessible for unaccompanied women who are fleeing domestic
violence, including women with issues that often are directly related to abuse such as
substance abuse and mental health issues.




                                            10
                                       Strategic Plan
Unaccompanied Youth
Youth Villages and Porter-Leath Children’s Services report very low utilization of
emergency shelter beds for youth. State law requires that homeless youth (runaways or
“throw-aways”) age 18 or younger who are not reunited with their families or extended
family within 48 hours of coming to the attention of the Juvenile Justice system, become
wards of the State. While this law no doubt was intended in the best interests of
homeless youth, it appears that an unintended consequence is that homeless youth
avoid, at all costs, being identified as homeless. Providers report that persons under the
age of 18 rarely seek services, shelter or housing from them.

Priorities for Unaccompanied Youth:
• Work with the Gay, Lesbian, Bi-sexual, and Transgender (GLBT) drop-in center and
    other programs where homeless youth congregate to develop and implement a plan
    to better identify and ensure services and housing for homeless youth age 18 and
    over, particularly those who have aged out of foster care.

Needs of Homeless Families with Children

Homeless Families in which the Primary Caregiver has a Mental Illness
To the credit of local providers of services, shelter, transitional housing and permanent
housing for homeless families, only one family (a mother with one child) has been
located during the annual counts of unsheltered people. However, annualized data for
the data year ending September 30, 2010 reflected that of the primary special needs
reported, only 14 reported having a mental illness. This could well be a reflection of the
fact that women with untreated severe and persistent mental illness are likely to have
lost their children to other family members or to the foster care system. It could also be
a direct result of the reality that most emergency shelters and transitional housing
programs are not funded or staffed to serve families in which the primary caregiver has a
serious mental illness.

Priorities for Families in Which the Primary Caregiver has a Mental Illness
•        Encourage expanded use of HOME TBRA for these families.
•        As funds become available, utilize to develop a range of permanent supportive
housing options for these families.

Homeless Families in which the Primary Caregiver is a Chronic Substance Abuser
Renewal Place, a 15-unit transitional housing program specifically for families headed by
mothers with chronic substance abuse disorders, has an excellent reputation for serving
these extremely vulnerable families and their children but records reflect that it rarely
operates at full capacity (15 families). There are no emergency shelter beds where
women who are actively abusing alcohol or other drugs, often as a means of coping with
domestic violence, can promptly receive shelter and linkage to treatment and services
for themselves and their children. The Memphis/Shelby County Emergency Housing
Partnership has assessed hundreds of families with children seeking housing
assistance. Only ten percent of these families have met the criteria for receiving rental
assistance. It is highly likely that the primary caregiver in some of the 90% of the families
that were not eligible for HPRP assistance are chronic substance abusers.

Priorities: Homeless Families in which the Primary Caregiver is a Chronic Substance
Abuser
                                              11
                                         Strategic Plan
•       Mine the Partnership’s data to collect information on the number of families with
a substance-abusing primary caregiver. Develop and implement a plan for
offering/encouraging/linking these families to Renewal Place.
•       Make development of emergency shelter that will accept and appropriately
shelter, serve, and link to more appropriate resources, families in which the primary
caregiver is an active substance abusers.
•       Encourage and provide incentives for emergency shelters and transitional
housing programs to serve this population.

Homeless Families Headed by Persons Living with HIV/AIDS
Client-level data provided for the HMIS reflected that no adult caregivers were reported
to be living with HIV/AIDS. No doubt this reflects HUD’s ban on asking HIV/AIDS status
at assessment and intake when a response might be used to deny services. It may also
reflect the success of HOPWA and HOME TBRA funds being used for rental assistance
for this population by two local agencies serving families wherein a family member is
living with HIV/AIDS.

Priority: Homeless Families Headed by Persons Living with HIV/AIDS
Continue and expand as needed and as possible use of HOPWA and HOME TBRA
funds to serve this population.

Families That are Victims/Survivors of Domestic Violence
It bears repeating that local providers of services to homeless women with and without
children, officers with the Memphis Police Department, the leadership of the Domestic
Violence Council, representatives of Operation Safe Community, and the leadership of
the Memphis Area Women’s Council report the serious lack of accessible emergency
shelter for women with and without children who are victims of domestic violence,
especially those with mental health and/or substance abuse issues that go hand-in-hand
with efforts to endure and/or cope with abuse.

Priorities for Families that are Victims/Survivors of Domestic Violence
A 10-unit, appropriately staffed emergency shelter needs to be developed for mentally ill
or substance abusing victims of domestic violence, with (or without) children.
Approximately seven of those units should be designed to accommodate families with
children, including older male children.

Conclusion:
Underlying all of the needs and priorities expressed above is the critical need for
affordable housing for people with limited incomes and limited potential for significantly
increasing those incomes.

Programs established by the McKinney Act and administered by the U.S. Department of
Veterans Affairs were the Health Care for Homeless Veterans Program and the
Domiciliary Care for Homeless Veterans Program, both of which provide critical funding
for local programs for homeless veterans.

At the U.S. Department of Labor, the McKinney Act established the Job Training for the
Homeless Demonstration Program and the Homeless Veterans Reintegration Project.
At the U.S. Department of Education, it established the Education for Homeless Children
and Youth Grant Program and the Adult Education for the Homeless Program. The
McKinney Act also further described the purpose of FEMA’s Emergency Food and
                                             12
                                        Strategic Plan
Shelter Program, “To supplement and expand ongoing efforts to provide shelter, food
and supportive services for homeless and hungry individuals nationwide.”

The funding from these programs came none too soon. According to The Federal Plan
to Break the Cycle of Homelessness, produced by the U.S. Interagency Council on the
Homeless in 1993, “by the middle of the 1980s homelessness had reached a level not
seen since the Great Depression.” The McKinney-Vento Act had also created the U.S.
Interagency Council on the Homeless (USICH) (now known as the U.S. Interagency
Council on Homelessness) to coordinate the McKinney Act and other programs from the
various departments and agencies.

In August, 2002, following the lead of the National Alliance to End Homelessness and
the few major cities that had produced more comprehensive plans to address
homelessness, the Memphis and Shelby County Mayors’ Task Force on Homelessness
released the Blueprint to Break the Cycle of Homelessness and Prevent Future
Homelessness (the Blueprint). That report, developed in collaboration with a broad
cross-section of the community, built on but went beyond the Continuum of Care
planning to encompass broader goals for maximizing mainstream resources and
included strategies for meeting those goals. It also included the most recent point-in-
time and annualized data, and an inventory of emergency shelter, transitional housing,
and permanent supportive housing. The Blueprint was underwritten by the Assisi
Foundation, and produced by Partners for the Homeless on behalf of the Mayors’ Task
Force.

In addition, the report included the Memphis/Shelby County Continuum of Care as one
of the 25 best-performing continuums in the nation. It also cited the Memphis/ Shelby
County Continuum of Care as an example of how progress could be made and goals
accomplished when neither the government or the non-profit sector controlled the
funding and decision-making processes.

The Continuum of Care
Continuum of Care (CoC) is the term used to describe a system of coordinated services
and housing specifically for homeless individuals and families and the entity responsible
for planning and facilitating implementation of that system. The concept was designed,
tested and initiated by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development’s Office
of Community Planning and Development as a means of encouraging coordination of
programs for homeless people that were funded, or seeking funding, from HUD. As
designed, the continuum includes prevention, outreach, assessment, emergency shelter,
transitional housing, and permanent housing. From its inception in 1993, it has been
clearly stated that homeless individuals and families are not expected to utilize each
component of the system but that the components need to be available and coordinated
to help ensure that homeless people receive appropriate services, shelter, and housing.


Where we are and where we’ve been as a Continuum of Care can best be determined
by:
    • the number and needs of people who were located during annual point-in-time
      street and shelter/facility counts;
    • the availability and effectiveness of outreach programs focused on locating,
      assessing, engaging, and providing services to help homeless people who are
                                            13
                                       Strategic Plan
       sleeping unsheltered or in emergency shelters to access housing, benefits and
       services, including treatment for mental health and/or substance abuse issues;
   •   the number and needs of individuals and families that were literally homeless for
       some period of time, at some point-in-time for some period of time, during the
       current year as compared to prior years;
   •   the number and effectiveness of emergency shelters, transitional housing
       programs and permanent supportive housing available to assist homeless
       people;
   •   by the outcomes of the individuals and families sheltered, housed and/or served
       by the system; and
   •   by the quantity and quality of data collected and analyzed to document the
       above.

