PUNCTUATION PUNCTUATION Please use me QUOTATION MARKS

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PUNCTUATION PUNCTUATION Please use me QUOTATION MARKS Powered By Docstoc
					PUNCTUATION
  Please use me
    QUOTATION MARKS (´ `)
• Direct speech to report the exact words
  someone said.
  ´My flight is leaving at 9 am`, said Pamela.
• Quotations (phrases taken literally from
  books, plays, songs, etc).
               COLON (:)
• To introduce a list
  – There were four of us on the boat: my mother,
    my father, my cousin Jane and me.
            SEMICOLON (;)
• Instead of a full stop, to separate main
  sentences when their meaning is
  connected.
  – Some teenagers find it extremely hard to
    choose a career; others consider it a fairly
    easy choice.
                   DASH (-)
• Informal English, used like a colon or semicolon.
   – There are three things I couldn’t imagine living
     without – my best friend, a good book and my
     dog.
• To introduce something that you thought of later,
  or something surprising or unexpected.
   – They’re closing down the old library – at least
     that’s what I’ve heard.
               DOTS (…)
• To show words that have been left out
  from a quotation, proverb, sentence, etc.
            BRACKETS ()
• To separate extra information from the rest
  of the sentence.
  – These days, you can buy popular newspapers
    (i.e. The New York Times, Le Monde, etc.)
    almost anywhere in the world.
                  ITALICS
• To show the titles of books, plays, films,
  etc.
  – The Hunchback of Notre Dame
• To show the names of hotels, restaurants,
  etc.
  – Cleo’s Grill House
           FULL STOP (.)
• End a sentence that is not a question or
  exclamation.
  -I’m having a great time. There’s so much
  to do here.
        CAPITAL LETTERS (Cc)
• Begin a sentence.
   -There’s a great film at the cinema.
• Days of the week, months and public holidays.
   -Monday, September, Christmas.
• Names of people or places.
   -Claire from Cardiff.
• People’s titles.
   -Mr, Mrs, Dr…
• Nationalities and languages.
   -They are studying French.
   -We love Italian cuisine.
• First or most important words in titles of books, films, etc.
   -The Sixth Sense.
                        COMMA (,)
•   Separate words in a list.
    -We need eggs, milk, flour and cheese.
•   Separate phrases or clauses.
    -He stopped walking, looked down, picked it up and gave it to me.
•   Separate long sentences linked by but, as, or, etc.
    -She was sick, but she still went to the party.
•   Separate a non-defining relative clause.
    -María, who is a ballerina, lives in Paris.
•   After certain linking words.
    -In addition to this, he collects watches.
•   When if-clauses begin sentences.
    -If we take her advice, there will be trouble.
•   Before or after reporting verbs.
    -’I’m exhausted’, she said.
•   Separate question tags from the rest of the sentence.
    -She’s your teacher, isn’t she?
                 OTHERS
•   Apostrophe (Susan’s)
•   Hyphen (kind-hearted)
•   Question mark (?)
•   Exclamation mark (!)

				
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