Transition and EBD by tyndale

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									Transition and EBD:


   Issues and Possible
        Solutions
              Need areas

   Self-advocacy
   Employment
   Post high school
    education
   Parenting
   Community
Self Advocacy

   What is my disability?
   How is it manifested?
   What does that mean
    for me?
   What
    accommodations will
    I need?
       Education
       Job site
       Other
Employment Statistics

   47.4% competitive employment 3-5
    years out of high school (69.4% in
    general population)

   52% unemployment 4 years out of
    high school (highest of any disability
    area)
Employment Issues


   Fewer hours or part-time
   More jobs over lifespan
   Tend to start later in job force
   Predictors of successful competitive
    employment: male, white, Voc. Ed. while
    in high school, graduation
                                 Solutions

   Teach social skills!!
   Consider student interest, preference,
    motivation
   Provide job orientation
   Have a plan for on-going support & crisis
    intervention
Social Skills

   Anger management
   Cognitive behavioral interventions
   Empathy training
   Social skills
       Job seeking
       Work adjustment
       Interactions with supervisor
       Interactions with co-workers
       Exiting a job
       Social skill mechanics: body language, attention
   Problem solving
High School Completion

   48.4% graduate - 14 times lower than non-
    disabled peers
   Risk factors for early school-exiting:
       Lower functional skills
       Lack of vocational education in high school
       Failure to address social/emotional/behavioral
        needs
       Push for absolute standards of achievement in
        fully inclusive classes with little effort to
        provide modification or meet emotional needs
Post High School Education

   25.6% enroll in any post-secondary
    education (only youth with CD & multiple
    disabilities were lower)
       Vocational training: 15.4%
       2-year college: 10.1%
       4-year college: 4.2%
   “Smart enough” isn’t the issue
Solutions

   Start early with goal setting
   Self-advocacy
   Related issues: financial aid, housing,
    transportation
   Non-traditional options
       On-line
       Correspondence
       Independent study, self-designed programs
       Internships, apprenticeships, support from
        employer
Parenthood Statistics


   3-5 years out of high school
       18.2% of EBD males are parents
       48.4% of EBD females are parents


   EBD females are 6 times more likely
       To have had multiple pregnancies
       To have lost custody of their babies
Issues



   Prenatal & postnatal care for the mother
   Infant care
   Day care
   Parenting skills
   Grandparents?
Solutions

   Independent, community based projects
   “Double dip” with regular education
   Classes in the high school
   Technical college courses
   Bartering in community based services
Community

   Living
   Leisure
   Accessing services
   Transportation
   Citizenry
       Legal assistance
       Voting
       Available services
Solutions


   Community based activities
   Teach generalization and provide
    opportunities to practice
   Are we “including” the student now to the
    detriment of future inclusion in the
    community?
Other

   Use IEP to create alternatives
   Double dip
   “More employable”
   Best practices
       Relatively low staff-to-student ratios
       Unconditional care and zero-reject
       Relationships
       Located off campus and not solely through the
        school
                                       Resources

   Bullis & Fredericks. Vocational and
    Transition Services for Adolescents with
    Emotional and Behavioral Disorders.
    Research Press, Champaign, IL.
   http://dpi.wi.gov/sped/ed.html
       Transition & EBD; Mental Health Fact Sheets;
        Effective Programming for Students who are
        EBD; Blueprints for Success; Using Literature
        to Teach Social Skills; & more!

								
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