Where we are can also be measured by a recent analysis of the effectiveness of the
Continuum of Care systems of services, shelter and housing in eleven cities nationally
recognized as high-performing cities in addressing homelessness. Katie Kitchin, a
nationally recognized expert on homelessness, compared the criteria used in ranking the
eleven cities as high-performing with Memphis’ data and reported that Memphis ranked
third, higher than nine of the eleven “high-performing” cities. In addition, for comparison
purposes, Ms. Kitchin also compared Memphis statistics with Nashville and Knoxville
statistics and found that Memphis scored significantly better than either city. The criteria
consisted of:
    • the availability of permanent supportive housing;
    • the rate of retention in permanent supportive housing;
    • the rate of homelessness as compared with the total population;
    • the rate of successful exits (from transitional housing) to permanent housing
    • the rate of employment of persons exiting transitional housing; and
    • the percentage of the population sleeping unsheltered.

Where we’re going will be determined in large part by the statutory requirements,
funding, and financial incentives embodied in the HEARTH Act. It will also be
determined by the quality of the response to those factors by the planners, funders and
providers that constitute the Memphis/Shelby County Continuum of Care and by the
response of the broader community.

Another important factor impacting the future of the Continuum of Care will also be
determined by the goals and strategies to be included in the National Strategic Plan to
End Homelessness being developed by the U.S. Interagency Council on Homelessness
(USICH) as required by the HEARTH Act. The USICH is a working group of the White
House Domestic Policy Council. Members of the council are the Secretaries or
Administrators of 22 Federal Departments and Administrations with programs and
funding that will be critical to ending homelessness. Currently chaired by the Secretary
of HUD, the USICH has also been chaired in recent years by the Secretary of the U.S.
Department of Health and Human Services and by the Secretary of Veterans Affairs.

Results of national research studies (Culhane, 2007, 2008, 2009up; Spellman, 2009up;
Burt, 2009up) have begun to suggest that the next phase in the fight to end
homelessness is to help people access the services that will either keep them in their
homes or restore their tenancy. Homelessness prevention, or rapid re-housing of those
who do become literally homeless, and housing stabilization are core strategies of this

                                             14
                                        Strategic Plan
emerging network paradigm. It will be critical to review those studies for comparison
with the quantity, quality, cost-effectiveness, and general effectiveness of transitional
programs for unaccompanied individuals and families in Memphis. It is important to note
that it was never suggested or required that a homeless individual or family should have
to move through each component of the Continuum. It is also important to note that
prevention, although not eligible for funding through the annual competition for
Continuum of Care funding, has always been included as a component of the Continuum
of Care, and is specifically eligible for funding through HUD’s Emergency Shelter Grant
(ESG) program.

Where we’re going will also depend, to a great degree, on the demand for services,
shelter, transitional housing and permanent supportive housing. If mainstream services
that address housing, health care, mental health, child abuse and neglect, domestic
violence, substance abuse treatment, education, employment, and the criminal justice
system were structured, funded, and administered in such a way as to effectively serve
the people who are most at risk of homelessness, the number of individuals and families
that become literally homeless could be greatly reduced.

Finally, where we’re going will depend on the definition of homeless, a subject of intense
and on-going debate. In an effort to ensure that HUD’s homeless assistance programs
serve individuals and families with “worst case” needs, the Department has historically
limited eligibility for admittance to programs funded with HUD’s McKinney Act
“homeless” funding to individuals and families that are literally homeless or at imminent
risk of homelessness. Some advocates and providers seek a much broader definition of
homeless as a means of ensuring eligibility for services and housing of individuals and
families who are living doubled-up and/or moving frequently with little potential for
residential stability.

Because the definitions are so important to an understanding of homelessness, a
summary of the most used definitions and acronyms is included in this report.

Methodology and Outcomes: 2010 Count/Survey of Emergency Shelters, Transitional
Housing, and Permanent Supportive Housing Programs

Pursuant to HUD requirements for securing HUD Continuum of Care funds, in late
January of each year, the Memphis/Shelby County Continuum of Care conducts a point-
in-time count of the number of sheltered/housed individuals and families and the number
of persons sleeping unsheltered. In January 2010, as in prior years, Partners for the
Homeless (Partners) and the Greater Memphis Interagency Coalition for the Homeless
(GMICH) collaborated to conduct/coordinate the count. Volunteers assisted the Greater
Memphis Interagency Coalition for the Homeless in conducting the street count and
Partners conducted the shelter/facility count. Partners contacted all known local
providers of emergency shelter, transitional housing, and permanent supportive housing
to verify contact information, then emailed or faxed one-page forms for the providers to
complete. The forms asked for information on:
     • the number of unaccompanied individuals in the shelter or housing at 10:00 p.m.
         on January 26, 2010 along with the number of those unaccompanied individuals
         that the program knew or estimated to be chronically homeless; and
     • the number of families and the number of people in those families in the shelter
         or housing at the same time that night.

                                             15
                                        Strategic Plan
Methodology and Outcomes: Annualized Data

As critical as point-in-time statistics are for planning purposes, they cannot, and do not
provide a complete picture of the dimensions of homelessness. More advanced
planning requires consideration of longitudinal data as well. For example, the reporting
requirements and deadlines for data to be provided to HUD for the Department’s Annual
Homeless Assessment Report to Congress (AHAR) mean that annualized data must be
reported by administrators of each Continuum of Care’s homeless management
information system (HMIS) each year for the period of time beginning October 1 and
ending September 30 of the following year.

To produce that data, Partners for the Homeless administers the CoC system-wide
Homeless Management Information System (HMIS), securing the technology, training
agency staff on entering the data, and extrapolating frequent reports of agencies’
capacity, utilization, and performance in assisting homeless individuals and families
achieve goals of increased self-sufficiency and residential stability. A total of 27
agencies administering 67 programs for homeless individuals and/or families collect
client-level data, with most of the programs entering the data directly into the HMIS.
Data provided by participating providers of services for the Homeless Management
Information System (HMIS) reflects that a total of 5,669 people, including 4,024
individuals unaccompanied by children and 494 families (including 30 with two parents
present) and a total of 1,127 children were documented to have received emergency
shelter, transitional housing and services at some point in time, for some period of time
during the data year ending September 30, 2009.

The following charts reflect the numbers of people in the two major sub-groups of the
homeless population documented to have been served by emergency shelters and
transitional housing programs for the data year ending September 30, 2009.

 Total Number of Unaccompanied Individuals
                                                          Men       Women      Total
 Emergency Shelter (ES)                                   2,613     363        3,176
 Transitional Housing (TH)                                1,740     199        1,939
 Total Duplicated Number Served                           4,353     562        5,115
 Number of Individuals Served by ES and TH                                     (1,091)
 Total Unduplicated Number
 of Individuals Served                                                         4,024


 Total Number of Homeless Families and People in Families
 Type of Program                Number of Families/Persons
 Emergency Shelter (ES)         Families Men       Women   Children                Total
 Families with Children         194       31       186     483                      700

 Transitional Housing (TH)
 Families with Children               323            13       317      701         1,031


                                             16
                                        Strategic Plan
        Total Duplicated # Families/          517             44    503          1,184        1,731
        Persons Served in ES & TH

        Total Unduplicated # of
        Families/ Persons Served by           494             22    486          1,127        1,646
        ES and TH

        Total # Families Served by ES         23
        and TH


The Memphis/Shelby County Continuum of Care application to HUD each year brings in
approximately $4.5 to $5 million to help pay for operations and/or services for local transitional
housing and permanent supportive housing programs. New and renewal funding is contingent
on meeting HUD and CoC goals and requirements and is critical to sustaining, restructuring,
and/or expanding the system. A summary of the HEARTH Act by the National Alliance to End
Homelessness (June 2009) includes the following major changes:
   • Homelessness prevention will be significantly expanded.
  • New incentives will place more emphasis on rapid re-housing, especially for homeless
      families.
  • The existing emphasis on creating permanent supportive housing for people
      experiencing chronic homelessness will continue, although families could also be
      considered chronically homeless.

Prevention and Re-housing Assistance: The New Emergency Solutions Grant (ESG)

The Emergency Shelter Grant (ESG) program is renamed the “Emergency Solutions Grant,”
signifying its shift to funding homelessness prevention and re-housing as well as emergency
shelter. Eligible activities include the traditional shelter and outreach activities of the current
ESG program, but also include more prevention and re-housing activities (such as):
    • short-or medium-term rental assistance, mediation, or outreach to property owners,
    • legal services, credit repair,
    • security or utility deposits, utility payments,
    • final months’s rental assistance, and
    • moving costs or other relocation or stabilization activities.

