Gender, Sex, and Nature Lecture 3 by bgc15733

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									                             Gender, Sex, and Nature
                                   Lecture 3
• LINK Male mouse from two female mice
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/08/070819213846.htm
• LINK gecko Geico commercial http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=acCfnwTpdxU
We are not always “accountable” to gender. For example, geckoes are an all-female species;
they clone themselves and require no male counterpart, parthenogenesis. Yet, we represent
them in commercials with a male voice. Mostly, though, westerners are very concerned with
getting these accountabilites “right.” Parthenogensis: e.g., roses, oranges, aphids, geckoes, ...

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• A photo speaks a thousand words

•Lecture
PART 1 – FINISH LECTURE 2 (start at slide #24)
PART 2 – LECTURE 3 – the short link between gender and sexuality
1 Meston, C.M. and Buss, D.M. (2007). Why humans have sex. Archives of Sexual Behavior, 36
(4), 477-507.
 2 NET Bean, M. (2007). Love lessons from the wild kingdom: 5 primal ways to boost your
animal magnetism. Men’s Health, 22 (4), 64-65. http://www.menshealth.com/men/sex-relationships/better-sex/animal-mating-
behavior/article/88af9b5a22522110VgnVCM10000013281eac
Tensions and Ironies…the stuff of sociology
    RECAP LECTURE 3 –   IF GENDER ISN’T NATURAL, IS SEX? THAT IS, IF GENDER IS
                         SOCIALLY CONSTRUCTED, IS SEX, TOO?
   SMUO Meston, C.M. and Buss, D.M. (2007). Why humans have sex. Archives of Sexual Behavior,
                                       36 (4), 477-507.

                                 •
Authors: Why we have sex has What can be said about the
                                   study’s sample of 1,549?
   been underestimated and • Who were the participants? Isp.
                                   there a bias here? See article,
   understudied.                   479
It is more complex than we • RESULTS: GENDER COMPARISONS
   think, if we allow ourselves Most of the top 25 reasons for
                                   having sex showed significant
   to think outside the            gender similarities …
   biological, pre-determined BUT - MANY DIFFERENCES WERE
   box. Still, there are variables DISCOVERED …
   that strongly support
   evolution, reinforcing the
   need for ecological dialogue.
    Main Differences and examples of sociological questions
1. Men operate more on physicalities, such as attractiveness. This supports
   the evolutionary hypothesis that males are aroused by visual and other
   sensual cues around potential fertility and genetic strength.

But, how does that theory include or exclude blind heterosexual males or
  elderly males without a good sense of smell who want to have sex?

2. Men operated under the “availability” variable; if women are available to
    have sex, then, why not have sex?
But, what kind of pressure does this place on women?

3. Women wanted to have sex to fulfill more emotional reasons.
Does this surprise you? What kind of pressure does that put on men?

4. Men were interested in having sex if women were not interested in
   demanding emotionality from them.
What does this say about “emotional” men? What does it say about the
   stereotypes around gay males?
   READING: Bean, M. (2007). Love lessons from the wild kingdom: 5
   primal ways to boost your animal magnetism. Men’s Health, 22 (4), 64-
   65. Link to reading
Is this a sociological article?
   Are these “love” lessons or sex
   lessons?
To whom is this article aimed;
  that is, who is its intended
  audience? What is the main
  message?
TENSIONS:
• Which animals and mating
  “tips” might be suggested for:
  women?
  gay men and lesbians?
  transpeople?
So, how “natural” is sex?
                 Next Class
• Assignment Details
• Ecological Dialogue Practice Sheets
• Reading Bell, D. and Holliday, R. (2000). Naked
  as nature intended. Body and Society, 6 (3/4),
  127-140.

								
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