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AP English Language and Composition

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					North Lawndale College Prep Charter High School                                                       (773) 542.1490
1615 South Christiana, Chicago, Illinois 60623                                                     Fax (773) 542.1492
                                                 English Department

24 May 2010

Dear 2010-2011 AP English Language and Composition Student,

We very much look forward to working with you. Often, Ms. Miyashita, Ms. Gruber, Mr. Bouman, and Ms.
James have commented on your abilities!

In order to begin with us on the first day of class in August, you must complete the following exercise. Start
early: the Critical Reading Journal (CRJ) and your essay will become your first two graded assignments of the
2010-2011 school year!

In your Critical Reading Journal:

1) Using a Critical Reading Journal (CRJ), read and take critical notes on The Road by Cormac McCarthy. The
   CRJ should be a new, not used, notebook that will become your CRJ next school year; pay particular
   attention to the diction, syntax, and imagery that McCarthy uses. Either find the book at a library or
   purchase it.
2) Selecting from any of these approved theaters — The Gene Siskel Film Center
   (http://www.siskelfilmcenter.org/), $7; Facets Multimedia (http://www.facets.org/pages/cinematheque.php),
   $9; The Music Box Theater (http://www.musicboxtheatre.com/), $9.25; or The Landmark Theatres
   (http://www.landmarktheatres.com/Market/Chicago/Chicago_Frameset.htm), $9, view and take critical
   notes in the CRJ on a film a film of your choice. Pay close attention to the small things that the director does
   to create his/her main idea. Staple the theater ticket stub to your CRJ pages.
3) Visiting “The Modern Wing” of the Art Institute of Chicago, 111 South Michigan Avenue
   (http://www.artic.edu/aic/collections/exhibitions/modernwing/overview), view and take critical notes on one
   selected piece of visual art (you choose — a painting, sculpture, tapestry, costume, mural, stained glass, etc.;
   be certain to write down the title, artist’s name, and year). Examine the small things that the artist does to
   create his/her main idea. [Please note: The Art Institute is free from 5:00 to 9:00 p.m., Thursday and Friday
   evenings, Memorial Day to Labor Day; at other times, the fee for adults is $18, the fee for children,
   students, and seniors is $12, and children under 12 are free. You may take photographs if the selected piece
   is from the permanent collection and you use existing light, on condition that the photographs are for
   personal, noncommercial use. Flashes, tripods, and video cameras are prohibited.] Staple the museum ticket
   stub to your CRJ pages.

In your Essay

   Then, you are to create a typed AP-style essay that weaves together your most thoughtful synthesis of all
    three works of art — the novel, the film, and the piece of modern visual art. Attach all drafts, including your
    and others’ editing notes of the drafts. See the attached outline

Summer can be nature’s time for re-imagining ourselves. We encourage you to use this summer exercise and
the rest of your summer to do just that — to re-imagine yourself, your possibilities, as you enter one of the
critical times of your young life, Senior year.

With best wishes for your summer,



Mr. Ian Taylor, Mr. Tim Bouman, and Mr. Barry McRaith
AP English Language and Composition Teachers
                                               Hook

   INTRO
                                               Claim



                                                            1
                                              diction       2
                                                            3
                                                            1
             A1    The Road                   syntax        2             B
                                                            3
                                                             1
                                              imagery       2
                                                            3




                                                                     1
                                                  technique 1        2
                                                                     3
                                                                     1
             A2   Your chosen film                technique 2        2
                                                                          B
   BODY
                                                                      3
                                                                     1
                                                  technique 3        2
                                                                     3




                                                                 1

             A3   Your chosen piece of art:   1 technique        2
                                                                          B
                                                                 3




CONCLUSION
                                                           AP® English Language and Composition
                                      2010 SUMMER READING SCORING GUIDELINES
                                                      North Lawndale College Prep High School


All essays, even those scored 8 or 9, may contain occasional flaws in analysis, prose style, or mechanics.
Such features should enter into the holistic evaluation of an essay's overall quality. In no case may an essay
with many distracting errors m grammar and mechanics be scored higher than a 2.