      These prevention activities are similar to those being funded under the Homelessness
      Prevention and Rapid Re-Housing Program (HPRP) that is being operated by HUD as
      part of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. Prevention and re-housing
      activities can serve people who are homeless or at risk of homelessness, including
      people who have less than 30 percent of area median income and move frequently for
      economic reasons, live doubled up, are facing eviction, live in a hotel or motel, live in
      severely overcrowded housing, or are exiting an institution (under certain conditions).
      Anybody considered homeless by other federal statutes can also be served with
      prevention or re-housing assistance.
      •        Funding for ESG increases to 20 percent of the amount available for homeless
      assistance. This is a significant increase over the existing allocation for ESG.
      •        At least 40 percent of ESG funds are dedicated to prevention and re-housing
      activities, although there is a hold-harmless provision that ensures that ESG grantees do
      not have to reduce funding for traditional shelter and outreach activities in order to meet
                                                      17
                                                 Strategic Plan
that percentage. In most communities, the amount of funding for emergency shelter and
outreach will remain similar to current levels, but there will be much more funding for
prevention and re-housing.

When reviewing the chart, please note that the 2010 statistics reflect that:
• 462 persons (28% of the total number of persons) were located in emergency
  shelters, including 331 unaccompanied individuals and 37 families with a total of 131
  people in those families;
• 1,030 (62% of the total number of persons) were located in transitional housing
  programs, including 512 unaccompanied individuals and 155 families with a total of
  518 people in those families) and
• 163 (10% of the total persons located) reported having slept unsheltered on the night
  of the count.




                                           18
                                      Strategic Plan
Table 8. Point-In-Time Count of Homeless People in 2007, 2008, 2009, and 2010
                                                                                         Total
              Sheltered                                                                  Sheltered
Homeless                                                                                 and
Population    Emergency Shelter             Transitional                   Unsheltered   Unsheltered
Families      Number of           % of      Number of           Percent                  Number of
with          Families/Units      Units     Families/Units      of Units                 Families with
Children      Available           Filled    Available           Filled                   Children:
2007 P-I-T    35/44               80%       163/191             85%        0             198
2008 P-I-T    36/46               78%       178/185             96%        1             215
2009 P-I-T    39/49               80%       153/179             85%        0             192
2010 P-I-T    37/45               82%       155/183             85%        0             192
                                                                                         Total
                                                                                         Number of
People in                                                                                People in
Families      Number of People              Number of People                             Families
with          in Families with              in Families with                             with
Children      Children                      Children                                     Children
2007 P-I-T    113                           520                            0             633
2008 P-I-T    100                           457                            2             559
2009 P-I-T    155                           480                            0             635
2010 P-I-T    131                           492                            0             623

                                                                                         Total
              Number of Single    Percent   Number of Single    Percent                  Number of
Single        Individuals/Beds    of Beds   Individuals/Beds    of Beds                  Single
Individuals   Available           Filled    Available           Filled                   Individuals
2007 P-I-T    520/389             133%      591/654             90%        70            1,181
2008 P-I-T    253/250             101%      672/762             88%        82            1,007
2009 P-I-T    334/261             128%      575/658             87%        69            978
2010 P-I-T    331/263             115%      538/654             82%        163           1,032
Total                                                                                    Total
Persons:      Total Persons:                 Total Persons:                              Persons
2007 P-I-T    633                           1,111                          70            1,814
2008 P-I-T    353                           1,129                          83            1,566
2009 P-I-T    489                           1,055                          69            1,613
2010 P-I-T    462                           1,030                          163           1,655


                                                    19
                                              Strategic Plan
Continuum of Care Homeless Population and
Subpopulations Chart
                                                                     Sheltered                                          Un-                               Jurisdiction
                                                                                                                      sheltered           Total
         Part 1: Homeless Population                          Emergency    Transitional                                                                   Data Quality

1. Homeless Individuals                                             331                         538                         163           1032
2. Homeless Families with Children                                  37                          155                          0            192
       2a. Persons in Homeless with
     Children Families                                              131                        492                           0            623
Total (lines 1 + 2a)                                                462                        1030                         163           1655

       Part 2: Homeless Subpopulations                                                                                  Un-
                                                                           Sheltered                                  sheltered           Total
                                                                                                                                                          Data Quality
1.     Chronically Homeless                                                        43                                       124              167
2.     Severely Mentally Ill                                                       179                                             0
3.     Chronic Substance Abuse                                                     814                                             0
4.     Veterans                                                                    228                                             0
5.     Persons with HIV/AIDS                                                       80                                              0
6.     Victims of Domestic Violence                                                97                                              0
7.     Youth (Under 18 years of age)                                                0                                              0




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  Fund Source: CDBG, HOME,
                                                                                                    5-Year Quantities




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    HOPWA, ESG or Other
                                        Currently Available




                                                                                                                                                                                                                             Plan to Fund? Y N
                                                                     2010                 2011                  2012              2013               2014                   Total




                                                                                                                                                                                                      Priority H, M, L
Part 3: Homeless
                              Needs




                                                              Gap




  Needs Table:                                                       Year 1              Year 2                Year 3            Year 4             Year 5
   Individuals




                                                                                                                                                                                      % of Goal
                                                                            Complete




                                                                                                    Complete




                                                                                                                      Complete




                                                                                                                                        Complete




                                                                                                                                                          Complete




                                                                                                                                                                             Actual
                                                                    Goal




                                                                                        Goal




                                                                                                               Goal




                                                                                                                                 Goal




                                                                                                                                                   Goal




                                                                                                                                                                     Goal
         Emergency
         Shelters             330      260                    83      0      0           0           0         0       0          0      0         0       0         0        0       0%          M                      N                       Other
         Transitional
         Housing              627      627                     0      0      0           0           0         0       0          0      0         0       0         0        0         0
Beds




         Permanent
         Supportive
         Housing              421      243                    178
         Total                1378     1,130
Chronically Homeless          322      155                                                                                                                                                        H                      Y                       Other




                                                                                               20
                                                                                       Strategic Plan
                                                                               5-Year Quantities




                                                                                                                                                                                                                 HOPWA, ESG or
                                                                                                                                                                                               Plan to Fund? Y
                                                                                                                                                                            Priority H, M, L




                                                                                                                                                                                                                  CDBG, HOME,
                                                                                                                                                                                                                  Fund Source:
                                                                                                                                                       Total




                                       Currently
Part 4: Homeless




                                       Available
                                                         Year 1            Year 2   Year 3    Year 4                            Year 5




                      Needs




                                                   Gap




                                                                                                                                                                                                                     Other
  Needs Table:




                                                                Complet




                                                                                   Complet




                                                                                                    Complet




                                                                                                                     Complet




                                                                                                                                      Complet




                                                                                                                                                                                                      N
                                                                                                                                                        Actual


                                                                                                                                                                 % of
                                                         Goal




                                                                           Goal




                                                                                             Goal




                                                                                                              Goal




                                                                                                                               Goal




                                                                                                                                                Goal




                                                                                                                                                                 Goal
    Families




                                                                  e




                                                                                     e




                                                                                                      e




                                                                                                                       e




                                                                                                                                        e
                                     263 beds
                                      for ind.
       Emergency                      45 units
       Shelters               208   for families   65      0        0        0         0      65        0       0       0        0        0      65          0    0%    M                      Y                   Other
                                     654 beds
                                      for ind.
Beds




       Transitional                  183 units
       Housing                640   for families     0     0        0        0         0        0       0       0       0        0        0        0         0   ###    L                      N                     NA
       Permanent                     243 beds
       Supportive                     for ind.
       Housing                        29 units
                              596   for families   360     0        0        0         0     360        0       0       0        0        0     360          0    0%    H                      Y                   Other
       Total             1444               1019   425     0        0        0     425          0       0       0       0        0        0        0   425       ###




                                                                              21
                                                                        Strategic Plan
 THREE YEAR HOMELESS NEEDS, OBJECTIVES & PERFORMANCE MEASURES


PRIORITY NEED I – PERMANENT SUPPORTIVE HOUSING FOR
CHRONICALLY HOMELESS PERSONS

Homeless Objective I: To assist the development of permanent supportive housing for
chronically homeless individuals

              Three-Year Homeless Performance Measures Objective I

   Support the development of permanent supportive housing for chronically
   homeless individuals                                                    90 units
   Plan to fully utilize permanent supportive housing for chronically homeless
   individuals



PRIORITY NEED II – TRANSITIONAL & PERMANENT SUPPORTIVE HOUSING
FOR MENTALLY ILL HOMELESS PERSONS and FAMILIES

Homeless Objective II-A: To assist the development of a range of permanent
supportive housing options for homeless families in which the primary caregiver has a
mental illness.

