Reconstructing the Genealogical Landscape: Kinship and Settlement along Moccasin and Indian Creeks, Pope County

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Reconstructing the Genealogical Landscape: Kinship and Settlement along Moccasin and Indian Creeks, Pope County Powered By Docstoc
					 Reconstructing the Genealogical
Landscape: Kinship and Settlement
along Moccasin and Indian Creeks,
          Pope County
                                    MARY Z. BRENNAN

THE STUDY OF CULTURAL LANDSCAPES has emerged as a central concern
in historical archaeology. Archaeological fieldwork has traditionally fo-
cused almost exclusively on the discovery and excavation of sites. While
site excavations remain of paramount importance, the focus of archaeolog-
ical research has broadened to include the study of entire landscapes and
surface survey in addition to, or instead of, excavation.1
     Initially, historically accurate landscape reconstruction began at sites
associated with elites, but the field has grown to include landscapes of peo-
ple who left fewer traces in the documentary record (e.g., women, laborers,
immigrants, and disfranchised groups). These studies are premised on the
idea that people designed and created landscapes to be seen and experi-
enced by others. Status or other social roles are symbolically communi-
cated by the landscape and its constituent elements. Because social
relations are reproduced at multiple scales, there is no single focus of anal-
ysis in the examination of cultural landscapes. They include regional, com-
munity, and individual studies.2
     The landscape that is the focus of this study includes approximately
10,000 acres in the bottoms and watersheds of Moccasin and Indian Creeks
     1
       Colin Renfrew and Paul Bahn, Archaeology: Theories, Methods, and Practice (Lon-
don: Thames and Hudson, 2000), 71.
     2
       Michael S. Nassaney, Deborah L. Rotman, Daniel O. Sayers, and Carol A. Nickolai,
“The Southwest Michigan Historic Landscape Project: Exploring Class, Gender, and Eth-
nicity from the Ground Up,” International Journal of Historical Archaeology 5 (Septem-
ber 2001): 219-223.
Mary Z. Brennan is an archaeologist with Ozark-St. Francis National Forest and a doctoral candidate
in anthropology at the University of Arkansas, Fayetteville.



				
DOCUMENT INFO
Description: Status or other social roles are symbolically communicated by the landscape and its constituent elements. Because social relations are reproduced at multiple scales, there is no single focus of analysis in the examination of cultural landscapes. [...] other tracts of lands, patented by an individual head of household, may have been subdivided and occupied by adult children, each making separate houseplaces and farms in the tract without title having been transferred.
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