                 9 Essays earning a score of 9 meet the criteria for 8 essays and, in addition, are especially
                   sophisticated in their argument, skillful in their synthesis of sources, or impressive m their
                   control of language.

8          Effective

Essays earning a score of 8 effectively argue how the novel The Road, a film of the student’s choosing and
a piece of art at “The Modern Wing” of the Art Institute of Chicago develop the same theme. They support
the argument by successfully synthesizing* the three sources. The argument is convincing, and the sources
effectively support the student's position. The prose demonstrates an ability to control a wide range of the
elements of effective writing but is not necessarily flawless.

                 7 Essays earning a score of 7 fit the description of 6 essays but are distinguished by more
                   complete or more purposeful argumentation and synthesis of sources, or a more mature prose
                   style.

6          Adequate

Essays earning a score of 6 adequately argue how the novel The Road, a film of the student’s choosing
and a piece of art at “The Modern Wing” of the Art Institute of Chicago develop the same theme. They
synthesize the three sources. The argument is generally convincing and the sources generally support the
student's position, but the argument is less developed or less cogent than the arguments of essays earning
higher scores. The language may contain lapses in diction or syntax, but generally the prose is clear.

                 5 Essays earning a score of 5 argue how the novel The Road, a film of the student’s choosing
                   and a piece of art at “The Modern Wing” of the Art Institute of Chicago develop the same
                   theme. They support the position by synthesizing the three sources, but their arguments and
                   their use of sources are somewhat limited, inconsistent, or uneven. The argument is generally
                   clear, and the sources generally support the student's position, but the relationship between the
                   sources and the argument may be strained. The writing may contain lapses in diction or
                   syntax, but it usually conveys the writer's ideas adequately.

4          Inadequate

Essays earning a score of 4 inadequately argue how the novel The Road, a film of the student’s choosing
and a piece of art at “The Modern Wing” of the Art Institute of Chicago develop the same theme. They
attempt to present an argument and support the position by synthesizing at least two sources but may
misunderstand, misrepresent, or oversimplify either their own argument or the sources they include. The link
between the argument and the sources is weak. The prose of 4 essays may suggest immature control of
writing.

* For the purpose of scoring, synthesis refers to combining the sources and the writer’s position to form a cohesive, supported argument, and accurately citing sources.



                                                                     © 2009 The College Board. All Rights Reserved
                               Visit apcentral.collegeboard.com (for AP professionals) and www.collegeboard.com/apstudents (for students and parents).
                                               AP® English Language and Composition
                          2009 SUMMER READING SCORING GUIDELINES
                                         North Lawndale College Prep High School


            3 Essays earning a score of 3 meet the criteria for a score of 4 but demonstrate less
              understanding of the sources, less success in developing their own position, or less
              control of writing.

2      Little Success

Essays earning a score of 2 demonstrate little success in arguing how the novel The Road, a film of the
student’s choosing and a piece of art at “The Modern Wing” of the Art Institute of Chicago develop the same
theme. They may merely allude to knowledge gained from reading/viewing the sources rather than
citing the sources themselves. These essays may misread the sources, fail to present an argument,
or substitute a simpler task by merely responding to the summer reading assignment tangentially or
merely summarizing the sources. The prose of 2 essays often demonstrates consistent weaknesses
in writing, such as a lack of development or organization, grammatical problems, or a lack of
control.

            1 Essays earning a score of 1 meet the criteria for a score of 2 but are especially
              simplistic, are weak in their control of writing, or do not cite even one source.

0 Indicates an on-topic response that receives no credit, such as one that merely repeats the
  prompt.

—      Indicates a blank response or one that is completely off topic




                                                          © 2009 The College Board. All Rights Reserved
                    Visit apcentral.collegeboard.com (for AP professionals) and www.collegeboard.com/apstudents (for students and parents).