Homeless Objective II-B: To develop a local policy that as a requirement of receiving
funding to provide transitional and permanent supportive housing, organizations will
coordinate and focus outreach efforts to unsheltered, mentally ill people and those in
emergency shelters

Homeless Objective II-C: To develop a plan which provides permanent supportive
housing for mentally ill homeless persons who are ineligible for program assistance that
is restricted to serving chronically homeless persons

             Three-Year Homeless Performance Measures Objective II

   Develop permanent supportive housing for homeless individuals and for women
   without children who are mentally ill                                   20 units
   Develop transitional housing units for homeless individuals and for women without
   children who are mentally ill                                            15 units




                                            22
                                       Strategic Plan
PRIORITY NEED III - ACCESS TO BENEFITS FOR HOMELESS PERSONS AND
FAMILIES:

Homeless Objective III: - To provide funding for workers who are trained to assist
homeless persons, including the mentally ill, to receive Supplemental Security Income
(SSI)

             Three-Year Homeless Performance Measures Objective III

To identify funding that will provide additional workers that will assist homeless persons
and families to receive Supplemental Security Income benefits 75 homeless persons




PRIORITY NEED IV – EMERGENCY and TRANSITIONAL SUPPORTIVE
HOUSING FOR HOMELESS PERSONS & FAMILIES WHO ARE SUBSTANCE
ABUSERS

Homeless Objective IV - A: To develop incentives and funding that will help transitional
housing programs that have underutilized space to develop programs that assist
homeless substance abusers

Homeless Objective IV - B: To develop incentives and funding that will encourage the
use of existing and the development of new transitional housing and emergency shelters
that will serve primary caregivers who are substance abusers who are homeless

             Three-Year Homeless Performance Measures Objective IV

   Use Emergency Shelter Grant to assist organizations to provide essential services,
   rehabilitate facilities, prevent homelessness and operate/maintain facilities to
   homeless persons/families who are substance abusers                     10 persons

   Use Community Development Block Grant funds to provide services to homeless
   persons/families who are substance abusers                        10 persons




                                             23
                                        Strategic Plan
                     2011-2013 HOUSING STRATEGIC PLAN

The City of Memphis will use entitlement funding provided by the federal government
and state grant funds to implement national housing policy. Two governmental agencies
are primarily responsible for providing affordable housing for low-moderate income
persons in Memphis: the Memphis Division of Housing and Community Development
(HCD) and the Memphis Housing Authority (MHA). The Tennessee Housing
Development Agency (THDA) and the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban
Development (HUD) also have a role in contracting for affordable housing initiatives in
Memphis.

Memphis’ housing strategies continue to respond to the rental needs of the elderly, large
families, would-be homeowners and existing homeowners. Emphasis over the next
three years will be towards the development of multi-family and other rental housing; the
construction of single-family housing within targeted neighborhoods; the preservation of
existing housing stock; and provision of direct and indirect housing assistance. HCD will
continue its focus to increase the number of rental housing units and continue efforts to
provide direct and indirect assistance to homeowners and homebuyers. To help
accomplish rental and single-family housing development, HCD will request proposals at
least twice a year for multi-family housing projects. Additionally, efforts are being made
to provide alternatives to predatory lending through the development of home loan
programs with non-profits and private lenders that assist low and moderate
homeowners. Citywide, HCD will continue programs that assist senior citizens with
minor home repair. To help meet the demands caused by houses needing repair, HCD
will enlist the participation of CHDO’s and non-profits to assist the rehabilitation
initiatives.

Memphis will use the CDBG, HOME, and City funds to provide a mix of subsidies that
respond to the homeowner and rental housing needs of low and moderate income
citizens. Three of the major programs that Memphis expects to use between FY 2011 to
2013 are Housing and Rehabilitation Program (HARP), Minor Home Repair Program,
single and multi family initiatives through Community Housing Development
Organizations (CHDOs), and the Affordable Single and Multi-family program, in
partnership with for-profit and non-profit housing developers.

The Single-family Rehabilitation Program (HARP) targets areas where eligible, low-
moderate income homeowners may receive grants of up to $30,000 for significant
rehabilitation of owner-occupied house. Where owners are able, they must re-pay up to
$4,500 of the grant ($25/month).

The Minor Home Repair and Volunteer Home Repair Programs will continue to be a
resource for limited and small repairs to homes owned primarily by senior citizens.

Community Housing Development Organizations (CHDOs) will continue to compete for
the use of set-aside funds to implement homeowner and rental programs for low-
moderate income families. These funds may be used for acquisition of properties, new
construction and/or rehabilitation of housing, and for direct assistance to buyers of
CHDO developed homes.

The Strategic Community Investment Fund (SCIF) process will continue to be made
available annually for all of HCD’s competitive programs. To increase opportunities for

                                            24
                                       Strategic Plan
affordable and middle-income housing development, a second funding round has been
added to the Single-family/Multi-family Housing Program.

Memphis Housing Authority (MHA) will continue to respond to the needs of primarily low
and very-low income renters by providing public housing and Housing Choice Voucher
rental vouchers which may be used to obtain rental housing in the private market. As
mentioned in its 2010 PHA Plan, MHA will focus on replacing obsolete public housing
stock; reducing its vacancy rate; coordinating case management with other social
service agencies; increasing job opportunities for residents; and restructuring and
reorganizing the agency.

The Tennessee Housing Development Agency (THDA) provides subsidy for
homebuyers and the production of renter occupied units. THDA assists low and
moderate income families seeking homeownership through the provision of low interest
mortgages through local lenders. The majority of THDA’s assistance is for multi-family
rental units produced by private sector developers through the low-income housing tax
credit program. Over the next three years, Memphis expects to benefit from the
programs offered under these programs, as they will increase the number of homeowner
and rental opportunities for low-moderate income families.

The ability to afford decent housing is dependent upon the costs of the housing in
relationship to a given household’s income. Many variables that impact
rental/homeowner costs include debt-financing, construction/rehab costs, taxes,
insurance and the quality of the housing. The housing study (located in Part One)
examines the relationships between housing costs and income. Clarification of the
study’s perspective on housing affordability in Memphis follows.

Special Needs Housing

The recent Housing Market Study reports an increase in cost-burdening amongst both
large and small-families that rent. Over the next three years, Memphis proposes to
provide Tenant-Base Rental Assistance (TBRA) to the mentally ill, women with
substance abuse problems, and the developmentally disabled. These priorities have
been established based upon the demand for assistance and the limited level of
assistance presently available to these sub-populations.

Recent research indicates the following:
     Most of the special needs population cannot work and their survival depends on
     either family or public support.
     Their main source of public monetary support is the Supplemental Security Income
     (SSI), which in 2010 pays an average of $498 per month.
     This amount is well below the level required for normal living expenses (for
     example, the 2010 “Fair Market Rent” in Memphis was $705 per month for a one
     bedroom housing unit and $783 for a two bedroom unit.

Actions to Evaluate and Reduce Lead-based Paint Hazards

HCD’s Lead Hazard Risk Reduction Initiative (LHRRI) is a federally funded
program to reduce lead-based paint hazards in single-family and multi-family
rental units. This is a coordinated effort between inter-governmental agencies


                                           25
                                      Strategic Plan
that include the Memphis and Shelby County Health Department, Memphis
Housing Authority, the State of Tennessee Department of Environment and
Conservation, the State of Tennessee Department of Health, Middle Tennessee
University, and Shelby County Department of Housing. The City of Memphis,
Division of Housing and Development received a grant for $4,000,000 from HUD
to reduce lead-based paint hazards. The goal of this concerted effort is to
complete 350 lead inspection/risk assessments and reduce lead hazards in 275
pre-1978 housing units over the life of the grant which ends February 1, 2012.
Since 1994, LHRRI has reduced lead hazards in more than 990 units.

Memphis Shelby County Health Department (MSCHD) provides free blood lead
level screening for children under age six. During FY2009, MSCHD screened
13,052 children, with 107 children screening positive for elevated blood lead
levels. Memphis/Shelby County continues to rank at one half the national
averages for lead-poisoned children. MSCHD provides testing of children at day
care centers, head start centers, WIC clinics and health fairs. The MSCHD
Childhood Lead Poisoning Prevention Program also provides educational
materials, information on nutrition and proper cleaning demonstrations to reduce
lead paint dust hazards.

Memphis Housing Authority, the State of Tennessee Department of Environment
and Conservation and Shelby County Department of Housing provide referrals of
properties that meet the criteria to participate in the program.

HCD will be taking an active role in raising public awareness of lead-based paint
hazards through the creation of a database that will be maintained by the
Memphis and Shelby County Health Department. This database will track the
childhood lead poisoning incidents in Shelby County. The MSCHD also provide
educational materials, information on nutrition and proper cleaning
demonstrations to reduce lead paint hazards.

Actions to foster and maintain affordable housing

In FY11, HCD will continue to support new affordable housing construction by
contracting with nonprofit and for-profit housing developers. Two projects are funded
through the real estate development department, Saint’s Court multi-family and Orange
Mound Single Family Housing will provide 136 units. Additionally, the minor home and
major home repair programs will assist in the preservation of existing homeowner
occupied units. Additionally, a second RFP was issued on April 3, 2010 to solicit
proposals for FY2011 funded multi and single family housing projects.

