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CPSC 332 Part 1 Database Systems

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CPSC 332 Part 1 Database Systems Powered By Docstoc
					            CPSC 332 Part 1
            Database Systems

              Shawn X. Wang, Ph.D.
               Associate Professor
            Telephone: (657)278-7258
            Email: xwang@fullerton.edu




What is a database system?




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Component Modules of a DBMS




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  A physical centralized architecture




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            A client/server architecture




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The hierarchical model


                                                         CUSTOMERS


                                        SUPPLIERD         ORDERS
              DEPTS

                                            OFFERS        ENTRIES
EMPS        MGR       ITEMS


               ENTRIES    OFFERS

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  The network model

                                                     MATH80
COURSES                    CPSC 201                                    CPSC 203


ENROLL                     1 A         1 C               2 B         1 A   3 A



STUDENTS                  Grind          Nerd                     Weenie   Jock



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  The relational model

 Name            SSN        Telephone                   Address
Brian         190897222    876-6723             12 David Dr
Edson         239026517    789-2579             58 Deerpark Ave
Jason         163899991    132-2311             90 College Blvd
Karlyn        179113131    708-7821             111 State Street



     SSN           Course         Grade
190897222         CPSC 231           A
239026517         CPSC 431           A
190897222         CPSC 440           A
163899991         CPSC 231           A

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  Brief history of the relational model

   1970 E.F. Codd “A Relational Model For Large Shared Data
   Banks” CACM
   1973 – 1980 Mike Stonebraker developed INGRES
   1980 – Stonebraker founded INGRES Corp.
    1981 – E. F. Codd received Turing Award
   1983 Codd’s paper of 1970 was reprinted in CACM
   1986 – Codd specified 13 criteria for a DBMS to be a relational
   DBMS
   1994 INGRES was purchased by Computer Associates
   1994 Stonebraker started POSTGRES – incorporating object
   relational concept



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Brief history of the E-R Model
            1975 – Peter P. Chen “The Entity Relationship Model –
            Toward a Unified View of Data”, VLDB 1975 and TODS
            1976
            1979 – First E-R conference was held. 23rd in 2004.
            1999 – Peter P. Chen “E-R Model, XML and the Web”
            In 2003, Dr. Chen received the IEEE Harry Goode Award
            and the ACM/AAAI Allen Newell Award.
            In June and July 2006, the TODS 1976 paper ranked 10th
            among the top 10 downloads from ACM’s Digital Library. It
            also ranked 9th among the top downloads in the year 2006
            up to July 2006.




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The fate of XML and SQL
Don Chamberlin (IBM):
  “I think that XML will become the dominant
 format for data interchange," with its flexibility
 and ability to provide self-description,”
 Relational databases will be fitted with front
 ends to support XML and process queries
 based on the XQuery standard.
 SQL will not go away, but there are new data
 formats for which it just was not designed.




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The fate of XML and SQL
Rick Cattell (SUN):
   "I think the momentum behind relational
  databases is insurmountable," very few people
  are going to store XQuery data in an XML
  format.
   Developers will need tools to convert
  relational data to XML and vice versa.




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The fate of XML and SQL
Daniela Florescu (CTO at XQrl):
  Documents will be stored natively in XML. XQrl
  offers a version of the XQuery XML query
  language.
  Eventually, an extension of XQuery will
  replace both Java and SQL.
(Cattell: "I don't think XQuery is ever going to
  replace SQL or Java," but there may be a
  query language to replace SQL.)




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The fate of XML and SQL

     Jim Gray (Microsoft):
       “The real challenge we face is to make
       computers self-managing so the
       management cost is less than the capital
       cost.”
       "The problem with p-to-p computing for
       databases is you have to send a lot of data
       around and $1 will buy you a lot of
       computing."



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  Are we reaching the end of SQL's life?
Jeffery Ullman (Stanford):
   No, the spirit will remain alive. SQL will adapt.
  There's been a lot of research into semi-structured
  data, of which XML is just an example. People have
  just begun to scratch the surface of how you optimize
  SQL-like queries on XML or tree-like structures. This
  is a very exciting area for the future.




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  Are we reaching the end of SQL's life?

Stephen Brobst (NCR):
   With more and more analytics and other work
  coming into the database, I see SQL remaining very
  much alive. Advanced analytic functions like data
  mining are going to move into SQL. There's just a ton
  of stuff that's going to happen with SQL going
  forward. The nice thing about SQL is that it's a
  functional language and therefore has very desirable
  properties for parallelization.




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  Are we reaching the end of SQL's life?

     Ken Jacobs (Oracle):
        SQL will be revitalized by these trends and
       continued expansion, not only to handle
       multimedia data and analytics, but also to express
       business functions. We have only begun to
       scratch the surface of exploiting this integration.
       We'll be able to do data mining or OLAP on
       collections of documents and then drive the
       results back into an operational OLTP
       environment.



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What is next for databases?
Ken Jacobs (Oracle):
  Certainly, the integration of SQL and XML and having
  a single repository that can store both relational and
  XML data will give businesses a great deal of power.
  You will be able to do data mining or other BI
  activities on XML data. Of course, this integration is
  going to be critical to Web services.




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