Barriers to Affordable Housing

There are a number of barriers to the development, maintenance, and improvements to
affordable housing in the City of Memphis. Many of these are related to public policies,
including policies affecting land and other property, land use controls, zoning
ordinances, and building codes. These are as follows (as indicated in HUD Form 27300):



                                           26
                                      Strategic Plan
The State of Tennessee does not provide significant financial assistance to local
governments for housing, community development and/or transportation that includes
funding prioritization or linking funding on the basis of local regulatory barrier removal
activities

The State of Tennessee does not have a legal or administrative requirement that local
governments undertake periodic self-evaluation of regulations and processes to assess
their impact upon housing affordability address these barriers to affordability.

The City of Memphis does not have an explicit policy that adjusts or waives existing
parking requirements for all affordable housing developments.

The City of Memphis does not provide for expedited permitting and approvals for all
affordable housing projects in your community.

The City of Memphis has not established a single, consolidated permit application
process for housing development that includes building, zoning, engineering,
environmental, and related permits nor does it conduct concurrent, not sequential,
reviews for all required permits and approvals.

The City of Memphis does not give “as-of-right” density bonuses sufficient to offset the
cost of building below market units as an incentive for any market rate residential
development that includes a portion of affordable housing.

The City of Memphis has not, within the past five years, modified infrastructure
standards and/or authorized the use of new infrastructure technologies (e.g. water,
sewer, street width) to significantly reduce the cost of housing, although this is under
study.

Efforts to remove identified barriers to affordable housing are examined and updated
annually as part of the preparation of the Annual Action Plan.

THREE-YEAR HOUSING NEEDS, OBJECTIVES & PERFORMANCE MEASURES

Specific housing priority needs, objectives, performance measures, and proposed
projects for FY 2011-2013 follow.


PRIORITY HOUSING NEED I – ASSISTANCE THAT INCREASES RENTAL
AFFORDABILITY FOR VERY-LOW AND LOW-INCOME RESIDENTS

Housing Objective I: To provide funding that assists the development and production of
affordable rental housing for very-low and low income residents

                     Three-Year Annual Performance Measures
   Provide Tenant Based Rental Assistance to seniors and
   disabled persons                                                          150 Units
   Support multi-family housing projects and programs that
   assist low and very-low income renters with large families                300 Units
   Provide funding to Community Housing Development
   Organizations for rental housing projects                                 30 Units

                                              27
                                         Strategic Plan
PRIORITY HOUSING NEED II – DEVELOPMENT OF ACCESSIBLE AND SOCIALLY
INTEGRATED HOUSING

Housing Objective II-A: To fund and further develop programs that provide accessibility up-
grades or modifications to existing housing (owner-occupied and rental housing)
Housing Objective II-B To seek passage of local requirements that will increase the minimum
number of accessible housing units in publicly-assisted housing developments

                     Three-Year Annual Performance Measures
    Develop accessibility modification program                                45 units
    Increase percentage                                                       10% minimum


PRIORITY HOUSING NEED III – PRESERVE THE EXISTING HOUSING STOCK

Housing Objective III: To provide assistance to homeowners that preserves and prevents the
loss of their properties

                     Three-Year Annual Performance Measures
    Provide housing rehabilitation assistance to low and moderate
    income homeowners                                                         175 Units
    Provide minor home repair to seniors and disabled persons                 375 Units


PRIORITY HOUSING NEED IV – INCREASE THE SUPPLY OF AFFORDABLE HOUSING
THAT CREATES MIXED INCOMED HOUSING CHOICES AND SPECIAL NEEDS HOUSING

Housing Objective IV: To provide funding that will help increase housing choices

                      Three-Year Annual Performance Measures
    Provide down payment assistance to new homeowners                  75 Clients
    Provide homeownership and credit counseling to new
    and existing homeowners                                            600 Clients
    Collaborate with lenders and non-profits to develop home improvement and loan
    programs as alternative to predatory lending                    1 Loan program

Public Housing Needs

The Memphis Housing Authority (MHA) has identified the following specific needs in its
2011 PHA plan:

    Replacement of obsolete public housing stock
    Reduce the vacancy rate
    Institute a coordinated case management system
    Increase job opportunities
    Continue the efforts to restructure and reorganize to make operations more effective
    and efficient



                                              28
                                         Strategic Plan
As of February 2010, MHA had an inventory of 3,744 public housing units and 6,217
Housing Choice Voucher units. The 2011 PHA plan states that 4,508 families are on the
waiting list for Housing Choice Vouchers tenant-based assistance. The plan also reports
10,821 families on its waiting list for public housing units.


Public Housing Strategy

The mission of MHA is to provide community revitalization through a seamless system of
supportive services, affordable housing, and new business development. The 2007
PHA plan outlines a number of goals that are associated to this mission. The goals
include the expansion of the supply of assisted housing, improvement of the quality of
assisted housing, increased assisted housing choices, provision of an improved living
environment, promotion of self-sufficiency and asset development of assisted families,
and ensuring equal opportunity and affirmatively further fair housing.

The following strategies are outlined in the PHA five-year plan:

       Maximize the number of affordable housing units available to the PHA within its
       current resources by employing effective maintenance and management policies
       to minimize the number of public housing units offline;
       reduce the turnover time for vacated public housing units;
       reduce time to renovate public housing units;
       seek replacement of public housing units lost to the inventory through mixed-
       finance development;
       seek replacement of public housing units lost in the inventory through Section 8
       replacement housing resources;
       maintain or increase section 8 lease-up rates by establishing payment standards
       that will enable families to rent throughout the jurisdiction;
       maintain or increase section 8 lease-up rates by marketing the program to
       owners particularly those outside of areas of minority and poverty concentration;
       maintain or increase section 8 lease-up rates by effectively screening Section 8
       applicants to increase owner acceptance of the program;
       participate in the Consolidated Plan development process to ensure coordination
       with the broader community.
       increase the number of affordable housing units by applying for additional section
       8 vouchers should they become available;
       leverage affordable housing resources in the community through the creation of
       mixed-finance housing;
       pursue housing resources other than public housing or section 8 tenant based
       assistance;
       target available assistance to families at or below 30% of the area median
       income (AMI) by exceeding HUD federal targeting requirements for families at or
       below 30% of the AMI in tenant-based rental assistance and adopting rent
       policies to support and encourage work;
       target available assistance to families at or below 50%of AMI by employing
       admissions preferences aimed at families who are working and adopting rent
       policies to support and encourage work;
       target available assistance to the elderly by seeking designation of public
       housing for the elderly and applying for special purpose vouchers targeted to the
       elderly, should they become available;

                                             29
                                        Strategic Plan
       target available assistance to housing for families with disabilities by carrying out
       the modifications needed in public housing based on the section 504 needs
       assessment for public housing, applying for special purpose vouchers targeted to
       families with disabilities should they become available, and affirmatively market
       to local non-profit agencies that assist families with disabilities;
       increase awareness of public housing agency resources among families of races
       and ethnicities with disproportionate needs by affirmatively marketing to
       races/ethnicities shown to have disproportionate housing needs;
       conduct activities to affirmatively further fair housing by counseling section 8
       tenants as to locations of units outside of areas of poverty or minority
       concentration and assist them to locate those units and to market the section 8
       program to owners outside of areas of poverty or minority concentrations.

These strategies were selected due funding constraints, evidence of housing needs as
demonstrated in the Consolidated Plan and other information available to MHA, and the
influence of the housing market on MHA’s programs.


Actions to address needs of public housing

In FY 2011, HCD will provide opportunities for public housing residents and will
implement projects that will support public housing in general. Among the programs
funded (with both Federal and local funds) that will be available for public housing
residents the RISE Foundation's savings and financial literacy programs, community and
support services related to HOPE VI programs, and an incentive program for youth who
perform well in school.

HCD promotes both housing and public services programs for which public housing are
eligible. The Down Payment Assistance program has special provisions to assist public
housing residents seeking to become homeowners. Residents of public housing qualify
for up to $10,000.00 in down payment assistance funds. HCD also partners with MHA in
a program that enables Section 8 voucher holders to use the vouchers to purchase
homes. HCD funds a number of youth programs and economic development, such as
Girls, Inc. and MIFA which serve residents of public housing developments. HCD also
funds community and support service efforts in conjunction with the College Park HOPE
VI. The Memphis Housing Authority’s newsletter is used to inform public housing
residents of programs and services provided by the HCD and the City of Memphis.

In addition to targeting neighborhoods for revitalization efforts, HCD works in conjunction
with MHA on neighborhood redevelopment plans that have public housing developments
located within them. Criteria for targeted neighborhoods are levels of physical distress
or code enforcement emphasis, significant public investment, infrastructure
improvements, and planned major housing initiatives. It is believed that redevelopment
areas, such as HOPE VI initiatives will create the critical mass needed to form the basis
for creating viable communities.




                                             30
                                        Strategic Plan
         2011-2013 SPECIAL NEEDS POPULATION STRATEGIC PLAN


The primary Special Needs goal for HCD is to help ensure that low-moderate income
members of special needs populations and their families have access to decent and
affordable housing and to associated services and treatment that helps them live as
independently as possible.

Priority needs, services and programs that are being proposed to respond to priority
needs are based upon the needs assessment and consultation. Consultation has
occurred through application processes and forums held with service providers to reach
consensus on gaps in services and housing, priority needs and objectives.

The following section describes and presents the estimate of the special needs
population, an inventory of programs and services available, the priority needs, the
objectives, the strategies, and three-year performance measures.

HIV/AIDS
A growing body of practice-based evidence shows that for persons living with HIV/AIDS,
improved housing status is directly related to the reduction of high risk behaviors,
improved access to health care, higher levels of adherence to medical treatment
including life-sustaining medications, lowered viral loads, and reduced mortality.
According to the Shelby County Health Department, as of 12/31/2009, there were 6,653
persons living with HIV/AIDS in the Memphis metropolitan area with 5,949 (89%) living in
Shelby County.

ATTACHMENT 3: AIDS INCIDENCE, AIDS PREVALENCE AND HIV (NOT AIDS)
PREVALENCE
BY DEMOGRAPHIC GROUP AND EXPOSURE CATEGORY
TRANSITIONAL GRANT AREA (TGA)
MEMPHIS TGA- ALL 8 COUNTIES


                       AIDS Incidence:          AIDS Prevalence         HIV (not AIDS)
Demographic            01/01/07-12/31/08        As of 12/31/08          Prevalence
Group/                                                                  As of 12/31/08
Exposure Category      AIDS incidence is        AIDS prevalence is      HIV prevalence is
                       defined as the           defined as the number   defined as the
                       number of new AIDS       of people living with   estimated number of
                       cases diagnosed          AIDS as of the date     diagnosed people living
                       during the period        specified.              with HIV (not AIDS) as
                       specified.                                       of the date specified.
Race/Ethnicity         Number       % of        Number      % of        Number         % of
                                    Total                   Total                      Total
White, not Hispanic    39           9.8         555         18.8        722            19.4
Black, not Hispanic    351          88.2        2332        78.9        2921           78.5
Hispanic               4            1.0         47          1.6         50             1.3
Asian/Pacific          1            0.3         5           0.2         7              0.2
Islander
American
Indian/Alaska Native   0           0            1           0           3             0.1
Not Specified          3           0.8          14          0.5         16            0.4


                                                31
                                           Strategic Plan
Total               398          100          2954        100     3719         100
Gender              Number       % of         Number      % of    Number       % of
                                 Total                    Total                Total
Male                 251         63.1         2116        71.6    2402         64.6
Female               147         36.9         838         28.4    1317         35.4
Total                398         100          2954        100     3719         100
Age at Diagnosis     Number      % of         Number      % of    Number       % of
(Years)                          Total                    Total                Total
<13 years            0           0            7           0.2     43           1.2
13-19 years          11          2.8          18          0.6     112          3.0
20-44 years          267         67.1         1769        59.9    2572         69.2
45+ years            120         30.1         1160        39.3    992          26.6
Total                398         100          2954        100     3719         100
Percentages are rounded

AIDS INCIDENCE, AIDS PREVALENCE AND HIV (NOT AIDS) PREVALENCE (CONT’D)
                        AIDS Incidence:    AIDS Prevalence        HIV (not AIDS)
Demographic Group/      01/01/07-12/31/08  As of 12/31/08         Prevalence
Exposure Category                                                 As of 12/31/08
                        AIDS incidence is  AIDS prevalence is     HIV prevalence is
                        defined as the     defined as the         defined as the
                        number of new AIDS number of people       estimated number of
                        cases diagnosed    living with AIDS as of diagnosed people
                        during the period  the date specified.    living with HIV (not
                        specified.                                AIDS) as of the date
                                                                  specified.
Adult/Adolescent AIDS Number         % of  Number        % of     Number         % of
Exposure Category                    Total               Total                   Total
Men who have sex with   139          34.9  1385          47.0     1344           36.8
men
Injection drug users    11           2.8   223           7.6      178            4.9
Men who have sex with                                    4.0
men and inject drugs    2            0.5   117                    78             2.1
Heterosexual            134          33.7  788           26.8     1043           28.5
Other/hemophilia/blood
transfusion             1            0.3   16            0.5      18             0.5
Risk not reported or    111          27.9  416           14.1     993            27.2
identified
Total                   398          100   2945          100      3654           100
Pediatric AIDS          Number       % of  Number        % of     Number         % of
Exposure Categories                  Total               Total                   Total
Mother with/at risk for
HIV infection           0            0     7             77.8     53             81.5
Other/hemophilia/ blood
transfusion             0            0     1             11.1     7              10.8
Risk not reported or    0            0     1             11.1     5              7.7
identified
Total                   0            0     9             100      65             100


Over the past five years the number of persons living with HIV/AIDS in Shelby County
has increased 22% from 4,653 in 2004 to 5,949 in 2008. There are significant gender
and racial disparities revealed in the data. African Americans represented 83% of the
persons living with HIV/AIDS in Shelby County in 2008 and 86% of the new cases of


                                              32
                                         Strategic Plan
HIV/AIDS in 2008 in Shelby County. There have been 2,599 deaths due to HIV/AIDS in
the Memphis Metro Area with African Americans making up 85% of these deaths.
These figures reflect the greater prevalence of HIV/AIDS in the African American
community, as well as disparate access to HIV medical care, resulting in a marked
survival disadvantage for African Americans. The number of deaths attributed to
HIV/AIDS has declined consistently in Shelby County since 2005. Deaths decreased by
50% between 2007 and 2008 in Shelby County, primarily due to the advances in the
treatment of the disease through new medications. This means that the number of
persons living with the disease continues to increase as deaths decrease, placing a
continued strain on the ability of services providers to meet the housing and supportive
service needs of these individuals.

Based on the annual ‘point-in-time shelter and street count’ conducted in 2007, there are
an estimated 5 to 15% of persons living with HIV/AIDS are homeless. Data from social
service agencies that serve persons living with HIV/AIDS show that as many as 17% of
persons with the disease who receive services are homeless or lack stable housing.
According to the 2009 Ryan White HIV/AIDS Services Comprehensive Plan, 91% of
persons living with HIV/AIDS in Memphis area are living at or below 300% of federal
poverty level. The document also states that respondents to the 2008 Ryan White Needs
Assessment had net monthly incomes of $1,000 or below.

According to The 2009 Memphis TGA Ryan White HIVAIDS Care Needs Assessment
(6/1/2009; T. G. McGowan, Ph. D., Principal Investigator), for those persons living with
HIV/AIDS who were in care, an ‘HIV Doctor’ was ranked as the most frequently reported
service that was needed and utility assistance and low-income housing rank 6th and 7th.
Food pantry was ranked 4th and HIV health insurance assistance was ranked 5th. Among
persons who are not in care in the Memphis area, housing was ranked the number 1
need and various supportive services that helped the individuals remain in housing (case
management, support groups, nutritional assistance and treatment adherence programs)
were ranked as a high need. This fifty-four percent (54%) of persons living with
HIV/AIDS who are not in care represents a disturbing number of 3,581 persons. Due to
their not being adherent with medical treatment the life expectancy and quality of life of
these individuals is dramatically affected. This lack of adherence often is due to a
number of issues with stable housing being one of the most significant issues affecting
their adherence.

Mentally Ill
From estimates extrapolated by the Center for Mental Health Services, Substance
Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, United States Department of Health
and Human Services, it was determined that in 2000 there are approximately 35,589
adults in Memphis and 41,547 in all of Shelby County who suffer from serious mental
illness. There were approximately 6,629 persons in 1999 in Shelby County that were
enrolled in the Medicaid program that had a serious and persistent mental illness.

Most agencies serving persons with mental illness also serve persons with dual
diagnoses of mental illness and substance abuse. The 2004 data reflects that of the 562
families that were sheltered/housed by participating programs during the reporting year,
mental problems were reported as a primary or secondary disabling condition for 137
adults in the families. Severe mental illness was reported for 38 primary caregivers, with
71 reporting depression, and 28 reporting a mental disorder. There is only one


                                            33
                                       Strategic Plan
transitional housing program (Genesis House, 29 beds) in the city that specifically
serves only homeless men and women with severe and persistent mental illnesses.

Low and very-low income adults with children find it especially difficult to cope with
mental illness. Complicating the issue even further is the high incidence of alcohol
and/or other drug abuse that often goes hand-in-hand with mental illness as clients “self-
medicate.” Unfortunately, many find it impossible to care for their children and relinquish
care of the children to family members or lose them to the foster care system. The city’s
progressive action in reprogramming HOME funds in 2004 to be used as tenant-based
rental assistance (TBRA) for these families has been exceptionally well-received.

Elderly
The number of elderly in Memphis is 71,026 people with approximately 10,370 living
below the poverty level (2000 Census). Frail elderly, those with more than four times the
risk for death or functional declined over a two-year period, are estimated by the
American College of Physicians-American Society of International Medicine to comprise
a population between 15,000 to 23,000 people in Memphis.

The demographics of aging continue to change dramatically across the nation, with a
larger population of older Americans who are more racially and ethnically diverse and
better educated than previous generations. Having its share of the baby boomers who
are contributing strongly to these trends, Tennessee is experiencing a similar pattern of
growth and change. Based on Census 2000, Tennessee ranks as the 16th state in
population aged 65 and over (703,311) and 29th in the percentage of population aged
65 and over (12.4%). Of these older Americans, approximately two thirds reported
relying on Social Security, with 33,584 (4.8%) residing in nursing homes (He, Sengupta,
Velkoff, & DeBarrios, 2005).

Along with the nation and many parts of the world, Tennessee’s economy took a
downward spiral in 2008. Job losses occurred monthly, while the number of unemployed
people skyrocketed and retail sales collapsed. Tennessee’s housing markets declined,
with residential building permits in November at 28.1% of the 2007 level. Planners and
policy makers at all levels must take into consideration the current economic low and the
dismal forecast held for the near future. State economic conditions are likely to rebound
only if the same holds true for national and global economies. Significant rebound may
not be seen in Tennessee until at least late 2009 or perhaps not even before 2010
(Murray, 2009).

Health care costs have risen dramatically for most older Americans, especially in relation
to prescription drugs. More and more attention is placed on quality and availability of
services, insurance coverage, utilization rates, demographic effects of an aging
population, technology, and other aspects of health care, including patient literacy about
this field and self-managed care. In fact, more and more people are adopting a wellness
attitude and taking personal responsibility for identifying and meeting their own health
needs. Greater emphasis on wellness and prevention can help in making long-term
improvements. Choices made in day-to-day living—diet, physical activity, obesity, and
smoking—and the preventive measures taken—screenings and vaccinations—
contribute significantly to health and well-being throughout the lifespan, but particularly
as individuals grow older and experience the results of earlier choices.



                                             34
                                        Strategic Plan
Within this context, the statewide needs assessment tapped current thinking expressed
in literature on aging and disability, experience and expertise of key informants across
the state, and selected indicators of the current and future status of Tennessee’s
vulnerable adult populations. Findings help to surface possible items to be given priority
in the development of the new state plan. Transportation and housing are prime
examples; they are essential to creating livablecommunities, enhancing quality of life,
and helping people to age in place. Lack of accessible, affordable transportation and
appropriate housing options undermines the individual and the community at large.
Effectively addressing these two needs can lead to improvementin a number of other
areas of concern and possible savings overall in the long run. With the intricacies of the
aging and disability arena and the interrelationships among attendant strengths and
needs, the same can be said of many other services, barriers, programs, and initiatives.

Without question, there is a critical need to educate the general population about aging,
disability, and available services in Tennessee. This need extends to health care
professionals, law enforcement, community planners, and others who deal directly or
indirectly with the needs of vulnerable adults. Key informants repeatedly suggest
increased marketing and raised public awareness. Better communication, coordination,
and collaboration are essential. In fact, partnerships may be the way to optimize
resources and reduce barriers to services. Partnerships can enhance advocacy and
outreach. Partnerships can help meet needs for case management and coordination of
services. Agencies and service providers can be further strengthened by more effective
support for their personnel through better pay and opportunities for training and
professional development. Otherwise, as it now stands, it is difficult to maintain
quality services and to carry forward program goals when turnover of essential staff is
high.

Health care and caregiving bring with them a host of needs, especially considering costs
and scarcity of providers in some areas. Health needs that are not covered by insurance
or Medicare may go neglected. People may forgo dental care, eyeglasses, or hearing
aids indefinitely, and these deficiencies can in turn exacerbate other problems. For
example, bad teeth or improper dentures may adversely affect nutrition, general health,
and overall quality of life. There are often not enough health care professionals who are
trained and willing to treat patients who are aging or disabled. More effort is needed to
encourage specialties in geriatrics and gerontology and to ensure that medical school
curricula adequately cover aging and disability.

Tennessee’s health care system is fragmented; knowing how and where to access
services is confusing. A single point of entry has been mentioned as a possible solution.
Informal, unpaid caregiving continues to be the mainstay for many care receivers. In
fact, taking care of caregivers themselves is paramount. Programs like adult day care
and respite can help prevent burnout, diminished health and wellbeing, loss of paid
work, and other negative impacts to the caregivers. At the same time, more vigilance
must be maintained to forestall elder abuse either at the hands of questionable
caregivers, unethical providers, or scam artists.

Educating and empowering individuals to self-direct their care and to advocate for
themselves can help resolve many issues in aging and disability. Along that line, senior
centers can serve as hubs for socializing, acquiring information about health care and
services, learning about opportunities for employment and volunteering, and opening
doors to myriad programs and activities. Yet, planners must keep in mind that the

                                             35
                                        Strategic Plan
anticipated older generation is different from that of days gone by. The oncoming surge
of baby boomers is changing our society on every front, and services like senior centers
must update their policies and practices accordingly. These same principles and many of
the key points brought out in this study also apply to the development of the new state
plan.

Aging in place means growing older without having to move from where we call home; it
has become the order of the day whenever possible. About 89% of older adults report
that they want to remain in their homes for as long as they are able. Of the 21.8 million
households headed by older persons in 2001, 80% were owners and 20% were renters.

Table ___. Comparison of U.S. and Tennessee Average Rates for Selected Types
of Care
Type of Care             United States    Nashville, TN      Memphis, TN

Private Room in                           $203 daily                    $162 daily                         $200 daily
Nursing Home

Semiprivate Room in                       $176 daily                    $147 daily                         $146 daily
Nursing Home

Home Health Aide                          $19 hourly                    $19 hourly                         $18 hourly

Homemaker/Companion $17 hourly                                          $19 hourly                         $15 hourly
Adapted from: The University of Tennessee Social Work Office of Research and Public Service. March 2009.



Chronic Substance Abusers
Statistics extrapolated from the U.S. Department of Mental Health and Human Services
Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration reflect that approximately
51,660 individuals in Memphis/Shelby County (2000) abuse or are dependent on alcohol
and/or illicit drugs with approximately 7,500 of those being eligible for publicly funded
services.

Data reported by transitional housing programs for families with children shows that only
14 percent of the adults in families served reported substance abuse as a primary or
secondary handicap. These statistics are at great odds with statistics from prior years
and more than likely reflect a failure to document this disabling condition when it is
identified. Primary caregivers in families with children seeking admittance to most
emergency shelters or transitional housing programs must agree to drug-testing as a
condition for admittance; however, passing the drug test does not guarantee that the
client will remain drug-free, nor does the test identify problems with alcohol abuse.
Increasingly, as these problems are identified, case managers refer or link the caregiver
to an outpatient treatment program. It is highly likely that the failure to record the
problem in the database occurs at that time.




                                                                 36
                                                          Strategic Plan
Developmentally Disabled
According to extrapolations of statistics provided by the Department of Health and
Human Services, there are 24,862 (based on 2000 Census and 1996 disability rates)
persons with developmental disabilities in Memphis. Little quantitative data exists
concerning persons with developmental disabilities.


Physically Disabled
According to the 2008 U.S. Census American Communities Survey for the City of
Memphis, 14.4% of population, or 89,964 people have a physical disability. Of
these, 7.2%, or 11,964 people, are under 18, 12.6% or 49,441 people are
between the ages of 18 to 64, and 43.9%, or 28,559 people are 65 and older.
This compares to 14.8% of people living in the State of Tennessee who have a
physical disability.

Victims of Domestic Violence
In 2009, there were 719 incidences of domestic violence reported in Memphis (Memphis
Police Department). However, researchers estimate that only between one-seventh to
one-half of all incidents of domestic violence are ever reported. Data regarding domestic
violence is also significantly lower than anecdotal reports or in-depth research indicates.
It is important to note that providers consistently state that from 30 to 50 percent of the
families they serve have experienced domestic violence. While a smaller percentage of
homeless families may be fleeing domestic violence, the overall percentage as
estimated by providers could reflect that the families had a history of having experienced
domestic violence. Also, citing the safety and security of other client families, most
programs are not able to accommodate families in which the primary caregiver is
actively abusing illegal substances or is unwilling to comply with treatment plans that
require psychotropic medications.

While overall crime rates in the City of Memphis have declined consistently within the
last three years, domestic violence offenses are on the rise.

   •   Between 2008 and 2009, domestic violence offenses have increased by 7.4% in
       the city of Memphis. (Janikowski & Reed, 2009).
   •   In the last 3 1/2 years, there have been almost 30,000 reported domestic
       offenses in Memphis. (Janikowski & Reed, 2009).
   •   The economic impact of domestic violence in Memphis and Shelby County is
       estimated to be $45 million annually (The Tennessee Economic Council on
       Women, 2006).

Use of HOME funds to provide Tenant-base Rental Assistance for Special Needs
Sub-populations

Recent research indicates the following:
     Most of the special needs population cannot work and their survival depends on
     either family or public support.
     Their main source of public monetary support is the Supplemental Security Income
     (SSI), which in 2010 pays an average of $498 per month.


                                             37
                                        Strategic Plan
      This amount is well below the level required for normal living expenses (for
      example, the 2010 “Fair Market Rent” in Memphis was $705 per month for a one
      bedroom housing unit and $783 for a two bedroom unit.)

The recent Housing Market Study reports an increase in cost-burdening amongst both
large and small-families that rent. Over the next three years, Memphis proposes to
provide Tenant-Base Rental Assistance (TBRA) to the mentally ill, women with
substance abuse problems, and the developmentally disabled. These priorities have
been established based upon the demand for assistance and the limited level of
assistance presently available to these sub-populations.


THREE-YEAR SPECIAL NEEDS POPULATIONS PRIORITY NEEDS, OBJECTIVES &
                     PERFORMANCE MEASURES

                2011 – 2013 NEEDS OF THE SPECIAL NEEDS POPULATION

Specific special needs population priority needs, objectives performance measures and proposed
projects for FY 2011-2013 follow:


PRIORITY NEED I – PERMANANENT SUPPORTIVE HOUSING: New permanent
supportive housing units/beds for Special Needs sub-populations to assist rehabilitation
and/or new construction

Special Needs Objective I: To make funding available that will assist the development
of permanent supportive housing for Special Needs sub-populations

     Three-Year Special Needs Populations Performance Measure Objective I

   Provide funding that will help to develop new permanent supportive housing for
   income eligible Special Needs sub-populations                        21 units


PRIORITY NEED II – SUPPORTIVE SERVICES: Supportive services for Special Needs
sub-populations is needed to sustain housing support and assistance

Special Needs Objective II: To continue to give preference to funding requests that
propose to provide supportive services to Special Needs sub-populations

     Three-Year Special Needs Populations Performance Measure Objective II

   Fund supportive service programs that will assist income eligible Special Needs sub-
   populations                                            2000 families & individuals




                                              38
                                         Strategic Plan
PRIORITY NEED III – TENANT-BASED RENTAL ASSISTANCE: Tenant-based rental
assistance for income eligible persons within the Special Needs sub-populations

Special Needs Objective III: To make funding available that will respond to the
increase demand for tenant-based rental assistance for income eligible persons within
the Special Needs sub-populations

     Three-Year Special Needs Populations Performance Measure Objective III

   Increase the number of income eligible persons within the Special Needs sub-
   populations to receive tenant-based rental assistance              225 individuals



PRIORITY NEED IV – PUBLIC FACILITIES: Public facilities and improvements to public
facilities that provide supportive services to income eligible persons who are members of
Special Needs sub-populations

Special Needs Objective IV: To continue to give preference to funding requests that
propose to develop new or rehabilitate public facilities which provide supportive services
to income eligible Special Needs sub-populations

    Three-Year Special Needs Populations Performance Measure Objective IV

Fund improvements to public facilities that will assist income eligible Special Needs sub-
populations                                                           2 facilities




                                             39
                                        Strategic Plan
                         2011-2013 Strategic Plan
           Neighborhood, Economic, and Community Development

As part of the City of Memphis’ efforts to meet the primary objective of the Community
Development Block Grant (CDBG) program, the Division of Housing and Community
Development (HCD) identified priority non-housing, community development needs and
specific long and short-term community development objectives. The non-housing
community development description required for this section addresses
public/community services, neighborhood and economic development categories.
Assessment and development of priority needs and objectives included consultation with
community-based organizations, Community Housing Development Organization’s
(CHDO’s), neighborhood and community development professionals and economic
development specialists. The broad spectrum of concerns covered by the statutory
goals of the CDBG program and the consolidated planning process was given
consideration by those who attended public hearings and planning sessions. This input
was used to help define the neighborhood, community and economic development
priority needs that as they relate to providing a suitable living environment and to
providing expanded economic opportunities for low-moderate income residents.

On average, close to 90% of CDBG funding allocated for non-housing community
development provides public services to low-moderate income residents of the City. In
developing a three-year strategy for non-housing community development, HCD relies
upon the City General Fund for resources that enables the City to further address
economic and neighborhood development. The FY 2011 General Fund Budget has
proposed over $4.7 Million to fund projects that support community and public service
initiatives and the Capital Improvement Project budget has $11.3 million to support
infrastructure improvements in conjunction with revitalization initiatives. This financial
commitment to economic development, neighborhoods and the community development
increases Memphis’ capacity to address non-housing needs identified in this section and
leverages the CDBG entitlement.

Public input received during the planning process identified a need for anti-crime
programs and initiatives that is being addressed by the Police Department who works
with HCD in collaboration on the neighborhood redevelopment initiatives and targeted
neighborhood activities.

The following priority needs were established for non-housing, community development:

   1. Create neighborhoods where people choose to live, work, and invest
   2. Retention of small business and expansion of small business opportunities
   3. Provide public services and facilities that address the needs of low and moderate
      income persons and communities
   4. Financial resources and physical infrastructure support for economic and
      neighborhood development




                                            40
                                       Strategic Plan
Long Term Objectives

   •   To redevelop Targeted Areas and neighborhoods
   •   To provide capital and financial resources to support small business
       development and job creation & employment training
   •   To increase the number of neighborhood and public facilities in targeted areas
   •   To give preference to grant requests from organizations and businesses that
       provide employment training and job opportunities that provide a living wage
   •   To give preference to grant requests from non-profit organizations that provide
       essential, supportive and public services to elderly persons and to programs that
       seek to improve the self-sufficiency of very-low to moderate-income persons

Short Term Objectives

1. To provide infrastructure improvements that support the redevelopment of targeted
   areas
2. To develop area/neighborhood redevelopment plans

Specific objectives and measurable outcomes for non-housing community development
are presented in the following tables and include those activities reflecting the 2011-
2013 Strategic Plan for Neighborhood, and Economic, and Community Development.

NEIGHBORHOOD, COMMUNITY AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT PRIORITY NEED I: -
Create neighborhoods where people choose to live, work, and invest

Neighborhoods, Community & Economic Development Objective I: To prepare
neighborhood and area plans and to redevelop targeted areas and neighborhoods

 Three-Year Neighborhood, Community & Economic Development Performance Measures

   Start redevelopment of targeted area                                   3 targeted areas
   Support neighborhood revitalization projects                          2 neighborhoods
   Develop neighborhood plans                                            5 neighborhoods


NEIGHBORHOOD, COMMUNITY AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT PRIORITY NEED II – A
trained workforce that helps retain small business and expand small business
opportunities

Neighborhoods, Community & Economic Development Objective II: To give preference to
grant requests from organizations and businesses that provide employment training and job
opportunities that provide a living wage and to expand small business development efforts in
targeted areas

 Three-Year Neighborhood, Community & Economic Development Performance Measures

   Provide job skills, training and employment                           75 People




                                                 41
                                          Strategic Plan
NEIGHBORHOOD, COMMUNITY AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT PRIORITY NEED III –
Provide public services and facilities that address the needs of low and moderate income
persons and communities

Neighborhoods, Community & Economic Development Objective III: To give preference to
grant requests from non-profit organizations that provide essential, supportive and public services
to youth, elderly persons, very-low to moderate-income persons and to increase the number of
neighborhood and public facilities in targeted areas.

 Three-Year Neighborhood, Community & Economic Development Performance Measures

    Educational Achievement                                               100 Youth & Parents
    Support programs that seek to enable self-sufficiency                 2 programs
    Support help-care/homemaker services for the elderly                  500 persons
    Help develop public facilities                                         2 public facilities


NEIGHBORHOOD, COMMUNITY AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT PRIORITY NEED IV –
Financial resources and physical infrastructure support for economic and neighborhood
development

Neighborhoods, Community & Economic Development Objective IV: To provide capital and
financial resources to support small business development and job creation & employment
training

 Three-Year Neighborhood, Community & Economic Development Performance Measures

    Create new jobs                                                               30 new jobs
    Retain jobs                                                                   700 jobs




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                                           Strategic Plan

								
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